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Modern Food Processing

June 2010


EDITORIAL

For the better

A

s the country continues on a consumer boom and the food processing sector gears up to leverage the fresh wave of investments and expansion plans, here is our attempt to further boost the content offerings in ‘Modern Food Processing’. Besides more rich and varied business information, the endeavour is to make the edit sections more reader-friendly. Of course, it will be good to receive your feedback on this, which will help us in serving you even better. With increasing demands for safety & quality, efficiency & productivity, regulatory obligations and higher profitability, the need for automation in the food & beverage (F&B) industry was never felt so decisive. Further, robotic automation not only helps an enterprise remain competitive but also maintain a food supply chain that is safe, efficient and cost-effective. Although robots in their earlier days were used to handle rigid & highly repeatable products such as cartons and cases, with the increasingly powerful capabilities associated with vision and line tracking, they are currently excelling in more diverse applications where producers are required to change product types & packages with much higher frequency.

Published in association with Editor : Manas R Bastia Assistant Editor: Rakesh Rao

As the scales of operations become increasingly complex and long for F&B manufacturers, these are likely to see even more adoption in the days to come. For further details on this, turn to the ‘Industry Update’ section. Beyond the manufacturing zone, it is quite important to have a robust food supply chain in place. However, its current state in the country is sub-optimal… Just a look at the amount of food and vegetables that are wasted (ranging between 30-40 per cent, as per different estimates) primarily due to lack of cold chain infrastructure, drives home this point. Thankfully, it seems that the scenario is changing – for better! With the government’s support for the cold chain logistics through various subsidies & tax benefits, the food processing sector can realise an exponential growth that require refrigerated transport and storage, among others. The ‘Market Trends’ section offers an insight into it. Read on…

Editorial Advisory Board Dr A S Abhiraman Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd Prof M Y Kamat Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Deptt., UICT, Mumbai

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Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Infomedia 18 Limited and printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J.K.Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Food Processing is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. 14798/2005. Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Infomedia 18 Limited. Infomedia 18 Limited reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the information published in this edition, neither Infomedia 18 Ltd nor any of its employees accept any responsibility for any errors or omission. Further, Infomedia 18 Ltd does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. Editor: Manas R Bastia

June 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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CONTENTS

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LEADERS SPEAK “With new advancements in technology, the food testing segment is progressing steadily” ...says, Philippe Sans, President & CEO, Silliker Group Corporation

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ROUNDTABLE Food processing: A tool to control inflation?

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IN FOCUS Parag Milk Foods: On an integrated growth path

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INDUSTRY UPDATE Increasing efficiency & quality: Robots provide a helping hand

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Automated solutions: Integration is the key to success

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MARKET TRENDS Cold chain logistics: On a healthy path Traceability technology: Keeping ‘track’ of the food supply chain Andrew Tay, President - APAC, Zebra Technologies Corp

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INDUSTRY INSIGHTS Marine products market: Rising with the growth wave Shushmul Maheshwari, CEO, RNCOS E-Services Pvt Ltd Cover photo courtesy: ABB

FOOD SAFETY Safety during packaging: Play it safe Subhash Vaidya, Proprietor, Dairytech Consultancy Services

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54

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SMART LOGISTICS Sustainable supply chain: Giving a competitive edge Abhijit Upadhye, Director, McDonald’s India

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POLICY WATCH Global quality standards: The evolving scenario Dr Jochen P Zoller, President - Food Services, Intertek

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R EG U L A R S EC TI O N S Editorial .................................................... 11 National News ......................................... 14 World News............................................. 18 Tech Updates ........................................... 22 Events Calendar ....................................... 68 Technology Transfer ................................. 70 Product Update........................................ 72

Highlights of Next Issue

Product Inquiry ........................................ 83 Advertisement Inquiry.............................. 85

Sector Watch

:

Bakery & Snack Foods

Product Index........................................... 87

Industry Update

:

Edible Oils / Fats

Advertisers’ List ....................................... 88

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Modern Food Processing | June 2010

Note: $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise


NATIONAL NEWS HEALTH & WELLNESS

Health foods to drive the growth of food industry, says Datamonitor

The health and wellness wave will be a forerunner in shaping the Indian NAME CHANGE

Tata Tea adopts a new name embracing its associates The Board of Directors of Tata Tea Ltd has approved a name change. Tata Tea, Tetley, Eight O’Clock Coffee, etc will now be under one corporate name ‘Tata Global Beverages Ltd’, subject to approval of the shareholders and the Central Government. The company will unite its five beverage

FMCG industry in the future, according to a report, ‘Consumer trends in India: Health and wellness food & beverages’, published by Datamonitor. As per the report, in 2009, the packaged food & beverages market in India was worth $ 21.6 billion, of which, health and wellness foods accounted for $ 725 million. In the past years, manufacturers in India have made constant attempts to position some of their offerings on a health platform. To meet the informed

demands of today’s critical and discerning consumers, manufacturers have to continuously innovate by bringing in ingredients-linked claims, which are relevant and authentic. Analysing the prospects, Datamonitor predicts that there is a tremendous opportunity for the food & beverage manufacturers to drive growth by offering ingredient modifications and packaging innovations to cater to this emerging set of health concerns & consumption pattern.

businesses, marking another step in its transformation to become a global leader in the beverage sector. The current brand names will be retained for its products. The announcement is a major milestone in the evolution of the beverage business, where 70 per cent of the current consolidated revenues come from outside India. “The new name reflects the company’s aim to go global

and its successful transition from being a tea & coffee commodity business to that focussed on delighting consumers across the world with great-tasting branded beverages,” said the company.

California produces nearly 100 per cent of the canned peach supply from the US and is the world leader in canned peach production, offering the highest levels of food safety, quality & traceability. India, being a growing market for processed foods, a trade mission consisting of California peach growers and processors was recently in Delhi to investigate market opportunities

for canned peaches. Rich Hudgins, President and Chief Executive Officer, California Canning Peach Association (CCPA), remarked, “The CCPA is owned by nearly 500 growermembers representing approximately 80 per cent of California’s cling peach growers. We will be talking to importers and retailers in India to establish a bigger market for canned peaches here.”

a long-term commitment. Ashok Sinha, Secretary, Ministry of Food Processing Industries, presided over the function. Sahai added that he wanted to see IGPB strengthen its foundations and he requested the Chief Minister of Maharashtra to allot land to IGPB for constructing its building at Pune, which would be the headquarter of the Board. Sahai also said that during his recent visit to the headquarters of the

‘Organization of Vine and Wine’ (OIV), his delegation has understood the role of this inter-governmental organisation of wine producing nations in the development of Indian wine industry.

OPPORTUNITIES

Californian association explores Indian market

Rich Hudgins

NEW FACILITY

MOFPI to set up new wine testing & certification lab Subodh Kant Sahai, Minister of Food Processing Industries (MOFPI), recently inaugurated the national conference on ‘Indian wine sector: Potential & challenges’, organised by the Indian Grape Processing Board (IGPB). On the occasion, he said that being a capital-intensive industry, Indian wine sector requires

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Modern Food Processing | June 2010


NATIONAL NEWS NEW CONTRACT

GLG Life Tech seeks to develop stevia in India

Stevia supplier, GLG Life Tech is planning to develop agricultural and extraction facilities for stevia in India, and market COLLABORATION

Haryana and Manitoba plan to set up food development centre A memorandum of understanding (MoU) has been signed between Haryana and the Province of Manitoba with plans to create a Food Development Centre (FDC) in the state and cultivate a working relationship between the new facility and the FDC in Portage la Prairie (Manitoba), according to Stan Struthers, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural ACADEMIA

TANUVAS plans for M Tech in food processing technology

WINE EXHIBITION

IGPB takes Indian wineries to London show The Pune-based Indian Grape Processing Board (IGPB) formed last year by Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MOFPI), took a group of eight producers to the 30th edition of the London International Wine Fair (LIWF) held recently. The exhibitors at the Indian pavilion were Sula, Four Seasons,

its stevia extracts in the country. The company said that it had signed a memorandum of understanding with Global AgriSystem Pvt Ltd, a Katra Group company, to pursue commercialisation of stevia sweeteners in India. Both companies said that they were also considering construction of joint extraction facilities in India as per the demand. Gokul Patnaik, Chairman, Global AgriSystem, said, “India needs valueadded agri products like stevia that

provide solutions to meet the local demand gap for sweeteners. India’s agriculture base can easily adapt and handle growth of the stevia plant, given its conducive climatic conditions.” Dr Luke Zhang, Chairman & CEO, GLG Life Tech, said, “As the world’s leading consumer of sugar and one of the largest markets globally, India holds significant potential for GLG’s stevia extracts, which can aid in the reduction of sugar consumption in the consumer diet.”

Initiatives, Manitoba. Through the MoU, the FDC will provide services and technical expertise on a fee-for-service basis to support the establishment of the new development centre in India based on the Manitoba model. These services focus on food engineering & process developments, pilot plant design & equipment sourcing, product development as well as custom processing and co-packing. “This MOU is intended to create a working relationship that will

allow the province and the FDC to share common experiences and solutions to achieve common goals with the Haryana State Industrial and Infrastructure Development Corporation,” said Struthers.

Pongalur N Palanisamy, Minister for Rural Industries & Animal Husbandry, Government of Tamil Nadu, stated that he is planning to approach the All India Council for Technical Education to start an M Tech course in food processing technology at the The Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University

(TANUVAS) based in Chennai. After distributing in-plant training and placement orders to 18 students, who completed their B Tech degree course in food processing technology, he said that this course was in great demand. The Minister also advised the students to think of starting their own enterprises.

Indage, Mercury, Renaissance, Valle de Vin, Vintage Wines and York. IGPB also showcased the role of the Board and its services, according to Vinod Kotwal, CEO, IGPB, and Director, MOFPI. Rajeshwar Rao, Joint Secretary, MOFPI, and Vice Chairman of the joint private-government initiative that came into existence last June, presented and gave all support to the Indian producers.

James Murray, Exhibition Director, LIWF, informed, “Indian wines are finding much interest abroad. India is emerging as a key player in the world and its wines are definitely the ones to watch for, in the future.”

June 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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NATIONAL NEWS INVESTMENTS

Food processing in Arunachal Pradesh to get a boost

The Central Government is set to promote the food processing industry in Arunachal Pradesh, which has immense NEW ALLIANCE

India and Vietnam to enhance bilateral trade India and Vietnam will establish a joint committee to strengthen bilateral cooperation in trade, investment, and agricultural production. Minister of Food Processing Industries, Subodh Kant Sahai, and Vietnam’s Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Cao Duc Phat, recently MARKET RESEARCH

TNAU advises farmers to sell black gram quickly

The domestic and export market intelligence cell of Tamil Nadu SEMINARS

ARC’s process industry forum to be held in Hyderabad ARC Advisory Group will conduct various forums in the coming months. The forum ‘Driving innovation, sustainability and performance for process and batch industries’ (for chemical, oil & gas, cement, metals

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potential in this sector, said Amrit Lal Meena, Joint Secretary, Union Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MOFPI). He added that there is huge potential in the state, with abundant raw materials, but food products go waste due to lack of infrastructure and processing facilities. For this, he said, the ministry would be holding an investors’ meet in the state capital to make investors & stakeholders and the state government aware of the opportunities available in this sector.

He said that the meet would help promote the MOFPI’s schemes to popularise agri-food business in the state and act as a platform for farm sector players to explore opportunities for contact farming, sourcing, processing, value addition, distribution & marketing. Also, it would help identify profitable agricultural, horticulture & agri-processing projects in the state and encourage investors & entrepreneurs to invest in the food processing sector for profit & employment generation.

signed an agreement to this effect. Sahai said that India hopes to advance cooperation with Vietnam in food processing and animal feed production. He aded that the Indian Government will create favourable conditions for investors from Vietnam. Phat encouraged business houses of Vietnam and India to set up joint ventures in manufacturing & food

processing industries, as well as hold fora & trade fairs for agricultural produce & seafood in both countries.

Agricultural University (TNAU), after studying the market for black gram ( urad ), has advised the farmers to sell their produce immediately after harvest without storing them. In Tamil Nadu, the peak period of black gram arrivals to market is in April-May, even though it starts flowing to the market from January onwards. This year, however, due to insufficient rainfall during growing seasons, black gram arrivals started from April first week

and may prolong until August. India is the largest producer of black gram followed by Myanmar and Thailand. During 2008-09, about 1.92 million hectare of land was under cultivation for black gram, with production of 1.17 million tonne. Andhra Pradesh, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh are the major states that are cultivating black gram, accounting for a total of 62 per cent of production.

& mining, pharmaceutical, food & beverage, etc) will be held during July 14 & 17, in Hyderabad. It will also organise a concurrent show on ‘Achieving business excellence through IT and automation solutions’. ARC forums bring thought leaders from the industry on a single platform to discuss and deliberate on the technology solutions that enable companies to gain

sustainable competitive advantages, empowering them to pursue the goal of operational excellence. Yet another unique feature of ARC forum is that it is structured for key decision makers.

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

Cao Duc Phat


WORLD NEWS EXPANSION

Agrozumos expands capacity using Krones technology

RESEARCH

Kampffmeyer to inaugurate new R&D centre Kampffmeyer Food Innovation’s new R&D centre will begin operations in August this year. The centre will offer opportunity for bakers to work alongside technologists for trial recipes and developing new products. Svenja Frank, Project Manager, Kampffmeyer Food Innovation, said that initially the centre’s focus would be on the German bakery sector, but PRODUCT LAUNCH

Chr Hansen introduces probiotic-fibre for the constipated

Danish food ingredient supplier Chr Hansen has started offering probioticTRADE FAIR

IFFA evokes good response from meat processors Over 58,000 trade visitors from 130 countries visited IFFA 2010, the world’s leading trade fair for the meat processing sector, to see the range of products and services offered by 949 companies. “The huge number of visitors led to full order books for manufacturers of meat-processing & packaging machines

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Agrozumos, a Spanish subsidiary of the Riha Group, Germany, has increased the capacity of its plant with the latest technology for its bottling line as well as intralogistics. The Riha Group, which has experience with aseptics, has installed its first PET line in Spain, using Krones’ dry aseptics technology in the form of the PETAsept D featuring gaseous hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2). Agrozumos has opted for a fully automated high-bay

warehouse, also supplied by Krones. Agrozumos was founded in 1981 as a bottler of juices and squashes. It is located in the north of Spain, in Lekunberri, 30 km to the northwest of Pamplona in Navarra. As the first vendor to offer fruit juices in soft packages, the company had back then revolutionised the Spanish fruit juice market. Currently, it sells aseptically filled dealer’s brands and branded articles in PET.

the facility is also keen to extend its reach to the wider European market. She added that the company plans to work with universities and hopes to unite experts from industry & academia for conducting brainstorming sessions on the issue. The centre will cover an area of 2,200 sq m and include a trial kitchen and cutting-edge baking technology to enable extensive testing of new binding systems & coatings, as well as pilot

plants for refining milled grain products. The facility is also set to have laboratory equipment for sensorial analysis and measurement of product properties, claimed the German milling group.

fibre blends in self-dispensable 6 gm powder sticks to makers of supplements for the constipated. About the new product, Charlotte Beyerholm, Marketing Manager - Human Health & Nutrition, Chr Hansen, said, “Constipation is a widespread health concern globally. About 12 per cent of people worldwide suffer from self-defined constipation according to a 2006 global omnibus

study involving 13,900 individuals.” The company said that strains like BB-12 had showed constipation benefits, which could now be enhanced with the addition of fibres to create a symbiotic offering. A reformulated version of Bonsoy soy milk has been approved for sale by Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ), after initially being withdrawn due to high iodine levels derived from a kombu seaweed ingredient.

and a sector distinguished by a much greater willingness to invest after a difficult year,” stated Messe Frankfurt, the organiser of the event. Detlef Braun, Member - Board of Management, Messe Frankfurt, said, “IFFA is the unchallenged leading trade fair for the sector worldwide. An increase of 5 per cent in the number of exhibitors, more exhibition space sold and, at 59 per cent, a higher

proportion of international visitors give impressive confirmation of the great importance of IFFA, especially in times of economic difficulty.”

Modern Food Processing | June 2010


WORLD NEWS MARKET WATCH

Danone numero uno in food sector

According to a new report, dairy giant Danone leads the list for category PACKAGING EXPO

ProPak Asia 2010 to be held in Bangkok ProPak Asia will be held from June 16-19, 2010, at Bangkok International Trade and Exhibition Centre (BITEC). For members on the supply side, the megaevent is an opportunity to showcase products & solutions live and in-person to a buying audience from Asia and the Middle East. ProPak Asia holds significant strength in the food, drink & pharma NEW LAUNCH

Atlas Copco introduces energy-efficient screw technology blowers

Atlas Copco recently launched its new and proven energyNEW REGULATIONS

US government to curb food-borne illness with new poultry standards The US Federal Government has introduced a new set of standards for Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry with the aim to eliminate the 65,000 foodborne illnesses occurring every year. About the standard, Tom Vilsack, Agriculture Secretary, US Government, said,

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dominance in the European food sector, followed by Unilever and Nestle. A US research firm Sanford C Bernstein, which issued the report, identified a ‘sustainable top-line growth’ pillar, comprising four growth drivers - categories, markets, category dominance and execution. The report lists food firms dominating various product categories, with focus on the industry’s three big players - Nestle, Unilever and Danone.

Sanford C Bernstein judged category dominance on a category/country level, using 100 food categories in 80 countries. Danone dominated the category, considering that it is a focussed company operating largely in four businesses. According to Sanford C Bernstein, Danone is the number one player in categories/markets, representing 71 per cent of sales, and is top 2 in 91 per cent.

sectors and, in 2010, it will continue to focus on its primary development sectors on brewing & beverage technology (DrinkTech Asia), pharmaceutical technology (PharmaTech Asia), plastic materials, moulding & processing equipment (PlasTech Asia) as well as laboratory & test equipment (Lab & Test Asia). D V Malhan, Executive Secretary, All India Food Processors Association, said, “India, which has progressed well

in advancing its food manufacturing standards for export, is keen to achieve a leading position. To drive their businesses forward, ProPak Asia is an ideal platform for Indian manufacturers to keep themselves updated with the latest technology solutions and trends innovatively presented by world-class suppliers.”

efficient technology for air blowing applications - the ZS screw blower (ZS 75-1250 VSD). This technology is 30 per cent more energy efficient than lobe technology, claimed the company. According to Atlas Copco, industries and applications like wastewater treatment, pneumatic conveying, power generation, food & beverage, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, pulp & paper, textiles, cement, & general manufacturing will benefit from

energy savings by replacing conventional lobe with the leading screw technology. Chris Lybaert, President - Oil-free Air Division, Atlas Copco, informed, “Energy consumption represents 80 per cent of the lifecycle costs of a blower. By introducing screw technology to our air blower range, we now offer a complete product portfolio of compressors and blowers for all applications & processes below 4 bar(e)/58 psig.”

“We are working every day as part of the President’s Food Safety Working Group to lessen the danger of foodborne illness.” According to the new inspection rules, companies are required to reduce the percentage of samples that test positive for a given pathogen to a certain level in young chicken and turkey. The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) stated that the new Campylobacter

standards will prevent the occurrence of about 39,000 illnesses each year. Also, the revised Salmonella standards are expected to result in 26,000 less number of illnesses after two years under the new standards.

Modern Food Processing | June 2010


WORLD NEWS MARKET RESEARCH

Zetar sales grow with new range of healthy snacks

INNOVATION

Traceability system to aid consumers to track the origin of dairy products FrieslandCampina has introduced a traceability system for an organic dairy brand in the Netherlands to enable customers to track their purchases back to the farmyard. With the help of a code displayed on the package of all products in the Campina Boerenland range, Dutch consumers can now identify the farmer MARKET TRENDS

Farmers reject plans to sell Glanbia

Farmers have dampened Glanbia Plc’s plans to sell its Irish dairy business FOOD POLICY

FDA issues import alert for modified atmosphere packaged raw seafood The US Food & Drug Administration (USFDA) has issued an import alert to all companies worldwide who export vacuum packaged or modified atmosphere packaged raw seafood to the US. Under this alert, USFDA automatically detains all shipment

Zetar, a UK-based snack and confectionery group, claimed that its new healthy snacking range had accelerated its sales growth and aided strong financial recovery in the second half of 2009. The company said that sales had increased 10 per cent to reach £ 131 million. According to a report, the introduction of a number of economy dried fruit &

nuts lines proved incremental to the existing premium ranges and together with the launch of the company’s first licensed branded products such as Reggae Reggae nuts and Sun Pat peanut clusters, contributed to an overall 11 per cent increase in divisional sales. The company’s confectionery sales also saw a hike of nine per cent to £ 82 million.

that supplied the milk processed in their dairy purchases. FrieslandCampina said that the system represents an important step towards further openness on the origins of dairy produce. It also comes as interest in the origins of food is on the rise and concern about detachment from those origins is a growing issue. About 130 Dutch organic dairy farmers supply milk for the Campina Boerenland range, and these farmers have supplied the company with

descriptions of themselves and their farms, which consumers can read on the Campina website for the Netherlands.

& focus on nutrition and the US cheese market. In April, Glanbia had agreed to sell its Irish dairy business to its majority shareholder Glanbia Cooperative Society for Euro 343 million. But, the deal is now shelved, due to insufficient number of farmer members of the co-operative, which has a 54 per cent share in Glanbia Plc. About 73 per cent of members voted in favour of the acquisition, whereas 75 per cent vote was needed to proceed the acquisition.

