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Modern Food Processing

January 2011


EDITORIAL

Rejuvenating prospects

W

hat a transformational decade has it been for the country and the world! Some of the buzzwords that hogged the headlines in the last 2-3 years include slowdown, transformation, diversification, rebound, growth, among others. Amid this phase of uncertainty, there were select trendsetters in the industry who not only believed in the saying ‘Do not waste a crisis’, but were also able to successfully rise above this crisis as a window of opportunity. Having said that and not withstanding its share of challenges, the year 2010 was an inflection point for the Indian food processing industry and the economy, in general. Case in point is the global focus on India as a key growth market and a marked shift in the approach – not as a mere vendor but as a strategic partner. In other words, it signifies the country’s leverage not only on better cost proposition, but also lean and efficient business model as well as faster time-to-market capability. Given the growing maturity of the domestic market, expanding ecosystem of start-ups, and rising domestic demand, one can fairly look forward to the new decade in which India has the potential to become the fastest-growing economy. This in turn promises to present unparalleled opportunities to transform the

Published in association with Editor : Manas R Bastia Assistant Editor: Rakesh Rao Senior Features Writer: Prasenjit Chakraborty Features Writers: KTP Radhika Jinoy (Delhi), Mahua Roy Senior Correspondent: Shivani Mody (Bengaluru) Correspondent: Geetha Jayaraman (Delhi), Anwesh Koley (Delhi) Copy Desk: Marcilin Madathil Products Desk: Abha Mishra Assistant Art Director: Varuna Naik Chief Photographer: Mexy Xavier Design: Mahendra Varpe Production: Pravin Koyande, Vikas Bobhate, Dnyaneshwar Goythale, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian, Sanjay Shelar, Lovey Fernandes, Pukha Dhawan, Varsha Nawathe, Akshata Rane, Abhay Borkar Marketing & Branding: Jagruti Shah, Ganesh Mahale CEO-Publishing: Sandeep Khosla Associate Vice President: Sudhanva Jategaonkar Subscription: Sunder Thiyagarajan, General Manager - Copy Sales Sheetal Kotawadekar, Senior Manager Tel: 91-22-3003 4631/4633 Email: customercare@infomedia18.in

lives of millions, and thereby realise the much sought-after inclusive growth. However, ripple effects of global economies continue to remain as a reality. Therefore, without any clear and strong signs of worldwide business resurgence, it will be pragmatic to have a cautious outlook for the near future. Also, 2011 can be the beginning of a phase, wherein opportunities would be new and would call for greater focus on innovation and novel models of growth. Hopefully, the surging economy, coupled with timely policy implementation, will go a long way in transforming global as well as Indian businesses. Believe, you will find enough value while referring to this edition with an eclectic mix of the past, present and future of the food processing industry, as much as we liked putting it together. Of course, your opinions and feedback will add more value to our endeavour. Here’s wishing you a marvelous New Year!

Editorial Advisory Board Dr A S Abhiraman Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd Prof M Y Kamat Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Deptt., UICT, Mumbai

Manas R Bastia Editor manas@infomedia18.in

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Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Infomedia 18 Limited and printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J.K.Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Food Processing is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. 14798/2005. Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Infomedia 18 Limited. Infomedia 18 Limited reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the information published in this edition, neither Infomedia 18 Ltd nor any of its employees accept any responsibility for any errors or omission. Further, Infomedia 18 Ltd does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. Editor: Manas R Bastia

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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CONTENTS

30

HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010

14

LEADERS SPEAK 30

“It is a myth that the improvement of the system incurs cost” ...says Dr Jochen P Zoller, Head - Global Food Service Division, Intertek

ROUNDTABLE 32

Food safety regulation: Will it meet the expectation?

IN FOCUS 34

ADF Foods Ltd: Giving global touch to ethnic flavour

SECTOR WATCH - FUNCTIONAL FOODS 36

Nutraceuticals: A bouquet of taste and health

32

SECTOR WATCH - PROCESSING 40

Health foods: Adding value, aiding wellbeing Dr J S Pai, Executive Director, Protein Foods & Nutrition Development Association of India

MARKET SCOPE 43

Innovations in functional foods: Need for an out-of-the-box thinking

INDUSTRY UPDATE 47

Fish processing industry: In troubled waters

TREND ANALYSIS Indian malted beverages market: The milky way to health Srividyaranjani V, Research Analyst (South Asia & Middle East - Chemicals, Materials and Foods), Frost & Sullivan

54

QUALITY MANTRA 56

Asian markets: In search of a ‘safe’ tomorrow Courtesy: The Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council Asia

36

TECH TRACK Processing breakfast cereals: A challenge to deliver nutrition Christopher Rubin, Head - Product Management & Marketing, Business Unit Pasta and Extruded Products, Bühler AG

60

TRADE ZONE 65

Better marketing efficiency: Tips to leverage online tools Sandeep Deshpande, Country GM, Alibaba.com, India

REPORT „

drink technology India and International PackTech: Brewing success through innovative techniques

„

Annapoorna – World of Food India 2010: Taking the industry to the next level

„

PackPlus 2010: Encapsulating some of the best technologies

„

Frost & Sullivan 2010 India Excellence in Chemicals, Materials and Food Awards: Inspiring performance, imparting knowledge

RE GU L A R S EC TIO NS Editorial .................................................... 11 National News ......................................... 21 National News - Report .......................... 24 World News............................................. 26 Tech Updates ........................................... 28 Events Calendar ....................................... 67 Technology Transfer ................................. 73 Product Update........................................ 75 Product Inquiry ........................................ 85 Advertisement Inquiry.............................. 87 Product Index........................................... 89 Advertisers’ List ....................................... 90

40

69 70 71 72

47

Highlights of Next Issue Sector Watch

:

Biotech in Food

Industry Update :

Food SMEs

Market Insight

Financing solutions for the food industry

:

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise

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Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Details on page no. 45, 46, 63, 64


HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010 National

ACQUISITION Tata Global Beverages acquires Activate (October) An overseas subsidiary of Tata Global Beverages (TGB) acquired a minority stake in US-based Activate, a performance beverage and water firm. The move follows a $ 20 million investment in the firm being led by TGB. “We are thrilled to have found a partner in Tata, that has had a significant presence in the North American market for over 60 years,” said Dan Holland, President, Activate. Peter Unsworth, Group CEO of Tata Global Beverages, said, “We have ambitious growth plans, and a vision to become the leader in the ‘good for you’ beverage segment.”

McCormick buys 26 per cent in Eastern Condiments (November) McCormick, one of the global leaders in the manufacturing & marketing of spices, herbs and seasonings, bought 26 per cent stake in Eastern Condiments Pvt Ltd (ECPL), a major Indian spices and seasonings dealer, for $ 36 million. The partnership is believed to bring the latest technology in the spice supply chain management and manufacturing into India. McCormick will also help ECPL grow in the authentic Indian cuisine segment in the US and other Western markets.

Jain Irrigation acquires UK firm

Cargill announces vanaspati acquisition

(November) Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd (JISL), one of India’s biggest fruit and vegetable processing companies, acquired controlling stakes of 80 per cent in the UK-based food firm Sleaford Quality Food Ltd for around £ 10 million. The acquisition is perceived as bringing JISL to enter into the large ethnic food market in the UK. “Jain’s food business is worth around ` 520 crore. We believe Sleaford affords us good returns and adds to our top-line. Through this deal, we will have direct access to the end users of our products,” said Anil Jain, Managing Director, JISL.

(November) Cargill, international producer and marketer of food, agricultural, financial and industrial products and services, signed an agreement with Agro Tech Foods Ltd to acquire Rath, its vanaspati brand. Rath is one of the leading vanaspati brand in North India. This acquisition not only strengthens Cargill’s existing portfolio of leading edible oil and vanaspati brands, but also expands its market reach in India’s vanaspati market. Rath vanaspati’s annual turnover is estimated at ` 120 crore.

ANALYTICAL LABS Coca-Cola invests in analytical services centre

Godrej Agrovet sets up leaf and soil analysis laboratory

(February) The Coca-Cola Company started a state-of-theart analytical services centre Pune, at an investment of ` 18 crore. The lab spreads over an area of 2,000 sq m to offer analytical and technical support to the company’s operations in India and South Asia apart from Eastern Europe, southern Eurasia and the Middle East. The company has invested more than $ 1 billion in its Indian operations, emerging as one of the country’s top international investors and employs approximately 6,000 people in India.

(September) Godrej Agrovet Ltd (GAVL) inaugurated a leaf and soil laboratory in Vijayawada. The laboratory aims to facilitate farmers to improve farm productivity and profitability in oil palm plantations aiding them with information like indepth soil and leaf analysis, fertiliser recommendations and the suitability of specific soils & water for their plantations. It will have state-of-the- art technology to measure nutrients like nitrogen, potassium, iron, copper and zinc in the leaf and soil, while studying soil & water pH and electrical conductivity.

Intertek opens food testing lab in India

NMPPB sets up food testing lab

(August) Intertek, a provider of quality and safety solutions serving a wide range of industries globally, opened a food testing laboratory in the NCR Gurgaon region. The new laboratory will offer testing and analysis on a range of fresh fruits and vegetables, RTE foods, bakery and confections, beverages, oils and fats, dairy and meat products. The facilities are equipped to perform analysis for pesticides, antibiotics, heavy metals, aflatoxins, nutritional labelling, organic compound residues, pathogens, allergens, and shelf life studies, etc.

(November) Subodh Kant Sahai, Minister of Food Processing Industries, inaugurated the food testing laboratory in New Delhi, for the National Meat & Poultry Processing Board (NMPPB). In view of the stringent quality controls in international markets, the lab will have facilities for ascertaining the quality, presence of toxins and microbes in food samples. The laboratory will be catering to the needs of the the meat and poultry processing industry of the northern part of the country. This laboratory will be useful to research scientists and other academicians in this region.

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National HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010

BEVERAGES Siva Group buys stake in Norwegian mineral water brand

Tata Tea and Pepsi in JV for health drinks

(March) The Chennai-based Siva Group, a $ 3-billion diversified conglomerate, announced acquisition of 50 per cent stake with two others in Isklar, a Norwegian glacial natural mineral water company. The transaction reportedly involves an outlay of $ 22 million and is a 50:50 joint venture of Siva Group with Sabco, a water brand company from Oman, and Jova Holdings, also from West Asia. Fifty percent contribution is by Siva Group and other 50 per cent jointly by the two others.

(April) Tata Tea and PepsiCo signed an MoU for a joint venture in the non-carbonated ready-to-drink health and wellness market. The JV will take Tata Tea a step closer to its goal of global leader in ‘good for you’ beverages. Moving beyond the stagnant tea category, the focus on health and wellness based beverages include beverages from juices to fortified water. PepsiCo, on the other hand, has a presence in the healthy beverages segment though the sports drink Gatorade, the fruit juice Tropicana and the drinking water brand Aquafina.

FDI IN INDIA FDI inflow into food processing sector increased two-fold

Carlyle Asia acquires 20 per cent in Tirumala Milk

(April) FDI flow in the food processing sector increased to about ` 937 crore, compared with ` 455 crore in the entire 2008-09 fiscal. The major investors included PepsiCo Panimex investing in PepsiCo India Holdings in two installments of ` 243 crore and ` 244 crore each. While explaining the reason for the increase in investments, Amrit Lal Meena, Jt Secretary, Ministry of Food Processing Industries, said, “The fiscal benefits that have been accorded to this sector in the last five years have made this sector highly investment friendly.”

(June) Carlyle Asia Growth Partners IV (CAGP IV), a $ 1.04billion fund, announced an investment of ` 100 crore to pick up a 20 per cent stake, in the Andhra Pradesh-based dairy firm, Tirumala Milk. “We are going to use the funds for our expansion to Maharashtra, Goa and West Bengal. The funds will be used for expanding its procurement network and processing capacity and for the manufacture of new value added products,” said Brahma Naidu, Managing Director, Tirumala Milk.

NEW FACILITY UK-based Newby Teas forays into Indian beverage market

Novozymes inaugurates R&D centre

(January) UK-based Newby Teas Ltd, one of the leading tea and tisanes companies, forayed into the Indian tea beverage market. It has inaugurated a research & packing facility in Kolkata. “The factory is HACCP, BRC & ISO 22000-2005 certified. The plant has special storage and preservation systems with continuous temperature adjustments, humidity control systems, air-purification systems and the most hygienic environment that prevents cross contamination,” stated the company officials.

(November) Novozymes inaugurated its new R&D centre in Bengaluru, which will house the Indian operations, including global support services and the R&D centre. It was inaugurated by Steen Riisgaard, CEO, Novozymes and Per Falholt, Executive Vice President - R&D. Falholt said, “This centre will play an important role in our efforts toward discovering new applications and technologies globally and locally.” The R&D centre will undertake protein engineering work for Novozymes’ global requirements and will act as a resource base for the company’s discovery projects.

Grundfos India on expansion mode

FieldFresh inaugurates unit at Hosur

(April) Grundfos Pumps India Pvt Ltd, a 100 per cent subsidiary of Grundfos Group, has inaugurated the new 7,000 sq m facility in Chennai with an investment of ` 17.6 crore. This new facility has sophisticated material handling equipment needed to handle pumps and components in manufacturing, assembly & storage operations, and houses an office area of 1,000 sq m. It also has a test bed capacity that is built to 300 KW, and the entire load is well supported by back-up power, which will help in the testing of large pumps used for massive infrastructure projects.

(November) FieldFresh Foods, a joint venture of Bharti Enterprises and Del Monte Pacific Ltd, inaugurated its R&D and manufacturing facility at Hosur, Tamil Nadu. The facility is the first-of-its-kind in India with beverage and processed food being produced at the same place under the brand Del Monte. The facility, with an initial investment of ` 115 crore is spread across 21.4 acre and will produce fruit drinks. Besides, the facility will process fruit drinks at the rate of 300 cans & 200 PET bottles per minute and over four tonne per hour of culinary products.

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HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010 National

REGULATIONS Catch certificate must for seafood exports to EU (January) Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) implemented catch certificate validation scheme in light of the new regulation by the European Commission (EC) which insists on validated catch certificate for consignments of fish, shrimp, squid, cuttlefish, octopus, etc exported to EU. The Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and regional fisheries management organisations, like the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, want the member countries to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing for healthy growth of the fisheries sector.

Maharashtra proposes changes in food adulteration law (January) Concerned over the adverse impact on public health due to adulteration in food & beverage items, Maharashtra cabinet approved a proposal to make such offences punishable by awarding life imprisonment. It has decided to amend five sections of the Indian Penal Code to punish offenders with life terms. Currently any offence for adulteration invites six months imprisonment and a fine of ` 1,000. Sections 272, 273, 274, 275 and 276 of the Indian Penal Code deals with the offences related to adulteration.

MISCELLANEOUS CIPHET unveils latest food processing technology

HUL forays into retail cafes

(January) The Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET), a premier institute of Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Ludhiana, unveiled the latest food processing technologies to produce green chilli powder, guava bars and peanut milk. R T Patil, Director, CIPHET, said, “If an industry gets established, a farmer can get up to ` 7-8 per kg as compared to Rs 5 for green chillies. When the product is processed, the industrialist will contact the farmer directly and the farmer can earn up to ` 10 per kg. It will bring about a revolution.”

(September) Hindustan Unilever (HUL) forayed into the retail cafes segment in a significant brand extension to capitalise on the increasing trend of eating out. It is test-marketing Lipton Cafes and kiosks across the education, travel, corporate and leisure channels in key cities. The cafes also sell other HUL products like soups. Currently, the company has over 40 Lipton Cafes and kiosks as pilot models. HUL will now directly compete with coffee shop retailers. Analysts say that the ` 26,000-crore ‘out of home’ business in F&B is booming, with beverages accounting for ` 11,000 crore.

Around 2,000 applicants get approval for cold storage subsidy

GLG Life Tech launches marketing pact for Stevia in India

(June) A total number of 2,221 cold storages with capacity of 92.23 lakh tonne have been approved so far with eligible subsidy of ` 614.86 crore for cold storages in India. National Horticulture Board (NHB) provides back-end capital investment subsidy to eligible organisations for creation, modernisation, expansion of cold storage and controlled atmosphere storage at 25 per cent of the project cost.

(October) GLG Life Tech Corporation, the verticallyintegrated leader in the agricultural and commercial development of high quality stevia, announced its joint venture with Global Agrisystem Pvt Ltd (Global Agri) for the marketing, development and distribution of GLG’s portfolio of stevia extracts in markets throughout India and the Middle East. Global Agri’s strengths include market development, new product introductions, food processing, distribution and agribusiness management.

F&B players pledge for responsible advertising

IFFCO signs pact with New Zealand firms for dairy development

(July) About seven major food and beverage processors signed a unique pledge committing themselves to responsible advertising and marketing to children. This is the first such self-regulatory pledge in India on the lines of the one in the European Union (EU). These companies include Indian subsidiaries of global majors - Hindustan Unilever, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, Nestle, Kellogg, Mars International and General Mills. The pledge provides a framework for F&B companies to help promote healthier dietary choices and an active lifestyle for the Indian children.

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(November) Indian fertiliser major IFFCO entered into an agreement with two firms, including the world’s largest milk exporter Fonterra Cooperative Group, to conduct a joint feasibility study on a pilot basis. The cooperative said the study, which will be completed shortly, will mainly look at zeroing in on key parameters for the project. The MoU is the first step towards the vision of establishing large-scale dairy farms in India. IFFCO wants to expand its business into dairy project to cash in on the growing demand of milk.


HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010 International

ACQUISITION Kraft acquires Cadbury for $ 19.6 billion

Kerry Group buys Springthyme Oils

(February) After months of fierce resistance, Kraft Foods sealed a friendly deal to buy Cadbury for about $ 19.6 billion. Irene Rosenfeld, CEO, Kraft, injected more cash into her bid to takeover Cadbury. The final offer of 850 pence for each Cadbury share marked a 14 per cent increase over Kraft’s initial bid of 745 pence. “This is a bitter-sweet moment. As a chairman of a public company you are paid and required to focus on shareholder value and the process which we have undertaken has delivered shareholder value,” commented Roger Carr, Chairman, Cadbury.

(September) The Kerry Group acquired Lancashire-based infused oil-maker Springthyme Oils, which makes intensely flavoured oils that are steeped with fresh ingredients, heated rapidly for maximum flavour release and then filtered. These oils have gradually replaced dried herbs and other flavoured oils in many soups & dressings owing to their clean-label status. They are also sold to bottling companies for own-label and branded oil ranges for the retail market. Springthyme recently developed unique semi-solid infused fats bakery shortenings.

Filtrona CSP buys BP Labels

Unilever acquires Diplom-Is operations in Denmark

(March) Filtrona Coated and Security Products (CSP) acquired a Welsh food and drink labelling company BP Labels Ltd, which is a manufacturer of secure self adhesive labels for the food and drink, pharmaceutical, healthcare and cosmetic markets - often carried out as part of an authentication process. “The acquisition is consistent with Coated & Security Products vision to be the premier provider of creative and secure packaging, identity and security solutions to our customers and markets of choice”, said Tony Edwards, Divisional Managing Director, CSP.