Despite the narrow margin of the vote, the parties behind the deal have so far not suggested resurrecting the plans or changing the voting rules. The benefits of a disposal of the Irish dairy business could be significant for Glanbia Plc. Not only would a sale deliver a significant overnight improvement in margins but would also give Glanbia the financial freedom to go after growth opportunities in the nutrition sector.

from firms that are not on the USFDA ‘Green List’. USFDA designed this alert to prevent fatal botulism poisoning (Clostridium botulinum), which can be a risk associated with raw seafood shipped in packages that prevent the seafood from oxygen exposure (anaerobic conditions). Since September 2009, USFDA had placed only 46 foreign firms on the ‘Green List’ for Import Alert #16-125. To ship their frozen seafood, foreign

processors must have themselves listed on the ‘Green List’ or obtain a ‘Green Ticket’, which helps gain access to the US market.

June 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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TECH UPDATES

Ozone can reduce bacterial load in apple juice A study, conducted at Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland, found that ozone treatment can effectively reduce bacterial load in apple juice, with the amount of ozone application depending on the acidity level of the juice. The research, published in Food Microbiology, investigated the efficacy of gaseous ozone on inactivation of escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and NCTC 12900 strains in apple juice with a wide range of pH levels, using an ozone bubble column. Traditionally, fruit juices are pasteurised at temperatures below 100ºC for a few second or minute. Though it is a short heat treatment, there is usually a loss of nutritional and organoleptic properties. The authors said that non-thermal processing technologies like ozone are preferred alternative methods for juice processors to produce a minimally processed food with minor quality changes. But, further studies are warranted to determine the effect of ozone on sensory and nutritional quality retention for apple juice.

Campden explores potential of hyperspectral near infrared imaging Food manufacturers could now use a form of near infrared (NIR) imaging technology, pioneered by the military, to measure the distribution of components like moisture, fat and protein in foods where they are not evenly distributed. It could also be used to grade products for freshness and quality, according to the UKbased Campden BRI, which has been working with several food manufacturers on trials of hyperspectral NIR imaging using equipment from Gilden Photonics. Dr Martin Whitworth, Manager - Cereals and Milling Sciences, Campden BRI, informed, “NIR spectroscopy has been in use for a long time, but it is only useful for bulk samples or where an average fat or moisture content is to be obtained. In contrast, hyperspectral NIR imaging can provide rapid, non-destructive, in-line analysis of components that are not uniformly distributed, such as fat around French fries or doughnuts, moisture in baguettes and fat penetration in meat.” NIR spectroscopy relates to the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter in the 750-2,500 nanometre wavelength region. As this region contains information related to molecular bonds that form the basis of proteins, carbohydrates, fats and water, it can be used to determine their relative quantities in food samples.

Kemin launches novel antimicrobial system for bakery

Soy fibre increases yield, lowers cost in processed meats

Kemin Food Technologies, a division of Kemin Industries, has launched Amplifresh, a unique antimicrobial system designed to keep cakes and muffins fresh & safe for a longer period of time without impacting their original taste profile. “Celebrations are memorable events and manufacturers take pride in delivering products that are fresh & wholesome to their customers for these celebrations. Amplifresh extends the freshness period of cakes & muffins, enabling manufactures to manage inventory more efficiently, reduce product waste, address aftertaste associated with conventional options and ultimately increase the satisfaction of their customers,” said Melanie Galloway, President - Food Technologies Division, Kemin Industries. The company claimed that dedicated scientists ensure optimal pH, enhanced stability, superior solubility and better dispersion through a proprietary manufacturing process while utilising permitted antimicrobials for use in cakes & muffins in India. In addition, Amplifresh is manufactured in an HACCP & ISO 9001:2008 certified facility in Gummidipoondi, near Chennai. Kemin Group of Companies provides health & nutritional solutions to agrifoods, food ingredients, pet food, human health and pharmaceutical industries.

Solae, one of the world’s leading players in soy-based technologies and ingredients, has introduced a new soy fibre ingredient, Cenergy FMS. The company claims that this ingredient, which is recommended for ground meat and kebab manufacturing, increases cooking yield, reduces cooking time and provides cost savings. The company said that its Cenergy FMS ingredient contains a mixture of protein, soluble and insoluble fibre from the soybean cotyledon. According to the company, the combination of these components results in the ingredient’s ability to control purge, increase water retention and improve cooking yields in ground meat applications. About the new soy fibre, Reinhart Schmitt, Vice President, Solae Europe, said, “We believe our soy fibre provides additional advantages to current ingredient solutions being used by meat manufacturers today. One of those benefits being that Cenergy FMS can produce significant overall formulation cost savings when added to standard ground meat products.”

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TECH UPDATES

High-pressure processing to increase sales and safety

Nizo’s tool can objectively measure cheese defect

By using high-pressure processing (HPP), a Greek food company has claimed to have significantly increased its sales of meat products, improved shelf-life and dramatically reduced product returns. Fresh cut meat and salad producer Ifantis said it had invested in the technology from US company Avure in a bid to tackle high product returns because of an unreliable cold chain distribution network in Greece’s islands. Growing consumer concern over food safety and increasing demand for products with less preservatives was also a driver, stated the company. Since installation of the HPP system, a post-packaging lethality treatment that eradicates food pathogens and spoilage organism in products, the sales of its sliced meats has surged by more than 30 per cent and product returns due to cold chain issues have been cut to ‘almost zero’, claimed the company. As part of its service, Avure also helped the Greek company with product reformulations, HACCP and regulatory approval, as well as collaborating on a new logo for the HPP-treated products.

Nizo Food Research claimed that it has developed a new grading system and computer tool to objectively measure ‘rim air’ defects in cheese and avoid potential conflicts between buyers and sellers. Rim air is an accumulation of small holes within 1 or 2 cm of the crust of hard and semi-hard cheeses such as Gouda-type and Maasdammertype products. It is a visual defect that can lower the value of cheese depending on the severity of the case. When present to a moderate degree, rim air does not affect consumer appreciation, but in worse cases, it can cause cracks to form in the cheese and reduce value significantly. Nizo has, therefore, developed a universal grading system & computer tool to enable cheese producers to measure rim air in cheese and provide objective information for judging the commercial value of a cheese. Hans Tromp, Senior Texture Scientist, Nizo Food Research, informed, “There is a need for an objective description of different intensities or grades of rim air. The grading system developed by Nizo avoids conflicts between selling and buying parties.

Novel method to boost polyphenol levels in cocoa products

New technology to reduce cost of nanomaterial for food packaging

According to a study published in Food Research International, a wet heat treatment process, which avoids the cocoa fermentation and roasting steps, produces polyphenol-rich cocoa powder. The authors of this study maintain that the health benefits of cocoa polyphenols, as reported in recent studies, have increased the interest in obtaining products from cocoa beans not only with high polyphenol but also with a high flavan-3-ol content. According to the study, the main flavan-3-ol compounds present in cocoa are the monomers catechin and epicatechin, and the dimer procyanidin B2. But during the processing of cocoa, significant degradations of these compounds take place due to fermentation and high roasting temperatures. “In the aerobic fermentation of cocoa, (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin and anthocyanidin molecules are oxidised & polymerised in the presence of the polyphenol oxydase (PPO) enzyme. These high-molecular-weight polymers (tannins) have less bioavailability than their precursors,” stated the authors. In the recent years, studies have focussed on ways to mitigate or suspend the PPO enzyme activity in cocoa in order to avoid polyphenol oxidation reactions and polymerisation.

Innventia has reportedly developed a breakthrough technology that could bring down the cost of producing a renewable nano-based ‘super material’ for the food packaging and processing sectors. The Swedish firm is also setting up a pilot plant that will enable the production of nanocellulose on a commercial scale for the first time, thanks to the development of a revolutionary energyefficient process. Mikael Ankerfors, Research Manager, Innventia, said, “The innovation means the company has taken a decisive step towards large-scale industrialisation as prices of nanocellulose could be cut significantly.” Nanocellulose, which is extracted from wood fibres, can be used in the production of highly effective barrier films for packaging and as a viscosity agent in foodstuffs. The substance is sustainable, as it comes from a renewable source – in contrast with several other oil-based materials. Its facility, to be completed by September or October 2010, will be able to produce up to 100 kg of nanocellulose a day. “To put this in context, a typical surface barrier coating for packaging requires only 1 gm per sq m of nanocellulose. This means we can produce enough material every day to coat 1,00,000 sq m of packaging,” he added.

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LEADERS SPEAK

“With new advancements in technology, the food testing segment is progressing steadily” …says Philippe Sans, President & CEO, Silliker Group Corporation (SGC). With over 50 laboratories established in 16 countries, Silliker today is one of the global leaders in the field of food safety, quality and nutrition. As CEO of SGC, Sans has successfully initiated a globalisation effort in the company, expanding its presence to new geographies, including India, China and Brazil. In a conversation with Rachita Jha, he reflects on the emergence of need for food testing services in the global food industry…

Food safety in a globalised world… The global food industry is a complex domain. The shift in food trade in a globalised world and increasing consumer preferences from perishable to processed food products, increased consumer & media awareness of food crises, enforced and new regulations, all have created a need for safer food. Considering the number of matrices available in the market, from raw materials to finished products, bringing in analytical accuracy and reproducibility to all levels of the food chain is a challenging feat. Food safety has gained new significance in the world of globalisation, and with new advancements in technology, the food testing segment is progressing steadily. Moreover, today in the global food market, compliance to quality and standards has emerged as a by-product of these diminishing borders of trade between countries. And, it is only a matter of time, we will realise the importance of a universal food safety and certification system to simplify the complexities of the global food supply chain.

Need of the hour… Globalisation of the food industry has been a precursor to the need for quality standards, while the challenges to public health that better nutrition can address is the precursor to innovations in the food industry. Better nutrition can play an important role in public

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LEADERS SPEAK

health, considering that an unbalanced diet causes 30 per cent of cancers, cardiovascular diseases & diabetes and is directly linked to increased obesity. Thus, food processors must innovate to retain their position in the market and answer increased consumer demand for better products in terms of nutrition & health benefits. Ensuring safety of food products across the world is a requirement of multinational retail chains operating across several countries, via a uniform system for food safety standards and accreditation. These standards should ideally be applicable across all ranges of food products to include them in the ‘safe’ net. Recently, the global food industry has increasingly been showing an interest in trade with developing countries for sourcing food products. Companies thus prefer ensuring the quality and safety standards of these products before bringing them to the market. Here, SGC comes into play, carrying out food testing and analytics at international levels to provide successfully a holistic coverage of safety standards.

Making inroads into the Indian food industry… India is one of the fastest growing countries worldwide, and our investment reflects our strategic ambition to expand our international presence & scope of services in the country. Also, many of our global customers are demanding our presence in India. With outstanding gains in the trade of food products from India, the requirement for quality and safety of products is becoming imperative. This forms a gap between the profits and the quality of food products, which we aim to bridge through our latest food testing services. Also, our experience of such services in many countries will facilitate better compliance with regulations in the US or European countries. This is an important strategic move for us. With our new venture in India, known as MicroChem Silliker, we have opened a new state-of-the-art laboratory for nutritional chemistry and food & safety, covering an area of 22,000 sq ft, in Mumbai. This facility has a dedicated chemical, microbiology, instrumentation and sensory evaluation laboratories.

Growth drivers for food testing market…

Harmonising safety regulations…

The key growth drivers for food testing services worldwide include the widening net of strict food regulations that are binding on many food products and countries, considering public health concerns. These regulations have had more impact in the post-recession era, especially in the food industry in India, China and the US. Also, food testing was recently enlisted as one of the top 12 priorities to be addressed by the current government in the US. The second important trend expanding the base of food testing applications, especially across processed food products, is the increasing public awareness on food safety and human health. Many countries are also witnessing an emerging trend of public opinion, thus driving companies to adopt stringent quality compliance standards.

Generally, the quality function within large manufacturing companies is driven by their local operations. But, with the expansion of big food manufacturing companies, quality also attains importance as a global function of trade outlets. With global mergers and alliance between various countries, each country wants to conform with the global testing & compliance systems to avert all concerns for safety. They need to ensure that the food is tested for the compliance factors for their parameters of concern. This harmonisation has been a challenge for us. To accomplish this, we have a dedicated research & development facility, and are one of the best in providing molecular biology services for food testing. We also coordinate between 50 laboratories across 16 countries, and are guided by a unique paradigm that

We look forward to see MicroChem Silliker becoming a leading company for food testing & quality here. We aim to create a large network of laboratories across numerous locations in India, as one of the challenges here is the comprehensive sampling of food items. the standard technologies are available in all laboratories. We have a uniform quality system for all laboratories. We have also created local teams for each laboratory that hold authority on the local food regulations, policies and trade legislations. Together, Silliker is working towards a single-window accreditation system for food safety standards and a certification system that will streamline the movement of food products across countries in the ‘safe’ mode.

Future course of action… Besides Microchem Silliker in India, we have partnered with accredited laboratories located in China & Brazil, with a strategy to continue expansion in these key markets. In future, we aim to form alliances in Argentina and Chile. As India is an important strategic location for the company, we look forward to seeing MicroChem Silliker becoming a leading company for food testing & quality here. We also aim to create a large network of laboratories across numerous locations in India, as one of the challenges here is the comprehensive sampling of food items. Our alliance includes expanding the scope of analytical services, increasing sensitivity to stress reports and aligning to the international scenario for requirements from different countries when they source food from India. We believe that we have all the ingredients to become a leading company for food testing in India.

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ROUNDTABLE

Food processing

A tool to control inflation?

Courtesy: Lowe’s Commercial Services

Rajiv Jaisinghani Managing Director, Darshan Foods Pvt Ltd The government needs to have a progressive mindset to promote the food processing sector. This can be done by offering sops to increase the number of stakeholders in this trade and bring it to a sizeable strength. This will, in turn, help the producer by ensuring sales and the buyer by ensuring availability of quality products at appropriate prices the year round. Subsequently, food prices will be stabilised throughout the year, and remain insulated from short-term impacts leading to inflation. The food processing industry currently faces certain critical issues and challenges, which if addressed by the government can support the industry to some extent. These issues include lack of proper logistics leading to high costs and wastage; lack of adequate funding & rates leading to high installation costs resulting in cost cutting and infrastructure that is not at par with international plants; bureaucratic controls that require licence for setting up an industry.

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Since quite some time India has been facing the issue of food inflation. One of the methods to control food inflation is by reducing the wastage of agricultural products. For this purpose, the government has introduced various strategies to boost the growth of the food processing industry, but these need to be implemented appropriately. Shivani Mody talks to some industry experts to find out how food processing can act as an effective tool to control food inflation.

A common set of rules along with industry-specific parameters like pollution should be centrally notified to set up the industry, to avoid permission requirements at the local level. Free use of agricultural land should be permitted for agro-based industry without seeking permission at local levels; continuous power (at regular rates) should be made available rather than restricting usage beyond specified hours; zero rate of duty for import of plant, machinery, reefer trucks & equipment; waiver of no-entry for vehicles supplying food & perishable commodities in cities, which currently prohibit entry of or restrict such vehicles to some hours only; and, finally, as CNG commercial vehicles cannot run reefer plants for minus temperatures, a solution should be found or exemptions granted for such vehicles to ply within cities. Addressing some of the above issues can definitely reduce food inflation. Reduction in food wastage by processing will be self-sustaining. The wasted stocks of 30-40 per cent if made available to the industry at negligible cost will itself pay for the processing, logistics, storage costs, and hence be cost neutral. Besides ensuring a year-long availability of quality products, it will be a good tool for countering inflation, which is generally due to local or global short-term impacts. Also, this will ensure food safety & security during draught and national or international disasters.


ROUNDTABLE

Dr Arpita Mukherjee Professor, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations India has been struggling to control food inflation since last year. A primary cause of this inflation is the lack of post-harvest infrastructure such as cold chains, transportation and storage facilities, which leads to increased wastage. Also, the food processing industry in India is small compared with those in countries like China. This reduces the longevity of agricultural products. Also, the presence of several intermediaries along the supply chain reduces efficiency and increases costs. The prevalence of hoarding and black-marketing practices in the country has further deteriorated the situation, creating artificial shortages, which eventually leads to price hike. Food processing can help reduce food price inflation by increasing the durability of the products, thus reducing wastage. With increasing number of agricultural products being processed, investment happens in the

Parveen Dang Director - Sales & R&D-South Asia, Orana India The wholesale prices of all food products have touched a 10-year high. Food inflation is estimated at 17 per cent. Prices of agricultural food products have shown a sharp increase, which is due to many reasons, one of which is wastage of food products in India. The country bears huge losses of agricultural food products due to lack of postharvesting infrastructure like cold chain, storage and proper processing. Indian customers spend about 45 per cent of personal disposable income on food. Hence, any increase in food prices will adversely affect the economy. Here, one of the ways to control inflation is to boost processing of food products. The government can play a major role to promote food processing and give some benefits to the industry such as tax holidays, building infrastructure like roads, cold chains & railways, to enable the movement of perishable food items from the farm to customers. One of the major challenges faced by the food processing industry is lack of infrastructure such as cold chain, logistics issues & storage facilities and strict Indian food laws. It is risky for companies to invest in food processing, as the time for breakeven is long and return on investment is low. This inhibits investment by Indian business groups in this sector and also makes it difficult to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) in this segment. Thus, providing this industry with additional advantages will help attract investors. India has a broad range of food products, eg, fruits & vegetables, dairy, grains, meat and poultry. Of this, only 2 per cent are processed, with the remaining consumed raw or going waste. In developed countries,

supply chain and the chain itself is consolidated. The government acknowledges the importance of the processed food industry and has been offering several incentives to this sector, which are not sufficient. Interstate barriers to movement of food grains, barriers to imports of primary agricultural commodities, among others, are hurdles faced by the food processing sector. The movement of food grains between deficit & surplus states should be freed and the private sector should be allowed to import primary agricultural commodities during domestic shortage at zero import duties. Agriculture is the main industry in India, and in the absence of agricultural reforms, the food processing industry cannot grow and achieve the economies of scale.

the level of value addition is in the range of 70-80 per cent. Most of these food products are perishable, which after processing can lengthen the shelf-life and make these available throughout the year. This will help control the prices, which are low during a specific season. Also, after the season, rapid surge in prices is seen, as the supply decreases but demand is still there. During the season, tomato can be converted to tomato puree and made available anywhere anytime. Such products are available in India and many companies have attempted this, but it needs encouragement & marketing support. The government should promote these products by educating customers about processed food products. If the wastage of of food products is reduced by 30-40 per cent, it will result in abundant food products and lesser shortage of food in India, thus keeping the prices under control. Moreover, the excess products can be exported, which can earn us foreign exchange as well. Processing these products will make them available throughout the year, with better quality, better preserved nutrition and health benefits of food products. The demand for food products in India is increasing due to increased purchasing power, modern lifestyles, boost in the Indian retail industry, huge middle class and awareness of health & wellness. There is a need to be ready to meet the increased demand for food products in India, the best possible option for which is food processing.

June 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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ROUNDTABLE

Piruz Khambatta Chairman & Managing Director, Rasna Pvt Ltd The customers’ changing preferences for convenience is adding to the growth of the value-added agriculture sector. Here, the government should play the role of a catalyst, creating reforms based on some strategic plan. An ‘effective demand’ should be created by bringing about critical tax interventions, eg, 100 per cent exemption from all taxes on processed food products to ensure that the cascading effect of tax, which is almost 20 per cent on the consumer selling price of almost all food products and,

Dr B Sesikeran Director, National Institute of Nutrition The government can use the food processing sector as a tool to control food inflation. First, the government needs to address the challenges currently faced by the food processing industry. Appropriate scientific inputs and access to the food processing industry are needed to realise the necessary changes in their products, along with a fast and sciencebased regulatory process.

Yashika Singh Head - Economic Analysis, Dun & Bradstreet India In India, monsoons have always played a critical role in the growth of agriculture sector. Given its dependence on monsoon, agricultural production is crucial in determining food inflation in India. Although India’s agricultural production base is reasonably strong, there is considerable wastage of agricultural produce due to poor post-harvest infrastructure such as cold chains, transportation and storage facilities. The huge wastage across the value chain leads to lower level of processing, and hence low value addition.

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if removed, the price will decrease, creating more demand. Technology, R&D and innovation should be incentive-based. Also, India should be positioned as the preferred outsourcing hub for processed foods and a global food factory. Investments need to be increased for design and implementation of appropriate financial interventions depending on the characteristics and needs of the industry. An efficient and competitive supply chain should be developed, starting from the farm, with benefits like zero taxation & special finance incentives. Also, the government can set up international level laboratories and CODEX cells across the country. With these reforms and focussed attention by government & collaboration with the industries, academia & future managers, the issues related to food, especially inflation can be addressed.

Rather than looking to solve the issue individually, the government should consider a partnership approach for successful implementation. Here, the government should use the food processing sector as an active partner to help solve social needs. Today, in India, nearly 30-40 per cent of the farm produce is wasted mainly due to improper infrastructure facilities, adding further to the problem of food shortage. Thus, by reducing food wastage, the inflationary trends can be controlled. The government aims at better utilisation of and value addition to agricultural produce, minimising wastage in the food processing chain by developing infrastructure for storage, transportation & processing of agro-based food produce, induction of modern technology and encouraging research & development (R&D).

The government has given highest priority to the development of physical infrastructure, with several initiatives, including development of food parks, packaging centres, modernised abattoirs, integrated cold chain facilities, irradiation facilities and value-added centres. Policies are now encouraging participation of private investors to promote efficiency in food processing and agriculture marketing systems. Proper & efficient implementation of these measures will have enormous positive multiple effects on the agriculture and food processing sectors & the national economy in general. However, the food processing industry has certain roadblocks for faster growth. Some of the key issues faced by the industry are lack of suitable infrastructure, eg, cold storage, warehousing, etc, which need to be overcome immediately.


IN FOCUS

Parag Milk Foods

On an integrated growth path Although India is the largest producer of milk in the world, a huge gap exists between the demand and supply of various dairy products. Parag Milk Foods with its state-of-the-art facility is determined to fill this gap with international quality products at affordable prices. Since its inception, the company has shown steady growth. Read on as Divya Sharma Karmakar tracks the growth path of the company that believes in continuously evolving itself.

F

or more than thousand years, dairy farming has been considered as a part of agriculture. It had always been a small part of diverse agricultural practices. With industrialisation and emergence of cities & towns, the demand for dairy products also has surged. This subsequently resulted in emergence of large farms, which are engaged only in dairy production. India realised the need of the hour, which resulted in the ‘White Revolution’ or ‘Operation Flood’ in 1970, spearheaded by National Dairy Development Board (NDDB). However, with the increase in awareness, the affluent Indian consumer has begun to demand products of international standards. Parag Milk Foods aims to satisfy the discerning consumer by churning out high-quality products at affordable prices.

of manufacturing, packaging & exporting a wide range of milk & milk products, eg, milk powder, ghee, processed cheese, butter, dahi and proprietary foods like dairy whitener & gulab jamun mix powder under the brand names Gowardhan & Go. Speaking about the company, Devendra Shah, Chairman, Parag Milk Foods, says, “We are an ISO 9000 and Agmarkcertified company, committed to international standards of product quality.” Parag Milk Foods has recognised the need of the consumer and invested in state-of-theart technology to fulfill the same. Throwing light on the infrastructure of the company, Shah says, “We have brought in state-of-the-art technology from Europe, to facilitate production of high-quality milk & milk products as well as to ensure rapid scaling up and bringing these to market.”

The beginning Parag Milk Foods, one of the largest private dairies in the country, with an output capacity of 1,000,000 ltr per day (lpd), is located in Manchar, Pune. This state-of-the-art dairy farm was established by the Shah family in 1992. The company handles the business

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Journey so far The company has come a long way since the days when Shah used to procure milk from the local farmers on milk holidays. Saturdays and Sundays were called milk holidays, as on these days the milk was not collected by other government


IN FOCUS

and co-operative societies, thus leading to wastage of milk. Speaking about those initial days, Shah says, “We had a humble beginning. The company was incorporated in December 1991 mainly to market milk & dairy products. For this, we had set up a small pasteurising plant at Manchar the following year and accelerated its capacity in stages to 79,000 lpd in 1997-98. Today, the processing capacity of this unit has increased to 10,00,000 lpd. Since its inception, the company has grown from strength to strength. And, from the beginning, the company’s compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) in sales has been 43.80 per cent.” Parag Milk Foods did not rest on its achievement but has been on a continuous improvement and expansion drive. Recently, the cheese plant underwent expansion, with a capacity of 40 metric tonne per day. “In the coming financial year 2010-11, we expect the turnover to be more than Rs 700 crore. And, for the years beyond, we plan to increase it to Rs 850–900 crore,” avers Shah. The sales operation of the company started off from Pune, which then expanded to Mumbai, remaining parts of Maharashtra & Gujarat states. Currently, Parag Milk Foods is spread throughout the country and its products are also exported to nearly 30 countries. The company, which started off by handling liquid milk has now ventured into a variety of products like ghee, cheese, butter, dahi, skimmed milk powder, gulab jamun mix, chhaas and many more.

Production unit for butter

Business model Parag Milk Foods has segmented its entire business based on two modules. The traditional products are under the brand name Gowardhan while the value-added premium range is marketed under the brand name of Go. Speaking about the new brand and the response received, Shah says, “The brand Go cheese was launched in December last year, and has garnered good and encouraging response. We have been able to make an impact on the cheese market in India and, importantly, consumers have started perceiving Go cheese as a premium brand in this segment.” He adds, “The company has increased its marketshare in the organised cheese segment from 3-5 per cent to 18-20 per cent.” The company envisions tremendous scope for growth in the years to come. Shah says, “Our strategy would be not to compare ourselves with domestic brands, but to be better than some of the international brands. The future of cheese in India is growing, and we visualise this as an excellent opportunity for us to make our presence felt and grow exponentially.”

packaging & distribution with product traceability and in-house R&D facility. The company has an efficient distribution network that includes over 50 super stockists and 750 dealers servicing 200,000 retail counters; it has a pan-India presence through both traditional and modern trade. Speaking about the company’s distribution network, Shah says, “We are well equipped with latest technology for packaging and processing of milk, along with strong & efficient distribution network, ensuring timely delivery of our products.”

Manufacturing expertise

The company has a strong distribution network. It has tied up with more than 500 Village Level Collection Centres (VLCCs) and 35 chilling centres for continuous milk procurement. It produces 10,00,000 lpd of milk and is equipped with latest technology for milk processing,

The company’s commitment to quality & innovation has resulted in huge investments in infrastructure and technology. The integrated dairy and cow farm at Manchar, is rapidly scaling up to cater to the ever-expanding circle of customers in India, who seek allnatural, wholesome dairy products. One of the facilities, known as the Bhagyalaxmi Dairy Farm, is spread over an area of 35 acre and boasts of being India’s largest cow farm. The farm has about 2,500 cows and is equipped with rotary parlours, which has mechanised the entire milking process and, in turn, maximised quality & hygiene. A rotary parlour system can milk 50 cows at a time. Describing the parlour and its utility, Shah says, “A throughput of 400 cows per hour is achieved with a staff of five, making it one of the most efficient milking units available today in India.”

Ghee packaging unit

Rotary parlour

Distribution network

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IN FOCUS

Devendra Shah Chairman

The growing demand and market has attracted international players who are seeking to enter the Indian dairy market. Thus, it only makes sense to strengthen our market position through improvements in quality & quantity of products. The parlour helps in procuring cow milk of highest quality standards with regard to physical & chemical properties as well as bacteriological load in the produce. This world class facility meticulously follows specialised farming, nurturing, breeding & a milking programme, ensuring that the milk obtained is wholesome and of the highest quality. The extensive range of products is processed at the company’s ultramodern dairy. The fully automated dairy plant adheres to international standards and is equipped with the latest European technology. The plant churns out 1,000,000 lpd of milk, and also has an output capacity for about 10 million tonne of butter, 25 million tonne of ghee, 10 million tonne of dahi and 65 million tonne of milk powder. Besides the high-tech milking and processing technology, the farm also

boasts of possessing Asia’s largest cheese manufacturing facility. Speaking about the facility, Shah informs, “It is also one of the only two facilities in Asia with Ultra High Treatment (UHT) technology.” The equipment is imported from Stephan Machinery, Germany, pioneers in cheese processing equipment. “The UHT technology does not require cold chain and enhances penetration. It allows the cheese to be stored in ambient condition without refrigeration for a maximum of 6 months in tropical countries like India,” opines Shah, describing the technology. Besides, the company has also established a state-of-the-art plant with fully automatic Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)-controlled capacity of 40 million tonne per day on latest technology in a separate building. The company is now gearing up to introduce in the domestic market its UHT-treated, superior quality cheese, which will be available in a variety of forms such as slices, wedges, spreads and a range of exciting flavours.

Quality analysis

Right from the reception of milk to the finished product, the company maintains a strict no-humancontact policy throughout the entire manufacturing process. The ISO 90012008 certified company has three tier quality control systems — pre-process, process controls during manufacturing and post process controls. At every step of processing, stringent hygiene & sanitation is maintained to give customers high-quality products. Shah avers, “To ensure that our products are consistent in taste and nutrition, we believe in walking that extra mile by implementing a multistage quality control programme through the entire Packaging unit for butter production process.”

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The company realises that in order to meet the expectations of consumers and to expand its product line in future, a major requirement is a robust research & development (R&D) department. Shah avers, “We continuously carry out R&D activities for new product development, upgradation of existing products and innovations in packaging. Also, we are implementing new ideas for packaging to enable easy & handy use of the products.”

Milky path to success Apart from securing its future through R&D, Parag Milk Foods is on an expansion drive and is planning to invest Rs 160 crore for its new projects comprising a cold chain and broadening its base to Palamner near Bengaluru as well as Shrirampur near Shirdi in Maharashtra. Describing the importance of R&D and new units, Shah says, “The dairy industry is booming with the consumption of dairy products increasing rapidly. Moreover, the growing demand and market has attracted international players who are seeking to enter the Indian dairy market. Thus, it only makes sense to strengthen our market position through improvements in quality & quantity of products.” Parag Milk Foods is aiming for robust growth by providing domestic consumers with high-quality traditional products, which match international standards. With latest machinery, technology and R&D, the company seems to be on the right path to achieve this goal.


INDUSTRY UPDATE Robotics

The food industry is a rather difficult setting for people to work in owing to health, safety and ergonomic issues. It is thus reasonable for manufacturers to invest in robotics, considering the safety, consistency and efficiency that robots offer. Though robots are mainly used for end-ofthe-line operations, companies are utilising them in downstream processes as well. Rakesh Rao explores how robots are making a difference in the food processing industry.

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Courtesy: ABB


Robotics INDUSTRY UPDATE

A

t a food production facility one can see a mix of tasks performed by manual labour and automated machines or robots. While the reliance on manual labour is steadily declining, automation solutions are increasingly being used for activities in installation of food manufacturing units. Food companies have begun to realise the benefits of automation, making it the largest growth area for robotics and automation in the manufacturing sector. Ake Lindqvist, President, International Federation of Robotics (IFR), says, “Food & beverage (F&B) industry is one of the fastest growing areas in robot automation. Similar to many other areas of robot automation, it saves labour cost by reducing the number of employees - but is not the main reason for automation with robotics. In future, robotic automation will play an ever-increasing role due to its flexibility compared with hard automation machinery.”

designed for particular applications such as picking and palletising are now available. Recent models, such as the ABB FlexPicker and Fanuc M-430iA, have been designed to meet hygiene and wash-down standards specific to food applications. Michael Taylor, Chairman, Centre for Food Robotics and Automation (CenFRA) Ltd, the UK, informs, “In addition to developments in robots, there has been significant progress in the associated equipment and supporting technologies. For example, integrating revolutionary vision systems within robot applications can help the food industry handle randomly positioned products on a conveyor, thus providing an easy-to-use affordable solution.”

Robots for general purpose no longer exist, but machines designed for particular applications such as picking and palletising are now available.

The transition phase Considering the application of automation & robotics, food processing is, in many ways, in a position similar to what the automotive industry was in the 1970s. Robot and automation suppliers have also recognised that different applications require specific capabilities. Robots for general purpose no longer exist, but machines

Ake Lindqvist President, International Federation of Robotics

Picking and packing also reduce extreme human monotonous work, which many times can lead to wear & damage to the human body. Robotic palletising can be a tough & heavy work and not actually suitable for humans.

Another major application issue is the type of products being handled, which are often delicate or of variable size and shape. Developments have also been made in gripper technology to help solve such problems. “RTS Flexible Systems has recently installed a robot system to pack poppadoms immediately after frying, knowing how delicate they are. Festo has recently developed an entirely new gripper concept, the Fingripper, which adapts its form to the object being picked, providing reliable gripping for fragile or soft objects. Even delicate fruits, such as peaches, can be gripped without bruising,” says Taylor. Most of the technical challenges to implementing robotics in the F&B industry can now be solved, and there are many applications for which solutions not only exist but also are proven in production. These

Michael Taylor Chairman, CenFRA Ltd

The knowledge & experience gained by robot manufacturers in the last 30 years, has led to the development of easy-to-use robots that can provide extensive functionality and high levels of reliability. solutions range from palletising to secondary packing, primary packing and even food preparation such as lettuce processing.

Investing in robotics With the economy still recovering from the global slowdown and lack of jobs, why should the food industry consider investing in robotics? Brian Huse, Director, Marketing & Public Relations, Robotic Industries Association, answers, “It is common to hear that employees are shifted to better jobs (running or maintaining robots for instance), and better efficiency & quality achieved by robots results in acquiring more customers for a company, which can lead to steady or increased staffing. Gains in accounts of a company thanks to gains in efficiency and quality - ensures a more competitive place in the market, thus protecting jobs. The justification becomes more difficult when labour is inexpensive and there is no concern about staff turnover, but in many cases improvements in safety (and sanitation) help offset those issues. Companies using robots can use people to perform more strategic work and leave the travail to machines.” The recent economic crisis has obviously been difficult, but the advantages of robot are needed in case of the tough competitive landscape. Arvind Vasu, Regional Manager, Robotics (India, MiddleEast & Africa), ABB, avers, “The

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INDUSTRY UPDATE Robotics

Brian Huse Director, Marketing & Public Relations, Robotic Industries Association

Robots are moving into upstream applications for cutting and trimming meat & poultry, although this is still a small part of the work they do. This trend seems more common in Australia and Europe than in the US. mission we have for our robots is to increase productivity, reduce costs and enhance the nature of work by removing monotonous & dangerous jobs. Also, robots are the perfect candidates for those looking for new employees to fill in for shortage of skills. Many companies are afraid of the up-front investment, to their own loss. We can provide real-world examples of customers in India who have seen their production lines, and their businesses, transformed by robot-based automation.” According to Pradeep Shoran, Marketing Manager, KUKA Robotics India Pvt Ltd, “Robots can be used flexibly and integrated easily into existing or new cell concepts. Further, they work with high quality and utmost precision. Special paintwork or surface finishes also bring about clear hygiene advantages for the food industry. Robots can be used for particularly difficult tasks that are arduous for human workers. Rather than jeopardising jobs, industrial robots actually secure them, as well as ensure a decisive quality advantage.”

Giving a qualitative edge Besides the need for improving competitiveness, the increasing interest in automation is partly a recognition that robots are now just as applicable to the food sector as to the automotive industry and partly that the cost of automation solutions

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is often lower than what is percieved within the sector. Taylor explains, “The knowledge & experience gained by robot manufacturers in the last 30 years, has led to the development of easy-touse robots that can provide extensive functionality and high levels of reliability. This improved product and superior performance is also provided at a much lower price, with robots costing less than half than they cost 20 years ago.” Automation performs exactly as required, often reducing waste and increasing yield from the input materials and can be used for tedious or arduous operations. This reduces the risk of injuries and insurance claims. Automation gives reliable performance over many hours and does not suffer from lapses in concentration or fatigue. The application of vision systems for inspection eliminates the risk of human workers missing rejected products. Rush LaSelle, Director - Worldwide Sales & Marketing, Adept Technology, opines, “Robots and vision systems offer F&B manufacturers the ability to produce high volumes of products with greater flexibility to match the changing preferences of consumers while offering a more sanitary and safe alternative to manual labour. Robotic automation bridges the gap between the speed, yield and quality associated with high-speed production equipment and the flexibility of manual labour.”

Variety in applications Standard applications for robots primarily include packaging and palletising. Shoran opines, “Increasing numbers of robots are also being used for picking. Generally, though, degrees of automation in the food sector vary. In the beverage industry, the degree of automation is about 98 per cent. Here, robots are used for palletising and depalletising crates & barrels as well as in filling systems. The degree of automation is already around the 80 per cent mark in largescale bakeries as well. In the meat processing industry, on the other hand, the corresponding figure so far is only 20 per cent. In particular, there is enormous potential in this area. The range of possible tasks for robots includes 3D measurement and cutting of sides of pork as well as packaging & palletising of fillets.” According to Lindqvist, the main driver for robot automation in F&B is its ability to meet the increasing requirements for flexibility, which hard automation cannot really compete with. He adds, “The flexibility requirement, in turn, comes from consumers’ increasing requirements for variety in F&B and its appearance, to which manufacturers respond with shorter batches, different products, different sizes & products differing in appearance. This also leads to many different products being placed on the same pallet - through robotic flexible palletising - for distribution to the F&B stores and super markets,

Table 1: Benefits of robotics in F&B industry Benefits Easy-to-clean robot, minimum retention areas, connection Better process control protection High reliability, high Productivity improvement speed Features

High dexterity, several Compact cell, less room requirement, simpler mechanical solution mounting positions Cleanliness Better hygiene Flexibility Marketing innovative products and packaging Vision and conveyor Product picked and controlled in process, in any position tracking

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

Courtesy: Staubli


Robotics INDUSTRY UPDATE

starting to imaging other manufacturers ‘just-in-time’ delivery.” It is important to recognise that picking by robotics can be fast & precise, mostly eliminating potential human errors, waste and rework. “Picking and packing also reduce extreme human monotonous work, which many times can lead to wear & damage to the human body. Robotic palletising can be a tough & heavy work and not actually suitable for humans. Again, it has a flexibility that hard automation can barely match,” informs Lindqvist. Robots were originally best suited to handle rigid & highly repeatable

Advantages of robots R Flexibility R

Higher Mean Time between Failure (MTBF), as they are produced in higher volumes than conventional equipment

R Multiple robots deployed on a

line can be faster than larger custom machinery R Highly

configurable footprints permitting customisation to satisfy unique plant floor arrangements

R Readily redeployed robots can be

used for similar or even unrelated operation after a given process is no longer required R Capable of multitasking when

cycle-time permits Courtesy: Adept Technology

Advantages of conventional processing machinery R Frequently more familiar to F&B

operation staffs

and

maintenance

R Designed

to run at high production rates (though, parallel-link robots implemented in clusters can more frequently match the speeds of some conventional machinery)

R Specialised to handle specific tasks Courtesy: Adept Technology

products such as cartons and cases. However, with the increasingly powerful capabilities associated with vision and line tracking, robots are being applied in more diverse applications where producers are required to change product types & packages with increased frequency. Meanwhile, robotic automation has been systematically migrating upstream in production lines from palletising and secondary packaging areas, where they have experienced the highest levels of adoption. Huse says, “Robots are moving into upstream applications for cutting and trimming meat & poultry, although this is still a small part of the work they do. This trend seems more common in Australia and Europe than in the US.” Robots are also enjoying greater returns on investment when applied to primary food handling. “Combining their ability to handle products in a sterile manner and capability of handling natural products with highly irregular shapes, robots have now become excellent alternatives to manual labour in handling of raw food. The F&B industry is compelled to reduce the amount of human contact to that necessary in their plants, as this is the greatest contributor to contamination in raw foods, especially meats and dairy products,” informs LaSelle.

Benefits to SMEs The food processing industry is dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs), for which cost is a major factor with regard to investing in automated systems. “Robotics are not only cost-effective for small-scale manufacturers but represent a wise investment. Robots can be implemented in a cost-effective manner to satisfy lower volumes at the outset of a product or business cycle, then through reconfiguration and with the addition of more robots to a line, production can be ramped up to satisfy

Pradeep Shoran Marketing Manager, KUKA Robotics India Pvt Ltd

Robots can be used for particularly difficult tasks that are arduous for human workers. Rather than jeopardising jobs, industrial robots actually secure them, as well as ensure a decisive quality advantage. increasing demands. At the back end of a product or business cycle, robots can be redeployed or sold to obtain further economic value from the asset. Conventional machinery, on the other hand, rarely holds much residual value at the conclusion of a production cycle,” says LaSelle, speaking about cost-effectiveness of robots. Supporting his views, Lindqvist says, “Previously, F&B manufacturing required expensive hard automation machinery, which small-scale manufacturers could not have afforded. The increasing flexibility requirement in F&B drives manufacturing towards robotics even for small-scale manufacturers, and the same advantages regarding eliminating monotonous & heavy work is valid here as well as the elimination of potential human errors & resulting re-work. The robotics development of the so-called SME robotics, makes this even more attractive for small-scale manufacturers, through the increased ease of use and ease to program robots, specifically suitable for small batch production.” Shoran emphasises that robots can be cost-effective even for small-scale manufacturers. “These work round the clock without a break, and processes are reproducible and of improved quality. Also, programs can be written offline in the office while the robot is working. All these add up to decisive competitive advantages for small and medium-sized companies,” he adds.

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INDUSTRY UPDATE Robotics

drivers. Hence, robots designed to meet these needs will enable F&B producers to achieve their goals

Rush LaSelle Director - Worldwide Sales & Marketing, Adept Technology

Robots can be implemented in a cost-effective manner to satisfy lower volumes at the outset of a product or business cycle, then through reconfiguration and with the addition of more robots to a line, production can be ramped up to satisfy increasing demands. Sustainable manufacturing Today, in the food processing industry, the areas of greatest focus revolve around sustainable manufacturing and sanitary production. “As noted previously, the use of certified or approved robots in primary food handling has been the largest growth area relative to the use of robots in the F&B industry,” informs LaSelle. According to him, robots contribute to sustainability in many ways, but following two are the major benefits: R Through easy redeployment or adaptation to new packaging configurations, robots can offer sustainable production with shorter product lifecycles. This means that supply chain power is shifting from large manufacturers to large retailers and ultimately to consumers. This forces F&B manufacturers to make more frequent line changes. Robots can accommodate the new dynamic manufacturing paradigm by small reinvestment and low scrap (unused machinery) R Manufacturers also want to be sustainable through less use of consumables such as packaging materials & energy, and robotics offer a means of satisfying both these requirements. A key metric for many producers is Cost Per Pick (CPP), and with the use of this metric, all consumables including electricity and plant air act as

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New growth horizons Speaking on the emerging trends, Lindqvist says, “From a general point of view, the main robotic application areas in the form of picking, packing & palletising are continuously being developed into faster, more flexible, with higher handling capacity & larger palletising robotics, as well as the advantages in the SME concept robotics. From the point of view of process, robotic automation is emerging into fish rinsing, meat cutting, cow milking, etc. From a consumer point of view, the industry is emerging into an ever-increasing flexibility in a variety of products to meet consumer requirements.” Food processors are increasingly looking at improving hygiene

With increasing demands for safety & quality, the outlook for robotics in the food industry is bright. standards, enhancing throughput and reducing production times. “The use of sensor systems and even simpler operator control of robots have a role to play here. Other trends that are already becoming apparent are human-machine cooperation and the futuristic topic of service robotics,” informs Shoran. Traceability and 100 per cent inspection are often considered while installing robotic automation. LaSelle explains, “Robots have the ability to translate information from the physical to digital worlds and vice versa to reconcile what is expected (information in a manufacturing database) and what is actual (products on the manufacturing floor). There has

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

been an increasing need to conduct 100 per cent quality control on products, and traceability is a critical process for many F&B producers. Robotics has the ability to act as the ‘last mile’ between products and information suitable for a plant-wide information system. Sensor-based robotic solutions can capture information about every product handled by the automation and relay the information to high-level information systems.” With increasing demands for safety & quality, the outlook for robotics in the food industry is bright. Huse elaborates, “In the US, the potential for robots in food and beverage applications is quite big. The same is true in other countries, although the drivers are different depending on health & safety regulations as well as pay rates and availability of labourers. High-speed picking can be a deterrent to robotics for containers, but palletising of beverages is a wellestablished application for robots. Delta robots are making great headway in the handling of frozen foods, confectionery and, to some degree, protein (meat, poultry & fish). Larger, multi-axis robots are likely to continue expanding for end-of-line applications. Some are even used for egg and chick handling.” Robot manufacturers envision the food processing segment as a growth market and are developing products to meet the growing requirements of this industry. Lindqvist opines, “In the food industry - and also in many other industries - the flexibility, effectiveness and consistency & quality in the production is key to stay competitive in today’s market. Those that do not stay competitive will ultimately perish, probably sooner.” Hence, in the future, the food processing companies will have to invest in robotics not only to remain competitive but also to maintain a food supply that is safe, efficient and cost-effective.