Alfa Laval acquires Chinese fluid handling company

(October) Unilever signed an asset purchase agreement with the Norwegian dairy group, TINE, to acquire the activities of Diplom-Is, in Denmark. TINE owns and operates Diplom-Is in Norway, Sweden & Denmark and is now selling its Danish ice cream operations to Unilever, incorporating 30 employees & five local distribution centres in Denmark. Unilever’s is one of Denmark’s leading ice cream players with a brand portfolio of well known brands like Magnum, Cornetto & Carte d’Or.

Emmi buys Californian goat cheese company

(April) Alfa Laval Group has acquired a majority stake in a leading Chinese fluid handling company as it seeks to capitalise on growth in the country’s flourishing food processing industry. The Sweden-based company bought 65 per cent share in Si Fang Stainless Steel Products Co, which targets a wide range of segments in China’s food and beverage market. The firm specialises in sanitary products such as pumps, valves and fittings. Last year it posted sales of around Euro 15.5 million.

(October) Cypress Grove Chèvre of Arcata, California, was bought by one of Switzerland’s leading dairies, Emmi. The move is seen as an important boost to the already prominent market position in the US for cheese specialist Emmi. Cypress Grove Chèvre was founded in 1983 as a producer of premium fresh and mature goat milk cheese. Last year it announced a turnover of around $ 10 million. The attraction for Emmi includes the growing importance of specialty cheese such as those from goat milk in the US. Annual cheese sales in the US market now top $ 16 billion.

EXPANSION Nestle’s new plant in Dubai starts production

Wild Fig triples ice cream production

(May) Nestle’s Middle East Associate started producing powdered milk, confectionery and wafer products at its new plant in Dubai, which has a capacity of 1,00,000 tonne a year. The 1.78 million sq ft facility in TechnoPark was built as part of a $ 400 million investment programme in the region. Nestle already has a total of 17 factories and 37 offices in the Middle East region. The production of milk powder has already started, so has the packaging of imported Mackintosh’s Quality Street chocolates.

(September) Welsh ice cream manufacturer Wild Fig trebled its production after picking up a major contract to supply ice cream tubs to the Wales Millennium Centre. The familyowned firm, which makes ice cream and sorbets using fruit grown at its own farm at Peterson super-Ely in the Vale of Glamorgan, has invested heavily in new equipment to meet growing demands. Lucy George, MD, Wild Fig, noted, “In the last 12 months, the business has been transformed. We have invested in the ice cream production area with an additional batch freezer and an ageing vat.

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International HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010

PACKAGING Coca-Cola unveils plan to buy most of its largest bottler

Tetra Pak unveils China technology centre

(February) Coca-Cola revealed plans to buy the bulk of its largest bottler following a similar move from rival PepsiCo. In an acquisition worth over $ 10 billion, Coca-Cola will buy the North American operations of its bottler Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE). At the same time, it intends to sell its Swedish and Norwegian bottling operations to CCE and has obtained the right to sell its German bottling business to CCE as well. The European side of CEE will, therefore, be entirely separate from Coca-Cola. The deal is a major about-turn in strategy for Coca-Cola.

(April) Tetra Pak inaugurated its newest technology centre in China as part of its on-going strategy to consolidate its position in the domestic processing and packaging sectors. The company officially opened the 37,000 sq metre site in Pudong, near Shanghai. According to Tetra Pak spokeswoman, “The centre, which brings together resources from product development and engineering, technical service, training, sourcing and distribution, provides Chinese customers with a one-stop service in food processing and packaging solutions.”

Krones builds new water efficient cellar concept

SCA sells off Asian packaging business

(February) Krones launched a new cellar concept, which the company claims connects pipes and tanks in a way that cuts down on water consumption, saves on energy use, and reduces cleaning times. To be used by breweries to store and ferment beer, the new Steinecker TwinPro is a cellar concept that comes in sizes starting from 1,00,000 hl per year to up to 10,000,000 hl a year. The Twin Pro concept is based on double seat valves, grouped together in filling and draining racks. Several tanks can be connected to the filling and draining valve racks in what are called tank loops.

(April) SCA signed an agreement to sell its Asia packaging operations to International Paper for $ 200 million. The Sweden-based packaging giant said that it had sold off its15 plants in China, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia to focus on growth of its hygiene products in Asia. According to SCA spokesman, the Asian market is a very fragmented one and we are exiting from it in order to concentrate on the company’s core competencies. He further added, “We announced our intention some time ago and it was just a case of finding the right buyer at the right price.”

POLICY DECISION Industry backs EFSA review of non-plastic food contact materials (February) Leading industry bodies endorsed a proposal by European safety chiefs to evaluate the safety of non-plastic food contact materials such as inks, coatings and adhesives. Organisations such as adhesive and sealant association FEICA, can coating body CEPE and EuPIA, the printing inks group, have all come out in support of a measure by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to develop and introduce specific non-plastic food contact regulations.

Denmark bans bisphenol (March) Denmark introduced a temporary ban on bisphenol A (BPA) in all food contact materials for young children amid fears the chemical could inhibit brain development. The Government decided to impose the ban for children aged 0-3 years as a precautionary measure after its food safety experts raised concerns that low-level exposure to the substance may inhibit learning capacity. Henrik Hoegh, the Minister of Food, said that research from the National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark had not found any clear evidence that BPA had harmful effects in new born rats.

UK pork industry agrees for labelling code

UN finalises global guidelines for fish production

(February) The work on a new code of practice on country of origin labelling (COOL) of the UK pork got underway thanks to an agreement hammered out between the UK government and key industry players. The scheme was drawn up with the help of pig producers, processors, major food retailers, and the food service sector. Leading UK trade group the British Pig Executive (BPEX) has welcomed the initiative. “This is a very significant step forward by all elements of the pig meat supply chain to provide consumers with even greater confidence,” said Mick Sloyan, CEO, BPEX.

(November) The first-ever global guidelines for aquaculture certification were adopted recently at a United Nations-backed meeting. More than 50 countries attended the meeting of the subcommittee on Aquaculture of the Committee on Fisheries, part of the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) at Phuket, Thailand. The non-binding guidelines, finalised after four years of debate among governments, producers, processors and traders, are the first to subject animal health, food safety, the environment and socio-economic issues relating to aquaculture workers to compliance.

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HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010 International

SUPPLY CHAIN UK logisitics group acquires Hungarian food transport firm

FrieslandCampina launches traceability system for organic dairy range

(March) Leading European logistics firm, TDG, acquired a Hungarian transport business serving food manufacturers such as Friesland Foods and Cerbona, a move the company said will allow it to extend its full range of services across Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). Kevin Richardson, Director, Strategic Development, TDG, said the acquisition allows TDG to expand its services into the Hungarian market by offering a high quality domestic transport capability.

(May) The Netherlands based FrieslandCampina introduced a traceability system for an organic dairy brand to enable customers to track their purchases back to the farmyard. Using a code on the packaging of all products in the Campina Boerenland range, Dutch consumers will be able to identify the farmer that supplied the milk processed in their dairy purchases. The 130 Dutch organic dairy farmers that supply milk for the Campina Boerenland range have supplied the company with descriptions of themselves and their farms.

MISCELLANEOUS Nestle reopens Zimbabwe dairy factory

Coca-Cola increases stake in Innocent

(January) Nestle reopened its dairy processing plant in Zimbabwe after receiving written assurance from the local government guaranteeing staff safety. Nestle suspended operations at its Harare factory saying that the safety of employees could no longer be assured. The company had been under pressure to continue buying and processing milk from non-contracted suppliers, including from Gushungo Dairies, an estate managed by Grace Mugabe. This followed a promise from Nestle in October to end business dealings with Gushungo Dairies.

(May) Coca-Cola increased its stake in healthy smoothie maker, Innocent, to 58 per cent. The move comes after the gradual erosion of Innocent’s once pulsating and booming business plan. The 12-year-old business plan went awry as many more new products came into the market laden with antioxidants. According to reports, access to more costeffective raw material purchase, distribution and marketing by Coca-Cola may help in turning around Innocent’s fortunes. In March last year, Coca-Cola had purchased 18 per cent of Innocent’s shares.

Ecolab’s new cleaner tackles zero trans fat oil stains on machinery

Japan and China sign food safety pact

(February) Ecolab developed a cleaning gel to help food processors deal with the problem of cleaning zero trans fat oils from machinery and surfaces. The company has developed its proprietary Exelerate ZTF product as a solution to the difficulties faced in potato, snack food, bakery and meat processing plants by the increasing use of zero trans fats. “Due to the recent focus on dietary benefits of zero trans fat, a rapid switch in the food industry from standard, high trans fat cooking oils is taking place,” said Ecolab officials.

GENS Nano develops new natural coating to control bacteria spread (April) A new coating technology for food processing plant interiors utilises titanium dioxide (TiO2) to inhibit odours and reduce the risk of bacterial contamination, claimed the Canadian developer Green Earth Nano Science (GENS Nano). Recent outbreaks of microbes (Listeria and Escherichia coli) in food industry have increased the requirement to test a plant’s surfaces, for example, countertops & meat slicers, as well as non-contact surfaces, for example, walls, ceilings and drains.

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(June) Officials from Japan and China reached a bilateral agreement to improve food safety standards and restore confidence. Under the pact authorities from both states are permitted to inspect one another’s processing facilities when concerns are raised over the safety of food imports. The document follows the 2007/08 dumplings scandal when 10 Japanese fell ill after eating pesiticide-tainted gyoza dumplings imported from China. The countries have pledged to hold annual meetings and will form an action plan on food safety to resolve issues quickly and effectively.

Sidel creates South African subsidiary (November) Sidel created its own subsidiary in South Africa to better serve the growing beverage industry in the country and surrounding regions. The supplier of beverage packaging machinery has installed 400 pieces of equipment in Southern Africa. As the size of the beverage industry continues to grow in the region, Sidel has decided to develop its own activities there. Mart Tiismann, President & CEO, Sidel, said, “Establishing our own local company is the first step in strengthening our local presence for greater responsiveness and stronger support to our customers.”


NATIONAL NEWS ACQUISITION

Tata Group acquires UK’s largest salt manufacturer

R Mukundan

The Tata Group has bought yet another major company in the UK, the country’s largest manufacturer of salt, consolidating its position as UK’s biggest manufacturing employer. WELLNESS INGREDIENT

DSM Nutritional Products introduces Fabuless™ DSM Nutritional Products, recently introduced Fabuless™. According to Jörgen Quick, Marketing Manager, Weight Management, DSM Nutritional Products, “ Fabuless™ is a unique ingredient within the area of weight management and appetite control. Safe, natural and with an unprecedented clinical substantiation, Fabuless™ is a proprietary emulsion, EXHIBITION

Horti Expo to kick start at Pragati Maidan

Trends like contract farming, cooperative movement and booming food retail, are changing the entire landscape of horticulture sector. Tracking these changes under one platform, the 3rd International Horti Expo 2011 will be held from January 7-9, 2011 at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi. Organised by Media Today Group, this 8-in-1 event will have concurrent shows such as Food Retailing Expo, India Organic Expo,

In a deal valued at about ` 650 crore, Tata Chemicals’ European subsidiary Brunner Mond acquired Cheshire Salt Holdings, the parent company of British Salt, from its current owners LDC, the private equity arm of British banking group Lloyds. “The acquisition will be entirely debt financed on a non-recourse basis to Tata Chemical,” said R Mukundan, MD, Tata Chemicals. British Salt generates annual revenue of around £ 35 million.

The move gives Brunner Mond and the Tata Group an entry point into the food processing and gas storage business sectors where British Salt has considerable expertise. British Salt produces about half the UK’s pure salt for a range of applications from food processing to industrial applications, currently in huge demand in snow-bound Europe. The company has manufacturing plants in Northwich, Cheshire, where it has its headquarters.

derived from all-natural vegetable oils and works in harmony with the body’s regulatory mechanism to control appetite. It has been welcomed by manufacturers all over the world that are looking to provide effective weight management solutions. Fabuless™ can be consumed on its own or in a variety of applications, such as dairy products, meal replacement drinks and supplement sachets”. The clinical evidence behind

Fabuless™ is extensive. Many independent studies have been performed that substantiate the product’s effect on reducing calorie intake.

Agri Finance & Insurance Expo, Agri Science & Technology Expo, Processing & Packaging Expo, Cold Chain & Logistics Expo, Seed Agrochem & Irrigation Expo and Medi-Herbal Expo. The event is supported by Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI), Ministry of Health, Department of AYUSH, Agricultural & Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA), National Medicinal Plant Board, Indian Retail Association, All India Food Processors Association, etc. This time the theme of the expo is ‘Projecting India’s farm power: Combining food quality and safety’. “Today the global horticulture and food industry is changing to bring about innovations in productivity and also facing challenges to stand

to international standards. Under the able leadership, visionary support and through the schemes of MoFPI, the scenario of Indian food processing sector is changing to science based standards with modern hi-tech production to value addition of fruits & vegetables and upto modern retailing,” said S Jafar Naqvi, Chief Coordinator, & President, Indian Flowers & Ornamental Plants Welfare Association (iFlora). He added, “To synchronise the efforts of all concerned departments, we are organising two days international conference/workshops and training programme for progressive farmers and agri entrepreneurs concurrently with the expo. It will promote the need of backward and forward linkage and among all concerned within farming community.”

Jörgen Quick

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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NATIONAL NEWS MARKETING STRATEGY

Coca-Cola plans consolidation

Coca-Cola India plans to take national a slew of non-soda beverages it currently sells in select markets to CONTRACT FARMING

FieldFresh Foods to explore business in East India As it looks to widen product portfolio of its fresh fruits and vegetables, FieldFresh Foods announced its expansion of contract farming to east India, to source pineapples. The company, a joint venture between Bharti Enterprises and Philippine’s Del Monte Pacific, said it has partnered with farmers in Siliguri (West Bengal) for pineapples. “We have

PRODUCT LAUNCH

Britannia launches health snack for diabetics

Britannia has created NutriChoice Diabetic Friendly Essentials, to meet the nutrition and taste needs of a person with diabetes, providing enjoyment of diet, FAST FOOD CHAIN

KFC completes 100 stores in India One of the world’s largest chicken restaurant chains , Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) recently announced the opening of its 100th store and said it planned to grow aggressively in the Indian market to touch 500 stores by 2015. “We have grown from 50 stores in 2009 to 100 stores today. We plan to add 70 to 75

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consolidate and grow its functional drinks portfolio. The company will also take its portfolio of still beverages like Minute Maid into smaller towns and expand its retail reach by around 20 per cent to 1.5 million outlets next year, as per Atul Singh, President and CEO, Coca-Cola India. “We would like to tap the opportunity for still beverages in

the smaller markets and rural India, which are fast getting urbanised,” he added. Coca-Cola launched 8-9 products last year, including Minute Maid apple, ready-to-drink iced teal Nestea, Maaza Milky Delite and energy drink Burn, which are either test-marketing in different locations or launched in select markets.

recently starting engaging with farmers in Siliguri to source pineapples from 25 acre farmland. Another area of focus is banana, for which also the company is roping in farmers,” said Rakesh Bharti Mittal, Vice Chairman and Managing Director, Bharti Enterprises. At present, most of the FieldFresh branded products are sourced from farms at Ludhiana, J&K, Punjab, Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh. The company currently sells fresh vegetables and fruits- primarily baby corn, sweet

corn, apples in international and domestic markets. Besides the expansion on the fresh side, the company is also planning on introducing new products in the processed food segment from the Del Monte portfolio.

feeling of satisfaction and feeling active for longer. Vinita Bali, Managing Director, Britannia Industries Ltd, said “NutriChoice is our flagship health brand and has launched several innovative products like Hi Fibre biscuits and 5 Grain biscuits to meet the health and lifestyle needs of emerging India. Diabetes is posing a serious lifestyle challenge needing immediate attention and NutriChoice is committed to building awareness for diabetes prevention & management, and creating expert products that can

be included in the lifestyle of a person with diabetes. We are looking forward to have the Britannia NutriChoice Diabetic Friendly Essentials range put back the enjoyment of eating into the lives of diabetics.” Lifestyle management in diabetes needs to cover regular physical activity, disciplined medication and a balanced diet that should also include healthy snacking. Experts say that a healthy snack in between meals can help in keeping blood sugar levels stable.

stores every year and aim at reaching the milestone of 500 stores by 2015,” said Unnat Varma, Director - Marketing, KFC. KFC has been expanding in the cities where it is already present and also entering new ones. It plans to increase its presence from 21 cities now to around 75 cities by 2015. The company is keen on entering new cities like Madurai, Salem, Hubli, Mysore in the south and Kanpur, Allahabad in the north.

“Surprisingly, we have seen higher sales traction in some smaller cities,” Varma said. Stores in Dehradun, Amritsar, Vishakapatnam, Mangalore, Coimbatore are seeing good traction.

Modern Food Processing | January 2011


NATIONAL NEWS BRANDING

Dabur’s Real gets a brand makeover

Dabur India recently announced its plans of giving its juice brand Real an image makeover as part of its strategy to garner sales of ` 700 crore from its food division ENERGY DRINKS

XXX targets 30 per cent market share by 2012 XXX Energy Drinks Pvt Ltd has announced that it is aggressively targeting a sizeable chunk of the energy drinks marketshare by 2011-12 and is extremely bullish on its growth prospects in the coming financial year. A subsidiary of the ` 1,000-crore JMJ Group, XXX Energy Drinks Pvt Ltd is targeting a 30 per cent share of the

RECOGNITION

Atul receives Siemens Ecovatives Award 2010

Atul Ltd, one of India’s leading specialty chemicals companies, has been awarded the prestigious Siemens Ecovatives Award 2010 in Earthcare on December 13, 2010. HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Addict chain of health drink parlours inaugurated Addict Juice Bars, one of the first chains of smoothie cafes in Southern India formally opened its first stand alone store in Bengaluru. Addict as a concept is about inspiring people to lead a healthy lifestyle. The company claims that its flagship product,

in the next three years. The company officials said Dabur is now focussing to highlight the nutritional aspect of its juices as against the earlier practice of promoting the brand for taste. “Over the years, consumers have accepted the taste (of Real) and loved it. And, now we are educating consumers about the nutrition aspect of our juices. Hence, we decided to go for a re-branding,” said K K Chutani, Head of Marketing (Foods), Dabur India.

As part of the exercise, the company has changed the logo and also the packaging of all its Real products. “Real is a more than ` 400 crore brand - the market leader in the packaged fruit juices category in the country. Going forward, we expect to see the brand growing with strong double digit figure,” Chutani said. At present, Dabur sells 12 variants under the Real brand. The company plans to introduce more variants to this range.

market by the end of the fiscal year 2012 and aims to sell around 7.5 lakh cans per month during the same period, up from 2.5 lakh cans per month currently. As a part of the aggressive marketing and promotion strategy, XXX has entered into a tie-up with Amalgamated Bean Coffee Trading Co Ltd (ABCTCL) to promote its brands at all Café Coffee Day outlets across the country. XXX Energy Drinks has also engaged in direct

contacts with quick service outlets, HORECA (Hotel, Restaurant and Catering) outlets at multiplexes in order to directly engage with its target audience.