INDUSTRY UPDATE Automation

Automated solutions

Integration is the key to success High level of integration and transparency are must for success in the food processing industry. The more seamless is the interaction of production-relevant processes in a company, the easier it will be to meet the economic requirements. Integrated automation system comes into play here. Rakesh Rao explores further as companies integrate their systems from raw materials to the finished goods warehouse and from the field level to the enterprise resource planning (ERP) level. Courtesy: ABB

T

he manufacturing industry has undergone remarkable changes in the last decade. While many manufacturers have embraced automation, the food processing industry has been quite slow, relying more on conventional production methods and a highly flexible labour force. Given the future changes in rules & regulations in food quality & safety, many Food and Beverage (F&B) producers may have to struggle to remain competitive unless they move towards more automated methods. “A major challenge faced by F&B industry in India is sustainability. The industry has to adapt to rapid changes in consumer demands, globalisation and price-sensitive customers. Automating production and improving process efficiency plays a major role in facing such challenges. Today, automating the plant is proven to make possible cost reduction, increase production flexibility and improve product quality,” says Deepak Kudtarkar, F&B Sector Incharge, Siemens Ltd. Lowering cost, flexibility in production, improvement in product quality and efficient tracking & tracing are among important parameters that F&B manufacturers look for while setting up a new plant or upgrading

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Modern Food Processing | June 2010

their existing one, though the approach is more conservative even today. “Cost of installation takes priority over Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). We think there should be a strategic shift from the present approach of isolated solutions to an integrated solution concept. This change can happen by educating the end customers on new technological trends,” opines Kudtarkar.

Integration is imperative The trend in automation does not consider individual devices or machines but a fully integrated automation solution. Manufacturing should be more agile, allowing for rapid product line changeovers and rapid system conversions for new product introductions. Holger Schmidt, Global Industry Manager Food and Beverage, Endress+Hauser Messtechnik GmbH+Co KG, says, “Integrating all parts of a food plant into one system is a basic requirement to ensure the availability of the required raw material, utilities and production & packaging machines. Automated systems enable monitoring of the carbon footprint of a single batch and ensure availability of all resources when required. Also, companies should rely on automated data recording, as


Automation INDUSTRY UPDATE

manual data collection is not reliable and fast enough.” By ensuring that different automation technologies work together, from plant floor to ERP, or from plant to plant, food processors can utilise different control technologies to balance consistency and variations, and obtain right information in the right place, real-time, for making right business decisions.

In total control An integrated plant-wide control system along with packaging line automation with identification & traceability systems pose several advantages for the F&B manufactures to enhance efficiency in the manufacturing and business processes. Such a system imparts flexibility, provides scope for improvement & optimisation and reduces business risks. F&B manufacturers need detailed insight into production efficiency, production margins and final profitability. The use of manufacturing execution system (MES) integrated with ERP system empowers manufacturers to keep stricter control on all aspects of business. Schmidt opines, “Raising the availability, showing gaps in the process & supporting decisions and making the best out of the resources become easier if decision-makers have a relevant idea of the activities involved. The first step is knowing what, why & when something is happening. The next step

Deepak Kudtarkar F&B Sector In-charge, Siemens Ltd

Cost of installation takes priority over Total Cost of Ownership. We think there should be a strategic shift from the present approach of isolated solutions to an integrated solution concept. This change can happen by educating the end customers on new technological trends.

is to educate the system to enable problem solving in case of incidents. Following these steps can help create really automated systems.” Integrated automation solution links supply chain with factory floor production, converting retailer demand to a plant production schedule, and executes production operations to meet that schedule. For instance, Siemens’ Totally Integrated Automation offers a unique & extensive range of hardware and software to ensure integration along the entire production line – beginning from the goods receiving area, through the processing and production areas to the finished goods warehouse. “Our concept of Totally Integrated Automation can make the entire production process more efficient and flexible. Uniform design is

Benefits of integrated automations R Reduces total cost of ownership R

Offers greater flexibility

R

Consistently ensures high quality

R

Helps in products

precise

tracing

of

the most striking feature of this system. All products & systems use uniform tools for engineering, visualisation and communications. F&B manufactures can cut costs and save time over the product lifecycle while drastically minimising the number of interfaces for improved workflow & higher plant availability,” opines Kudtarkar. With the right management systems and intelligent IT solutions, all areas relevant to operations can be integrated to a uniform architecture: from production automation, building management to energy generation, distribution to MES, and up to maintenance & servicing.

Em‘power’ing growth Recent developments in sensors help faster integration of automation systems in the company. Schmidt says,

Holger Schmidt Global Industry Manager F&B, Endress+Hauser Messtechnik GmbH+Co KG

Integrating all parts of a food plant into one system is a basic requirement to ensure the availability of the required raw material, utilities and production & packaging machines. “Improvements in sensor technology lead to more opportunities for measuring inline quality parameters. Thus, we find an intelligent automation system that is actually target-oriented and not recipe or step-controlled.” Energy costs are an increasingly significant factor. Currently, companies like Siemens are offering integrated solutions for power distribution, which can unearth significant potential for cost savings. Schmidt informs, “Fully integrated systems will be the next step in the food industry. Combining the track & trace solutions for the production process with relevant and appropriate data will be followed by integration of energy usage data. The carbon footprint available will be broken down to a single batch. Also, complete documentation will be available in a single database.”

Future perspectives As India readies for a continued consumer boom, the future of F&B industry seems exciting. Efficiency requirements, regulatory obligations and demand for higher profitability will fuel the growth of automation in the F&B industry. With the scale of operations becoming increasingly complex for F&B manufacturers, they are expected to become more conducive to investing in the latest technologies and products to collaborate between various manufacturing & in-house business processes along with network partners.

June 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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MARKET TRENDS Logistics

Cold chain logistics

On a healthy path With food security gaining momentum among the policy makers and government administration, this year’s Budget announcement to focus on cold chain supply for perishable goods is a step in the right direction. The government’s support in this segment indicates that India is now ready for proper management of supply chain of perishable goods through rail, road and air within the country. Rachita Jha reveals some of the changes taking place in this industry… Courtesy: Yeti Refrigeration

I

ndia is counted among the largest producers of food products. Considering this fact, India can easily become the food basket for the world, but only if these products can travel seamlessly from farm-to-fork via the supply chain network. The recent growth trends in the food processing sector, with participation of more private players coupled with improved infrastructure in connectivity, has resulted in faster movement of food and food products. This has also led to the need for integrating cold chain systems into the food supply chain system.

Cold chain: The missing link With the wide range of food and food products offered by the country, it is a challenge to pass on perishable food items from producer to consumer markets. These items usually include fruits, vegetables, milk products and many processed food products & ready-to-eat category items. The changing consumption patterns of the Indian population and the need to make available all major food products throughout the year has prompted the growth of cold chain network in the food logistics industry. It forms an important link in the supply chain of perishable food products. “With food processing in India at only 11 per cent, there is huge scope

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Modern Food Processing | June 2010

in the country. More than 30 per cent of produce worth $ 10.63 billion goes waste due to lack of cold chain facilities. The cold chain industry is estimated at $ 2.12-3.19 billion and is growing at a rate of 20-25 per cent. This is expected to reach $ 8.5 billion by 2015. India, being the second largest producer of fruits & vegetables and largest producer of dairy products, is ready to take a leap towards new global marketing opportunities,” avers Atul Khanna, Director, Global Cold Chain Alliance India. As part of the food industry, a cold chain offers transport, storage, distribution and sale of temperature-sensitive food usually in frozen condition. It includes equipment and its operation so as to maintain the food product in a completely frozen condition at the correct temperature. “In India, cold chains are used primarily for fruits & vegetables, meat & marine products, dairy products, ice creams and confectionery. Nutraceuticals is another major emerging category where cold storage is critical,” informs Sanjay Sethi, Vice President - Supply Chain, Arshiya Supply Chain Management Pvt Ltd.

The need to optimise facilities With India changing its consumption trends in line with the western model of consumerism,


Logistics MARKET TRENDS

the demand for food and food preferences has changed drastically over the years. The increasing income, purchasing power and changing lifestyle has led to the demand for food items throughout the year. “There have been changes in food habits of people who are now going up the value chain and consuming more processed & international products. The primary driver for fresh foods is coming from the consumer that is now demanding year-round availability of food products. Thus, we need to preserve the products from in-season to out-of-season to ensure continuous annual supply of food products,” says Anil Arora, Managing Director, MJ Logistics. To make food available round the year, there is a need for cold chain facilities for farm produce and processed food products. “Few trends are largely driving the demand for cold chain facilities in India. One of them is the emergence of organised retail, where Indian consumers now have the option of selecting milk products, processed foods, fresh vegetable and fruits from the large-sized retail chains. This, combined with the emergence of fast food joints, have increased the demand for cold chain infrastructure in India,” avers Lars Sorensen, Managing Director, Damco – South Asia. Besides the domestic demand, India also has a significant export market that is highly dependent on

Sanjay Sethi Vice President - Supply Chain, Arshiya Supply Chain Management Pvt Ltd

In India, cold chains are used primarily for fruits & vegetables, meat and marine products, dairy products, ice creams and confectionery. Nutraceuticals is another major emerging category where cold storage is critical.

temperature-controlled environment. “The current state of food supply chain in India is sub-optimal. It is estimated that 25 per cent of food and vegetables go waste owing to lack of cold chain infrastructure in India. This hampers the growth potential of the country in export markets for numerous commodities such as bananas in which India is the leading producer. In a domestic distribution scenario for food products, the Indian cold chain infrastructure is not sufficiently equipped to support the exponential growth that the country will witness in the consumption of products that require refrigerated transport and storage,” adds Sorensen.

India’s cold chain warehouses are largely standalone facilities with poor infrastructure compared with the western markets and other developed markets. Business potential The food supply chain is complex, which includes perishable goods and numerous small stakeholders. In India, the infrastructure connecting these partners is weak. Moreover, the cold chain in food logistics is now evolving gradually, according to the specific needs of the industry, export opportunities and viability. India’s cold chain warehouses are largely standalone facilities with poor infrastructure compared with the western markets and other developed markets. Currently, few options are available for refrigerated transport and storage in the country. Moreover, the onset of a robust cold chain system in India has been slow because of the fragmented supply chain network in the food sector and absence of a planned post-harvest storage & transportation

Atul Khanna Director, Global Cold Chain Alliance India

The cold chain industry is expected to reach $ 8.5 billion by 2015. India, being the second largest producer of fruits & vegetables and largest producer of dairy products, is ready to take a leap towards new global marketing opportunities. of food products at the farm gate level. Elaborating on the current losses incurred by the industry due to lack of such facilities, Sethi says, “Against a requirement of more than 31 million cold storage units, India has over 5,101 cold storage units with a cumulative capacity of nearly 21.7 million tonnes, leading to a loss of about 40 per cent of the agri-produce post-harvest.”

Latest technologies Integrity of the cold chain is the most critical model in perishable food distribution. It refers to a continuous constant-temperature supply chain through which temperature-sensitive perishable goods are transported from processors and manufacturers to retail fridges. Some of the leading technologies for cold chain logistics in India include wireless, sensor and internet technologies, radio-frequency identification devices (RFID), bidirectional smart container, GPS, data loggers, insulated shippers, pre-cooling – vacuum storage, refrigerated doors, etc. “For most domestic perishables, pre-cooling is a method in which temperature of the products at which they are picked, produced or processed is rapidly decreased to the temperature appropriate for storage and transport. The modern cooling systems in this field are advanced enough to keep huge perishable loads fresh almost indefinitely,” says R Kannan, CEO, Snowman India.

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MARKET TRENDS Logistics

Anil Arora Managing Director, MJ Logistics

The primary driver for fresh foods is coming from the consumer that is now demanding yearround availability of food products. Thus, we need to preserve the products from in-season to out-of-season to ensure continuous annual supply of food products. The use of mobile pre-coolers in the fields and farms, especially for exports and high-value products and commodities is an upcoming trend along with the use of multitemperature vehicles for perishable food products. Traceability is also gaining importance due to various reasons. The primary one being food safety & ability to identify food source and as a result facilitate rapid recall in case of food contamination. On the use of RFID technology for perishable goods, Pankaj Shukla, Director - RFID Business Development, Motorola Enterprise Mobility Solutions, says, “In the US alone, despite better transportation and logistics capabilities, over 56 per cent of perishables go waste because they are not delivered to grocers under optimal condition or in saleable window. RFID coupled with temperature-sensing capability will allow food industry to not only track shipments but also conditions in which the food is transported.” This enables users to predict the remaining shelflife of the product and provide timely information to aid real-time business decisions on operational actions to effectively manage these stocks.

Exports scenario The Indian logistics infrastructure also needs to improve to support the

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growth in the export of food products from India. Today, the country exports significant quantity of commodities like seafood, meat, mangoes, bananas & grapes. Also, trading of such commodities requires a cold chain infrastructure encompassing storage and transportation across large geographical areas & modes. Besides considerable technological innovation and implementation of cutting-edge farming processes at the production end, the logistics infrastructural support is the key in driving the export of food products from India. “Indian farming and production technologies are still in the developmental stage, barring a few players who have the latest technology, compared with the developed markets.

Dairy 4%

Others 12%

Bananas 24%

Meat/ Poultry 18%

Citrus 9% Seafood 21%

Deciduous 12% Source: SCS Group

Figure 1: Segment-wise categorisation of reefer market

This means that the Indian products have a lower shelf-life than those from other markets across the world that have adopted latest technological methods at the production and packing stage,” says Sorenson. These technologies include precooling facilities, cold storages, refrigerated transport, refrigeration facilities at the port and capacity to handle refrigerated ocean carriers & airplanes along with port facilities. He further adds, “Transportation of refrigerated cargo meant for export can improve by leaps and bounds if we can develop a network of rail, road, short-sea infrastructure to be used for transportation of refrigerated cargo from production centres to gateway ports.”

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

‘Last mile’ refrigeration The last mile logistics is critical for maintaining the temperature of perishable cargo, which is important for commodities like essential food products transported through the cold chain. Although the ‘last mile’ of a company’s supply chain is the final & critical link between the company and its customers, it has historically been a neglected segment of a corporation’s supply chain strategy. At the last mile, merchandise is delivered from regional distribution centres to local branches or directly to end customers. While most companies have optimised their supply chains up to the store front, a surprisingly few have focussed on last mile deliveries. This is changing in food industry, especially for perishable foods. “On average, 28 per cent of transportation costs are incurred in the last mile, according to the Council of Logistics Management, which greatly impacts the net profit of a company. Though a host of new technologies and services have come up in the last 10 years, promising to streamline the supply chains of companies, only a few have specifically addressed the last mile,” informs Kannan. The last mile refrigerated transportation ensures that perishable products are safe and of a good quality at the point of consumption. Cold chain facilities that can handle diverse cargo

Lars Sorensen Managing Director, Damco – South Asia

In a domestic distribution scenario for food products, the Indian cold chain infrastructure is not sufficiently equipped to support the exponential growth that the country will witness in the consumption of products that require refrigerated transport and storage.


Logistics MARKET TRENDS

and are well-connected & integrated to a transport network via road, rails & short-sea until the last mile, remain a much desired facility for the cold chain industry. “We also need to have better last mile logistics facilities that involve road transport in refrigerated trucks. Currently, the capacity of such trucks on a national level is a challenge,” opines Sorenson. A failure in keeping products at appropriate temperatures can result in introduction of various negative attributes including textural degradation, discolouration, bruising and microbial growth. “If the farmer community processes the food at the farm gate level, it will provide a great upswing for the food processing industry to leverage on the agricultural produce and supply chain network in India,” says Arora.

Hurdles on the way The integrated cold chain logistics in India is not sufficient. A fragmented network of suppliers provide cold chain infrastructure at various stages of the cold supply chain. “There are only a few players who can offer a national network of cold chain warehouses, eg, refrigerated trucks. Again, there are only a few players who can offer a nation-wide network of refrigerated trucking options. Further, other infrastructural challenges in port facilities, roads and rail network also hamper the

R Kannan CEO, Snowman India

Though a host of new technologies and services have come up in the last 10 years, promising to streamline the supply chains of companies, only a few have specifically addressed the last mile.

movement of refrigerated cargo in India,” says Sorenson. Also, with cold chain demanding high cost, introducing cold chain logistics in food supply chain becomes challenging due to the capitalintensive nature of the industry. He adds, “Land, modern technology & other cold chain investments require considerable amounts of capital, and these investments tend to have a longer repayment period. Hence, only a few players are able to invest in this sector. Moreover, the government is currently supporting the cold chain industry through various subsidies & tax benefits for investors in this industry, and hence we should see an improved investment environment for this key industry.”

On time delivery, good network across India, more improved & modern logistics will define the future of cold chain for food logistics in India. The government has been proactive in supporting cold chain logistics in India. “The Vision 2015 paper has clearly focussed on the need to adopt a strategy, whereby cold storage facilities are provided collectively to production centres as ‘Cold Storage Centres’ with potential strengths for storage of primary and processed agricultural products during most parts of the year,” says Sethi. Besides the government initiatives, the current situation demands increased investments in cold chain infrastructure, post-harvest technologies and installation of food processing plants for food supply chain. “More co-ordinated efforts are needed from the farmers at the farm-gate level, from retailers at the front-end level and from the logistics services providers to ensure fast & safe routes of transport of perishable goods,” opines Arora.

Pankaj Shukla Director - RFID Business Development, Motorola Enterprise Mobility Solutions

RFID coupled with temperature sensing capability will allow food industry to not only track shipments but also conditions in which the food is transported. Future plans On time delivery, appropriate storage temperature, good network across India for supplying of goods, more improved & modern logistics will define the future of cold chain for food logistics in India. “The value for reefer transportation in India is worth $ 250 million including both organised and unorganised sector. It includes about 250 reefer transport operators involved in the business of transportation of perishable products. It is estimated that 25,000 vehicles are involved in the business of perishable products transportation,” says Khanna. Thus, there is a growing need to further expand this fleet of refrigerated transportation in order to provide quality food products throughout the country the year round. “Besides, a much wider and better network of cold chain facilities is needed in India with appropriate technology at the production stage to ensure a longer shelf-life of the produce. Moreover, the next crucial step would be appropriate packaging and handling of the cargo,” opines Sorenson. Cold chain is an important link demanding immediate attention to boost the food supply and catch pace with the consumption demands for domestic & export markets. With more private players and technology upgradations entering the overall supply chain, the processed food industry is definitely making a headway to the growth highway.

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MARKET TRENDS Tracking Solutions

Traceability technology

Keeping ‘track’ of the food supply chain Some of the major concerns in front of producers, processors, retailers and consumers of food are microbial and chemical contamination of food products throughout the supply chain. Traceability technologies can address this concern by tracking the flow of products along the food supply chain. Tracking food ingredients ensures that adequate safety & quality standards are maintained as well as quick & efficient response is offered if something goes wrong. Courtesy: Zebra Technologies

Andrew Tay

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ood traceability has undergone considerable evolution since the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act of 1930 (PACA) came into effect in the US. According to the Act, the industry was required to provide a documented account of transactions between buyers and sellers. Today, several influences are making track & trace issues relevant to businesses and consumers alike. These influences include the 35th anniversary of the bar code (a key component in traceability solutions); introduction of the GS1 DataBar, which contains serial numbers, lot numbers and expiration dates; and the Senate taking on the Food Safety Enhancement Act of 2009, which has specific traceability provisions.

Defining food traceability A mechanism for tracking the flow of food products from their point of origin until the end consumers, along the food supply chain, is termed as a food traceability system. Information is recorded and retained with the

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help of a variety of tools, at each stage of the production cycle; however, by ensuring their integration and compatibility, information is rapidly retrieved when required. Information technology (IT) plays a central role in food production systems. A typical computerised tracking system offers a common ‘language’ platform for businesses along the supply chain to capture essential product information and history. Track & trace capability across the food value chain can be a useful tool for faster identification of sources or destinations of contaminations or defective ingredients, thus resulting in rapid and organised response as well as maximising consumer protection & minimising the costs incurred. Besides ensuring that a product is safe & contaminant-free, an efficient & effective traceability system can help monitor & maintain food quality and, in some cases, also improve it. Traceability does not prevent an accident from happening but diminishes the impact after the accident has occurred.