This award was presented to Atul Ltd for its unique innovative green initiative of ‘Greening the Deserts’ through scientific cultivation of tissue cultured date palms. The award was presented by Dr Prodipto Ghosh, Member of Prime Minister’s Council of Climate Change and Former Secretary, Environment and Forest in the Union Government of India, and received by B N Mohanan, Whole-time Director & President – Infrastructure Unit, Atul Ltd. Dedicating the Award to Rajasthan Horticulture Development Society,

Government of Rajasthan and toiling farmers of arid regions, Mohanan said, “This green initiative, envisioned by our Chairman & Managing Director, Sunil S Lalbhai and supported by Government of Rajasthan will help improve the economy and ecology of the arid regions and benefit the farming community.’’ As a part of the integrated project, Atul is also setting up a world class Date Palm Tissue Culture laboratory at Jodhpur in a joint venture with Government of Rajasthan, with overseas technology.

Smoothie which is designed to take care of one full day’s requirement of nutrition from fruit. Apart from smoothies, Addict also has a wide range of functional beverages and healthy products like salads and sandwiches, which have garnered overwhelming appreciation from the patrons. Krishna Verma, Director said, “With the launch of our first stand alone store in Bengaluru, we are attempting

to reach out to a vast audience. The range of our products, the thought and the concept behind each of them shows our endeavor to provide the very best to our customers.”

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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NATIONAL NEWS Report

Food cluster

CCCL initiates food SEZ in Tamil Nadu Pearl City Food Port SEZ is expected to address issues of food wastage and also create job opportunities in the coming years.

Conceptual view of the SEZ

Prasenjit Chakraborty

F

ood Processing is one of the fastest emerging sectors in India. However, colossal wastage of food every year, due to inadequate infrastructure, is a matter of great concern for the entire nation. Taking due cognisance of the fact, Consolidated Construction Consortium Ltd (CCCL) is developing an interesting and unique initiative near the major port city Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu. The initiative is aptly dubbed as ‘Pearl City Food Port SEZ’, perhaps a first of its kind SEZ in the country dedicated exclusively to the food processing industry. CCCL is the Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) company for the project, and has an able partner Tamil Nadu Industrial Development Corporation (TIDCO) to accomplish its goal. According to CCCL, the initiative is being planned and implemented to make the SEZ a ‘destination for the food industry’ with a mission to contribute towards ‘making India a food factory to the world.’ The major attraction and advantage of the project is its proximity to the Tuticorin Port, which is one of the fastest growing ports in the region and also a major hub for import & export of agrifood products. Thus, units coming up at the SEZ will have tremendous logistical advantages, as they

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would be able to use the port for both import (eg, machinery, ingredients and even key raw materials like sugar, wheat, pulses, etc) and to export to a plethora of global markets. “The SEZ would offer the units a diverse range of raw materials including fruits, vegetables, spices, salt, herbal produce, coconut, rice, ragi & other millets, poultry and seafood products,” said G V S Mani, Head - Marketing & Business Development, Pearl City Food Port SEZ. This also means that the SEZ can house a diverse range of food product producers. Another advantage is the labour, as it is believed to be economical and productive in the region. “Tamil Nadu and its southern regions are known for industry-friendly labour, given the fact that this region still lags in large-scale industrialisation,” opined Mani. Considering the unique needs of the food industry, the SEZ will offer facilities like cold storage, warehousing, food testing laboratory, food irradiation facility, diesel tanks, weigh bridge, etc. Other amenities like power, water, good roads, common ETP facilities, cafeteria, administrative support, etc will also be made available. The developers have decided to offer ready-built factory units spanning an area of 10,000-20,000 sq ft for the micro and small enterprises (MSE) segment. “This will help in reducing the initial investment costs for such units. By availing the common facilities, they can scale up substantially to compete in the global market,” said Mani. In the initial phase of the project, the investment is likely to be in the range of ` 100 crore. CCCL hopes to have a basic infrastructure in place by early March 2011, and expects to have a good number of units by mid 2011. If everything goes in the right direction, the SEZ will provide the much needed momentum to the processed food sector in India.


WORLD NEWS ACQUISITION

GEA makes two acquisitions

GEA Group has recently acquired Convenience Food Systems (CFS) and the Bock Group. CFS is a processing and packaging firm specialising in animal protein foodstuffs, having a turnover COLLABORATION

MicVac inks partnership with Dai Nippon Printing The Sweden based MicVac has signed a license and partnership agreement with Dai Nippon Printing (DNP), Japan. The agreement will open up a large market for the Swedish company. DNP is a multinational corporation with a turnover of $ 19 billion. “This partnership gives us access to the markets in Japan and Korea,

EXHIBITION

Anuga 2011 to focus on food service and catering

The next edition of Anuga 2011, which is one of the important international events for food service industry will take place in Cologne, Germany. This edition will see greater emphasis on POLICY

US Senate passes the Food Safety Modernization Act The US Senate passed the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) of 2010. This bill directly enlarges FDA’s legal and regulatory authority over food in nearly every sector. Besides, this bill will substantially increase the regulatory compliance burden on foreign food manufacturers,

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of about Euro 400 million. Bock the supplier of piston compressors for cooling applications. GEA revealed that the deal is part of a defined strategy of expansion in the food sector and will serve as a platform for future acquisitions. “This acquisition follows our declared strategy to expand the food process technology activities of GEA Group horizontally. We are

taking our portfolio to another big step forward towards the less cyclical food industry,” said Juerg Oleas, CEO, GEA. According to Brian McCluskie, CEO, CFS, “The animal protein market (meat, fish and cheese) is one of the fastest growing segments in the industry and being part of the bigger GEA group will give it the best chance of exploiting that expanding market potential.”

which a smaller company like MicVac never would have had the possibility to access directly. The market potential is enormous and as an example more than 3 billion Bento boxes (prepared and packed lunch boxes) are sold per year only in the Seven-Eleven stores in Japan,” said Johan Zetterberg, Vice President, Business Development, MicVac. MicVac is a solution provider of a continuous cooking process for producers of chilled ready meals.

The unique patented MicVac solution gives premium products that retain taste, texture and nutrition. The valve incorporated in the packaging also gives an extraordinary convenience for the consumer due to the even heating.

the food service and catering market, which has been growing in importance for years. The proven Anuga concept “10 specialised trade shows under one roof” will continue, however, the former specialised trade show Anuga CateringTec is now being restructured into the Anuga FoodService trade show. This means that, in addition to technology and services for the food service segments, food and beverage suppliers will also be included. In

addition, Anuga FoodService will be clearly positioned by means of special shows, an experts’ meeting place and concise, informative presentations, etc. “This is the starting point for our concept expansion. The specialised trade show for the technical needs of the catering sector and related services is to be complemented by the presence of food ” said Peter Grothues, Vice President, Food, Technology & Environment, Koelnmesse.

farms and food importers without a proportional effect on food safety. In addition to representing huge projected government spending, this bill will cause producers to raise food prices and thus will lower food imports without a significant improvement in food safety. Benjamin L England, Food and Drug Law consultant & lawyer and also an employee of FDA for 17 years, warns

food importers about the new US Senate Bill 510 that is predicted to create unrealistic import-requirements in the near future.

Modern Food Processing | January 2011


WORLD NEWS STRATEGIC DECISION

RPC agrees takeover of Superfos

The UK based RPC Group has unveiled plans to acquire Superfos for Euro 240 million in a bid to boost its product ASEPTIC PACKAGING

Breakthrough in filling technology Krones AG, Germany, has received a letter of no-objection from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a rotary dry-aseptic PET-bottle filling system featuring H2O2 as the sterilising agent. This path-breaking development has so far been accomplished only by Krones, and will have been keenly noted well beyond the borders of the US.

EXHIBITION

drinktec to have new slogan

The slogan for drinktec is ‘Go with the flow’ which is a rallying call for all those who want to be part of the global network in the beverages and liquid food industry and be present at its strongest FOOD SAFETY

EFSA approves use of chromium picolinate in foods The New York-based Nutrition 21 Inc, the developer and marketer of ingredients for dietary supplements, foods & beverages, and animal nutrition, has announced that the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) issued its safety assessment supporting the use of chromium picolinate in foods

portfolio, technical know-how and geographical reach. RPC forecast the deal to acquire the Danish injection moulded rigid plastic packaging producer for the food and non-food sectors will be completed in early February 2011 and will add at least £ 10 million annually to its balance sheet by 2014. The takeover, which will be subject to regulatory approval, will strengthen its capabilities and competitiveness in the

open top-filled injection moulded plastic packaging market. It also highlighted that it will broaden its product range across new geographical markets and allow it to enter higher growth sectors. Acquiring 100 per cent of Superfos will give exposure to new and innovative products including thin-walled injection moulded packaging and newly developed oxygen barrier products. Superfos, headquartered in Taastrup, Denmark, has nine facilities across Europe.

The USFDA test includes verifying microbiological safety when filling lowacid aseptic products in the range from pH 4.6 to 7. Krones is thus the first bottling line manufacturer able to provide a complete dry process featuring H2O2 in strict compliance with the stringent stipulations applying in terms of sterilisation performance, residual concentration and shrinkage.

The downtime required for cleaning and sterilising the system has consequently been minimised. The machine has currently been validated for 48 hours of continuous operation.

and most go-ahead platform for new business: drinktec. This is one of leading events in food & beverage and liquid food technology segment which brings in the entire sector on one platform. Manufacturers and suppliers from all over the world – global companies & SMEs alike – meet up here with all the key producers & retailers of beverages and liquid food products. Within this sector, drinktec is regarded as one of the leading platforms for launching new products on

the world market. The fact that the entire production chain is represented at drinktec emphasises the fair´s role as the world´s leading trade fair for the sector. The fair´s ‘Flow’ visual captures this spirit. The ‘Flow’ visual is all about movement and dynamism. According to Petra Westphal, Director, Exhibitions, “The ‘Flow’ stands for transparency and openness, both of which are important attributes of drinktec.” The next edition will take place in 2013 in Germany.

intended for the general population in the European Union (EU). In its safety assessment, EFSA concluded that chromium picolinate has a large margin of safety supporting its use as a source of chromium up to the maximum level established by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Chromium picolinate is the chemical compound that is sold as a nutritional supplement to prevent or treat chromium deficiency.

The safety assessment is an initial step in obtaining formal EU approval of chromium picolinate as an acceptable form of chromium for use in foods. The company expects the formal approval will be issued in 2011.

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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TECH UPDATES

Baker Perkins’ die technology extends snack capability

Key Technology launches equipment to improve winery operations

Baker Perkins has extended its snack extrusion end-product capability with new die technology and the application of proven rotary cutter technology. This new process involves a specially adapted Baker Perkins SBX Master twin-screw extruder plus a new die that produces a thin, wide sheet of dough. The process may be supplied as part of a new snack extrusion system or, potentially retrofitted to an existing line. After extrusion, the sheet is cut into regular, geometric shapes by a rotary cutter, a technology well established in other sectors. The shapes may be fried as a conventional snack, or baked in an oven for snacks with a lower fat content. Baker Perkins ensures that snack manufacturers are able to take advantage of the latest equipment and product technology via the Snack Master modular line concept. This ensures that lines installed to produce one type of product can be gradually extended to make others by adding units from Baker Perkins’ wide range of post-extrusion equipment. Key to this concept is the SBX Master twin-screw cooker extruder, a solid-barrel unit offering process flexibility through modular design.

Key Technology has introduced its family of Crush Pad Equipment Solutions for wineries. Modules, which can be utilised separately or configured as an integrated system, include a receiving hopper, cluster sorting table, postdestemmer sorting table with MOG (material other than grape) separating system and colour sorters. These stainless steel systems help wineries improve their product quality while redirecting labour to other tasks. Key claims that its Crush Pad Equipment Solutions enable wineries to better control the quality of must going to their fermenting tanks by more effectively removing any unwanted objects such as insects, skins, raisins, ‘shot’ berries, stem jacks, petioles, leaves and other MOG from the product flow. Gentle handling and improved sanitation further enhance product quality. The modules are available in a range of standard sizes that handle from one to 10 tonne of product per hour. The mobile modules feature locking caster wheels, leveling screws, and adjustable-height legs for easy repositioning. “Each Crush Pad Solution module is designed to achieve superior performance at a competitive price to deliver the greatest value to customers,” stated Bret Larreau, Product Manager, Key Technology.

Research underway for catalyst to enhance bioplastics performance

Quadrant develops new metal detectable plastics range for food processing

A technique is being developed by researchers from the UK-based University of Bath and Israel’s Tel Aviv University for the production of bioplastic polylactic acid (PLA), with improved properties. The technique manipulates the material’s structure during the manufacturing process. Scientists are developing a catalyst that they claim enhances the characteristics of PLA in terms of barrier properties, as well as heat and impact resistance. Research teams feel that this will allow the material to be used far more widely in such areas, as microwaveable trays and hot drink cups in food packaging, as well as in engineering plastics for the automotive industry. According to Prof Matthew Davidson, Whorrod Professor of Sustainable Chemical Technologies at the University of Bath, “Greater market penetration is likely to lead to an increase in demand and a lowering of prices, as economies of scale kick in.” PLA is a type of biodegradable plastic that can be made from renewable plant sources such as corn, wheat or sugar. While its use in food packaging is increasing, major challenges include the perceived limitations of its physical properties and processability. The team has already formed initial commercial partnerships aimed Prof Matthew Davidson at scaling up production of PLA.

To help food processors tackle the issue of breakage and wear in equipment, Quadrant has introduced a new metal detectable (MD) engineering thermoplastics range. Food processors require plastic equipment parts that will provide reassurance of easy detection if fragments or particles fall off into the product during processing. Quadrant claims that metal detection is the most economical, dependable and therefore common form of monitoring for potential contamination. The MD engineering range includes three types of thermoplastics: polyethylene (PE), polyoxymethylene (POM) and polyamide (PA6) based food contact approved MD materials. Dr Stephan Glander, Global Research and Market Development Director, Quadrant, said, “Quadrant is the first to offer this range of metal detectable engineering plastic stock shapes, because a solution to the market is not one product, but a variety, which covers most of the requirements of the food industry.” Stock shapes of the three products will be offered as extruded rods or plates in various sizes and the range can to be used in processing equipment for the dairy, meat & bakery sectors.

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TECH UPDATES

VFP’s new foil seal improves production efficiencies

High-power pulsed light technology can act as food safety tool

Vaassen Flexible Packaging (VFP) claims that its new foilbased induction seal liner can significantly save materials and faster product-to-market times. The Netherlandsbased company said the three-ply seal challenges the traditional foil-based four layer laminate seal comprising PET, foamed PE, aluminium and a seal layer, by replacing the PET & PE with a single layer of PET50. Acting as an inlay to the screw cap of sauce bottles, the new foil ensures product freshness, pack integrity and tamper evidence. Once the bottle is filled, the screw cap is applied and the alufoil-based liner is sealed to the bottle by induction sealing. The PET50 successfully provides sufficient isolation to avoid melting the screw cap in the sealing process and it also achieves the rigidity function provided by the traditional foam layer, said the firm. Nigel Poole, Sales and Marketing Director Performance Films and Foils, VFP, said, “We estimate using our three-ply system results in a material saving of around 10 per cent. This adaptation to an existing application has the same barrier properties as the four-ply seal and, because it cuts out one step in the production line, it can speed up the product-tomarket process.”

According to a new study published in the Journal of Food Safety, a technique using high-power pulsed light is a fast, effective and green solution for combating food pathogens on chicken in a food processing environment. The research, undertaken by a team of Lithuanian scientists, found that use of the non-thermal technology was successful in reducing plate counts of bacteria such as Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. The group from the Institute of Applied Research in Vilnius said, “No significant changes in meat lipid peroxidation or sensory characteristics were detected in chicken treated under non-thermal conditions.” The scientists said the modified equipment they developed and data obtained could be used for the advanced development of high-power pulsed light technique which could be used for non-thermal decontamination of different food matrices (fruits, vegetables, eggs shell, fish and meat), food-related packaging surfaces, and processing equipment for the food, medical & pharmaceutical industries. High-power pulsed light is a technique that intense and short duration pulses of broad spectrum light ranging from 200 nm to 1,000 nm to cleanse surfaces.

Antioxidant levels in baked goods can be optimised

Goldpeg’s system gives flexibility in continuous cooking

As per the published findings in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, a method involving rapid baking at lower temperatures coupled with the addition of acidulents can increase residual natural source antioxidants in baked foods. The researchers found that blue corn-containing cookies baked with citric acid in a convection oven retained the maximum total anthocyanin content (TAC). Researchers concluded, “Cookies serve as a satisfactory model for baked food systems to demonstrate how manipulating ingredients and processing conditions can improve anthocyanin retention, yet retain acceptable cookie properties.” Researchers explained that blue corn (maize) contains high levels of anthocyanins - pink to purple water-soluble flavonoids that are naturally occurring pigments in many fruits and red wine and have claimed health benefits. In both in vitro & in vivo studies, anthocyanins tend to reduce cancer cell proliferation and inhibit tumour formation, report the team, which added that research has demonstrated that anthocyanins also protect against cardiovascular diseases.

The Australia-based technology supplier Goldpeg has developed a more compact version of its cooking & cooling system, Cube, offering a range of temperatures and flexible functions in processed cheese & other food production. The Cube can be used to produce a variety of products such as baby food, chunky sauces, vegetable purees, dips, pie fillers, pet food and meat preparations. Paula Bell, Spokesperson, Goldpeg, said, “It is a fully flexible but compact system featuring the RotaTherm with all its functionality.” The new model can be made in dimensions up to 1.6 m x 1.6 m x 1.6 m, includes a production rate of up to 1000 kg/hr, a cooking temperature range of up to 145°C and a direct vacuum cooling down to 60°C. According to Goldpeg officials, the RotaTherm’s continuous cooking and processing conditions can be adjusted specifically & appropriately for the each product. “Different conditions are achieved by adjusting and accurately controlling RotaTherm levers such as the heating profile, pressure in the cooking chamber and amount of shear/ mixing. Levers are also used to manage high and low product viscosities,” officials added.

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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LEADERS SPEAK

“It is a myth that the improvement of the system incurs costâ€? ‌says Dr Jochen P Zoller, Head - Global Food Service Division, Intertek, which provides testing, inspection and certification of products as well as a range of other services to the global food & beverage (F&B) industry. Prior to joining Intertek, he has worked with some of the leading organisations providing safety and quality services to the food industry. Here, Dr Zoller discusses with Rakesh Rao the importance of safety and quality certification for the food processing industry.

Key issues before the global F&B industry The global food industry is currently facing a challenge of consistency in the quality and safety of the products manufactured. The issues regarding the presence of residues, such as pesticides & antibiotics, traceability of products and efficient organisation of the supply chain are the major challenges. Although there is improvement in the hygiene-related issues from the side of manufacturers and processors, the same remains an issue for the primary producers across the world. However, recent standard developments will improve the situation at the starting point of the chain of custody as well.