Tracking Solutions MARKET TRENDS

Current scenario Even though the Food Safety Enhancement Act calls for stringent traceability regulations, which may include unique identifiers and complete electronic pedigrees, easy-to-implement bar coding technologies offer an important first step, as growers begin to refine and update their methods of record keeping. Recently, a study by Health & Human Services reported that 59 per cent of the North American food facilities surveyed did not meet the requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) about maintaining records of their sources, recipients & transporters. This lengthens the time taken for the USFDA to trace the origins of food-borne illnesses. With more label & scan points through a food growers’ operation and shipping, products can be more easily traced throughout their lifespan. This provides additional protection in case of a food-borne illness, allowing growers to quickly review their records & determine whether the defective product was from any of their farms and then quickly alert their partners. This can save many lives in case a severe food-borne illness outbreak occurs and also save time, money and reputation of a business. Using the precise traceability solution can achieve better inventory control, faster processing and faster turnover rate on products having rigid freshness windows, which is important for consumers and businesses alike.

Labeled boxes Courtesy: Zebra Technologies

A case study Buona Foods, Landenberg, the US, is a packer & shipper of fresh white, brown & exotic mushroom varieties for retail and wholesale/bulk sales under the Buona & private label brands. Buona has incorporated PTI case labeling into its packaging line with minimal disruption to the current process. In order to accomplish this objective, Buona used Zebra’s mobile hand-held printers driven by TraceGains’s CaseTrace PTI software application. The Zebra Model QL420 communicates with the TraceGains system via Bluetooth wireless communications. The portability of the QL420 provides the packaging line team the mobility necessary to apply labels rapidly as they pack each mushroom package into cases and then onto pallets without making any change in the process. Also, Buona’s HAACP protocol requires sanitary washdown of the packaging room after each production run. The ruggedness and portability of model QL420 makes it convenient to use. Zebra Technologies works closely with its partner, TraceGains Inc, to combine barcode technology with the latest software programs designed to help streamline compliance requirements such as the PTI, harvest data collected in the field, and to validate the pack-out process.

Tracking the product The Produce Traceability Initiative (PTI) is the focus of the industry on implementing a common protocol for labeling all products at the case level for purposes of retracing along the supply chain from retailer to farm. As a result, growers, packers and shippers of fresh produce are responsible for labeling of each case of product they pack. With the appropriate scanning & labeling systems implemented, companies have the potential of realising return on investment (ROI) of the day after implementation, which can range from cost-savings to reduced labour time and gain of other efficiencies. A case study by TraceGains cites a customer who realised a

full ROI after six weeks, and yearover-year (Y-O-Y) revenue growth of 83 per cent, because retail customers felt more secure in purchasing goods from that customer. With disruptions occurring daily in the supply chain, shipment tracking, granular traceability, advanced business intelligence & easy interoperation with other software systems is a critical component to safeguarding products & companies’ bottom line and, ultimately, protecting the integrity & reputation of a brand.

Initiating traceability For growers who are looking to adopt traceability technologies, some tips are enumerated to help assess

Work in progress in the field Courtesy: Zebra Technologies

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MARKET TRENDS Tracking Solutions

their technology needs and help in complying with PTI standards. Understand the objectives: There is a need to ensure whether one simply wants to provide the pedigree information to regulatory agencies and customers or to improve the company’s reputation, speed of delivery to customers, and increased efficiencies in the supply chain. A clear idea of the objective will guide the extent of technology investment of the producer. Establish mobility requirements: It should be clear whether access to software systems is required in the field, or is officelevel access sufficient. The appropriate technology applied at an appropriate time can save cost as well as time. The product to be labeled also needs to be identified, eg, whether they are individual products like produce, cartons/cases or pallets. It is better to start with the lowest level that is financially feasible, such as cartons or cases. Assessing the product to be labeled: There is also a need to understand whether these are preprinted in the office and then carried to the field. Or a mobile printer can be carried to the field and labels printed on demand. After determining this, it will be easier to decide whether a stationary or mobile printer is needed. Evaluating label needs: The demands placed on the label to

determine the best type also needs to be clear. For example, the environment in which the label will be, whether it needs to be weather resistant or temperature resistant, surface on which the label will be placed on - like directly on food, on cardboard boxes or on cellophane wrap. Register for Global Trade Item Number (GTIN): A GTIN is a 14digit number that helps in case-level identification of the manufacturer for supply chain traceability. These numbers are required by the PTI and, by 2012, the GTIN must be read and stored by every inbound and outbound shipment.

Today, the benefit of implementing track and trace technologies in the supply chain has become invaluable. Review: It is important to review the capability of the current inventory management and financial software systems. The traceability software should subsequently be evaluated that can be easily integrated with the legacy systems of the growers.

Field-to-fork ROI

Today, the benefit of implementing track and trace technologies in the supply chain has become invaluable. Food producers, processor and distributors should not wait for the pending legislation to be signed into law to implement a traceability solution. Many organisations have already initiated traceability throughout the food supply chain and have started to see the return on their Preparing labels for tracking Courtesy: Zebra Technologies investments through

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product recall cost reductions, improved product rotations, labour cost reductions & improved brand reputation.

Moving ahead Studies on genetically modified plants have shown that traceability can play a role in increasing public confidence in biotechnology, and similarly help alleviate concerns regarding development of animal biotechnology. For example, DNA technology can overcome certain difficulties by tracing animals and animal byproducts through their DNA code. This offers the possibility of tracing some animal by-products through the supply chain back to source animals. Developments in both DNA sampling and analysis technology are applying DNA traceability on a large scale, making it increasingly cost-effective and feasible, and likely leading to a broader uptake of DNA traceability concepts. Under the food traceability legislation, implemented in 2005 in the US, which made food traceability through the supply chain a legal responsibility, food producers must be able to identify products by batch, lot or consignment numbers and the product must be traceable at all stages of the production, processing & distribution cycle. Furthermore, the primary reason for food processors to establish a traceability programme should be food safety. For consumers in Asia, increased diligence and traceability can prove beneficial as it enhances safety & quality assurance of products. Andrew Tay is President - APAC, Zebra Technologies Corp and is responsible for market exploration and company management in the APAC market. Before joining Zebra, he worked with Symbol Technologies Inc and Cisco-Linksys Asia. For details, contact Janice Hon at email: jhon@zebra.com


INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

Marine products market

Rising with the growth wave Worldwide demand for Indian marine products is increasing and hence, there is huge potential to gain a larger marketshare in the global trade. But, recent incidences on quality compromise have put this sector under the EU scanner. Amendments in regulatory norms and infrastructure are needed to increase the quantity & quality of marine products in the long term. Also, the Indian Government should take initiatives to boost the marine industry to enhance growth in the international business arena. Courtesy: Aqua Alliance Group

Shushmul Maheshwari

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ith its long coastline and numerous water reservoirs that nourish the immense flora & fauna, India has a distinct advantage over its global competitors in the marine sector. The Indian fisheries & aquaculture industry includes fresh water fisheries and marine industry, and presently accounts for about 1.5 per cent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). While fresh water fisheries include mostly fresh-water inland fish capture that go into domestic consumption, the marine 13 %

industry comprises marine fisheries capture and marine aquaculture. Most of the marine catch comprises oil sardines, followed by penaeid and nonpenaeid shrimp, Indian mackerel, Bombay duck, croakers, etc. The government has initiated some remarkable developments in this sector, which directly employs more than 1.5 million fishermen. The marine aquaculture includes algaculture, fish farming, shrimp farming, oyster farming and pearl & ornamental fish culture. The sector has shown considerable growth as a result of high global demand for marine products. With

11 %

25 %

15 % 9%

5% 6%

Sardines

10 % Shrimps

Bombay Duck

Croackers

Others

EU Source: RNCOS

Figure 1: Share of major products in marine fish capture (FY 2009)

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24 %

7%

60 %

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

USA

China

15 % South East Asia

Middle East

Others

Japan Source: MPEDA

Figure 2: Major marine products export by countries in per cent (FY 2009)


INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

increasing income levels and rapid urbanisation, per capita consumption of marine food products has increased significantly. This increase in per capita consumption and population growth has inflated the demand for marine products. New commodities like cultured freshwater pearls, ornamental fish, protein-rich algae and bio-fertilisers also contribute to the diversification of the sector and are potential high income earners. The presence of strong fundamental requirements in the country, eg, vast availability of pollution-free water and 8,100 km long coastline makes the future of the marine fish industry seem promising. Further, the abundance of brackish water resources, 8.5 million hectare area for sea farming, immense manpower resources and world-class processing plants create viable business opportunities in the country.

Besides, other states have started initiatives to boost their marine production and trade. For instance, Tamil Nadu has planned to set up a Marine Biotech Centre at an outlay of Rs 2 billion. Karnataka has also begun to seriously consider developing its marine & aquaculture industry and planned to set up 50 retail fish outlets by 2012.

Marine merchandise

Courtesy: Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research

Export plays a prominent role in the Indian marine industry because it is viewed as a source of economic growth and foreign exchange. The total exports of marine products in FY 2009 surged to Rs 86.1 billion compared with Rs 76.2 billion in FY 2008. Frozen shrimp has consistently remained the single largest exported item in terms of value, accounting for about 44 per cent in the total export earnings during FY 2009, followed by frozen fish, cuttle fish and squid.

Union (EU) remained the largest market and destination for imported marine products worth Rs 28 billion in FY 2009. An important feature of the export trend was an increase in export to China during FY 2009, which emerged as the second largest buyer, importing products worth Rs 13 billion. Japan and Southeast Asian countries have also emerged as potential export destinations for Indian marine products. The main factors that have helped in achieving the positive growth in export are appropriate policies & interventions by the Union Government and Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) as well as a proactive role played by the industry. The global consumption of marine products has been soaring in the backdrop of spreading awareness among people about nutritional benefits of eating fish. This has further spurred the marine export from India.

Marine fish capture The marine fish capture has rapidly progressed in the past few decades. With tremendous increase in production levels and upgradation of production methods, the industry has now begun modernising its techniques. All these factors have boosted the marine fish production, which grew at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of over 2 per cent between FY 2005 and FY 2009 to more than 3 million tonne in FY 2009. Gujarat ranks first among the regional players in marine fish production. The state boasts of 1,600 km coastline, accounting for about 23 per cent of the total marine fish production. It has about 60 fish freezing plants with the total capacity of 2,881 tonne. The processing and freezing facilities infrastructure are now undergoing modernisation so as to initiate development and production. Other states including Kerala and Maharashtra have also shown remarkable industry developments in recent years and account for 20 and 14 per cent share, respectively, in marine fish production.

The global consumption of marine products has been soaring in the backdrop of spreading awareness among people about nutritional benefits of eating fish. Gujarat has been one of the leading exporters of squid and cuttle fish, exporting approximately 1,88,000 tonne of marine products worth Rs 12.65 billion in FY 2009. Other states including Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Orissa and West Bengal also predominantly export farmed shrimp & other marine products. Geographically, seafood is exported from 17 ports spread across the Western and Eastern coastal regions of the country. Due to the spurt in the demand for marine products, the government has taken steps to develop the ports infrastructure. Of the major export destinations for marine products in India, the European

Government initiatives With consumers increasingly becoming aware of the food they consume, quality is also becoming a key issue and a unique selling proposition. To follow the same, the Indian marine industry also abides by the norms of the global quality standards. However, after finding defects in the residue monitoring and testing methodology used in India, the EU has decided to thoroughly examine 20 per cent of Indian aquaculture exports to the region. This decision may adversely affect the exports to the EU.

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INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

Courtesy: Baby Marine Group

Thus, to counter this, the government has introduced field-level testing of scampi at the production level in all major aquaculture states. For further promoting the production of export-oriented marine aquaculture, the MPEDA has implemented several technical and financial assistance programmes. It has also taken measures for increasing production in aquaculture such as geographic mapping system (GIS) in farm census & traceability, cage farming and assistance for scampi development in Kerala. The government had spent about Rs 495.6 million for the development of marine fisheries, infrastructure and post-harvest in FY 2009. Various state governments are also being urged to allocate more land for aquaculture enterprises due to tremendous employment opportunities. The government is looking at creating 50,500, 27,500 & 20,350 hectare of land in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Orissa, respectively, for aquaculture. This initiative is expected to generate at least five million additional job opportunities besides increased export earnings. The Union Government has presently conducted surveys of wastelands in various states where coastal aquaculture could be started for enhancing marine trade.

Roadblocks & overcoming them India has demonstrated remarkable developments in the marine industry on all fronts, including production and

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exports. The country has become one of the world’s leading exporters of marine products. But, some roadblocks still exist, which can severely affect the growth of the industry. Although enriched with vast natural resources and numerous species with mariculture potential, sea farming has not achieved the well-established level in India due to lack of a policy on the usage of open water bodies. The requisite technology for breeding and culture of marine species & products is yet to be standardised on a commercial scale. Coastal aquaculture enterprises are primarily operated by small and marginal farmers. The organised sector is not keen on financing aquaculture projects. About 80 per cent of India’s marine food processing capacity remains unused. There is a lack of training to available human resources for meeting the desired standards of knowledge and technical capability. Further, there is an absence of a market-driven strategy with regard to the emerging exports market and products. The quality of packaging has not been satisfactory, thus negatively affecting the promotion of exports at the international level. To some extent, the government has tried to support the industry with some corrective measures, including mandatory quality testing for exports. However, the country still has much to do in order to sustain and improve the attractiveness & profitability of its marine industry. Certain corrective measures have also been identified, which, if implemented, can potentially improve the overall industry outlook. First, the industry should concentrate on diversifying marine products according to the international market demand. Mergers of the small business fisheries units can eliminate the weaknesses of the facilities for value addition and allow for larger inflow of capital, professional procurement discipline, reduced administrative expenses and increase in marketshare.

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

The government should focus on promoting potential brackish water aquaculture in Maharashtra, Gujarat and Orissa, which has immense potential for marine products and aquaculture. The country should also target outsourcing and reprocessing of marine products.

The road ahead It is anticipated that the Indian marine industry will gain dynamic momentum and achieve global leadership in the coming years. Also, the marine fisheries production is projected to reach about 3.5 million tonne by 2013. The sector is set to witness technological improvements on the fronts of production and quality in order to meet the growing domestic and international demand. Further, the prospective growth will be achieved by maximising contribution of the marine aquaculture sector. Moreover, strong demands for marine finfish and off-shore fish farming will offer new vistas for Indian aquaculture to witness a significant growth. Ornamental fish export to the EU will also be supported by high demand. The growth in the marine industry will also be spurred by the progresses made in research on marine products due to their medicinal properties. Further, the demand for organic cosmetics products will provide an upthrust to the development of the marine products in the country. Shushmul Maheshwari is the Chief Executive of RNCOS E-Services Pvt ltd, a market research & information analysis company with global presence. He has spent more than 15 years working in the senior management teams of both Indian and multinational companies. He has gained expertise in research & analysis field and actively participated in various national and international conferences and discussions organised by business and trade-related associations. Email: shushmul@rncos.com


An invite that rewards as well...

Dear Reader, ‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 3000 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 200 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will receive a complimentary copy of that particular issue and an honorarium cheque. Published by Infomedia 18 Limited , ‘Modern Food Processing’ is the leading monthly magazine exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the food processing industry. Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Media Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country), it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

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FOOD SAFETY

Safety during packaging

Play it safe

Courtesy: Kushtush Organics Eco Sleep Shop

Since past few years, consumer awareness of food safety and hygiene has gained importance. While proper packaging of food products ensures food quality, protection of food against chemical & physical damage, enhanced shelf-life, etc, manufacture of packaging material using appropriate raw material is critical with regard to security, safety & health of the end consumer.

Subhash Vaidya

T

he term food safety is associated with the food-borne hazards that may occur at the time of consumption. These hazards can occur at any stage of food chain in the entire organisational set up, from primary producers or harvesting to transport, processing, storage, distribution and consumption of food at the consumer end. These can also occur in some inter-related steps in the food chain such as manufacture of equipment, packing material, cleaning agents, additives and ingredients. The concept of hygienic quality and food safety has been rapidly gaining prominence in the past few years, with manifold increase in consumer awareness. A prevention system for food hazards, called Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) or ISO 22000 Food Safety Management System, addresses the associated chemical, physical and biological risks. Some factors causing a hazard situation in the food industry are contaminants like pathogenic organism, physical object, chemicals, raw materials, packaging material, process system, inadequate instructions for use to the consumers and storage conditions.

Guideline for food safety in packaging changes in lifestyles of people are swift and supported by increase in the income levels

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of middle class families, urbanisation & advertisement of different food products & articles through television media. These changes enable rapid advances in food technology, processing & packaging, techniques, etc, to ensure the safety of food supplied and make food preparation & distribution convenient for people. Despite these advances, food supply can become contaminated due to natural occurrences, accidental induction of contaminants or malpractices.

Role of packaging Packaging is an essential medium for preserving food quality, taste and reducing food wastage. It serves to protect the contents against chemical & physical damages while providing information to consumers. It also helps protect the form, shape and texture of food, prevents contamination by microorganisms, pests, etc. The choice of packaging material should not affect the nutritional quality of the product. Packaging also provides an excellent medium to provide product information such as product details, ingredients and nutritional facts.

Hazard analysis for packaging process HACCP is the recognised method for conducting a food safety hazard analysis. Recently, there has been an increasing trend for adopting the HACCP system mainly because of the increase


FOOD SAFETY

in reported cases of food-borne illness. Since the introduction of food safety acts & standards in different countries, carrying out a hazards analysis has become mandatory. Though there are no legal requirements for food packaging manufacturers to conduct a hazards analysis, it has recently become a strong customer requirement and the acceptance of formal HACCP is now an explicit requirement for the British Retailers Consortium (BRC).

Approach to HACCP principles The standard approach to HACCP is that specified by the Codex Alimentarius System 1997, which follows seven basic principles, given as follows: conduct a hazard analysis, determine Critical Control Points (CCPs), establish critical limits, create a system to monitor CCP control, establish the corrective action to be taken, establish procedure for verification to confirm that the HACCP system is under control and document all relevent procedures & records for these principles & their application.

the standard. The HACCP study also provides a greater understanding of the process, demonstrating coverage of all risks and hygiene.

BRC standards The BRC has developed global standard for the food packaging industry. The standard assists packaging manufacturers & converters to follow GMP and supporting management systems for developing & manufacturing safe packaging materials to ensure compliance to the highest level of quality requirements of customers. The packaging industry is broadly categorised into sectors based on product/technologies used, eg, glass, paper & board, metal cans, plastic & wood and other materials. The BRC standard is applicable to manufacturers producing packaging materials for food and consumer products.

Benefits of safety system in food packaging R

Facts of safety in food packaging

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Generally, the pattern of CCPs as encountered in food industries is not similar to that observed in the packaging industry. Most hazards identified in a food packaging operation are generic in nature and may occur at any stage of processing, eg, blade, glass, pests, poor personal hygiene, etc. Such hazards can be controlled by applying procedures commonly known as prerequisite programmes, eg, the standard operating procedures and basic environmental conditions are necessary for safe packaging. These procedures can be found in any comprehensive food packaging Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) or Good Hygiene Practice (GHP) system. The HACCP study does not identify any additional required control measures, but the practice of carrying out a hazards study may identify improvements or exemption against specific clauses of

R R R R

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Provides a preventive approach to food packaging safety Helps to identify the process improvements Reduces the likelihood of product recall & adverse publicity Enhances customer satisfaction Provides evidence of due diligence Facilitates better understanding of food packaging safety issue throughout the organisation Helps to maintain compliance of global standard in food packaging

The standard recognises three levels of hygiene risk based on the end use of packaging material; for instance, direct food contact comes under the highest level 1. Requirements of the standards are itemised separately according to the levels. Following chapters in the BRC standard are applicable to all levels of food safety. Top management commitment and improvement: This chapter explains full commitment of the top management to application of the standard.

Courtesy: Alison Eats Blog

Hazards & risk management system: It outlines the principles of the internationally recognised Codex Alimentarius System. Technical management system: It lists the requirements for technical management of product quality and quality & hygiene practices, based on principles of ISO 9000, ie, product specification, supplier monitoring, traceability & management of incidents and product recall. Site standards: It illustrates expectations for the production environment including the layout & maintenance of building & equipment, cleaning, pest control and waste management. Product and process control: This chapter describes requirement of product design & development stage, process control and product inspection & testing, as well as management of foreign bodies & chemical controls. Personnel: It details requirements for recruiting competent hall, training, expectation on protective clothing and personal hygiene.

Reasons for adopting standards Companies are often clueless about how to approach for certification, often a demanding process. For certification, over 300 clauses need to be satisfied along with general concerns like how to correct non-conformities within specific deadlines. Even when their operations are satisfactory, many suppliers find themselves ill prepared for the audit and do not perform well enough. The BRC standard is used throughout the food industry in the UK, Europe &

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FOOD SAFETY

beyond, and has become a benchmark for best practice. It enables companies to ensure they follow correct systems and present themselves in the best possible light during auditing. If products of a manufacturer or supplier of packaging material are used in branded food product, then this global standard should be adopted because the quality requirements differ based on the risk the products present to the food. Moreover, the supplier may apply for exemptions from certain clauses of the standard if identified and confirmed through the hazards analysis.

be convinced about the standard and benefits that can be obtained by using this system, eg, less customer complaints, increased productivity. From this group, members for the hazard analysis team should be selected. Carry out hazard analysis: Hazard analysis Courtesy: Ciba should be carried out by using HACCP. This methodology also provides a useful framework for conducting a hazards analysis in food packaging. Create confidence in all employees: To ensure full commitment and effectiveness of the hygiene & quality management systems, it is necessary to take into confidence the employees. They should understand at least the basic requirements of the standards and should know their

Recently, there has also been an increase in adopting new techniques for collecting, cleaning and reusing food packages.

Implementing procedures Achieving the global standard in packaging as mentioned earlier is possible but difficult, and it will depend on the technical and management systems followed by manufacturers. Gap analysis: Manufacturers should carry out gap analysis of their current technical system against the requirement of global standard for packaging. Further, they should determine the procedure needed to write and amend, access upgradation of facilities & services as well as obtain the draft proposal including cost, time & human resource. Discuss with top management: The proposal should be explained to a senior management personnel regarding the need for achieving the standards. Training to Managers & Supervisors: These personnel should

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responsibilities. The front line staff will be expected to put into practice the procedure & control methods and then they can make headway in the system. Develop & establish a system: The manufacturer needs to develop and properly install a system to carry out these procedures. Auditing of procedures: The procedures may seem good in the manual, but often they do not reflect the occurrences in practise. New procedures should be frequently audited until they become a standard practice. After a procedure becomes standard practice, the audit frequency may be decreased. Evaluation of systems: To evaluate the systems according to the standard,

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

an authorised certification body should conduct the initial evaluation and suggest the company to discontinue all non-compliances. After the final audit, they will recommend the company for certification. Product labeling and traceability: Pre-packaged foodstuff must comply with compulsory harmonised standards on labeling and advertising. The details mandatory to appear on packaging include the trade name, a list of ingredients and qualities, potential allergies, minimum durability date and storage condition. Many countries require that nutritional information be mentioned on the package, which must be implemented into the quality system of packaging manufacturers or certified separately by ISO 22000, EN 155933, BRC global standard for packaging materials or equivalent standards.

On a concluding note With new packaging materials coming up in the market, there is a need to take into account the end consumer, cost-effectiveness and safety from all hazards. Reusing and recycling of food packaging is important for the packaging industry. Recently, there has also been an increase in adopting new techniques for collecting, cleaning and reusing food packages. By manufacturing products that meet packaging legislation, consumer demand and safety of food, it can be expected that packaging is now designed to meet market criteria with respect to performance & cost, manufactured using clean production technology and following best practices, made from suitable material, which will ultimately address security, safety & health issues for the entire consumer market. Subhash Vaidya is a Senior Consultant for food, HACCP & ISO 22000 food safety management system. He is also a Consultant for the dairy industry. Email: dairytech@rediffmail.com


SMART LOGISTICS

Sustainable supply chain

Giving a competitive edge Increased growth and developments have had significant effects on the environment, thus depleting natural resources and raw materials. These complications give way to sustainability, which demands the maintenance of healthy environment and responsible usage of natural resources thus creating value & wealth while pursuing growth opportunities. Hence, companies need to take into account the factors that are critical for sustainable business. Courtesy: Agrana Beteiligungs AG

Abhijit Upadhye

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n October 2005, Scott Lee, President & CEO, Wal-Mart, publicly announced that his company was aspiring to achieve the following three goals ‘to be supplied 100 per cent by renewable energy, to create zero waste and to sell products that sustain our resources and environment’. When the world’s largest company makes a claim of this magnitude, everyone takes notice. This task cannot be achieved by itself, but needs commitment from internal and external stakeholders, including suppliers and nonprofit organisations.

What is sustainability? Sustainability is described in a variety of contexts by Wikipedia. The first is ecological context, in which sustainability is defined as the ability of an ecosystem to maintain ecological processes, functions, biodiversity and productivity in the future. Second, in a social context, sustainability is expressed as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Finally, in an economic context, a business is sustainable

if it has adapted its practices for the use of renewable resources and is accountable for the environmental impacts of its activities. We live in the era of unprecedented dynamic times and exponential growth. The impact of the increased commerce and growth on the environment is significant, resulting in depletion of world’s resources and making raw materials more scarce and rather expensive. Given this situation, similar to Wal-Mart, companies should start focussing on developing a ‘sustainable supply chain’ – one that is robust enough to support itself and actually improve the environment. According to a leading research firm, reducing, reusing and recycling are becoming the three Rs of supply chain management.

Sustainability in the food supply chain In 2008, food supply chain accounted for 20 per cent of the total global energy expenditure. Moreover, it is highly dependent on fossil fuels and, on an average, three times more energy is put into food than that actually produced. In the European Union (EU), 25 per cent of all highway transport is because of food and has an average per capita water use of 3,500 ltr/day, while

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SMART LOGISTICS

1.5 billion people in the world still do not have access to safe drinking water. Given these facts, it is important for companies in the food value chain to be concerned about the source of their food and the production process. The UK Sustainable Development Commission has combined many different views of stakeholders to produce an internationally applicable description of ‘sustainable food supply chains’ as those meeting the following criteria: R Produce safe, healthy products in response to market demands and ensure that all consumers have access to nutritious food & accurate information on food products R Support the viability & diversity of rural and urban economies & communities R Enable viable livelihoods to be made from sustainable land management, both through the market and payments for public benefits R Respect and operate within the biological limits of natural resources (especially soil, water & biodiversity) R Achieve consistently high standards of environmental performance by reducing energy consumption, minimising resource inputs and using renewable energy wherever possible R Ensure a safe & hygienic working environment and high social welfare and training for all employees involved in the food chain R Achieve consistently high standards of animal health and welfare R Sustain the resource available for growing food and supplying other public benefits over time, except where alternative uses of land are essential to meet other needs of society Inferring from the list, it is not possible for a company to single-handedly bring into effect all the above-mentioned points. Support from farmers, retailers, non-profit organisations, food processors and government is critical in order to achieve the vision of a sustainable supply for any organisation.

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Work done by leading food companies Sustainability has become a priority for businesses across the globe. In the past decade, several companies have been taking measures to make their supply chain more sustainable. Described here are some examples of the work being done by a few food companies. McDonald’s: Fish is a key ingredient in the McDonald’s menu and given the increasing economic & environmental pressure on fisheries, McDonald’s thought it necessary to source this important resource in a sustainable manner. In 2001, it began working with Conservation International to develop Sustainable Fisheries Guidelines in order to help its suppliers monitor the status of the fisheries supplying the McDonald’s System. The guidelines & standards developed were consistent with the US

It is important for companies in the food value chain to be concerned about the source of their food and the production process. Marine Stewardship Council’s principles of environmentally responsible and sustainable fishing. By 2008, about 98 per cent of all McDonald’s fish were sourced from fisheries without any unsatisfactory sustainability ratings. In parallel, McDonald’s also began working with its suppliers and an environmental organisation to develop a scorecard to enable the suppliers monitor & manage their environmental impact. The scorecard addresses four relevant guidelines to the final food processing stage – air, water, energy and waste. This scorecard has enhanced the environmental awareness and promoted better management of limited available natural resources.

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

Courtesy: GAO Group Inc

Starbucks: The Starbucks supply chain involves thousands of small farmers as well as innumerable intermediaries. While it mostly buys its coffee from exporters and distributors, its sustainability programme would not have been successful without the inclusion of the coffee farmers. Here, maximum damage occurred in terms of soil erosion, pesticide pollution, unethical labour practices, etc. Its Coffee and Farmer Equity (CAFÉ) practices initiative is a comprehensive programme covering a wide range of initiatives mentioned earlier. The programme offers incentives to farmers on higher levels of compliance. In 2005, the CAFÉ initiative produced only 13.5 million pound of coffee, whereas in 2007, half of its coffee requirement (ie, 225 million pound) was sourced through this initiative. The CAFÉ programme has not only helped it to progress on its sustainability journey but also helped to ensure strategic & highquality suppliers, smooth supply fluctuations and also successfully reduce supply chain costs. There are innumerable excellent examples of sustainability work being done in India as well, with McCain India being one of them. McCain is one of the largest potato manufacturers in the world, and has been applying leading agronomy practices & technologies to conserve resources & increase the viability of local agriculture, leading to sustainable, high-quality potato


SMART LOGISTICS

sourcing in India. Drip irrigation (instead of the conventional flood irrigation), flat-bed planting, fertiliser management and working with local government to provide farm-level subsidies are some of the practices followed by McCain at its Gujarat plant. With these practices, McCain farmers have improved their yields by almost 30 per cent while reducing water consumption by almost 40 per cent.

Critical success factors Outlined here are some of the critical factors for successful sustainability that need to be considered by companies embarking on this journey: Top management support: The Wal-Mart sustainability programme gained momentum only after its President & CEO made a worldwide public commitment to this initiative. Creating a strong business linkage: For many, sustainability is still a ‘buzz’ word, for which everyone

has obscure interpretations. To ensure alignment of all individuals to this initiative, it is important to create a business case as well as essential links to the business, eg, the sustainable fisheries programme at McDonald’s. Strong partnership and collaboration: Wal-mart’s progress and success in its sustainability programme would not have been possible without the support & partnership of its internal & external stakeholders. This large initiative is being collaborated by about 1.6 million employees, more than 60,000 suppliers and several non-profit organisations. Critical monitoring mechanisms: A classic proverb to be remembered at this time is ‘what is not measured, is not important’. One of the main reasons underlying the success of the Starbucks CAFÉ initiative was regular monitoring, reporting and accountability, which were cleary defined at all levels.

Long term growth path In summary, sustainability is no longer an imaginative nice-to-do initiative that can be done side by side. Work needs to be doen to make it a ‘must do’ initiative and should form a part of the mainstream strategy for companies. The results, as most organisations have started realising, are restricted not only to social and environmental benefits but also to significant economic benefits. Many companies believe that this could prove as their strongest competitive edge in the future. Abhijit Upadhye is the Director of Supply Chain, Menu Management & New Business Channels at McDonald’s India and has an extensive experience of over 14 years. He has done his management studies (in marketing) from NMIMS, Mumbai and BE in Mechanical Engineering from VJTI, Mumbai. Email: abhijit.upadhye@mcdonaldsindia.com

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Global quality standards

The evolving scenario As consumers’ concerns for the quality and safety of food continue to rise, so does the need to follow infinite numbers of laws & standards for manufacturing food products across the globe. This article throws light on the measures taken by governments around the world to address this issue. Courtesy: Fran Food

Dr Jochen P Zoller

Q

uality and safety of food has never been such an important issue for consumers as it is today. At local supermarkets, or by shopping on-line, ingredients from all over the world can be bought and cooked. Yet producers and manufacturers of food products globally must adhere to myriad laws and standards, as local laws differ from one country to another. Let us take a look at some of the current key developments and initiatives taken by governments on food safety & quality across the world.

Consumers seeking quality in China Consumers in China are increasingly demanding high-quality food & information on the source, contents & origin of food, and high-quality international food brands, with strong supply chain quality & safety systems. In 2007, the confidence of Chinese consumers in the overall food security was reported to be less than 50 per cent; however, recent reports indicate that Chinese consumers are buying more items that

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are more expensive and of better quality than ever before. Consulting firm A.T. Kearney found that 76 per cent of Chinese consumers said that they preferred shopping at supermarkets and hypermarkets because they have a wide variety of safe foods. Many Chinese suppliers have increased their spending on quality control, reflecting perhaps a desire to avoid product recalls and negative brand publicity, while multinational companies are increasingly emphasising on food safety & quality to position their brands in China. With a rapidly growing population and rising middle class, China has become a target growth market for international food brands & retailers as well as local producers. High-volume, low-cost manufacturing has accelerated China’s economy, but Chinese industries have, and continue to be, scrutinised by domestic & foreign consumers for sub-standard or tainted products & adulteration of food following a spate of highprofile international incidents. While food safety incidents occur in all food-producing countries, they have prompted the government to consider proposing new food-related laws.


POLICY WATCH

In April 2008, China had published comprehensive new draft laws for increased food safety evaluation, monitoring, recall and disclosure of information for public discussion, after which the Chinese National People’s Congress established a legislative schedule. The draft law suggests introduction of several significant changes. The draft law would require food producers to pay more attention to quality, testing and supply chain transparency, with more inspection & monitoring by companies needed to show compliance. Schemes for better identification, labeling and tracking of food are proposed, including requiring certain food product types to carry a ‘place and time of origin’ code. Penalties for producers of sub-standard food include fines, confiscation of incomes, revocation of production certificates and prison sentences. In line with the growing demand for high-quality food products in China, consumers are also showing greater interest in products with accurate nutritional information on them. In May 2008, the Chinese government introduced new non-binding nutrition labeling regulations to encourage manufacturers to use standardised, reader-friendly labels to inform consumers of the nutritional value of packaged food products sold in China. Labels must now carry a nutritional fact chart stating the energy, fat, protein, cholesterol and sugar content per unit, and also how ‘healthy’ each product is. The guidelines require manufacturers to ensure that health claims on food labels are factual, driving more analytical testing by food companies so as to validate and demonstrate these.

Upgrading food safety in India Like China, India’s rising middle class is also seeking food of higher quality and safety. Also, the sweeping changes in food regulations have been noted in India after the enactment of

a new national food safety legislation in 2007. Previously, multiple laws under different ministries governed food safety, making food standards difficult to maintain and develop. The new Food Safety and Standards Act 2006, however, has introduced new standards, institutions & recall procedures, increasing food quality standards and the country’s export food market. Standardising quality will help export opportunities for spices, processed food, pulses, rice, wheat, fruits and vegetables. The new central Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), established under the Act, began functioning in mid 2007 with new & wide regulatory powers. The body

In line with the growing demand for high-quality food products in China, consumers are also showing greater interest in products with accurate nutritional information on them. now regulates food manufacturing, storage, distribution, sale & import and is going to set scientific standards for ingredients, contaminants, pesticides, additives, supplements and biological hazards. It has wider food recall powers as well as the ability to regulate labeling, organic and genetically modified food & food hygiene for domestic & imported food. All food items produced, distributed and sold in India fall under the wide ambit of the FSSAI - restaurants, retail chains, food companies as well as roadside outlets - and every food sector entity is required to obtain a licence or registration under the Act. As a result of the new laws, companies locally are conducting more testing and monitoring to demonstrate compliance of products & practices. Violations under the Act now charge

new heavy penalties, more structured enforcement, a Food Commissioner in each Indian state and local-level officials to increase enforcement of the laws at the ground level. The new food standards will specify and define certain ingredients based on scientific analysis. These require Indian food companies to have products analytically tested to demonstrate that they meet all new standards. Greater monitoring and coordination of recalls by the FSSAI increases the risk that brands and companies found in breach of the Act & accompanying regulations will have greater public disclosure & consequential damage to their business due to loss of sales, recall replacement costs, negative publicity, loss of marketshare as well as goodwill. This, along with the additional penalties under the Act, may also drive Indian companies, that are not doing so already, to invest more in food quality assurance measures. The new Indian law does not cover primary food producers and farmers. Therefore, buyers in a supply chain from an Indian primary producer will need to ensure that raw materials are tested and monitored for pesticides and chemical residues before sourcing, to ensure that final products reaching Indian markets

Courtesy: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

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comply with applicable under the Act.

standards

Germany leads on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) Awareness of GMOs in food & feed has increased significantly in the last decade and is driving amendments in regulations, particularly in Europe. Germany and France have updated their guidelines on the evidence and testing that are required for a product to be validly labeled and sold as ‘GMO’, with the UK following suit. Local and international companies selling applicable products in Germany now need to meet comprehensive new testing guidelines & labeling rules. Other countries may or may not adopt German-style guidelines, but global producers as well as retailers are showing increasing demand for global best-practice GMO-labeling & testing programmes to overcome numerous disparate & inconsistent standards and guidelines existing today. Intertek has launched a new ‘Non-GMO’ global standard to help companies test and label non-GMO products to a consistent standard, which captures global best practice in non-GMO, including the latest government & industry standards.

Food packaging concerns in Europe Food packaging can react with food, tainting it or harming the consumer,

and is a topical issue in Europe. Current EU guidelines require food packaging to be tested for its reaction against four prescribed ‘test’ liquids - water, olive oil, acids and alcohol. However, the industry continues to develop more food products using new ingredients and diverse packaging to attract consumers’ attention and overall marketshare, thus challenging the adequacy of the guidelines. A retailer testing a new chocolate product wrapped in a certain foil package, for example, may not identify the actual reaction and affect flavour or quality by only testing against the four guideline liquids.

Implementing a more ‘future proof’ solution for the client can save significant time and costs in the long term by avoiding more interim reviews and changes to the system. More and more European brands are adopting tailored packaging reaction tests that will recognise the specific product & packaging chemistry, going above and beyond standard EU packaging guidelines. However, many companies are still unfamiliar with basic, current EU guidelines and the testing required under them. The migration of packaging components into food stuffs, therefore, remains a constant risk, and could be better addressed in the food industry in Europe & elsewhere.

Opportunity for safe food export in Latin America

Courtesy: The Mac Lawyer

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Latin America continues to successfully decrease levels of food-related

diseases and increase international food export volumes. However, the food legislation of many countries in the region is not fully aligned with the internationally recognised ‘Codex Alimentarius’ standards. This reduces the overall potential food export volumes of Latin America in comparison with the rest of the world. The Codex Alimentarius is a collection of internationally recognised standards, codes and guidelines on food production & safety. The World Trade Organization (WHO) recognises it as an international reference point and is maintained by a body set up under the United Nations’ Food & Agriculture Organization (FAO) and WHO. Not all Latin American countries have as many high-quality food testing laboratories compared with other global regions. Yet access to testing and expertise on global quality standards are key for producers & manufacturers wanting to make their products saleable in international market, demonstrating evidence of compliance with international quality standards. As producers seek to grow their business and trade, the food testing laboratories in Latin America are now in demand and are investing in growing additional quality & safety services for food & agriculture in this region. Consumers in Latin America are also becoming more conscious of the origin and quality of the food. Public concern and a strong lobby by more than 35,000 local organic producers seeking more stringent regulations to avoid GM contamination have led the Peruvian Government to introduce new legislation protecting public health and biodiversity. The production of GMOs in Peru has now become limited and transgenic crops are regulated. The government is also now developing GM labeling regulations to ensure accurate information on food contents for the public, which importers and international retailers need to observe. In Brazil, the Government and industry are facing similar pressures


POLICY WATCH

Courtesy: Medina County Health

regarding GMO laws. The Brazilian Association for the Producers of non-GM grains (Abrange) is strongly lobbying increased planting, production and development of non-GMO grains & seeds in Brazil. It demands more information on the quality and sustainability of this production to be provided to consumers as well as is promoting the need for certifications for non-GMO producers and corresponding supply chains.

Changing regulatory climate The global food industry today is a diverse network of multiple channels with varying industry standards and legislations. Ensuring compliance across complex supply chains poses huge challenges for companies in food & beverage production, manufacturing, retail and service industries. Governments have also come under the spotlight and food crises, new scientific advancements, changing patterns in global sourcing, industry practice or new consumer demands will continue to evolve their laws. Yet the pressure on companies comes from trying to be acquainted of these new laws as well as the global industry standards. Major global retailers set global purchasing requirements for food to meet a common global standard that their local producers and suppliers worldwide must adhere to. The International Food Standard (IFS) set by German, French and Italian food retailers & wholesalers, the British Retail Consortium’s (BRC) Global Standard for

Food Safety, the global Safe Quality Food (SQF) scheme as well as the Dutch HACCP Scheme are used widely within the industry as a standard & reference for testing, quality and auditing. These standards are also subject to change, as both BRC and IFS have issued updates to their standards in 2008, which the industry is currently re-familiarising itself with. With consumers worldwide increasingly opting for higher-quality food in the supermarket aisles, more companies are trying to differentiate their products solely based on quality. Companies are increasingly promoting the quality, safety & healthy content of products on their labels and advertising such claims in order to tap into and

Ensuring compliance across complex supply chains poses huge challenges for companies in food & beverage production. gain marketshare. However, promising quality to consumers requires a commitment by manufacturers in the production and essentially requires an overall commitment to supply chain visibility, auditing, testing and checking. The consequential damage to a business that has a product recall or is exposed for poor-quality food products and handling is significant. Immediate loss of sales, recall implementation costs, brand damage and loss of marketshare to competitors can take companies many years to regain.

‘Future-proof’ progress With food producers and retailers facing increasing pressures in many economies, and greater consumer demand for quality, the quality & compliance budget is being pulled in both directions. Further, amendments in legislation and standards place additional strain on these. Companies

have now begun looking for ways to cut costs and also increase their quality. One can witness this trend, with companies approaching food testing service providers for reviewing their quality, safety or supply chain systems in order to identify efficiencies that could be introduced. One can often see companies replacing two separate tests that they are conducting now with a single test that is more comprehensive and also more cost- and time-efficient. Furthermore, to investigate a clients’ present compliance demands, food testing service providers review potential new regulatory changes that could be ‘just around the corner’ and possibly affect them in the future. Implementing a more ‘future proof’ solution for the client can save significant time and costs in the long term by avoiding more interim reviews and changes to the system. Often, additional procedural steps or aspects can significantly strengthen the regime to stand up over time. In many cases, new legislation or standards in one part of the world are prompting similar standards to be reviewed in the other. In the changing world of food quality standards and laws, companies with the most future-proof approaches to quality & safety, will save time & cost, increase efficiency as well as gain advantage over competitors in the long term. Dr Jochen P Zoller is the President of the Global Food Service division at Intertek. He joined the Intertek team in May 2006. Besides expertise in food surveillance and development of structures and markets for new and expanding companies, he has a significantly strong scientific background in the field of chemistry with respect to renewable resources. He has made numerous contributions to various academic publications as well as leading chemical journals across the globe. Email: jochen.zoller@intertek.com

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EVENTS CALENDAR

National

Pune

Ahmedabad

Indore

Chennai

Maharashtra

Gujarat

Madhya Pradesh

Tamil Nadu

Nov 19-22, 2010

Dec 10-13, 2010

Jan 7-10, 2011

Mar 11-13, 2011

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies from machine tools, fluid power, instrumentation & control, electrical & electronics, material handling, plastics, rubber, packaging, chemical, CAD/CAM, auto components, and general engineering.