Impact of quality awareness on consumer The increased awareness about food safety and quality among the consumers globally, always keeps the manufacturers on toes and influences them to provide the right products in the market. Consumers show more interest in the food production and align this with their lifestyle elements. For them, food is not only for nutrition, but is part of their social and ethical life. Therefore, the quality and safety aspects become all the more important.

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LEADERS SPEAK

As a result, F&B manufacturers will have to take several steps to enhance the quality of their products and ensure credibility. Enhancement and consistency in product quality & safety can be achieved only by adopting the right approach for their systems, process & products in manufacturing and the entire supply chain.

Minimising risks in manufacturing Increased awareness about the regulatory, statutory & customer needs and implementation of the same throughout the food chain can minimise the associated risks. This can be achieved with increased diligence, systematic management of pre-requisite programmes, better planning & less post-process verification, more efficient and dynamic food safety hazard control, reduced liability & risk as well as focussing on end result.

Role of third party certification Third party certification of systems, processes and products can help organisations in achieving their business goals, managing their processes effectively, efficiently use their resources, enhanced customer satisfaction & confidence, continual improvement and reduction in unnecessary losses. A ‘neutral’ opinion is the most important contribution to the risk management of the vendors.

Balancing cost and quality The impression that making improvements in the system incurs cost is actually a myth. Contrary to that mentioned earlier, a properly managed system brings in a lot of benefits such as systematic approach, compliance with customers, statutory & regulatory requirements, organised & targeted communication among the trade

partners and facilitating business processes.

better

Importance of traceability Traceability is the ability to trace, track and follow food, feed, foodproducing animals or substances through all stages of production & distribution. In other words, it is the process of tracking an identified product (and its attributes) as it moves between locations. In the event of a disease outbreak or product recall, having an effective traceability system in place is vital. It ensures having timely and accurate information in order to minimise the impact on food safety, and hence encourage the business.

Global harmonisation of standards The requirement of the standards is based on the geographical location of the food products manufactured or retailed. For example, British Retail Consortium (BRC) food products are demanded by retailers in the British markets. Similarly, International Food Standard (IFS) is demanded by French, Italian and German retailers. The US is focussing more on the Safe Quality Food (SQF) standard. All these standards have a mutual recognition, and thus it is completely dependent on the manufacturer to decide which standard to adopt. Globally, some work is provided by the Global Food Safety Initiative (GSFI) to harmonise these various standards, which is difficult to achieve due to political influences. The evolution of ISO 22000:2005 was claimed to harmonise various standards and each associated component in the food chain.

Intertek’s offerings We, at Intertek, are a truly global full service provider for testing, auditing, certification and advisory along the entire food chain, from farm-to-fork. We have certification

Consumers show more interest in the food production and align this with their lifestyle elements. For them, food is not only for nutrition, but is part of their social and ethical life. Therefore, the quality and safety aspects become all the more important. standards for primary production level (eg, GlobalGAP, SQF 1000, etc), manufacturing & processing level [eg, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), ISO 22000:2005, BRC Food, IFS, SQF, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), etc] and retail level (eg, supply chain inspections and ‘brand certification’). We also certify the packaging material manufacturers for BRC IoP & ISO 22000:2005 certification, feed manufacturers with FAMI QS & ISO 22000:2005 certification and various other service providers to the food industry. In addition, we provide customised solutions as per the market needs. Our global network of well equipped laboratories support our clients with all types of testing and analysis in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, nutrition and high-end residue testing, along the entire food chain.

Mission growth Our goals are very clear. We want to become the top service provider in the Testing, Inspection and Certification (TIC) industry over the next three to five years. This will be achieved with a strong organic growth added by strategic acquisitions in different regions. Our daily development in food services is driven by fulfilling our company’s mission of ‘facilitating global trade’. Therefore, we are aiming for development at all levels of services and all regions.

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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ROUNDTABLE

Food safety regulation

Will it meet the expectation? While there is no dearth of rules and regulations governing the food industry in India, co-ordination between the regulating agencies is an issue. Realising the importance, the government introduced an integrated law, the Food Safety and Standards Act (FSSA) in 2006. In conversation with some of the experts, Shivani Mody finds out whether steps taken to tackle food safety concern are adequate enough.

Anand Ramanathan Manager, KPMG Advisory To improve the food safety standards, a wide range of initiatives are necessary. First, there is a need for harmonised standards for the traded food products as the current standards are rigid and nonresponsive to scientific advancements and modernisation. Second, there is a lack of skilled manpower, good laboratories and other resources, which have to be improved in order to effectively comply to food safety standards. Moreover, there is a need to make consumers aware of the best food safety practices. The focus should be on implementing a simple and effective regime rather than enacting new laws that add to the complexities of the existing situation. Government has the responsibility of regulating food manufacturing, storage, distribution, sale and import to ensure supply of safe & wholesome food to the citizens

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of the country. As of now, we have multiple acts, rules, etc, governing food safety. The government should look to move from multi-level/multi-department food control to a single and centralised food safety and regulatory system. The government is about to implement an integrated food law, Food Safety and Standards Act (FSSA), which is expected to come into force soon, and will aim to address all these concerns. Contemporising existing regulations will require a sustained effort and the key is to bring Indian food laws in line with existing global best practices. Playing a crucial role, responsible private food players follow Good Agricultural Practices covering on-farm and post-farm activities related to food safety and quality. Both private sector and government must work synergistically to achieve international food safety standards. The concept of food safety audits can be implemented in the country. The government will need to provide recognition to the food safety audit agencies to verify the compliance of food safety and management systems for the purpose. Focus on food safety and quality will make Indian exports more competitive and open up new markets.


ROUNDTABLE

Arvind Sinha CEO & Chief Advisor, Business Advisors Group To increase control in agri-food value system, four issues need to be looked at. First, reforms in food safety regulatory system must respond to any real or perceived risk in food production, transportation and processing, which can result into a safety crisis and have a negative impact on consumer confidence. There should be awareness among consumers and business houses involved in food production, processing and distribution regarding food safety & quality, and care needs to be taken to consider it in the planning and execution stages. Third, globalisation of food supply chain and increasing role of co-coordinating agencies/companies

Devinder Sharma Food Policy Analyst At a time when food contamination is rampant, the importance of food safety laws is as important as its implementation. And it is here that the Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) has failed miserably. Except for constituting the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) in 2008, the MoFPI has not made much progress on this count. Food adulteration is a major concern, and despite media’s continuous exposure nothing tangible has happened to boost consumer confidence. Designed more or less on the lines of the European Union’s Food Directive 2002, which is based on Codex Alimentarius standards, the FSSA is soft on the health implications of the

Ishteyaque Amjad Director - Corporate Affairs (India), Cargill FSSA, an integrated food law, is a step in the right direction to align the Indian food safety standards to the global level. While a large part of the Food Safety Act is aligned to the global standards such as CODEX, some of the standards are still left to be aligned. Once the Food Safety and Standards Rules are notified, it will be critical to watch how we streamline the food standards to meet the global food safety standards. The government has an important role to play in not only creating the law but also implementing them. While it is the role of the government to act as a regulator, it also needs to work as the facilitator of the food safety law. A concerted approach to implement the food safety from farm-to-fork is

have created new risks and challenges for maintaining quality and safety. Fourth, state governments should ensure that rules & regulations are implemented by all concerned agencies and companies. Food safety standards should be adhered to on a day-to-day basis. Food safety management systems should be mandatory for the entire food chain. In order to make it extremely successful non-compliance should be strictly penalised.

processed foods. Even in the US, food has now emerged as the biggest killer. More than 4,00,000 people die every year from obesity and related ailments, an obvious outcome of junk food. And yet the food industry has not been hauled up. The same norms are being introduced in India, which only means that the problems existing in the US pertaining to food laws are being inherited in our country. Labelling of genetically modified (GM) foods is one such area where ambiguity is being deliberately maintained.

needed to make the entire food value chain safe. The private sector remains a key stakeholder in ensuring this. It can bring in the practical aspects of a food safety law, the global best practices, new research and applications among others. It is time that both government & private sector comes forward and makes a collaborative approach to address the issue of food safety. There is also a need to create a better trust environment among government, scientist communities and private sector.

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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IN FOCUS

ADF Foods Ltd

Giving global touch to ethnic flavour With the right mix of satiety and taste, Indian cuisine is renowned world over. ADF Foods recognised this and built a business to take Indian ethnic foods such as curries, pickles, chutneys and spices in the Ready-To-Eat (RTE) format to the global markets.

Mahua Roy

W

hat started as a humble venture back in 1932 as a small retail store selling dry fruits & nuts, soon diversified into a major food processing company, manufacturing ethnic Indian pickles, chutneys, canned foods, frozen foods and spices under various brand names, which are included in the leading names in their segments, categories and markets. ADF’s international brands like Ashoka, Camel, Aeroplane, Khansama and Truly Indian have earned loyal patronage the world over. “The business was started in 1930s as a trading business by my grandfather who was a visionary and believed in owning & building brands. In possibly one of the earliest brand acquisitions, he acquired the Camel pickle brand in 1960s. I was inspired by my grandfather and joined the business right after college,” says Bimal Thakkar, Managing Director, ADF Foods Ltd. ADF gradually expanded its footprint in the Gulf and from there to Europe and the US markets. Apart from marketing and distributing its own brands, ADF Foods also undertakes contract manufacturing for leading multinationals and mainstream retailers worldwide.

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The facility The Nasik plant, situated in Sinnar, was established in 1996, as a step towards expansion and modernisation. It is involved in the manufacturing of RTE curries, pickles, chutneys & spices. The total factory area covers 32,718 sq mt. “Over the past one year, we have streamlined our manufacturing procedures and have upgraded our facility in terms of machinery. Also, we have automated most of our processes,” says Thakkar.

Manufacturing standards The plant is certified with ISO 9000, ISO 22000 and BRC, which are internationally recognised standards for Quality Management Systems, Food Management Systems and other practices viz GMP, GHP, HACCP, etc. Apart from these standard certifications, this facility is also certified with Halal and Kosher, thus ensuring the safety norms followed while using any ingredient/product. The routine analyses viz raw material inspection, finished goods inspection, salt & acidity testing, in-process material testing, rejection report of raw material & packing material, etc, help maintain the process and quality standards of the finished goods leaving the factory


IN FOCUS

premises. Needless to say that stringent quality and safety measures have to be adopted, considering it is dealing with the manufacture of food products. The highest level of quality and safety will ensure the trust in the brand.

R&D Apart from maintaining safety standards, a food manufacturing company has to be equipped with a robust and dynamic R&D. Maintenance of a competitive product pipeline is enhancing the company’s image in the international scenario. “We have a dedicated R&D team comprising experts with an experience of over a decade. The R&D team helps in keeping the product portfolio of our company in sync with the consumer requirements. Through market surveys, the shifting consumer demands and competitors’ approach towards the changing trends are gauged to remain ahead,” explains Thakkar.

Export strategy ADF has a loyal customer base abroad. Over the years it has gradually expanded its footprint in the Gulf, Europe and the US markets. As Thakkar explains the export strategy, “We have a threepronged approach for the International markets. We will continue to build

and expand our own brands in all our markets (currently 65 per cent of our sales comprise our own brands); then we will aggressively pursue institution business in the international markets and try and do maximum value addition in India. We plan to aggressively add on private label business for leading customers/retailers in various markets.”

ADF around the world ADF Foods has had a glorious past, worth reckoning. With its broad range of product offerings, ADF has managed to please the palates across the continents. In the late 1960s, ADF acquired a premium Middle Eastern Pickle brand Camel to diversify into the processed foods business. “This acquisition was a launch platform for our company into the food processing industry and international business,” reminisces Thakkar. A few years later, ADF launched an economy brand of Indian pickles in the Middle East under the name, Aeroplane, which is one of the leading mango chutney brands in the UK and the US. Under brand Ashoka, one of the leading ethnic Indian food brands made in India, ADF launched Easi-Pouch designed to maintain freshness and enhance convenience. “Having created a niche in the international market with successful

Bimal Thakkar Managing Director

The idea behind the acquisition of Elena’s was to move up the value chain and get our own sales and distribution in the US mainstream market. It gives us a new product line where there is synergy in distribution and also gives us a manufacturing facility/ base in the US. and recognised brands, we are now focussed towards growth in Indian markets as well,” adds Thakkar. Thus came the launch of SOUL, which offers India’s first range of pickles made in virgin olive oil, making it the healthiest option in pickles.

Acquisition of Elena’s ADF Foods was recently in the news for the acquisition of Elena’s, a company specialising in organic Mexican food products. “The idea behind the acquisition was to move up the value chain and get our own sales and distribution in the US mainstream market. It gives us a new product line where there is synergy in distribution and also gives us a manufacturing facility/base in the US, which is USFDA approved, where we can manufacture ethnic Indian meat products,” says Thakkar.

Awards and accolades ADF Foods has been glorified in the industry for its various ventures and innovative product launches. The company has been awarded the Best FMCG Company in the Agri-Business Sector (SME sector) and the Best Overall Exporter of the Year Award (SME sector) 2008-2009 by DHL-CNBC International Awards. Such recognition speaks volumes about the company, which is aptly taking the ‘India Shining’ message around the world.

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SECTOR WATCH Functional Foods

Nutraceuticals

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food,” is what Hippocrates had said centuries ago. This same quote has been the source of inspiration for researchers to magnify the health benefits of food. But now apart from health, another parameter has been added to the recipe of functional foods. With the new products launched, it is evident that the food companies have proven that, ‘what is healthy can also be tasty’.

A bouquet of taste and health

Mahua Roy

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reventive medicine is always preferred over therapeutics. With food becoming the new ‘medicine’, it is driving the growth of a nascent segment of nutraceuticals. Nutraceuticals are divided into three segments, functional foods, functional beverages and mineral supplements. The global nutraceuticals market is estimated at $ 117 billion, of which India has less than one per cent share. But the market is growing at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 18 per cent per annum. With 148 million potential customers, the Indian market is expected to become at least four times the existing size (` 172 billion) in the next few years. Of this, the functional foods market is the largest with 54 per cent marketshare followed closely by the dietary supplements market, which is at 32 per cent. The

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functional beverages market in India is relatively nascent at 14 per cent. “The expanding market indicates that consumers are inclined to accept these products since this industry, like any other, is surely market driven. It is a simple logic of demand and supply. However, it may be a niche market in the time to come,” says Dr B Sesikeran, Director, National Institute of Nutrition.

A closer perspective Although the concept of functional foods is not new to India, it is now going through a process of revamp, in the form of relaunches and rebrandings. It is interesting to note that the underlying message behind these marketing strategies portrays the emphasis on ‘taste’. And why not, if medicinal syrups can come up with appealing flavours, how can functional foods be far behind? “It is important for companies to understand one basic ethos of the Indian market. Taste comes


Functional Foods SECTOR WATCH

Hale ‘n’ hearty 14% 32% 54%

Functional foods Dietary supplements Functional beverages

Source: Ernst and Young

Figure 1: Break-up of the Indian nutraceuticals market

first, health comes later. Brands that understand this do well. Even the healthiest options need to be packaged with the overt cues of best in taste. Brands that attempt to do the reverse tend to fall by the wayside of consumer acceptance,” says branding expert Harish Bijoor, CEO, Harish Bijoor Consults Inc. The World health Organization (WHO) has identified India as one of the nations that will have the maximum number of people affected by the lifestyle disorders in the near future. Apart from becoming more common, these are also affecting the younger population in the age bracket of 30+ or even younger. Already considered the diabetes capital of the world, India now is poised towards gaining another dubious distinction of becoming the lifestyle disease capital as well.

Dr B Sesikeran Director, National Institute of Nutrition

The expanding market for functional foods indicates that consumers are inclined to accept these products since this industry, like any other, is surely market driven. It is simple logic of demand & supply. However, it may be a niche market for some time to come.

The Cardiological Society of India has estimated that the country is likely to have about 100 million heart patients or nearly 60 per cent of the world’s total heart patients by 2020. The culmination of the figures of those affected has broadened the positioning of functional foods for the heart, thus incorporating the younger generation as well. Thus, accentuating the taste of the product is being given prime significance, but keeping in mind the traditional taste buds. Indianising the taste concept is Quaker Oats, one of the leading breakfast options. Having launched a variant of Quaker Oats in kesar (saffron) flavour, Pepsi is ecstatic about the innovation. Says Vidur Vyas, Marketing Director Foods, PepsiCo India, “Quaker has been well-accepted by consumers as it resonates well with the Indian habit of consuming dalia. With changing lifestyles, consumers today are increasingly looking at healthier breakfast options combined with affordability and convenience, and we see this trend growing.” Not just oats, oils too are propagating the healthy heart message, without having to compromise on the taste of the food. After the sunflower oil boom, the focus is gradually shifting towards olive oil. The growing popularity is shown in the increase in imports of olive oil, which has gone up from 2,300 tonne in 2007 to approximately 4,500 tonne in 2008. This demand is estimated to increase to 42,000 tonne by 2012, with the growing affluence of the middle class and its concerns about health & fitness. Unilever has come up with the Becel range of butter, lard and hard margarines. Few years back, they launched spreads with plant sterols Becel/Flora pro•activ spreads. These spreads, as claimed by the company, have been clinically proven to reduce the absorption of cholesterol in the body and are endorsed by key scientists & health professionals around the world. In 2009, Becel pro•activ

Harish Bijoor CEO, Harish Bijoor Consults Inc

It is important for companies to understand one basic ethos of the Indian market. Taste comes first; health comes later. Even the healthiest options need to be packaged with overt cues of best in taste. Brands which attempt to do the reverse fall by the wayside of consumer acceptance. blood pressure range, enriched with potassium to help manage blood pressure, was launched. Back home, ITC created the Benne Vita Flaxseed biscuit range. Flaxseed, a rich source of Omega-3 acids that help control cholesterol, is the functional ingredient used in this product. “When it comes to food, Indian consumers are fundamentally looking at convenience and more importantly, indulgence. The concept of health and wellness is now coming in. The market for such foods is small, but the growth rate is very high. It can become a major segment in 5–7 years from now. Also, health and wellness cannot come at the cost of taste, else the person might as well consume medicines! Thus, product

Vidur Vyas Marketing Director Foods, PepsiCo India

Quaker has been well-accepted by consumers as it resonates well with the Indian habit of consuming dalia. With changing lifestyles, consumers are looking at healthier breakfast options combined with affordability and convenience, and we see this trend growing.

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SECTOR WATCH Functional Foods

Chittaranjan Dar Chief Executive, ITC Foods Division

When it comes to food, Indian consumers are fundamentally looking at convenience and more importantly, indulgence. The concept of health and wellness is now coming in. The market for such foods is small, but the growth rate is very high. development is very challenging in order to fit health and taste together,” says Chittaranjan Dar, Chief Executive, ITC Foods Division. In this area of functional foods for wellness, diabetes is another topic of concern. Sugar-free treats including confectionery, beverages, ice creams, etc are growing at an exponential rate due to the surging numbers of diabetes-affected population. The sugar alternative category itself is poised at ` 110 crore and is growing at 15-20 per cent. NutriChoice, the flagship health brand of Britannia recently launched the brand extension – Diabetic Friendly Essentials – a snack product for the diabetics. The product claims to have no sugar,

Anuradha Narasimhan Category Director Health and Wellness, Britannia Industries Ltd

No food product can sustain in a consumer’s life without the elementary taste enjoyment. One of the big challenges for the product development team is to create a product that is not only nutritionally sound, but also has great taste for people who have diabetes.