For details contact:

Engineering Expo Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3003 4649, Fax: 022-3003 4499, Email: shamal@infomedia18.in

ARC Process Industry Forum A conference on automation and enterprise solutions in process and batch industries aimed at key decision makers; July 14-17, 2010; at Hyderabad For details contact: ARC Advisory Group 20, Annaswamy Mudaliar Road Bengaluru 560 042 Tel: 080-2554 7116; Fax: 080-2554 7116 Email: prakasha@arcweb.com

India Foodex 2010 An exhibition on food processing & packaging technology, and food & beverage products will be held concurrently with GrainTech India and AgriTech India; August 20-22, 2010; at Palace Ground, Bengaluru For details contact: Media Today Group - Exhibition Division T-30, Khirki Extension, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi 110 017 Tel: 011-2668 1671; Fax: 011-2668 2045 Email: indiafoodex@gmail.com

International Foodtec India 2010 An international exhibition and conference for food processing, packaging, ingredients, beverages, cooling & refrigeration; September 30-October 03, 2010; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Cidex Trade Fairs Pvt Ltd 1, Commercial Complex

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Pocket H & J, Sarita Vihar New Delhi 110 076 Tel: 011-2697 1056; Fax: 011-2697 1746 Email: info@cidex-tradefairs.com

PROMACH 2010 An exclusive exhibition for the process plant & machinery industry; October 01-04, 2010; at Bangalore International Exhibition Centre, Bengaluru For details contact: Bangalore International Exhibition Service 10th Mile, Tumkur Road Madavara Post Bengaluru 562 123 Tel: 080-6583 3234 Email: dayanand@bies.co.in

Fi India 2010 An event that would feature companies showcasing ingredients for food & beverages, dietary supplements, functional/health foods, nutraceuticals, natural foods; October 22-23, 2010; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: UBM India Pvt Ltd Sagar Tech Plaza SakiNaka Junction Andheri (E), Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600, Fax: 022-6612 2626 Email: bipins@ubmindia.com

Food & Bev Tech 2010 An exhibition & conference for the food and beverage processing industry; October 29-31, 2010; at Bombay exhibition Centre, Mumbai

Modern Food Processing | June 2010

For details contact: Anil Padwal, Head – Trade Fairs CII (Western Region) 105, Kakad Chambers, Dr A B Road, Worli, Mumbai 400 018 Tel: 022-2493 1790, Fax: 022-2493 9463 Email: anil.padwal@cii.in

International PackTech India An exhibition and conference for the packaging & processing industry that will be held along with drink technology India; November 18-20, 2010; at Bombay exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf India Pvt Ltd 1, Commercial Complex 2nd Floor, Sarita Vihar New Delhi 110 076 Tel: 011-2697 1745, Fax: 011-2697 1746 Email: info@md-india.com

Food Technology Show 2010 To be held concurrently with PackPlus 2010, this event will focus on technologies, equipment, materials & services for food production & processing, brewing & distilling, baking, freezing, refrigeration & climatic engineering, etc; December 03-06, 2010; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Print-Packaging.com Pvt Ltd International Infotech Park Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 705 Tel: 022-2781 2093, Fax: 022-2781 2578 Email: info@indiapackagingshow.com


EVENTS CALENDAR

International FOODMASH 2010 International exhibition of equipment and technologies for manufacturing, processing and packaging of foodstuffs; June 15-18, 2010; at Crocus-Expo IEC, Moscow For details contact: MVK Holding Company Mikluho-Maklaya Str., 22 117437, Moscow, Russia Tel: +7 (495) 995-05-95 Email: info@mvk.ru

Propak Asia 2010 International food processing and packaging technology exhibition; June 16-19, 2010; at Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre (BITEC), Bangkok For details contact: Bangkok Exhibition Services Ltd. 62 Rama VI Soi 30 Rama VI Road, Samsennai, Phiyathai Bangkok 10400, Thailand Tel: +66 (02) 617 1475 Fax: +66 (02) 617 1406 Email: info@besmontnet.com

MIFB 2010 A trade fair for international food and beverage industry; July 22-24, 2010; at Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For details contact: Expomal International Sdn Bhd 7-2, Subang Business Centre Jalan USJ9/5Q, 47620 Subang Jaya Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia Tel: +603 8024 6500 Fax: +603 8024 8740 Email: info@expomal.com

INTERMEAT 2010 An international trade fair for meat, cold meats and sausage; September

92058 Paris-La Défense, France Tel: +33 (0) 1 7677 1111 Fax: +33 (0) 1 7677 1212 Email: infos@exposium.fr

12-15, 2010; at Düsseldorf Exhibition Centre in Dusseldorf, Germany For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Stockumer Kirchstrasse 61 D-40474 Düsseldorf, Germany Tel: +49 - 211 - 4560 900 Fax: +49 - 211 - 4560 668 Email: info@messe-duesseldorf.de

Food Processing & Packaging Indonesia 2010 International exhibition on food processing & packaging machinery, equipment, materials & services; October 27-30, 2010; at Jakarta International Expo in Jakarta, Indonesia

FI South America 2010 International food ingredients exhibition; September 21-23, 2010; at Transamérica Expo Center in Sao Paulo, Brazil For details contact: United Business Media Industrieweg 54, PO Box 200 3600 AE Maarssen, The Netherlands Tel: +31 34 65 59 444 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7921 8059 Email: jblack@cmpinformation.com

Ingredients Russia 2010 An event for food ingredients, additives and flavours; November 2326, 2010; Crocus-Expo IEC, Moscow

Saudi Agro-Food Industries 2010 A trade fair showcasing the latest in food products, processing and packaging technologies; October 04-07, 2010; at Riyadh International Exhibition Centre in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia For details contact: Riyadh Exhibitions Co. Ltd Olaya Road Postfach, P O Box 56010 SA - 11554 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Tel: +966 1 454 1448 Fax: +966 1 454 4846 Email: esales@recexpo.com

IPA 2010 International food processing and equipment week; October 17-21, 2010; at Paris Nord Villepinte in Paris, France For details contact: Comexposium Immeuble le Wilson 70, avenue du Général-de-Gaulle

For details contact: Krista Exhibitions Jln.Blandongan 28 DG Jakarta 11220, Indonesia Tel: +62-21 6345861 Fax: +62-21 6340140 Email: info@krista-exhibitions.com

For details contact: ITE Group Plc 105 Salusbury Road London, NW6 6RG, The UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7596 5000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7596 5111 Email: enquiry@ite-exhibitions.com

SIFSE 2010 Shanghai International Fisheries & Seafood Expo; December 10-13, 2010; at Shanghai Everbright Convention & Exhibition Center, Shanghai For details contact: Shanghai Gehua Exhibition Service Co Ltd Rm.1206-1208 Xin’an Building No. 99 Tianzhou Rd Shanghai 200233, China Tel: +86-21-54451166 Fax: +86-21-54451968 Email: info@gehuaexpo.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

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TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology Offered As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

An Indian firm is offering ‘threein-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

that produces cylindrical-shaped food paste with both ends sealed. This machine enables faster production of food-paste with consistent size and hygiene, which increase business potential in bigger markets both locally and abroad. Areas of application It is useful in food processing industries where the food products of cylindrical shape are required Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Chocolate conche

Food processing technology

An Indian company is offering chocolate conche with capacities ranging from VCS 500-4,000 kg. It is a rotary-type chocolate conche connected with motor and has a jacket body circulated with cold/hot water to control the product temperature during the process. Thus, it could be used for flavour development and also for removing the undesirable volatile acidic components. Areas of application Chocolate manufacturing Forms of transfer Technical services, equipment supply and turnkey

An Indian company provides technology for processing fruits & vegetables, biscuits, margarine, pickles, masalas, ready-to-eat foods, etc. Areas of application Aseptic processing, can processing, bottle processing, laminated pouch packing, tetra brick Forms of transfer Consultancy, turnkey

Beverage maker

Food-paste moulding machine A Thailand-based firm offers a food-paste moulding machine

Natural extracts An Indian company provides assistance for manufacturing oleoresins / natural colour extracts using SCFE technology ensuring minimal material loss, less pollution improved yield and better quality of product. Areas of application It is useful in areas related and

making use of food colours and natural dyes Forms of transfer Consultancy, turnkey

Technology for milk, fruit and cereal-based products An Indian firm offers technology for processing milk products, fruit & vegetable products and ready-to-eat & ready-to-cook food products Areas of application Food processing industries Forms of transfer Consultancy, subcontracting, joint venture, technical services, capacity building, technology licensing, equipment supply, turnkey, others

Vacuum sealer and gas injection machine A Thailand-based company is providing technology for preserving and extending shelf life of food products. Proper packaging is critical for avoiding food spoilage. The vacuum sealing and gas injection technique prevents contaminating microbes to enter the container, thereby increasing the shelf life of the product. Areas of application Food processing industry, agro-based industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Share Your Technology Propositions The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. We offer you an opportunity to participate in this endeavour by publishing the best technology ideas. Technology developers/sellers are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details (with environmental benefits, if any) for publication in the Technology Transfer column of Modern Food Processing. R&D organisations, technical consultancy organisations and individuals assisting small and medium enterprises may send the relevant literature, indicating the scope & services and the areas of specification. Contact: Modern Food Processing Infomedia 18 Limited, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 z Fax: 022-3003 4499 z Email: spedit@infomedia18.in

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TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology Requested Chocolate manufacturing

Food preservation

An Indian company is interested in acquiring chocolate manufacturing technology as a turnkey package. Areas of application Food industry Forms of transfer Others

A Thailand-based food and fruit preserved trading firm is looking for efficient technology to extend the shelf-life and preserve food and fruit. Areas of application Food processing industry, confectionary industry, pastry industry Forms of transfer Others

Corn processing An Indian company is looking for a complete proposal/project report to set up a dry milling corn processing plant in Andhra Pradesh. Targeted finished product is tinned corn, pop corn, corn flakes etc. It is also interested to import similar kind of plant & machinery to set up the same in India. Areas of application Corn processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Extruder pilot plant An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food. Areas of Application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products. Area of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Fruit drinks-doy pack A firm from UAE is interested in acquiring the technology for manufacturing fruit juices and drinks using optimum formulation technology. The firm needs technology providers, consultants and price quotes for the project based on turnkey & know-how. Areas of applications Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Juice and food processing A company based in the UAE proposes to establish a food processing plant that would help process fruit juices, jam/jelly, juice concentrates & pulp. Through this plant, the company also wishes to obtain valuable by-products like cattle feed, fertiliser and raw materials for plywood. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Rice husk ash to silica precipitates An Indian company is seeking the technology to convert rice husk ash

into some useful matter like silica precipitate, as the rice husk is rich in silica content. Areas of application Agro-based mills, which burn rice husk for internal purposes Forms of transfer Others

Spice grinding and processing plant An Indian firm is seeking to set up a spice plant and requires turnkey project consultants for the same Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Sugar-free bulk ingredients polyols A leading Indian pharmaceuticals company is keen to know more about project for sugar-free bulk ingredients like isomalt, xylitol, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol. The company is interested in setting up a project, either as a joint venture company or have an outsourcing partner. Areas of application Sugar-free bulk ingredients for the food and pharma industry Forms of transfer Joint venture

Xylitol technology A company based in Thailand is seeking the technology for producing gum by utilising maize-waste. Areas of application Food industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations - Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016 Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Packaging automation system

Microtubular coiled heaters

Neejtech India offers packaging automation system manufactured by Hekuma. The company provides complete systems for insert and take-out automation of injection moulding processes with upstream & downstream automation as well as in-mould labelling (IML) systems for injection moulding, vacuum forming and blister decoration including RFID. The applications of the product are in injection moulding IML for cups & containers, thermoforming (IML), blow moulding IML, blister decorating applications (BDA) for thermoformed PET/PVC blister packaging, etc. The functions performed by the system include high-speed take out, insertion of labels or metal parts or re-insertion of substrate for second shot, label application, assembly processes, stacking, flow wrapping, and automated packaging in any configuration. This system has capacity of clean rooms up to class 1000. The advantages include high-speed side entry robot, 6-axis robot for multi-functioning, major cycle time saving, high uptime, etc.

Joule Tech offers microtubular coiled heaters. Unlimited range of possible shapes can be obtained from the straight heater. The company offers 10 different cross sections. The electric resistive wire is uniformly distributed in a compacted MgO insulation, with CrNi steel outer protection sheath, which gives high resistance to mechanical shocks and withstand up to 700°C operating temperature. These heaters are used in various applications, such as heating plastic injection nozzles, as well as used in aerospace, railway, chemical, metal working & food industry, glass & paper industry, automotive, packing, medical industry, etc. These are also available with built-in thermocouple for high-resolution temperature measuring (J type Standard, K-type on request).

Neejtech India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 1312, Mob: 098250 40231 Email: sales@neejtech.com

Humidity cum temperature transmitters Katlax Enterprises offers humidity cum temperature transmitters. These transmitters are available in wall mount with display and duct mount without display. The sensor continuously monitors temperature and humidity. The conditioning/control circuit can be supplied in PCB form or in enclosure (IP-55) as per requirement. These transmitters are used in HVAC, automotive, consumer goods, weather stations, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, test & measurement, data logging, automation, white goods and medical. These transmitters feature include temperature range from -50 to +150°C, accuracy of ±1.5°C, operating range 0-75°C, humidity range of 0-100 per cent RH and response time <15 sec. Katlax Enterprises Pvt Ltd Gandhinagar - Gujarat Tel: 02764-286784-85, 079-2685 4693 Fax: 02764-286793, 079-2685 3979 Email: info@katlax.com

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Joule Tech Inc Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2353 1025, Mob: 093222 44540 Fax: 022-2351 7431 Email: sscorpn@vsnl.com

Mixer cookers Tricon offers models ‘UM/ SK’ 24, 60, 80, 130, 200 ltr universal mixer cookers manufactured by Stephan, Germany. These are compact and are ideally suited for lowcost production of consistently high-quality finished processed cheese varieties, mayonnaise, ketchup, etc. By combining all processing stages into one machine in one programmed cycle, this cooker completes the entire processing in a short time and reduces the number of transfer points. The various processing stages include size reduction, mixing, blending, emulsifying, heat treatment or cooking up to 80°C, pasteurising up to 100°C, sterilisation up to 125°C, vacuum processing, cooling, and de-moisturising with vacuum/condenser cooling - indirect cooling/heating through double jacket, etc. These cookers can also operate in tandem with patented UHT module for product temperature up to 145°C for bacteriological stability to extend shelf-life of cheese to about 12 months. Tricon Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2565 2205/2451, Mob: 098901 92832 Email: trivedi@pn2.vsnl.net.in


PRODUCT UPDATE

Bridge handle Elesa and Ganter India offers front mounting bridge handle with antimicrobial protection. It is made of glass-fibre reinforced polyamide based (PA) technopolymer with silver ions on an inorganic ceramic base. It is resistant to solvents, oils, greases and other chemical agents. The special antimicrobial material prevents any deposit of bacteria, mildew and fungi, thereby offering a sanitised effect on the surface. The resistance to high temperatures of the antimicrobial additive allows this handle to reach sterilisation temperatures (130째C). This handle is suitable for applications where hygienic and sanitary elements are required especially in medical and hospital equipment, disability aids, machines for food processing as well as pharmaceutical industry, equipment for catering service & urban and public fittings. Elesa and Ganter India Pvt Ltd Noida - Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0120-472 6666 Fax: 0120-472 6600 Email: info@elesaganter-india.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

EPS cup making machine

Dicing and slicing machines

Neejtech India offers both vertical and horizontal expanded polystyrene (EPS) cup making machine manufactured by Thermoware EPS Machinery BV for the production of cups, containers, tubs and meat trays. The features of the machine include guaranteed cycle time, high-volume production, (approximately 4,50,000 cups/day with three machines of 16 cavity), etc. It is available with upto 16 cavity moulds & machines, and is provided with pneumatic control and userfriendly electronics. This machine is used for manufacturing drinking cups for hot & cold drinks and ice cream cups. It is designed to run at an optimised cycle time and gives 60 per cent higher productivity. The key advantage of the machine is that disposable trays, plates, containers, etc can be made easily by changing the mould.

Tricon offers multipurpose dicing and slicing machines manufactured by MHS, Germany. The dicing and slicing machines are used for dicing, strip cutting, slicing and chopping of many food products. These machines are available with dicing range from 4 x 4 to 50 x 50 mm cube size and slicing range from 0-55 mm thickness. It can handle up to 90-120 mm section sizes of infeed products. The machine is available in 850, 1,000, 1,300 and 2,200 kg/hr capacity. These dicing and slicing machines are ideal for cheese, vegetables, fish, meat, pizza toppings, soup seasonings & slicing salads, salami & cold cuts and ice cream rolls.

Neejtech India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 1312 Mob: 098250 40231 Email: sales@neejtech.com

Tricon Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020 -2565 2205/2451, Mob: 098901 92832 Email: trivedi@pn2.vsnl.net.in

Flexible screw conveyor Noida Fabcon Machines offers flexible screw conveyor for food, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, minerals, ceramics, plastic and rubber industry. It consists of electric motor driven spiral, which rotates within a food-grade sealed tube. The material moves along the spiral within the tube. The unique action of the flexible spiral conveyor eliminates the risk of product separation. The conveyor maximum length can be up to 15 metre for material bulk density of 0.6 kg/ltr and may be increased or decreased inversely with bulk density. Feed hopper is available in standard size or according to customerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specification. Its main features include dust-free, easy to clean, high& low-level control, safe & hygienic handling, accurate metering and high transfer capacity. The different sizes of conveyor are suitable for any capacity upto 15 tonne per hour and any length from 2 to 15 metre per conveyor. Distribution of product at more than one outlet is also possible. The flexible nature of conveyor allows bends to be incorporated while installing the conveyor & the same can be managed through walls & roofs with minimal problem to the existing layout. Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd New Delhi Mob: 098183 77111, 098112 09769 Email: nishantb@fabcon-india.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Control system for bag making machine Streamline Controls offers control system for bag/pouch making machine (BMM) in a customised programmed package. It is provided with up to 4 inputs (start signal, stop signal, batch reset and mark sensor), up to 5 timer-based outputs (cutter, sealer, punch, alarm and batch), up to 3 errors (mark sensor missing, over speed and temperature), manual/fully auto functions of the machine and optionally analog input to synchronise with the main motor. It also facilitates additional inputs/ outputs and timers for advanced customised solution. Security of programmed parameters is ensured by the latest E2PROM technology. It comprises enhanced user-friendly membrane keypad programming for easy operator interface and 16x2 big LCD displays with 24 key membrane keypad. It is equipped with 4-digit preset counters for batching & cutting and 6-digit totaliser to count total number of bags. The programmable features include missing mark counter, offset, mark sensor on/off timers, length, speed, start proximity on/off, cycle delay, selective display of speed of the machine in number of bags per minute, forward/backward inching and individual output on/off from MMI. Streamline Controls Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-3291 0812, 3012 5136, Fax: 079-2741 1463 Email: mktg@streamlinecontrols.com

Digital colour mark sensor Lubi Electronics offers â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sunx LX-100â&#x20AC;&#x2122; series digital colour mark sensor, which can detect any marking because the sensor is equipped with red, green and blue LED light emitting element. Further, to expand the functionality, the sensor comes with dual mode, ie, mark mode (ultra high-speed response) & colour mode (high-precision mark colour discrimination) to suit any application. This sensor comes with Mode Navi technology for enhancing features and easy use. It is provided with 4-digit digital display, 12-bit A/D converter, D-code, key lock, timer, NPN or PNP outputs, IP67 protection, etc. It is used in many applications in industries such as packaging, food, pharmaceuticals, textile and plastics. Lubi Electronics Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2220 5471-76, Fax: 079-2220 0660 Email: info@lubielectronics.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Check weigher Technofour Electronics offers ‘CW 21K’ check weigher for online dynamic weighing for shipper. This device uses state-of-the-art technology to achieve greater accuracy in dynamic weighing. The system provides 100 per cent online weighing, ensuring compliance with international standards of pharmaceutical, food, chemical and cosmetics industries. The check weigher also improves production line profitability through significant reduction in product give away. This is an ideal system for shipper cartons. Some of the salient features of the check weigher systems are height adjustment for ease of integration with existing line; variable conveyor speed control to match the inlet speed; facility for dynamic weight compensation; display of net weight; and statistical data of total accept, total reject, standard deviation, percentage of rejection, range value, etc on graphical LCD display. This system can be tailor-made and is available in wide range from 500 gm to 50 kg to suit the requirement. Technofour Electronics Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2605 8063/4/5, Fax: 020-2605 8073 Email: sales@teplindia.com

Ripple softy with thick shake machine VCS India offers model ‘Combo-403’ compact ripple softy with thick shake machine. It is has stainless steel freezing cylinders with direct expansion-cooling system to ensure rapid operation. Independent refrigeration to the hopper ensures that the mix is thoroughly chilled, both during production as well as breaks. It is provided with specially crafted beaters having ‘Delrin’ beater blades. Thermometers are provided to constantly control storage temperature of ice cream mix inside the hopper at +4°C. It is fitted with environmentfriendly CFC-free refrigerant and free thermal insulation. It is also equipped with a mix level indicator, insulated dispense head, two compressors, motors, etc. It is available in threephase and single-phase models. VCS India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2589 2957, 2587 8077 Email: info@vcsgajjar.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Controlling and monitoring system Pepperl+Fuchs (India) offers â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;VisuNet GMPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; controlling and monitoring system within GMP environments. This system is tailored to the specific requirements of pharmaceutical, life science and food & beverage industries. Its product portfolio includes simple monitors, remote monitor systems with Ethernet connection to the host PC and complete PC systems. It is available with a variety of mechanical mounting options and in a wide range of configurations, such as single and twin-monitor systems. All models are equipped with a 19-inch display, which is optionally available as a touchscreen. It features stainless steel cabinets according to protection rating IP 65. Remote monitors and PCs offer RS232, PS/2, Ethernet, as well as USB interfaces. The overall architecture of the system is designed to prevent the accumulation of dirt and fluids. Pepperl+Fuchs (India) Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2837 8030, 2839 5585 Fax: 080-2837 8031 Email: info@in.pepperl-fuchs.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Cold room

Tomato strainer

Colpan Poly Panel Industries offers cold room. Its surface is made of GI prepainted sheet, SS sheet, GI plain sheet and aluminium sheet. It is available in thicknesses of 60, 80, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Its wall, floor, door frame, door leaf, tee walls, corners, ceilings and PVC gaskets are available in a variety of heights and widths. It is fitted with flush-type big door that could have a long-term heavyduty usage. Its window/ hatch door comes with a frame and can be fitted anywhere on the installed cold room. The door accessories consist of an imported-make handle, closer and chromium-plated hinges. The door leaf is made of fibreglass reinforced plastic lining. This does not dent, rust, wrap or scratch and can easily bear the impact of roll-in trolleys/carts. The cold room comes with double toughened glass vacuum due to which it becomes transparent and there is no need to frequently open the door. Its advanced high-density 40 kg/m3 of Puf insulation ensures insulating efficiency and uniform celstructure or density that can be provided as per the user’s demand.