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zero cholesterol & zero trans fat, and offer extra dietary fibres & complex carbohydrates. “No food product can sustain in a consumer’s life without the elementary taste enjoyment. One of the big challenges for the product development team is to create a product that is not only nutritionally sound, but also has great taste. There is a lot of effort that goes into understanding notions of taste and how to create a product that is immensely appealing to the senses of people who have diabetes,” says Anuradha Narasimhan, Category Director - Health and Wellness, Britannia Industries Ltd.

Food for thought Foods for cognition/memory are one of the highest growth categories in functional foods with malted health beverages being the key revenue earner in cognitive foods. Omega-3, vitamin B1 and B12, antioxidants, protein ingredients, vital minerals and phytochemicals such as Ginkgo biloba, brahmi extracts & amla, are some of the clinically proven ingredients used. Leading this bandwagon is Kellogg’s in India which has introduced the corn flakes in a wide variety of flavours including honey, chocolate and strawberry. The marketing of this product is clearly driven towards the plus points of brain health.

Natural defense One of the oldest nutraceuticals markets known in the India is chyawanprash, in which Dabur Chyawanprash holds 65 per cent share in the branded segment. Backed by a strong brand loyalty and Ayurvedic expertise, this product was launched 60 years ago by Dabur. “The world, India in particular, is waking up to a wide array of diseases like Swine Flu. A lot of these new-age diseases do not have any cure in the Allopathic system of medicine. In such cases, Ayurveda provides the only hope. While the modern sciences are searching for

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Praveen Jaipuriar Category Head - Health Supplements, Dabur India Ltd

The world, India in particular, is waking up to a wide array of diseases like Swine Flu. A lot of these new-age diseases do not have any cure in the Allopathic system of medicine. In such cases, Ayurveda provides the only hope. an answer every time a new virus/flu emerges, Ayurveda has been offering preventive cure for ages now,” states Praveen Jaipuriar, Category Head Health Supplements, Dabur India Ltd. But the sharp taste of the product was an entry barrier for Dabur, in targeting the youth. So even a traditional product like chyawanprash was introduced in new flavours, orange and mango, to maintain and enhance the marketshare of Dabur. “People feel that products that are healthy can never be tasty. The new Chyawanprash variants will end this dichotomy between health and taste,” claims Jaipuriar.

Balancing taste and health Often consumers reach for a product based on advertising or packaging, but if the taste does not deliver on the product promise, the consumer will seldom repurchase it. It has been proven that taste is the largest factor in building brand loyalty across a price and demographic segment. A comprehensive combination of consumer and brand understanding, material science and creativity to deliver a solution that is more than a flavour, is what will build a superbrand & ensure brand loyalty. A brand is more than just a product or monetary investment, it is an eternal relationship, which has to be maintained.


SECTOR WATCH Processing

Health foods

Adding value, aiding wellbeing Various dietary supplements like vitamins & minerals can be used to enrich conventional foods and improve their nutritive value. Interestingly, a steady rise has been noted in the demand for such foods and products, which has helped in the rapid growth of the health foods sector.

Dr J S Pai

F

oods are known to contain components that are beneficial to health. Vitamins at higher levels are needed to prevent deficiency diseases. Fibre providing benefits against colon cancer, probiotics promoting gut health, etc are some of the examples that were known for quite some time. Some of the ancient health sciences including the Indian system of Ayurveda had already shown benefits of some of the herbs and spices. Last few decades have produced a good amount of evidence of the health benefits of such ingredients in foods. The term nutraceutical was coined by combining ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’ to emphasise the medical benefit of nutrient or food ingredient. With the healthcare costs rising alarmingly, the idea of delivering medical benefits or at least preventive benefits through food sounded quite attractive to consumers. The steady rise in the demand for such foods and products has created a rapidly growing

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Modern Food Processing | January 2011

sector in the food industry. According to PricewaterhouseCooper, nutrition and wellness market is estimated to reach $ 290 billion by 2015. By then in India, the health and wellness foods market may reach ` 55,000 crore, as estimated by Tata Strategic Management Group.

Developing food products When making food products, ingredients rich in substances with beneficial physiological effects (eg, nutraceuticals) may be selected or these substances may be added in isolation from their rich sources. Most of these substances are highly reactive and if they degrade during processing, storage, etc their effectiveness would reduce. When such foods are produced and marketed with claims of health benefits, these need to be supported by evidence from scientific studies conducted to show that such benefits accrue upon the intake of such functional food or dietary supplements. Hence, there are certain steps that need to be followed before commercialising such foods in the market.


Processing SECTOR WATCH

The first step is to identify a relationship between the food component and the health benefit. This may be reported by an article in a scientific research journal or a folk medicine practised or just a hypothesis. This needs to be demonstrated to find out the efficacy of the ingredient or component and determine the intake level necessary to achieve the desired effect. Sometimes, it may be straightforward, but most often it is not an easy task, as it may involve long-term studies with many subjects along with effects of various factors such as stability of the compound, its bioavailability, consistency of effect and interference of other dietary factors. After one shows the effectiveness of the component, its safety at the level of consumption needs to be established. Even when the component may be a common substance present in diet, the effectiveness may require a much larger intake than normal. If these substances are not normally present in foods, then it will have to undergo an even more rigorous process of safety evaluation. Many such substances are effective at very minute levels, so an analytical process needs to be established that would not have any interference from other compounds in food products.

Add it carefully Once this component is proved to be effective and safe, a suitable food vehicle through which it may be introduced in the diet needs to be developed. Flours are the easiest and common vehicles, as enrichment can be achieved just by mixing the compounds. However, the making of the food should not affect the effectiveness or safety of the active ingredient or compound added. If probiotic is used in bread flour, then the baking process would easily destroy the microbes so the bread would hardly retain any probiotic activity. Even hardy substances like dietary fibre are affected by baking. Therefore, thermal processing may destroy heat-sensitive substances. Highly unsaturated substances like Omega-3 fatty acids, carotenoids, etc are degraded by both heat and oxygen. Other processing conditions like pH, presence of reactive chemicals, etc also need to be considered. Finally, when the food product is made, it is analysed to find out the presence of adequate amount of the active ingredient. Also, this food product needs to be studied to find out the effectiveness of providing the purported health benefit. At the same time, as only tasty foods are consumed, the acceptability of the food product should be very high. It is known that some of the health providing substances have undesirable taste and flavour; hence, such problems will have to be taken care of in the process of product development itself. Micro-encapsulation technology is useful in food products containing many ingredients that are

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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SECTOR WATCH Processing

susceptible to degradation due to interactions with other substances in food products. This protects them physically so it would not allow interaction with substances that might cause deterioration. Some of the active substances are highly unsaturated; thus, compounds having the ability to oxidise may cause changes in them. Some acids or bases may react or change the pH, resulting in lowering of activity. Others may actively react with the substance, thereby changing it to inactive substance or making it unavailable for absorption into body. Thus, micro-encapsulation becomes a cost-effective process in such a scenario.

Market opportunities Recent survey reports that the choice of food and drinks by Indian consumers is influenced by health considerations. Products claiming improvement in health and wellbeing, with special emphasis on heart and digestive system are more acceptable. Also, products claiming low fat, low sugar and reduced calories would influence consumers. Bakery and cereal products with higher fibre are accepted as well. This may be done either by using whole grain ingredients or adding fibre-rich ingredients like bran or

Rules to follow Canada has defined ‘nutraceutical’ as a product isolated or purified from foods and generally sold in medicinal forms like tablets and capsules, eg, betacarotene, lycopene, probiotics, anthocyanins, beta-glucan, phytosterols, etc. These fortified or enriched products are conventional foods to which vitamins, minerals, etc, may be added to improve their nutritive value. In Japan, in 1980s, Foods for Specified Health Uses (FOSHU) included foods to which a functional ingredient has been added for a specific healthful effect, such as gastrointestinal health, blood pressure or cholesterol level. US Dietary Supplement Health & Education Act (DSHEA) defines a large group of dietary supplements as products consumed orally containing dietary ingredients intended to supplement the foods in diet. In India, Food Safety & Standards Act (FSSA) defines foods for special dietary uses or functional foods or nutraceuticals or health supplements as foods that are specially processed or formulated to satisfy particular dietary requirements due to physical or physiological condition or specific diseases and disorders. These products do not include a drug as defined in the Drugs and Cosmetic Act and cannot claim to cure any specific disease.

using grains like oats in formulations that are rich in fibre. Low sodium products are also making appearance now a days, especially in salt and salt-rich foods. Oils used in India are mostly of vegetable origin, and except coconut & palm oils, these all are rich in polyunsaturated fats, which lower cholesterol levels. Monounsaturated fats favour increase in high-density lipoproteins (HDL) or the good cholesterol. For example, olive and groundnut oils, which are rich in monounsaturated fats. Omega3 fatty acids help in reducing the risk of heart disease and are also beneficial in arthritis. A number of such oils are now being marketed in India. Another ingredient that is also making appearance is probiotic added to yoghurt, ice cream, spreads, baby foods, etc. There are also functional foods aimed at diabetics & people with heart ailments, as well as for infants, seniors, pregnant & lactating mothers, and also people with specific ailments of kidney, liver, etc.

A word of caution Courtesy: Sara Lee

42

Courtesy: Dabur

With many new ingredients hitherto only allowed in medicinal systems like

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Ayurveda being considered for use in functional foods and nutraceuticals, it opens the doors for a vast array of food products in the category of health & wellness. Several ingredients in plant materials are known to impart health benefits when consumed as part of the daily diet. These ingredients when added to foods may help reduce risks of many ailments. However, it must be kept in mind that when used in foods indiscriminately, there are dangers of overuse of some of these substances, which may have undesirable side effects, as foods are normally consumed without restriction unlike medicines. Thus, before permitting these ingredients in common foods, their safety at high levels must be ensured. Further, the potential of such food products is enormous but safety must be considered at all stages while developing these. Dr J S Pai is the Executive Director of Protein Foods & Nutrition Development Association of India. Email: executivedirector@pfndai.org


MARKET SCOPE

Innovations in functional foods

Need for an outof-the-box thinking Increasing emphasis on general well-being and preventive therapy are driving the growth of functional foods sector, which has seen interesting new product developments (NPDs) targeting the new-age consumer. From beauty foods to relaxation drinks as well as from dynamic brand positioning to brand extensions, the NPDs are all set to take the market by storm.

Mahua Roy

T

he food companies are beginning to realise the apparent disconnect between what consumers want and what the products are offering. In response to the market demand, food science has seen the birth of new product categories in the functional foods segment. “Functional food is a growing segment where consumers feel that they have the ability to control their own health by consuming foods with specific health benefits. Today’s consumers are more knowledgeable in their expectations of the

health promises of these foods, but at the same time, are unwilling to compromise on taste,” states Jesse Wolff, Global VP - Creation and Application and Innovation, Flavors, IFF. As a result, all these products give special significance to flavours during the product development stage. ‘Mood food’ is no more a mystifying term in the market, and certainly not in Asia. In fact, 24.5 per cent of NPDs in the mood food genre were launched in Asia. Another variety that is creating waves is the range of ‘nutricosmetics’ or beauty foods. It is still in its infancy, commanding $ 2.1 billion, a small fraction of the beauty products

Top trends in the functional foods industry R Convenience: The ability to get health benefits in a

conveniently sized beverage on-the-go

way to satisfy hunger while getting the vitamins and nutrients for one’s body needs

R Believe what you see: When consumers can

R Looks matter: Novel packaging is the way to attract

experience the benefit claimed by the product, they see the value for money. This influences repurchases

and retain loyal consumers to food & health-product innovations

R Antioxidants: Primary wellness ingredient, touted to

improve heart health, mood and beauty R Snacking becomes healthy: Healthy snacking can

complement a weight-loss plan and is a convenient

R Super stars: Superfruits are those fruits that combine

antioxidants with high nutrient value and appealing taste eg blueberry, cranberry, grape, pomegrante, etc. The market for powerful superfruits is forecast to become a $10 billion global industry by 2011 Source: New Nutrition Business

43

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

43


MARKET SCOPE

market, in 2009. It is further expected to grow to $ 5.62 billion by 2015, which spells a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 17.8 per cent. The concept of nutritional snack bars is growing as well.

Beauty from within For years, consumers have turned to cosmetics, potions and lotions to maintain and enhance the beauty of their skin and hair. However, such products do not always provide the expected performance, because of inadequate levels of active ingredients, improper delivery vehicles or low skin absorption. Also, there may be underlying nutritional issues that must be addressed for optimal results. Fortunately, in the last few years, the trend of ‘beauty from within’ and a category of ‘nutricosmetics’ have emerged. As scientists have uncovered the role certain nutrients can play in skin health – slowing premature ageing & enhancing skin matrix – formulators and marketers have entered a new stage of product development. “Eating right is a consumer choice, and we have invested in fundamental research tenable to our clients to offer healthy alternatives that still deliver on their taste promise. The consumer no longer has to choose between healthy and tasty, as they now have both,” explains Wolff.

Jesse Wolff Global VP – Creation and Application & Innovation, Flavors, IFF

Functional food is a growing segment where consumers feel they have the ability to control their own health by consuming foods with specific health benefits. Today’s consumers are more knowledgeable in their expectations of the health promises of these foods.

44

Mood food: Relaxation drinks This new, but fascinating genre is expected to generate $ 500 million in sales revenue by 2010, a year-on-year growth of about 327 per cent, according to IBISWorld. The biggest advantage that relaxation drinks will have is that of immediate, visible benefit. Unlike beverages that guarantee an energy boost, relaxation drinks promise to help people unwind. And this is the most powerful reason, which will ensure the success of this product in today’s fast paced lifestyle.

India: Following the global trend Mapping the trends abroad, India is not far behind offering huge market for nutricosmetics. With about 50 per cent of the population being young, 4% 49.60% 23.20% 23.20%

Omega-3

Vitamins

Carotenoids

Others (fruit extracts, CoQ10, phytosterols, collagen) Source : Frost and Sullivan, 2009

Figure 1: Product-wise revenue of the nutricosmetics ingredients market

the innovative NPDs are bound to see a surge. A number of nutricosmetics are expected to be launched in the first half of 2011 in India. Firefly Chill Out brand, a relaxation drink from South Africa, was recently recently in India. Healthy snacking is also a global trend being modeled in India. Overall, the nutritional bar market is growing, particularly in the breakfast and granola/muesli product categories. The category as a whole grew by nearly 24 per cent during 2003-08, and is forecast to grow by an additional 8 per cent over the next 5-year period, according to Euromonitor. Consumers are starting to look for more functionality;

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Vishal Bhusari GM - Horlicks Foods, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare

With the growing working class and a rising demand for healthier snacking options for the fast paced life of today, we see great opportunity for this segment to grow faster. We also realised that taste along with nutrition plays a very important role in the success of the brand. thus, condition-specific health concerns such as bone, cognitive and hearth health, as well as satiety, are becoming more prevalent with consumers today. Nutritional bars serve as an ideal vehicle for delivery of additional functionality to fulfill these needs. Bars are portable and ready-to-eat for the on-the-go consumer and are now being positioned to be consumed throughout the day. GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) entered this nascent sector with the launch of Horlicks NutriBar, which is a nourishing multi cereal bar containing wheat, rice, corn, oats and honey. “With the growing working class and a rising demand for healthier snacking options for today’s fast paced life, we see great opportunity for this segment to grow faster. We also realised that taste along with nutrition plays a very important role in the success of the brand. This prompted us to launch our product in appealing flavours,” says Vishal Bhusari, GM - Horlicks Foods, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare. The consumer today takes stock of his health. Gone are the days of personal care. Today what we see is personalised, customised care. With the use of natural ingredients soaring, and companies translating consumer demands into NPDs, the functional foods industry is positioned on a fast track growth.


MFP_January _2011_ Engg Expo_Tab-1_PG_45


MFP_January _2011_ Engg Expo_Tab-1_PG_46


INDUSTRY UPDATE

Fish processing industry

In troubled waters Despite having enormous potential in fish processing both on domestic and exports fronts, India lags when compared with the South Asian and other developed countries. Lack of an integrated approach from the government and the industry players is one of the main reasons for this plight. Clearly, more efforts are needed to put the segment back on track and take advantage of the huge prospects this sector presents. The deboning process for creating fish fillets Courtesy: Triton Group

Prasenjit Chakraborty

I

n India, about 14 million fishermen and fish farmers depend on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihood. This figure by no means is small and clearly indicates the importance of the fish processing sector in the Indian economy. Fish processing includes freezing, drying and curing of shrimps and fish as well as producing breaded, marinated, extruded and textured products. According to Vincent Fernandez, Executive Director, Triton Group, the industry is primarily concentrated in the 12 major coastal states. He avers, “The industry is growing, with about 250 ice plants, 500-plus shrimp peeling plants, 400 freezing plants, 500-plus cold storage units, 6 canning plants, 16 fishmeal plants and 11 surimi plants.” However, due to lack of domestic demand for most of its products, the fish processing sector in India has become heavily export-oriented. The sheer potential of this industry can be realised from the fact that only 6 per cent of the total catch goes as input to the frozen foods processing plants, while 4.2 per cent goes to the drying and curing plants. “Together,

these two industries contribute over ` 6,500 crore per year to the economy,” says Fernandez. Much dependence on exports, and that too in only a few varieties, does not augur well for the fish processing industry. In this case, disappearance of a particular type of fish for one season may put many units in jeopardy. For example, the West Coast region is mainly confined to export of few varieties such as ribbonfish and mackerels since the last decade. This puts many units, especially those of small and medium scale to an uncertain future. “By any chance, if both these varieties disappear during one fishing season, many small and medium exporters will vanish from the market,” points out M M Ibrahim, Partner & Managing Director, Quality Foods and President, Seafood Exporters Association of India (SEAI), Goa Region. Due to environmental problems, availability of fish from sea is dwindling day by day, which is also a matter of concern for the industry. Disruption of ecosystem in the sea due to abnormal weather conditions, temperature fluctuations in seabed, undercurrents and increased pollution levels has resulted in diminished volumes of sea-catch.

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

47


INDUSTRY UPDATE

This diminishing sea-catch calls for an alternative method. “When the sea-catch reduces, the focus should be on culture fisheries. Introduction of a new variety, eg, Vannamei shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei) will give a new life to this sector,” exhorts M R Francis, General Manager, Naik Frozen Foods Pvt Ltd. He further says, “Volumes can be increased in the coming season, and we may be able to achieve a target of $ 6 billion worth of seafood export by 2017.”

Ensuring sustainability Like many other industries, the Indian fish processing industry suffers from lack of financial management, corporate governance and infrastructural support facilities as well as over-dependence on exports influenced by uncertain geopolitical factors. An affordable & adequate cold chain and logistics infrastructure network needs to be established across the Indian hinterland to ensure the seamless processing & supply of processed fish products within the country. “Governments also need to make arrangements for low-cost and continuous electricity, proper roads, land for building support infrastructure and a faster approval system,” opines Fernandez. It is essential to keep fish in refrigerated conditions immediately after the catch, and then transport to processing plants. But in India, this is 4.25% 6.94%

12.69%

9.06% 19.24%

9.36% 38.47%

Frozen shrimp

Frozen fish

FR cuttle fish

FR squid

Dried item

Chilled items

Others

Source: MPEDA

Figure 1: Major item-wise exports in 2009-10 (in terms of quantity)

48

still a far cry. “The domestic catch to consumption route does not go through a cold chain, resulting in the fish getting spoiled. Thus, the only solution here is to have infrastructure built for processing and supplying processed fish ready for cooking,” points out Anwar Hashim, President, SEAI. Since India depends heavily on export, it is imperative to establish a brand name in foreign countries. Achieving this requires undertaking a steady marketing drive to aggressively promote processed Indian seafood worldwide. In this direction, value addition and constant innovation of products are equally important. Apart from this, more thrust on export policies could take the sector to a new height in terms of bringing in more foreign currency. “Policies aimed at developing

Much dependence on exports, and that too in only a few varieties, does not augur well for the fish processing industry. In this case, disappearance of a particular type of fish for one season may put many units in jeopardy. sustainable aquaculture resources and dependable fishing supplies need to be implemented to bring consistency in supplies,” opines Fernandez.

Proper policy implementation Good management ensures incorporation of a long-term vision for sustained profitability over shortterm profits, thereby focussing on retaining human talent, managing cash flows, building infrastructure and incorporating a process-driven work culture. Technology, innovation and process orientation reduces dependency on individual talents & one-off ideas, thus providing a platform for sustained actions aimed at conservation & management of fish breeding grounds,

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Vincent Fernandez Executive Director, Triton Group

Policies aimed at developing sustainable aquaculture resources and dependable fishing supplies need to be implemented to bring consistency in supplies. Governments also need to make arrangements for low-cost & continuous electricity, proper roads and land for building support infrastructure. promotion of aquaculture & a reduction in environmental deterioration through pollution hazards. Fernandez strongly believes that the industry needs to prioritise the livelihood interests of natural resources-dependent communities, with a focus on better health and education. There are often talks about legislations for sustainable development of the fish processing sector. And the government also legislates many a times, for the development of the sector. Is legislation the only answer? Replies a pragmatic Hashim, “We legislate a number of controls to ensure sustainable exploitation of marine resources, but implementation fails, resulting in resources being wiped out. To ensure good governance, immediate action must be taken to regulate mesh size for trawl nets, banning of certain unhealthy ways of catching, etc.” Technology Upgradation Scheme of Marine Products (TUSMP) is a case in point. TUSMP is an excellent initiative by the government towards upgradation of this sector and is testimony to the importance & potential of the segment. Initial phases of the implementation process of this scheme have met with tepid reactions because of slow implementation and irregularities in grant approval. However, a good number of companies operating in this segment have been


INDUSTRY UPDATE

outside, as upgradations are timeconsuming processes. The technology upgradation, installation of new machinery and tightening of quality norms are very much visible within the industry. “The fruitful end results will be visible to everyone very soon,” says an optimistic Fernandez.

Resolving issues on priority

Close-up of the intricate deveining process of Shrimps Courtesy: Triton Group

able to take advantage of this scheme and update their existing set-up to meet international standards. “This has truly given a boost to our processing industry that has been facing stiff competition from the world over,” opines Fernandez. However, Hashim is not too optimistic about the scheme in its present form. He says, “TUSMP is an excellent scheme but conditions stipulated are too tough, and hence it has very few takers. Modification of the scheme is expected soon and only then it would be a success.” Changes in this segment are slow and difficult to perceive from the 5.15% 13.11% 9.24%

22.01%

4.93% 21.27%

24.29%

Japan

USA

European Union

China

South East Asia

Middle East

Others

Source: MPEDA

Figure 2: Country-wise share of exports in 2009-10 (in terms of quantity)

Indian fish processing industry has always suffered on quality issues – real or politically motivated. The industry requires to be technologically advanced and aware of international quality issues & standards. Further, appropriate technological innovations and systems must be in place to establish traceability from point of catch to point of sale of raw materials (both fish & fish additives) or finished goods as well as implement collaborative knowledge mining & sharing. Another important issue is the Indian mindset, which is biased against frozen products. These issues need to be addressed on priority, to enable the industry to benefit from the huge potential of the domestic market. Only after the Indian population accepts the products, can the indigenous value-added products targeting the taste of Indian people be developed and marketed strongly. “This will increase the nutritional intake of the Indian population and provide higher convenience value while reducing the fish processing industry’s dependence on the export market,” points out Fernandez. It is imperative to provide more attention to value-added production, since the demand for consumer packs will definitely increase due to sophistication of taste and need for convenience. This will give better opportunity for processing houses to operate efficiently and economically. “To increase and improve value-added production, the Centre along with Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) should assist exporters by way of reimbursement of sea freight incurred for export of value added products,”

M R Francis General Manager, Naik Frozen Foods Pvt Ltd

When the sea-catch reduces, focus should be on culture fisheries. Introduction of a new variety, eg, Vannamei shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei) will give a new life to this sector. Volumes can be increased in the coming season, and we may be able to achieve a target of $ 6 billion worth of seafood export by 2017. says Francis. For augmenting and attracting more exporters to produce value-added products like blanched & cooked IQF products, MPEDA should subsidise diesel/light diesel oil, which is used in boilers for blanching and cooking seafood. The Centre can also aid in value added production by extending some economic assistances for the additional power used in IQF production. “All these assistance put together will definitely help seafood industry to expand in value added production, thereby aiding this sector to emerge as one of the biggest exchange earners of India in the near future,” says Francis.

M M Ibrahim Partner & Managing Director, Quality Foods & President, SEAI, Goa Region

At times, due to unhealthy competition, some processing units purchase raw materials that are not of good quality. Also, unreputed brands push low quality products for survival. Due to this, many medium-size exporters are unable to export value added products, particularly squids & cuttlefish, to developed markets.

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

49


INDUSTRY UPDATE

demand in the global market and the large supply demand gap. “True, that there have been issues related to quality, but I do not consider Indian products as inferior to any other country’s produce,” observes Fernandez. He further adds that these South Asian countries form a major customer The automated line producing the final product base for Indian raw frozen after blanching and IQF products. What is required Courtesy: Triton Group here is, updating existing Another problem is unavailability technologies and improving processing of raw materials, which deters the quality to remain competitive. growth of this sector. Introduction of The global fish processing new varieties of fishes is also essential. industry is experiencing a phase of “This industry is always starved for consolidation. In this scenario, due to raw material; moreover, introduction the current advanced nature of the of Vennamei (Whiteleg shrimp) fish processing industry in South Asian is expected to boost production. New countries and India’s expertise in a wide varieties of catfish and tilapia must variety of raw fish, these countries have also be introduced to make available more fish to factories to provide jobs Many of the South Asian and fill up unutilised capacities,” asserts Hashim. countries have developed

Emphasising on quality Competition is always healthy, as it brings out the best quality in any product. Currently, many of the South Asian countries have developed their respective seafood and fish processing industries, anticipating the huge

Anwar Hashim President, SEAI

The domestic catch to consumption route does not go through a cold chain, resulting in fish getting spoiled. Thus, the only solution here is to have infrastructure built for processing and supplying processed fish ready for cooking.

50

their respective seafood and fish processing industries, anticipating the huge demand in the global market and the large supply demand gap. aligned themselves in specific areas of the global supply chain. Further, the government is taking initiatives like TUSMP and the Indian processing industry is bringing in fresh talents in their management systems. Sometimes, unhealthy competition among the processors seems to lead to compromise in quality, which ultimately affects the image of Indian products in foreign countries. “At times, due to unhealthy competition, some processing units purchase raw materials that are not of good quality. Also, unreputed brands push low quality products for survival.

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Table 1: Export of marine products from India in 2009-10 Q: Quantity in MT, V: Value in ` crore Change: Variation compared to previous year in terms of per cent

Year 2005-06 Q V 2006-07 Q V 2007-08 Q V 2008-09 Q V 2009-10 Q V

Export 512164 7245.30 612641 8363.53 541701 7620.92 602835 8607.94 678436 10048.53

Change (in %) 11.02 9.05 19.62 15.43 -11.58 -8.88 11.29 12.95 12.54 16.74

During 2009-10 for the first time in the history of marine product exports, the export earnings have crossed ` 10,000 crore mark. Source: MPEDA

Due to this, many medium sized exporters are unable to export valueadded products, particularly squids & cuttlefish to developed markets like the US, and are thus forced to send to China & Thailand in the raw form.” laments Ibrahim. Nevertheless, India has a bright future, provided that some corrective steps are taken immediately. This is because, on one hand, there is a shortage of seafood worldwide and, on the other, seafood consumption is soaring across the world. India ranks second in inland fish production and is the third largest fish producing country in the world. The strengths of Indian fish processing sector lie in the 8,000-km coastline, 3 million hectares of reservoirs, 1.4 million hectares of brackish water and the 14 major fishery product groups that it exports. This speaks volumes about India’s future in this arena. What is required here is adequate attention on consistent quality, technology upgradation, product presentation, etc. If these issues are addressed, one can witness the fish processing sector scaling new heights in the coming years.


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TREND ANALYSIS

Indian malted beverages market

The milky way to health 16% 12%

72%

GSKCH

Cadbury

Others Source: Frost & Sullivan

Figure 1: Market share representation for the malted health beverages

Srividyaranjani V

C

ognitive products are also called ‘nootropics’ that are intended to increase intelligence, memory, concentration and attention. These products are designed to augment brain function, shield the brain from damage, combat effects of ageing, cure depression & difficulty in concentration, aid in relaxation and help reduce aggressive behaviour. Cognitive foods contain certain clinically proven key functional ingredients like Omega-3, vitamin B1, vitamin B12, caffeine, antioxidants, protein and iron.

Market scenario Indian malt-based health beverages (malted health beverages) market is one of the biggest segments of the food processing sector. It was valued at ` 2,000 crore in 2009. These health drinks serve as an ideal base food for addition of such functional cognitive ingredients owing to their product uniqueness and positioning as a nutrition supplement. Malted health beverages segment is mainly targeted at children & women of all ages, narrowing down its consumer base to pregnant & lactating mothers and infants. As shown in Figure 1, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare (GSKCH) is the market leader in the Indian malted health beverages market, with 72 per cent marketshare with four of its major brands, Horlicks, Boost, Viva

54

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Indian malted health beverages market is considered to be an important segment in the cognitive foods sector, which is witnessing a surge. This has resulted in the entry of many new companies into this segment. While products targeted at children have grown substantially, niche segments such as malted beverages for women are yet to see healthy growth.

and Maltova. The successful brand Horlicks alone holds a marketshare of 53 per cent, which makes it the principal product in the said segment. GSKCH is followed by Cadbury, whose product Bournvita holds a marketshare of 12 per cent. Other noteworthy players who have a good presence in the market are Heinz (Complan), Amul (Nutramul), Nestle (Milo), Wockhardt Nutrition (Proteinex), Hindustan Unilever (Amaze), etc. The malted health beverages segment is one of the fastest growing processed food sectors, which is now budding with functional variants such as cognitive and weight management. Between the two variants mentioned earlier, the cognitive variant has been more popular than the latter. There are about seven or eight competitors in this segment. The key competitive factors are new & innovative marketing strategies adopted by the participants, including promotion of brand image of products of the FMCG majors and revamping the products by introducing new flavours & variants with upgraded nutrition profile. Of the mentioned factors, the most essential is providing a scientific background to the nutrients added and proving their benefits through clinical trials. The fresh entrants in the market include Hindustan Unilever and Dabur, with their brands Amaze and Chyawan Junior. Besides these, many other players are expected to enter the market in the near future.


TREND ANALYSIS

Table 1: Key brands and their year of launch augment the prices Year of in line with the Brand Company launch ingredient price range. Mother Horlicks GSKCH 2004 This makes it less Junior Horlicks GSKCH 2006 affordable, if at all, for Bournvita Lil Champs Cadbury India 2009 people in rural areas Complan Growth Heinz India Pvt Ltd 2004 R The rural populace Complan Memory Heinz India Pvt Ltd 2009 prefers homemade Amaze brain foods Hindustan Unilever Ltd 2008 conventional foods Chyawan Junior Dabur India 2008 to packaged food Source: Frost & Sullivan to meet their daily nutrient and calorie requirements. players and development of novel They still see packaged snacks as products, advanced manufacturing having less nutritive value, increased infrastructure, etc. Innovation in ingredient and cost and lacking in customary taste. Hurdles to health This conservative mindset of the mass technology is the new trend. The Some of the challenges faced by the is an impediment for the consumption product base is also widening with the cognitive health beverages market are: launch of many new products, which of malted beverages R The malted health beverage market R A large number of flavours, textures are fortified with Omega-3 fatty acids. has grown substantially well as far and varieties of health drinks alongside The ageing population, which tends to as beverages for kids are concerned. other traditional health drinks is spend more on nutritional products However, other niche segments, offered in the market with wide- that help in preventing age-related such as malted beverages meant ranging claims that have created adverse effects on brain functions, for women’s health or cholesterol confusion among the consumers is one more driver for the cognitive management, are not observing foods market. Other driving factors are much growth on account of poor Market outlook increasing innovation, technological The malted health beverages market is advancements in improving efficacy, consumer awareness R The ingredient used for cognitive presently estimated at about ` 2,000 taste of the product, etc. role is considered as one of the crore, which is growing at a rate of 20As India is a young market for finest ingredients in the Indian 25 per cent. The segment is expected cognitive foods unlike that in North food ingredient market. In order to to see an extensive expansion in the America, Asia Pacific and Europe, it maintain the margin, the marketers category with the ingress of many is thus paving the way for many new entrants. The market is expected to anticipate an exponential growth with No of competitors increase in the number of products available in the market. Regulatory Tiers of competitors organisations including the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), Prevention of Food Tier 2: Indian FMCG Tier 1: Large FMCG and Adulteration (PFA), etc, are setting and food & beverage food & beverage majors Target consumers companies trying to supplying globally up regulations specific for cognitive enter global market foods or malted drinks, which are anticipated to relax the stringency in Children between the age of 4 and 14 years and the regulatory standards, thus making geriatric patients, particularly those who are recovering way for better growth.

Table 1 illustrates key companies active in the cognitive malted health beverage market and their respective brands. Apart from cognitive malt beverages, several herbal malted health beverages are available in the market, which contain cognitive ingredients such as ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, brahmi extracts and amla extracts, whose origin is mainly from herbs. The key brands of the herbal malt beverages market, which are available in some parts of India, include Memory Vita from Velvette International.

7

from memory disorders

Competitive factors

Marketing & promotions, brand equity & brand differentiation, revamping the brands with more flavours introduction and upgrading the nutrition profile of the product, scientific background of the product Source: Frost & Sullivan

Figure 2: Competitive analysis of the Indian malted health beverages market

Srividyaranjani V, is Research Associate, South Asia and Middle East, Chemicals, Materials, and Foods at Frost & Sullivan. For details, contact Anish Charles on email: anishc@frost.com

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

55


QUALITY MANTRA

Asian markets

In search of a ‘safe’ tomorrow Courtesy: The Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council

Courtesy: The Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council

Asian markets are evolving in a common way, with regard to improvements in fresh food safety. Retail leaders play a central role in advancing government policies that accelerate this evolutionary development. While developed economies in the region have successfully achieved higher levels of food safety by leveraging active retail leader support, less developed countries lack these requirements. Thus, retail leaders can engage with and learn from other markets, as well as configure their fresh food safety practices to fit in to their own market context.

A

lack of basic water and sanitation infrastructure seriously hampers fresh food safety. A recent study noted that microbes proliferate at higher than normal rates in areas with sewage irrigation. In India, for example, sewage infrastructure operates in only 28 per cent of the country, and mortality due to food poisoning accounts for 2.7 per cent of all deaths. In Japan, by contrast, where running water and sewage infrastructure are present in nearly 100 per cent of households, the food poisoning mortality rate is 0.6 per cent.

Standards, regulations and enforcement Even with standards and regulations in place, lack of an enforcement mechanism can endanger fresh food safety. Strong and inexpensive pesticides are still widely used, irrespective of the danger to consumers, even in emerging countries with pesticide standards in place. The logistical difficulties

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Modern Food Processing | January 2011

in enforcement allow producers, especially small-scale growers, to prioritise efficiency and commercial gain over safety. Two areas where governments of emerging countries could take action to strengthen regulatory enforcement include offering thorough follow-up & monitoring and introducing third-party validation. Japanese and European practices provide guidance in these areas. Japan has reduced violations by establishing localised regulatory enforcement. Following enactment of the Food Safety Basic Law in 2003, a series of detailed regulations were implemented to further ensure food safety. Once a standard is enacted, local government farming experts visit farmers individually to introduce the new standard and offer advice. When a standard is violated, the government first polices the situation by publicly naming offenders, which is highly damaging to their reputation. The government may follow up by taking direct control where needed.


QUALITY MANTRA

The European Commission has formalised a third-party validation process through the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) as its core enforcement mechanism. The EFSA independently advises the European Commission and the governments of member states on legislative actions needed to manage existing and emerging risks.

Cold chain infrastructure Without a cold chain, the rates of food deterioration and microbe proliferation accelerate, posing a serious threat to fresh food safety. In markets, at earlier stages of development, however, cold storage and transport are uncommon or even scarce. A cold chain is enormously expensive and takes time to put in place; hence, it only makes sense for retailers to unite in this effort. To improve cold chain development, governments must implement standards that have a sweeping effect on temperature control, thereby triggering seamless cold chain development along the supply chain and improving retailerdriven methods.

Sophisticated base for producers and suppliers A lack of finesse among the upstream participants in a supply chain opens the door to a host of fresh food safety risks, which no amount of infrastructure or regulatory enforcement can prevent. A sophisticated base of producers and suppliers requires two main ingredients: market price stability and an integrated supply chain configuration. Market price stability: Producers facing heavy market price volatility are especially eager to cut costs while maximising profit. Under such circumstances, they may knowingly break regulations and seriously impair fresh food safety in the process. To counter illicit practices, some players in Hong Kong and Japan have used contracted growth allotments, whereby retailers contract

with farmers for a regular supply of a fixed volume. This practice not only stabilises prices and provides producers with more security, but also helps eliminate producer control over supply. Integrated supply chain configuration: A structured supply chain achieves two components crucial for fostering a sophisticated base of producers and suppliers. First, it facilitates traceability of product back to source. Second, a well-integrated supply chain provides retailers and government officials with a means of monitoring and educating upstream participants in the supply chain. Much can be learned from the Japan Agricultural Cooperatives (JA), which has devised a unique structuring mechanism. By promoting grower registries and pesticide use documentation to achieve consistent traceability across Japan, from producers to government oversight bodies, JA also facilitated support to producers that included training & equipment sharing. Achieving this linkage took decades, but has greatly contributed to an integrated supply chain configuration that promotes higher

levels of traceability & productivity and, ultimately, a more sophisticated upstream base (Figure 1).