The New India Electric & Trading offers the ‘Imperia Testarossa’ line of tomato strainers, which are used for making tomato puree. While squeezing tomatoes, both raw and cooked, the seeds and the skin are separated without crushing the seeds, thus eliminating the sourness and bitterness. They give natural red colour to the puree and also increases the shelf-life in order to obtain a smooth puree ideal for soup, sauces, gravy dishes, juices and preserves, which can be used by professional kitchens, caterers, pizza, Italian & Indian restaurants as well as home & professional canners. The Imperia Testarossa can also be fitted with professional meat-mincing attachment to extend the use of the machine. Mincing attachments include fine & coarse grinding dies and a sausage filling funnel.

Colpan Poly Panel Industries Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-6542 6394, Fax: 079-2297 1352 Email: panel@colpangroup.com

The New India Electric & Trading Co Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2265 1177 Fax: 022-2265 1597 Email: nietco@hotmail.com

Wrapping machine Pacwel Equipments offers ‘Model PE 108’ pillow pack wrapping machine for hard-boiled candy. It is used for packing foodstuff, and can pack up to 1,000 packs per minute depending on the product and its packaging material. It can be connected to a single-phase or three-phase power supply. It is provided with a vibratory feeder, which takes the candies from the SS hopper, then the chute removes the dust & broken pieces and feeds the desired candies to the detachable disc, which has the precise shape of candies and goes to the lug conveyor. The wrapping material released from the feed unit, passes through the rollers where the photocell mark is constantly monitored. The film makes a continuous tube in which the lug conveyor positions the candies. This continuous tube is sealed and guided by pairs of pulling and sealing rollers. After this process, the cross sealer seals the individual packs and a zigzag knife (fixed inside the cross sealer) separates the individual pack or gives perforation as desired. Pacwel Equipments Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2560 3491, Fax: 022-2568 8916 Email: pacwel@bom7.vsnl.net.in

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Flooring solutions Apurva India offers epoxy and polyurethane-based flooring solutions, which are used in the pharmaceutical, food & beverage and hospitals industries. Polyurethane-based floorings (PU concrete) are recommended in dairy, breweries and meat processing industries due to their high resistance to lactic acid & steam cleaning. These flooring systems have good chemical- and thermal-resistant properties. In addition, these contain a powerful antimicrobial and antibacterial additive. By applying these resin-based floorings, companies can protect their base floor from deteriorating and prevent recurring repair and production shutdowns while making it a clean and healthy environment to work. The company also offers multicoloured, self-levelling flooring. Apurva India Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2447 5051, Fax: 022-2447 5056 Email: sales@apurvaindia.in

Image sensor Banner Engineering India offers compact touchscreen-based image sensor. It combines the capabilities of three separate sensors into one housing. The match sensor compares the target object to a stored reference point, identifying parts of irregular shapes, alphanumeric characters, etchings and labels at fast production speeds. The second is an area sensor that identifies target features within a region of interest, ideal for detecting drilled holes on a metallic component or inspecting blister packs, and verifies that all features are correctly sized and located. The third sensor has a similar purpose, ie, examining an area for specific features and offers tools that adjust for motion. The tools allow the sensor to detect objects of varying position and orientation on the production line. The image sensor also incorporates integrated lighting and adjustable lenses to optimise image contrast and accommodate changing plant conditions. The touchscreen LCD display is used for setting up inspection and modifying parameters. The final set-up configuration and logged inspection results can be downloaded from the sensor to a USB drive through the sensorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s USB port. Banner Engineering India Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-6640 5624, Fax: 020-6640 5623 Email: salesindia@bannerengineering.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Form fill seal machine Associated Pack-Tech Engineers offers form fill seal (FFS) machine, which is designed to pack sticky hydroscopic and non free-flowing products like spices, turmeric powder, chilly powder, henna, glucose powder, ORS powder, detergent powder, pharmaceuticals powder, etc. The batch-to-batch variation in weight due to change in specific density is fully controlled in this machine by using specially designed adjustable disc system. The weight of the product being packed can be adjusted within minutes without stopping the machine by adjusting the handle. The hopper has been designed in such a way that it does not allow powder to stick to its wall and the material is continuously fed on the disc without any lump formation. The dropping and sealing time is synchronised in such a way that the materials get fully settled in pouch before sealing takes place, which ensures that materials do not come in the sealing portion of the pouch. The material being packed drops directly into pouches from the disc without touching any metal part of the machine, thus ensuring that heat is not transmitted to the material being packed. Associated Pack-Tech Engineers Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2277 3447 Email: packtech2003@yahoo.co.in

Chapathi making machine EssEmm Corporation offers chapathi-making machine. This machine is capable of making 1,800 chapathis or 3,600 puri per hour. This machine also helps in sheeting & spreading the dough for chapathi and puri. It ensures consistent size of the chapathi. The adjustable method of rollers allows very thin chapathi, which are soft and fluffy. Since the oil requirement is less while kneading, this machine can also be used to make oil-less chapathi. The company also offers vegetable preparation machines, coffee warmers, meat mincers, garlic peelers, cold drinks dispensers, conveyor ovens, etc. EssEmm Corporation Coimbatore - Tamil Nadu Tel: 0422-437 9814/437 9865, Fax: 0422-439 4865 Email: essemm@airtelbroadband.in The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

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 Aerosol spray paint ....................................  Corrugated tube heat exchangers ..............  Heat resistant door ....................................  Air cooler...................................................  Cutters.......................................................  Heavy duty mixer grinder ...........................  Animal feed technology .............................  Dehumidifiers.............................................  High pressure cleaners ...............................  Anti-skid floorings......................................  Dicing and slicing machines .......................  Hopper magnet .........................................  AODD pumps ............................................  Digital colour mark sensor..........................  Horizontal FFS machine..............................  Automatic scrubber driers ..........................  Doors.........................................................  Hot air & water generator ..........................

 Blower motor.............................................  Drum roller ................................................  Industrial door ...........................................  Boilers........................................................  Dust control door ......................................  Industrial type unit air cooler .....................

First Fold Here

 Bottle unscrambler.....................................  Electromagnetic feeder ..............................  Integrated automation solution..................  Brewing unit ..............................................  Emulsification solutions..............................  Juicer .........................................................  Bridge handle ............................................  Epoxy/EPU coatings....................................  Knife sharpner ...........................................  Burners ......................................................  EPS cup making machine ...........................  Labelling machine ......................................  Cable carriers .............................................  Evaporating units for cold rooms ...............  LV motors ..................................................  Cable connectors .......................................  Exhibition - ARC India Forum .....................  Magnetic equipment..................................



Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in

 Bearings.....................................................  Drives ........................................................  Image sensor .............................................



 Capping machine.......................................  Exhibition - India Foodex 2010...................  Magnetic plate...........................................  Carpet cleaning machines ..........................  Exhibition - Promach 2010.........................  Magnetic traps...........................................  Cartoring machine .....................................  Extruded products......................................  Market research .........................................  Case erector...............................................  Extruder .....................................................  Metering pumps ........................................  Case packer ...............................................  Feeder........................................................  Microtubular coiled heaters........................

Tel.: +91-22-3003 4685



 Case sealer.................................................  Filling machine...........................................  Mixer cookers ............................................  Centrifugal pumps .....................................  Fire tube type package IBR steam boiler .....  Mixer cooler...............................................  Chains .......................................................  Flexible screw conveyor ..............................  Moneycontrol.com.....................................

Second Fold Here

 Chapathi making machine .........................  Flexible transparent PVC strip door.............  Multi fuel fired IBR steam boiler .................  Check weigher ...........................................  Flooring solutions ......................................  Nip  Chocolate/cocoa making machine ..............  Flour milling unit .......................................  Oil milling unit ...........................................  Circumferential piston pumps ....................  Flow wrapping machine.............................  Overwrapping machine ..............................  Cleaning section equipment .......................  Food testing programmes ..........................  Packaging automation system ....................  Cold room .................................................  Forced convection unit air cooler................  Pasta making machine ...............................



Please tick against the box of product(s) you are interested in:  Mention specific product/service you need,  Complete all the details on this form.  Tear the form & mail it to us. (It is a prepaid mail)

 Bag form, fill and seal machine .................  Drawer magnet..........................................  Humidity cum temperature transmitters .....



 Colour sorting unit.....................................  Form, fill seal machine ...............................  Piston pumps.............................................  Connectors ................................................  Grain handling unit....................................  Plastic pellets .............................................  Control system for bag making machine ....  Grill magnet...............................................  PLCs ..........................................................  Controlling and monitoring system ............  Grinding & dispersion system .....................  Processing solutions for fruit juices & purees .....

Send your inquiries at: Tel: +91-22-3003 4685 Fax: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in

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We will send your inquiries to the manufacturers and ask them to send you the details or contact you directly. Use this form for FREE additional Information on products published in this issue.How to use this form:

 Advance fluid mixing dispersion .................  Conveyors ..................................................  Haul off .....................................................

Third Fold Here

PRODUCT INQUIRY FORM

 AC drives ...................................................  Conveyor systems.......................................  Gyratory screen ..........................................


Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

City:

Pin:

Tel:

Fax:

06 / 2010

Address:

Email:

 Product handling equipments ....................  Shrink film .................................................  Universal type unit air cooler ......................  Pulversier ...................................................  Shrink sleeve applicator..............................  Vaccum cleaners ........................................  PVC strip door ...........................................  Shrink wrapping machines .........................  Ventilators .................................................  Rare earth tubes ........................................  Single disc machines ..................................  Vertical FFS machine ..................................  Ready to eat retert pouches (microvable

 Steam boilers .............................................  Vertical form fill and seal machine ............

& non microvable) .....................................  Sweepers ...................................................  Vertical non IBR oil fired steam boiler.........

 Rice milling equipments .............................  Takeup drum..............................................  Vibration motor .........................................  Ripple softy with thick shake machine ........  Thermal processes......................................  Wall coatings .............................................  Robotic palletiser .......................................  Thermic fluid heater...................................  Water wall membrane panel IBR. steam boiler ..  Rotary lobe pumps.....................................  Thermoforming machine............................  Winder ......................................................  Safety door ................................................  Tomato strainer..........................................  Wood fire four pass thermic fluid heater ....  Self adhesive tapes.....................................  Tray sealing machine ..................................  Wood fire thermic fluid heater ...................  Shrink bundlers..........................................  Ultrafresh coater ........................................  Wrapping machine ....................................

Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J.K. Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028, INDIA.

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se this form for FREE additional Information on advertisements published in this issue. We will send your inquiries to the advertisers and ask them to send you the details or contact you directly.



How to use this form:

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Tel.: +91-22-3003 4640



Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in 

 ABB Limited ................................................................................ 

Heat And Control........................................................................

 Alfa Laval India Pvt Ltd................................................................ 

HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd........................................................

 ARC Advisory .............................................................................. 

IDEX India Pvt Ltd .......................................................................

 Balkrishna Boilers Pvt Ltd............................................................. 

Igus India Pvt Ltd ........................................................................

 Bangalore International Exhibition............................................... 

Ind Flooring Systems ...................................................................

 Bonfiglioli Transmissions (Pvt) Ltd ................................................ 

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd .......................................................

 Bosch Limited ............................................................................. 

Media Today Pvt Ltd....................................................................

 Bry Air Asia Pvt Ltd...................................................................... 

Money Control............................................................................

 Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd................................................................... 

New India Electric & Trading Co ..................................................

 Business Development Bureau India P Ltd.................................... 

Paharpur - 3P..............................................................................

 Clearpack India Pvt Ltd................................................................ 

Plast World .................................................................................

 Danfoss Indus Pvt Ltd.................................................................. 

Shah Brothers .............................................................................

 Diversey India Pvt Ltd .................................................................. 

Siemens Ltd ................................................................................

 FX Multitech Pvt Ltd.................................................................... 

Sreelakshmi Traders.....................................................................



First Fold Here

Second Fold Here Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

City:

Pin:

Tel:

Fax:

Email:

06 / 2010

Address:

Third Fold Here

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4. Specific product requirement


POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Business Reply Inland BR Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA

Special Projects

INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J.K. Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028, INDIA.


PRODUCT INDEX Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

AC drives .................................................... 29

Emulsification solutions...................................... 9

Multi fuel fired IBR steam boiler ...................... 73

Advance fluid mixing dispersion......................... 9

Epoxy/EPU coatings.......................................... 77

Nip .............................................................. 36

Aerosol spray paint .......................................... 75

EPS cup making machine................................. 74

Oil milling unit ........................................... 13

Air cooler........................................................... 7

Evaporating units for cold rooms....................... 7

Overwrapping machine...................................... 3

Animal feed technology................................... 13

Exhibition - ARC India Forum............................. 8

Packaging automation system .................. 72

Anti-skid floorings............................................ 77

Exhibition - India Foodex 2010 ........................ 30

Pasta making machine ...............................13, 77

AODD pumps .................................................... 9

Exhibition - Promach 2010 ................................ 6

Piston pumps................................................... 17

Automatic scrubber driers................................ 43

Extruded products ........................................... 13

Plastic pellets ................................................... 13

Bag form, fill and seal machine ............... 19

Extruder ........................................................... 36

PLCs................................................................. 29

Bearings............................................................. 4

Feeder......................................................... 36

Processing solutions for fruit juices & purees .. FIC

Blower motor .................................................. 36

Filling machine................................................... 3

Product handling equipments .......................... 53

Boilers.............................................................. 73

Fire tube type package IBR steam boiler .......... 73

Pulversier ......................................................... 77

Bottle unscrambler............................................. 3

Flexible screw conveyor.................................... 74

PVC strip door ................................................. 81

Brewing unit.................................................... 13

Flexible transparent PVC strip door .................. 81

Rare earth tubes ........................................ 73

Bridge handle .................................................. 73

Flooring solutions ............................................ 81

Ready to eat retert pouches (microvable

Burners ............................................................ 73

Flour milling unit ............................................. 13

& non microvable)......................................... 35

Cable carriers ............................................... 4

Flow wrapping machine .................................... 3

Rice milling equipments................................... 13

Cable connectors ............................................... 4

Food testing programmes................................ 31

Ripple softy with thick shake machine ............. 76

Capping machine............................................... 3

Forced convection unit air cooler ....................... 7

Robotic palletiser ............................................... 3

Carpet cleaning machines ................................ 43

Form, fill seal machine..................................... 82

Rotary lobe pumps ............................................ 9

Cartoring machine ............................................. 3

Grain handling unit ................................... 13

Safety door ................................................ 81

Case erector....................................................... 3

Grill magnet .................................................... 73

Self adhesive tapes .......................................... 75

Case packer ....................................................... 3

Grinding & dispersion system .......................... 13

Shrink bundlers.................................................. 3

Case sealer......................................................... 3

Gyratory screen................................................ 73

Shrink film ......................................................... 3

Centrifugal pumps ............................................. 9

Haul off ...................................................... 36

Shrink sleeve applicator ..................................... 3

Chains ............................................................... 4

Heat resistant door .......................................... 81

Shrink wrapping machines................................. 3

Chapathi making machine ............................... 82

Heavy duty mixer grinder................................. 77

Single disc machines........................................ 43

Check weigher ................................................. 76

High pressure cleaners ..................................... 43

Steam boilers................................................... 73

Chocolate/cocoa making machine.................... 13

Hopper magnet ............................................... 73

Sweepers ......................................................... 43

Circumferential piston pumps ............................ 9

Horizontal FFS machine ..................................... 3

Takeup drum .............................................. 36

Cleaning section equipment............................. 13

Hot air & water generator ............................... 73

Thermal processes............................................ 13

Cold room ....................................................... 78

Humidity cum temperature transmitters........... 72

Thermic fluid heater......................................... 73

Colour sorting unit .......................................... 13

Image sensor.............................................. 81

Thermoforming machine.................................... 3

Connectors ........................................................ 4

Industrial door ................................................. 81

Tomato strainer .........................................77, 78

Control system for bag making machine ......... 75

Industrial type unit air cooler ............................. 7

Tray sealing machine ......................................... 3

Controlling and monitoring system.................. 77

Integrated automation solution ...................... BIC

Ultrafresh coater ........................................ 77

Conveyor systems............................................. 53

Juicer .......................................................... 77

Universal type unit air cooler ............................. 7

Conveyors .......................................................... 3

Knife sharpner ................................................. 77

Vaccum cleaners ........................................ 43

Corrugated tube heat exchangers .................... 17

Labelling machine ........................................ 3

Ventilators ....................................................... 75

Cutters............................................................. 36

LV motors........................................................ 29

Vertical FFS machine.......................................... 3

Dehumidifiers............................................. 63

Magnetic equipment ................................. 73

Vertical form fill and seal machine ................. 19

Dicing and slicing machines............................. 74

Magnetic plate ................................................ 73

Vertical non IBR oil fired steam boiler.............. 73

Digital colour mark sensor ............................... 75

Magnetic traps ................................................ 73

Vibration motor ............................................... 73

Doors............................................................... 81

Market research ................................................. 5

Wall coatings ............................................. 77

Drawer magnet................................................ 73

Metering pumps ................................................ 9

Water wall membrane panel IBR. steam boiler .... 73

Drives .............................................................. BC

Microtubular coiled heaters ............................. 72

Winder ............................................................ 36

Drum roller ...................................................... 36

Mixer cookers .................................................. 72

Wood fire four pass thermic fluid heater ......... 73

Dust control door ............................................ 81

Mixer cooler..................................................... 36

Wood fire thermic fluid heater ........................ 73

Electromagnetic feeder.............................. 73

Moneycontrol.com........................................... 10

Wrapping machine .......................................... 78

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover June 2010 | Modern Food Processing

87


ADVERTISERS’ LIST

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

ABB Limited

Pg No

Pg No

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Business Development Bureau India P Ltd 5

Ind Flooring Systems

T: +91-80-22949560

T: +91-20-27010321

T: +91-9890005725

E: amit.a.sharma@in.abb.com

E: info@bdbmr.co.in

E: anil.mani@indfloorings.com

W: www.abb.co.in

W: www.bdbmr.co.in

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd

Alfa Laval India Pvt Ltd

29

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

FIC

Clearpack India Pvt Ltd

3

T: +91-22-42532220

E: info@jkmagnetics.com

E: india.info@alfalaval.com

E: sales@in.clearpack.com

W: www.jkmagnetics.com

W: www.alfalaval.com

W: www.clearpack.com

Media Today Pvt Ltd

8

T: +91-80-25547116

36,37

73

T: +91-79-25894701

43

W: www.balkrishn.com Bangalore International Exhibition 6 T: +91-124-4014060

BC

Paharpur - 3P

35

T: +91-120-4389102

Heat And Control

53

T: +91-44-42103950

19

HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd

E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com 17

T: +91-20-25663581

T: +91-832-669-2004

63

IDEX India Pvt Ltd

E: foodkit@shahbros.com 9

W: www.shahbros.com

T: +91-11-23906777

T: +91-22-66755966

Siemens Ltd

E: marketing@pahwa.com

E: info.fmt@idexcorp.com

T: +91-22-24987000

W: www.bryair.com

W: www.idexfmt-asia.com

W: www.siemens.com/answers

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd

13

Igus India Pvt Ltd

31

T: +91-22-43560400

W: www.hrsasia.co.in

W: www.boschpackaging.com

W: www.stripdoor.co.in Shah Brothers

E: cthe@hrsasia.co.in

E: Amol.Matkar@in.bosch.com

81

T: +91-9376128372

W: www.heatandcontrol.com

W: www.bonfiglioli.co.in

W: www.pilpack.com Plast World

E: info@heatandcontrol.com

E: bonfig@vsnl.com

Bry Air Asia Pvt Ltd

W: www.nietco.in

E: anarmesh@pilpack.com

T: +91-44-24781035

Bosch Limited

E: nietco@hotmail.com

T: +91-79-27910993

W: www.frascold.it

W: www.promach.co.in Bonfiglioli Transmissions (Pvt) Ltd

7

E: fxmultitech@gmail.com

E: amit.mehta@cii.in

W: www.moneycontrol.com

T: +91-22-22651177

W: www.diversey.com FX Multitech Pvt Ltd

10

New India Electric & Trading Co 77

T: +91-22-66444222

E: info@balkrishn.com

T: +91-11-26682045

Money Control

W: www.danfoss.com Diversey India Pvt Ltd

30

W: www.indiafoodex.com

E: danfoss.india@danfoss.com

W: www.arcweb.com/res/forumindia

73

E: indiafoodex@gmail.com

T: +91-44-66501555

E: prakasha@arcweb.com

Balkrishna Boilers Pvt Ltd

Danfoss Indus Pvt Ltd

77

T: +91-79-22970452

T: +91-20-27107246

ARC Advisory

Pg No

4

BIC

Sreelakshmi Traders

T: +91-80-22890000

T: +91-80-39127800

T: +91-44-24343343

E: sujit.pande@buhlergroup.com

E: info@igus.in

E: sreelakshmitraders@gmail.com

W: www.buhlergroup.com

W: www.igus.in

W: www.sreelakshmitraders.com

75

Our consistent advertisers

88

Modern Food Processing | June 2010


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90

Modern Food Processing - June 2010  

‘MODERN FOOD PROCESSING’ is the leading monthly business magazine in India exclusively for the food processing industry. It covers the lates...

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