Aware and active consumers Poor consumer knowledge poses serious dangers to fresh food safety. Consumers commonly handle meat, poultry & fish, despite the hazards of microbe generation and negating any benefits achieved through temperature control. To some extent, this behaviour is cultural in nature. In India, for example, consumers prefer fresh products sold warm rather than cold – retailers could end up losing money by employing cold chain practices. While such attitudes can only be changed over the long term, they can nevertheless be changed. Japanese consumers used to select product, which is much like what Chinese consumers often do today, ie, handle loose product. Cold chain build-out and improved hygiene standards gradually changed consumer perceptions and, today, direct handling of meat before purchase is unheard of. The lesson for retailers is to give adequate care to consumers’ current perceptions while setting

Leafy vegetable example *

Product flow

Wholesaler model – China tier 2 city

Direct-farming model – Hong Kong

Third-party association model – Japan

Retailer

Retailer

Retailer

Suppliers

Wholesalers

Wholesalers

Farms/ Packing houses Individual households

* McKinsey market visits and interviews

Associations

Source: McKinsey analysis

Figure 1: Supply chain scenario in Asia

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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QUALITY MANTRA

direction for both short- and longterm actions. The media also plays a key role in informing consumers and keeping them up to date on food safety issues. Consequently, retailers should examine how they can leverage mass media to provide accurate and prompt information.

Asian countries: Different stages of development All Asian countries are evolving along a common trajectory in building their infrastructural and other requirements. Figure 2 shows a range of indicators against each of the five requirements. These indicators were used to categorise each country into one of the three stages. In developed countries such as Korea, Japan and Australia, the five foundational requirements mentioned earlier followed, and global best practices are regularly sought, adopted and, in some cases, innovated. Retailers tend to employ common standards and certification regimes such as Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) or ISO 22000, and seek to learn from incidents as they occur. Several retailers in these countries, such as Aeon

in Japan, are on the global cutting edge in traceability and assurance programmes. Developing countries, including Thailand, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore (along with some of China’s largest cities & markets), are midway through the journey. Typically, they have achieved development on some, but not all, requirements. Retailers in these countries can benefit from global standards, but they still face enormous constraints in regulatory enforcement, product tracing and seamless cold chain development. Retailers in emerging countries – India, the Philippines, Indonesia and most regions in China – face more fundamental constraints. They are lacking in most of the requirements for food safety. Global standards, while a useful aspiration, are impossible to achieve in the near term. Significant constraints hinder advances in providing universal access to running water & sewage, developing a seamless cold chain, offering primary education, passing and enforcing regulations, building consumer awareness about the importance of food safety as well as consumer knowledge. The varying contexts in East Asian countries and markets represent Good Developing

Emerging Requirement 1 Basic water and sanitation

2 Standards, regulations, enforcement

Selective indicators

India

Philippines

Moderate

Poor

Developed

Indonesia

China

Thailand

Taiwan

Hong Kong

Singapore

Korea

Japan

Australia

•Sewage system availability (%)

28

72

37

59

96

29

95

99

74*

100

100

L

L/M

L

L/M

M

M

M/H

M/H

M/H

H

H

34

45

24

56

86

99

99

99

99

98

100

L

M

L

M

M

M

M/H

M/H

H

H

H

32

38

47

63

27

n/a

n/a

n/a

62

62

82

L

L/M

L

L/M

M

M

n/a

n/a

M/ H

M/ H

H

66.6

93.0

91.8

94.0

94.0

98.7

95.4

94.7

98.6

99.9

99.9

0.7

0.7

0.8

1.1

1.8

9.8

21.8

18.1

11.0

19.8

25.1

•Standards

Call for action for retailers Context indeed matters. Fresh food safety plans that aspire to lofty goals while willfully disregarding the ground realities are doomed to fail. The call to action is twofold: retailers must adapt to today’s context and seek to shape tomorrow’s. Adapting to the current context: Retail leaders can drive the most rapid improvement by fixing the ‘hot spot’ issues relevant to their markets. Research suggests that the biggest issues are generally based on the stage of market evolution, so the imperative for retail leaders today is to set priorities and adopt practices already proven to be feasible & effective. Shaping tomorrow’s context: Retailers in countries at all developmental stages can and must actively drive progress on the five foundational requirements mentioned earlier to ensure better long-term food safety and promote industry productivity. For this, they must exercise their influence over a diverse set of industry participants, including governments.

sufficiency

•Regulatory body clarity

•Enforcement 3 Cold chain infrastructure

different points on a single evolutionary path. That is, developed countries have already worked through the first two stages, Japan and Korea, in the last generation. The implication is that countries and markets across Asia can learn from each other, not just in the present, but by understanding the history of development and what it took to advance.

•Refrigerator availability (%)

Courtesy: Coca-Cola Council Asia (CCRRCA)

Retailing

Research

•Sophistication of cold chain 4 Producer and supplier sophistication

•Rice productivity (000 HG/hectare)

•Concentration/ configuration

5 Aware and active consumers

•Literacy rate (%) •Income per capita (USD, 000)

* Average of sewage availability across Korea’s nine provinces in 2007. Source: “Data & Statistics in Water Supply & Sanitation”, The World Bank; Euromonitor International from UNESCO/national statistics; “World Economic Outlook Database”, Oct. 2008, IMF; FAO stat, “Retail and Shopper Trends”, Nielsen report; DOA of Malaysia; FSIS; AVA; Economist Intelligence; Ministry of Environment, Korea

Figure 2: The evolution of Asian markets

58

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

This article is based on a study commissioned by retail industry think tank CCRRCA and conducted by McKinsey & Company to encourage retailers to focus more on improving food safety standards. CCRRCA is a research body dedicated to in-depth investigation of food retailing issues in a cooperative, non-competitive environment. For details, email: gwalsha@apac.ko.com


TECH TRACK

Processing breakfast cereals

A challenge to deliver nutrition Breakfast cereals are today firmly established on breakfast tables almost all over the world. Along with a variety of forms, tastes and colours, these are expected to meet stringent nutritional quality requirements as well. A quick look at the key process components in the production of direct- and indirectexpanded breakfast cereals. Courtesy: Buhler AG

Christopher Rubin

T

he roots of ready-to-eat (RTE) breakfast cereals can be traced to Battle Creek, where one of the first deliberately conceived ‘health foods’ was developed. These cereals were made and advocated then to make the diets based on whole grains more palatable. Interestingly, some of the processes and products developed in the early days of the industry are still in use today. These products made in the initial days included flakes made from corn grits & wheat berries, shredded wheat biscuits & nuggets of barley and other ingredients baked in loaves & then milled & dried. Today, RTE cereals comprise one of the profitable and diverse segments of major food companies. Another player in the market collectively is the category of private label cereals made by several small- to medium-sized firms. These products are usually imitations of the branded products, but are sold for less because they have lower marketing costs, lower investments in research and, sometimes, use less expensive processes.

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Modern Food Processing | January 2011

Processes involved The major processes included in manufacturing cereals are flaking, gun puffing, shredding and extrusion. Earlier, cereals had separate process steps for mixing, cooking, forming, drying and coating. Typically, many of these process steps were, and often still are, batch operations. For example, whole wheat berries or corn grits are cooked in pressure vessels along with malt, salt and other ingredients, using direct steam injection. The objective here is to gelatinise the starch and temper the grains with enough moisture to make them plastic, without making them soft and mushy. These process steps in making cereals are explained in detail hereafter.

Flaking After cooking, the grains are cooled and slightly dried. These then undergo forming, as these are passed between polished steel rolls to form flakes. Whole grain rice is also cooked and then lightly ‘bumped’ between rolls; after this, the grain undergo forming by toasting in an oven. In the traditional flake process, flakes from the rolls are dried and toasted in conveyor ovens. Some modern ovens use high-velocity


TECH TRACK

jets to fluidise the bed of flakes and shorten the drying time. For coating flakes with sugar or other flavours, these are passed through a coating drum or belt and then dried. Coated or uncoated flakes often have a vitamin emulsion sprayed on them as a final step, followed by another drying step and then packaging. If flakes are to be enriched, the vitamins and minerals are added in the last step because these cannot withstand the high temperature treatments or the process steps mentioned earlier . Cereals are considered as desirable vehicles for delivery of added nutrients because they represent a significant portion of a daily diet, are usually eaten with milk and have a wider appeal. Often, nutrient fortification is an important part of a given brand’s image and marketing message.

Gun puffing This step begins with cereal flour or whole grains, depending on the products to be made. Flour-based products are formed using lowpressure extruders, similar to those used for pasta or ‘halfproduct’ snacks. The pellets are dried and heated in a closed pressure vessel. The pellets are then released from the elevated pressure by opening the vessel suddenly or transferring through a special valve. The sudden pressure change in the softened pellets causes expansion of water vapour and rapid cooling, making the pellets expand & then harden. The porous shape hence formed retains a crunchy texture even when dipped in milk. Puffed pieces are dried further, coated & enriched as mentioned earlier, and then packaged.

Shredding This process involves cooking whole grains to a precise moisture content and then passing them through batteries of special rolls in which one roll is grooved and presses against

a smooth roll. High pressures are developed as the grain is forced into the grooves, so the rolls tend to be short, to control deflection. In a commercial line, there are several banks of rolls. The threads of wheat are laid over one another in mats and cut into biscuits. A variation is to have cross grooves so that threads remain attached to one another. In some processes, cooked grains may be stored in a relatively moist state before forming. It is possible that this step contributes to final flavour by permitting chemical and biochemical reactions to occur. In general, it is observed that the traditional, batch and relatively slow processes are

The goal of the branded cereal makers is to deliver great taste while also ensuring healthy nutrition. able to produce the more complex flavoured products, though constant efforts are being made to increase the speed & efficiency of these processes.

nutrition. Lately, this has meant a focus on whole grains with high bran or fibre content. Fibre essentially remains inert and interferes with expansion of the grains. Some products can be made by alternative processes, such as gun puffing or extrusion; however, differences between these processes can be observed by instrumental inspection. Today, extruders are well established in the breakfast cereal industry. Stateof-the-art technology and process control systems allow reaching the same product quality with extrusion in comparison to traditional plants. Extruders can be used to produce all types of breakfast cereals. Specialised products are also termed as co-extruded products. These are pillow-shaped products with a fat- or water-based filling. Another specialty is extruded multigrain flakes. A multigrain flake contains a cereal matrix with fractions of other cereal grains. These fractions are still visible after expansion. This inhomogeneous appearance accentuates the healthy background of this product.

Extrusion One of the most important improvements in cereal processing was the application of cooking extrusion. An extruder can combine in one machine the operations of mixing, cooking, forming and expansion. Some companies were able to focus on extrusion, in part, because they had little investment in more traditional processes, other than gun puffing. At the time, as there were no extruders intended for food products, companies used equipment from the plastics industry. Today, there are specialised manufacturers of food extruders. Extruded cereal products tend to use flours rather than intact berries or grits. The goal of the branded cereal makers is to deliver great taste while also ensuring healthy

Courtesy: Buhler AG

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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TECH TRACK

Coating and inclusions Sugar coating is a complex process in its own way. Coatings may be transparent or opaque and may include artificial sweeteners such as aspartame and non-cariogenic substances like sugar alcohols. High solids coating solutions must be kept hot and are subject to discolouration. Application of such solutions is challenging because these crystallise and harden quickly. Fruits, such as raisins, have been added to cereals for many years, but in the search for new products, other inclusions, such as nuts, freeze-dried fruit, yogurt and granola (a cereal mix itself) are also added these days. These inclusions create processing challenges in feeding at correct rates, prevention of segregation, matching moisture activity and preventing creation of fines. For instance, the water activity of raisins and cereal flakes are

different; hence, when enclosed in a sealed package, the flakes can become soggy and the raisins dried out. Earlier, packaging involved the use of waxed paper in cardboard boxes, which permitted some moisture to escape. With time, when cereal packaging shifted to the use of polymer liners, which are better moisture barriers, the equilibration issue became more noticeable. One solution is to add solids to raisins, such as sugar or cereal fines coatings, to reduce water activity. Moreover, fines are an almost inevitable byproduct of cereal manufacture and have become a useful ingredient in other products, such as breadings and coatings.

Cereals with health value RTE cereal is an interesting food category not only for the variety and challenges that many of its processes

carry, but also for the several ways in which it can be analysed. There are cereals available for adults and children, sweetened & unsweetened, short-lived novelties and 100-yearold standards, originals & imitations, whole grain- & flour-based as well as branded and private label products. For manufacturers, RTE cereals are profitable, challenging and a source of technical accomplishment. And, for consumers, it continues to be nutritious, enjoyable and generally of good health value. Christopher Rubin is Head of Product Management & Marketing, Business Unit Pasta & Extruded Products at Buhler AG - a provider of processes and plants for many applications in the food (including breakfast cereal) and feed industry. He can be reached at christopher.rubin@buhlergroup.com

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

Dear Reader, ‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 3000 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 200 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will receive a

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complimentary copy of that particular issue and an honorarium cheque. Published by Infomedia 18 Limited, ‘Modern Food Processing’ is the leading monthly magazine exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the food processing industry. Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Publishing Ltd (one

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Manas R Bastia Editor Infomedia 18 Limited ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W) Mumbai 400 028 India

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D +91 22 3003 4669 T +91 22 3024 5000 F +91 22 3003 4499 E manas@infomedia18.in W www.infomedia18.in


MFP_January _2011_ Engg Expo_Tab-2_PG_63


MFP_January _2011_ Engg Expo_Tab-2_PG_64


TRADE ZONE

Better marketing efficiency

Tips to leverage online tools Small & medium enterprises (SMEs) have a major share in the food processing industry in India. With SMEs planning to expand their business locally as well as overseas, they require cost-effective ways to compete with big companies. If used efficiently, Internet can prove to be an important tool for SMEs to advertise & market their products and improve their business prospects.

Sandeep Deshpande

W

ith ruthless rivalry in the food processing sector, Indian small businesses spend large amount of money on advertising & marketing to differentiate themselves from others and improve business prospects. However, the high cost of marketing confines small businesses from innovating and competing with big players on fair grounds.

WorldWideWeb to the rescue If Indian small businesses in the food industry aim at better breaks beyond their home turfs, they will need more than traditional marketing methods to reach out to buyers. The WorldWideWeb (WWW) provides them with just the right tool. The WWW presents a WinWin-Win situation, allowing small businesses to win over the barriers of geography, time and language, making global trade more accessible. In addition to sourcing, a small business can engage in a full range of commercial activities including export, domestic wholesale and retail at the same time, by engaging on both B2B and B2C e-commerce platforms.

Small businesses in the food processing industry in India are doing just that, and flourishing. Shanaya Modi, Director, Mazda Ltd, is one such entrepreneur. Mazda started its food & beverage division with the help of Alibaba.com’s platform, an online international marketplace that connects buyers and sellers around the world. The company claims that its revenues have increased by 120 per cent, since sourcing on Alibaba.com. Today, all its business comes from e-commerce. Without e-commerce, it would have been too expensive for a small company like Mazda Ltd to engage in global sourcing, export, domestic wholesale and retail, but it is doing it all efficiently with a small team based in Ahmedabad. The Internet also offers a myriad of marketing tools to market their products effectively and efficiently. Indian small businesses in the food processing industry can engage in the entire eco-system of emarketing to improve business opportunities. But the key lies in how a business makes the choice in the face of various marketing options.

Business promotion To begin with, the most effective way to promote a business is to establish a company website, which includes information about

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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TRADE ZONE

the company, products, services and contact. However, the purpose of investing in a company website is to generate sales, directly or indirectly and bring revenues to one’s doorstep. And that is the challenge with websites – transforming browsers into buyers. While websites can be expensive to develop & maintain and not necessarily bring any sales, banner ads are a more cost-effective solution. Banner ads are usually placed in prominent places on a web page. With the rising popularity of rich media in recent years, banner ads can be made more interactive & attractive, embedded with audio, video and animation, allowing advertisers to create the so-called ‘wow effect’. A downside, however, is that banner ads cannot always reach the advertiser’s target audience. It also matters if products are targeting end-users or not. Many banner ads are relatively more effective when they are consumeroriented. Yet, they tend to have a high exposure rate without a correspondingly high click-through rate. The emergence of search engine marketing complements the inadequacy of banner ads. Unlike banner ads, which may be shown on unrelated web pages, search engine marketing shows an advertisement only on designated search results pages based on the keywords chosen by the advertiser, so they are highly targeted. Advertisers bid on keywords that their target customers may use as search terms when they are looking for a product or service. Search engine marketing services, such as AdWords provided by Google, offer a pay-per-click fee structure, where advertisers only pay when an Internet user actually clicks on an advertisement.

Look for specialised portals Search engines are good for mass marketing and accessing individual consumers but for advertisers there are pitfalls. A search engine’s traffic is general and there is no budget guarantee, so costs can accumulate without any reasonable assurance of sales.

66

Further, there is a serious global issue of click fraud, whereby competitors click repeatedly to increase one’s pay-perclick advertising costs. Search engines crawl the Web but their keywords are usually bought on a per country basis. If a supplier in India wants to sell goods in the UK, the supplier could buy a few keywords on a search engine targeting the UK buyers. But if buyers in the US, Australia or Europe are also among the potential customers, one will have to allocate a separate budget for each market. What if the target customers are not from the mainstream market or if the products are not being sold to consumers but to other businesses? In that case, e-commerce and specialised online marketplaces can be a good choice.

One of the best ways to help tap prospective clients is to offer them the option to reach the seller easily. The interactive face of the Internet is why people prefer to trade online. E-commerce means buying and selling goods & services via the Internet. Some interactive online marketplaces target business people interested in B2B trade, and that is a more effective online business tool that businessmen should use. They can provide Indian small businesses with a cost-effective way to establish their presence on the Internet to promote products directly to potential buyers in India and around the world 24x7 and to interact with potential trading partners. A standardised supplier storefront on an online marketplace has many of the same functions as a corporate website and can be updated at any time by the registered member. Besides aggregating a huge online community and providing buyer & supplier matching, a comprehensive

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

e-commerce platform is equipped with real-time communication tools, trade resources, industry news, community message boards & forums. It also has third-party services like authentication and quality control. Because of their huge scale, these virtual marketplaces offer a one-stop solution for domestic or international trade and can provide huge benefits to users with limited or no investment.

Other options No longer is the business scenario such where sellers market & sell, and buyers blindly buy. With the rise in competition, buyers are looking for a way to interact with a number of suppliers, and then make the choice that best matches their requirements. One of the best ways to help tap prospective clients is to offer them the option to reach the seller easily. The interactive face of the Internet is why people prefer to trade online. There are several new ways to ensure interaction – live chat, email services, feedback options, comments, etc, to allow buyers get in touch with the seller. It is also essential to determine market & target customers, assess the different online promotional channels and choose the one that fits best, and soon people will be enjoying the fruits of the Internet. It is advisable that small businesses getting started with online marketing should keep it simple and outsource what they do not understand. The most important criteria in making the selection should be ease of use, return on investment and manageability. E-commerce is the business tool of the future and hence businesses, both big & small, should reap maximum benefits of the Internet by marketing through the right channels. Sandeep Deshpande is the Country General Manager India at Alibaba.com, an online marketplace that connects buyers and sellers around the world. For details, contact Linda Kozlowski on email: lkozlowski@hk.alibaba-inc.com


EVENTS CALENDAR

National MUMBAI Concurrent Shows

INDORE

CHENNAI

Madhya Pradesh Jan 7-10, 2011

Tamil Nadu Mar 11-13, 2011

Maharaja Shivajirao School Grd, Chimanbaug

Chennai Trade Centre

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation & Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022 3003 4651 Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in

International Horti Expo 2011 A horticulture and food technology exhibition providing a platform to the entire sector, right from producers to retailers; January 07-09, 2011; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Media Today Group T-30, Ist Floor, Khirki Extn Malviya Nagar, New Delhi 110 017 Tel : 011-2668 2045 / 81671 Fax: 011-2668 1671 Email: hortiexpo@gmail.com

TASTE 2011 A trade fair for wine, spirits, food & hospitality; January 27-29, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Informa India A202 Business Square Solitaire Corporate Park Andheri-Kurla Road Chakala, Andheri (E) Mumbai 400 093 Tel: 022-4020 3355 Fax: 022-4026 4000 Email: nece@informa.in

Aahar 2011 An international trade fair for food processing, machinery and technology; March 10-14, 2011; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: India Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO) Pragati Maidan, New Delhi 110 001 Tel: 011-2337 1725

One of the largest advanced design and manufacturing events in India featuring Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation & Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022 3003 4650 Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: hitech@infomedia18.in

Fax: 011-2337 8464 Email: rkmaggo@itpo-online.com

Food Forum India 2011 This two-day conference and exhibition will focus on various areas of food business like retailing, design, technology & processing, logistics, etc; March 28-29, 2011; in Mumbai For details contact: Images Multimedia Pvt Ltd S-21, Okhla Phase II New Delhi 110 020 Tel: 011-4052 5000, 4050 2500 Fax: 011-4052 5001 Email: info@imagesgroup.in

NNS Events & Exhibitions Pvt Ltd Meri Delhi House 25/10, East Punjabi Bagh New Delhi 110 026 Mob: 098102 13597 Email: anilrana_ars@yahoo.co.in

Fi India 2011 An event featuring new and innovative food ingredients from India and abroad; October 3-4, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

India Packaging Show The event will focus on latest trends in food packaging and emerging opportunities in the fast industrialising markets of South India; July 1-4, 2011; at HITEX, Hyderabad For details contact: Print-Packaging.com Pvt Ltd International Infotech Park Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 705 Tel: 022-2781 2093, Fax: 022-2781 2578 Email: info@indiapackagingshow.com

Food & Technology Expo 2011 An international exhibition focussing on food processing & packaging machines & technologies; July 29-31, 2011; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Anil Rana

Maharashtra February 17-19, 2011 NSE Ground, Goregaon

For details contact: Bipin Sinha UBM India Pvt Ltd 611-617, Sagar Tech Plaza - A Saki Naka, Andheri-Kurla Road Andheri (East), Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600 Fax: 022-6612 2626 Email: bipin.sinha@ubm.com

SUGARASIA 2011 An event dedicated to sugar processing, co-generation, ethanol and cane harvesting; November 21-25, 2011; in New Delhi For details contact: Nexgen Exhibitions Pvt Ltd 1201/1206 Pragati Tower 26, Rajendra Place, New Delhi 110 008 Tel: 011-4008 1051/1000 Fax: 011-4008 1099 Email: sugarasia@nexgengroup.in

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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EVENTS CALENDAR

International FBK 2011 An exhibition for the baking and confectionery industries; January 23-27, 2011; at BEA Bern Expo, Switzerland For details contact: BEA Bern Expo Mingerstrasse 6, Case Postale 3000 Bern 22, Switzerland Tel: +41 (0) 31 340 12 34 Email: info@beaexpo.ch

ISM International sweets and biscuits fair; January 30-February 02, 2011; at Exhibition Centre Cologne, Germany For details contact: Koelnmesse GmbH Messeplatz 1, 50679 Köln, Germany Tel: +49 221 821-0 Fax: +49 221 821-2574 E-mail: info@koelnmesse.de

IFFIP PACKFAIR International forum for food industry and packaging; February 02-04, 2011; at KievExpoPlaza Exhibition Center, Ukraine For details contact: IFWexpo Heidelberg GmbH Landfriedstraße 1a 69117 Heidelberg, Germany Tel: +49 (0) 62 21 - 13 57-0 Fax: +49 (0) 62 21 - 13 57 - 23 Email: info@ifw-expo.com

PRODEXPO 2011 An international fair of foodstuffs and food raw materials; February 07-11, 2011; at Expocentr’ Krasnaya Presnya Fairgrounds in Moscow, Russia For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Stockumer Kirchstrasse 61 D-40474 Düsseldorf, Germany Tel: +49 - 211 - 4560 900 Fax: +49 - 211 - 4560 668 Email: info@messe-duesseldorf.de

Fruit Logistica 2011

14055 Berlin, Germany Tel: +49 (0)30 3038 Fax: +49 (0)30 3038 2325 Email: central@messe-berlin.de

Mobac Show 2011 A specialised exhibition for the bakery and confectionery industries showcasing the latest trends in machinery, equipment, tools and raw materials; February 16-19, 2011; at Intex Osaka, Japan For details contact: JBCM No 3 Azuma-Bldg, 1 Kanda-Hirakawa-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0027, Japan Tel: 03-3862-8478 Fax: 03-3862-8470 Email: mobac@jbcm.co.jp

Gulfood Exhibition A trade fair showcasing the latest developments in food & beverage, refrigeration & food service equipment, food processing machinery, bakery & confectionery products & equipment, and food packaging; February 20-23, 2011; at Dubai International Exhibition Centre, UAE For details contact: Dubai World Trade Centre PO Box 9292, Dubai, UAE Tel: +971 (4) 332 1000 Fax: +971 (4) 3312173 Email: info@dwtc.com

Foodtechmash 2011 Exhibition of equipment and technologies for food industry; February 23-25, 2011; at KievExpoPlaza Exhibition Center, Ukraine For details contact: Kyiv International Contract Fair, JSC PO Box B-13, Kyiv, 01001, Ukraine Tel: +380 (44) 461-93-40 Fax: +380 (44) 461 93-40 Email: info@kmkya.kiev.ua

China Drinktec 2011

An international trade fair for fruit and vegetable marketing; February 09-11, 2011; at Messegelände Berlin, Germany

Exhibition on beverage, brewery and wine technology; March 09-11, 2011; at China Import and Export Fair Pazhou Complex, China

For details contact: Messe Berlin GmbH Messedamm 22

For details contact: Adsale Exhibition Services Ltd 321 Java Road, North Point,

Hong Kong Tel: +852 2811 8897, Fax: +852 2516 5024 Email: exhibition@adsale.com.hk

Seafood Processing America 2011 Trade show for seafood and food processing industry; March 20-22, 2011; at Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, the US For details contact: Diversified Business Communications 121 Free Street Portland, Maine 04112-7437, USA Tel: +1 (207) 842-5500 Fax: +1 (207) 842-5503 Email: shows@divexhibitions.com.au

Interfood Sweden 2011 A food industry exhibition & congress; April 14-16, 2011; at Swedish Exhibition & Congress Centre For details contact: Svenska Mässan Box 5222, 40224 Gothenburg, Sweden Tel: +46 31 708 80 00 Fax: +46 31 16 03 30 Email: info@swefair.se

Oil China 2011 An international exhibition of olive oil and edible oil; April 18-20, 2011; at Shanghai Everbright Convention & Exhibition Center, China For details contact: Beijing Regalland Convention & Exhibition Co Ltd Room No 438 Jin Ou Building Chaoyang District Beijing 100029, China Tel: +86 10-64416542 Fax: +86 10-64412631 Email: regalland@regalland.com

IFIA Japan 2011 Exhibition and conference for food ingredients and additives sector; May 18-20, 2011; at Tokyo International Exhibition Center, Japan For details contact: E J Krause & Associates Inc 6550 Rock Spring Drive Suite 500 Bethesda, MD 20817, USA Tel: +1 (301) 493-5500 Fax: +1 (301) 493-5705 Email: ejkinfo@ejkrause.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

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REPORT

Brewing success through innovative techniques Messe Muenchen GmbH and Messe Duesseldorf GmbH, as a part of strategic planning, put forth a successful event, which encompassed two vital pillars of the food processing industry – beverages & packaging. drink technology India (dti) 2010 and International PackTech India, held in Mumbai from November 18-20, 2010, received an overwhelming response.

Mahua Roy

I

ndia is considered to be one of the fastest growing markets for packaging in the world. Thus, there is a huge potential for the beverages market in the country. Naturally then, dti and PackTech India exhibitions held concurrently, recently, drew the attention of key decision makers in these segments.

Aiding innovation More than 6,000 buyers and professionals visited the three-day event, clearly portraying the growing significance of both exhibitions in the country. The opportunities offered at both shows were huge, adding a boost of optimism for the beverage & liquid food processing and packaging segments. The Food Processing and Packaging Machinery Association of VDMA (German Engineering Federation) was instrumental in influencing the two exhibitions to be staged concurrently. “We are pleased to see the two organisers combining their expertise. We find the co-location of both exhibitions an excellent concept, as we have one major and unique platform in India that caters to the entire value chain of food processing, beverage & packaging technology. Companies

Highlights R

201 Exhibitors from 22 countries showcased their products

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An exhibitor forum on drink technology was organised by Messe Muenchen GmbH

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A conference on packaging and sustainability was organised by Cognizance Packaging along with Institute of Packaging Machinery Manufacturers of India (IPMMI) and Paper Film and Foil Converters’ Association (PFFCA)

R

A three-day seminar was organised by the Versuchs und Lehranstalt für Brauerei (VLB), Berlin, one of the leading brewing research centres

involved in this sector should make their presence felt, as India is an important market and is developing dynamically,” said Richard Clemens, Managing Director, VDMA.

Stimulating growth According to the organisers of the event, India will continue to offer a conducive platform for exhibitors and visitors to network effectively, gather new contacts, catch up with existing customers & suppliers as well as stay abreast of the latest market trends, demands & challenges. The next edition of dti and International PackTech will be held in October 2012 at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai.

January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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REPORT

Visitors interacting with the exhibitors

Subodh Kant Sahai inaugurating the event

The latest edition of Annapoorna – World of Food India provided the much needed momentum to the F&B industry in terms of products, services, etc. The participation of 19 countries at the event, highlights the potential of the segment.

Taking the industry to the next level

Prasenjit Chakraborty

A

nnapoorna – World of Food India took place from November, 24-26, 2010, at NSE complex, Mumbai. With each edition, the event is getting stronger, reflecting the growth of India’s food & beverage industry. The exhibition was organised by Koelnmesse GmbH and the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry. The event was inaugurated by Subodh Kant Sahai, Union Minister of Food Processing Industries. According to the organisers, the number of exhibitors and visitors had increased over the previous edition. This edition saw a total of 6,053 trade visitors, which included buyers from India’s leading companies and hotel chains. Among the top visitors to the event were buyers from Reliance, Spencers, Tata Westside, FoodBazaar, HyperCity, Carrefour, Nature’s Basket, Taj Group of Hotels, Emke Group UAE and Tesco. The event also witnessed 178 exhibitors from 19 countries, displaying their latest products and services for the trade & catering, food service and hotel industries. Speaking at the event, Peter Grothues, Vice President - Food, Technology & Environment, Koelnmesse GmbH, said, “Annapoorna – World of Food India – has been supporting the growth

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of the Indian food and beverage market for five years now. This year it has once again made an impressive showing and successfully generated good networking & excellent business.”

Country pavilions National pavilions were organised by Germany, France, South Africa and Australia. Australia, which is a newcomer in the show, had presented around 45 exhibitors. The major importers that once again came to the fair as exhibitors included Epicure International, Kiara Wines, Manisha, MRK Foods, Permedia Foods, Privasia, RR Trading, Suresh Kumar, Tree of Life and World Wide Food, among others. Interestingly, four franchise companies participated in the fair for the first time under the aegis of the International Franchise Association (IFA)- Cafe Buddys, Mother Dairy, Bennigan’s Grill & Tavern and Chicken King Malaysia.

B2B meetings The B2B meetings organised by the Confederation of Indian Food Trade and Industry (CIFTI) were popular. The ‘Foodworld India 2010’ conference running parallel to Annapoorna – World of Food India also attracted a large number of participants. The UK was the partner country of the conference, whose main themes were R&D and various aspects of the supply chain.


REPORT

Encapsulating some of the best technologies A view of the exhibition

Print-packaging.com and industry associations from the packaging & food processing industries came together to put forward a comprehensive trade exhibition from December 03-06, 2010, at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi. Satisfied experiences of visitors, exhibitors and organisers speak volumes about the success of this event. A conference on ‘Inclusive growth of food processing industry’

Mahua Roy

C

onvenience is the buzzword in the food industry today. The growth of food processing sector has nearly doubled to 13.7 per cent during the last four years. The growing percentage of the middle class, liberalisation and organised retail sector are the catalysts to growth in packaging. Thus, the Indian packaging industry is growing at the rate of 22-25 per cent per annum. In the next five years, the sector is expected to triple to around $ 60 billion. In this backdrop, a trade show dedicated to the packaging industry was bound to be coveted by the food processing and packaging industry.

A trade forum The exhibition showcased latest technological innovations from the industry and provided a business platform to the visitors who had the provision of a one-to-one interaction with the senior personnel from the companies. According to the organsiers, there were several ‘on the spot sold’ machines.

Highlights R

350+ exhibitors with 11,423 visitors

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100+ product launches, 230+ running machinery

R

PackAge Conference: focussing on ‘Packaging conversion’

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Conference on ‘Inclusive growth of food processing industry’

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Workshop on: ‘Meeting operational challenges in modern packaging through industrial automation’

Subodh Kant Sahai, Union Minister of Food Processing Industries, shared growth figures of the industry and encouraged the stakeholders to come up with development proposals.

The next edition With the success of the 2010 edition, organisers of PackPlus 2010 have already geared themselves up for the Southern edition, to be held from July, 01-04, 2011, at HITEX Exhibition Centre, Hyderabad. PackPlus will be back with its 2011 edition from December 07-10, 2011 at NSIC Exhibition Centre, Okhla Industrial Estate, New Delhi. The special section of ‘converting zone’ will be a part of an entirely separate event to be held during Mumbai in November 2011.

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REPORT

Frost & Sullivan 2010 India Excellence in Chemicals, Materials and Food Awards

Inspiring performance, imparting knowledge In a unique award ceremony held recently, Frost and Sullivan (F&S) recognised and rewarded the top performers in the fields of Chemicals, Materials and Food (CMF) with honours. Identifying the top players in each of the designated 27 categories, F&S India Excellence in Chemicals, Materials and Food Awards painted a consolidated picture of the industry.

Award recipients lead the way...

Mahua Roy

T

he F&S award function was organised on December 6, 2010 to give due recognition to deserving performers from diverse sectors. These lumainaries belonged to industries such as food ingredients, specialty chemicals, bioplastics, high-performance fibres, protective equipment, etc. The event recognised and acclaimed their contribution towards ameliorating India’s economic position. On this occasion, F&S recognised 27 exemplary organisations that have showcased unparalleled innovation. “In the CMF markets, we are seeing rapid innovations and new players. There was a definite need to identify these innovations and bring them forth on a common forum. This will

Some award recipients from the food industry Category Award recipient International Flavors & Fragrances (India) Pvt Ltd Product Innovation in Flavours Product Innovation in Enzymes Novozymes South Asia Pvt Ltd Product Quality Leadership in Flavours Firmenich Aromatics (India) Pvt Ltd Product Innovation and Quality Danisco (India) Pvt Ltd Excellence in Functional Ingredients Product Innovation and Quality Danisco (India) Pvt Ltd Excellence in Food Additives Product Innovation and Quality The Solae Company Excellence in Protein Ingredients

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not only help organisations that are driving these innovations but also others in the competition to find out what they need to do to thrive in the market. Further, from a consumer’s perspective, this also enables to identify the best and the most progressive of the lot. At F&S, we regularly collaborate with companies in accelerating their growth and help them identify strategic partners,” said Mamta Wadhwa, Senior Director - CMF, South Asia and Middle East, F&S.

Parameters of excellence The awards recognised the distinction of products & services with respect to customer value, competence, features & functionality, customer focus, etc, alongwith a host of other crucial factors such as leadership, strategy, growth, innovation, integration and reliability. The nominees and award recipients were identified through a diligent process, taking into consideration perspectives from customers, experts and thought leaders within the industry, along with F&S’s expertise. “The award recipients were identified through a thorough research process. Keeping in mind the industry feedback, F&S would like this forum to be a regular feature and at the same time become a benchmark for the industry to look up to in the future,” added Wadhwa.


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology Offered As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

Beverage maker An Indian firm is offering ‘threein-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Chocolate manufacturing technology An India firm provides chocolate manufacturing and snack extrusion technology with machinery. The firm supplies chocolate machines like chocolate conches, chocolate enrobers with cooling tunnel, one shot chocolate moulding machines, chocolate storage tanks, etc. The machines are manufactured using European technology. Areas of application Chocolate manufacturing Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services and equipment supply

Food-paste moulding machine A Thailand-based firm offers a food-paste moulding machine

that produces cylindrical-shaped food paste with both ends sealed. This machine enables faster production of food-paste with consistent size and hygiene, which increase business potential in bigger markets both locally and abroad. Areas of application It is useful in food processing industries where the food products of cylindrical shape are required Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Food processing technology An Indian company provides technology for processing fruits & vegetables, biscuits, margarine, pickles, masalas, ready-to-eat foods, etc. Areas of application Aseptic processing, can processing, bottle processing, laminated pouch packing, tetra brick Forms of transfer Consultancy, turnkey

Natural extracts An Indian company provides assistance for manufacturing oleoresins / natural colour extracts using SCFE technology ensuring minimal material loss, less pollution improved yield and better quality of product. Areas of application It is useful in areas related and

making use of food colours and natural dyes Forms of transfer Consultancy, turnkey

Technology for milk, fruit and cereal-based products An Indian firm offers technology for processing milk products, fruit & vegetable products and ready-to-eat & ready-to-cook food products Areas of application Food processing industries Forms of transfer Consultancy, subcontracting, joint venture, technical services, capacity building, technology licensing, equipment supply, turnkey, others

Vacuum sealer and gas injection machine A Thailand-based company is providing technology for preserving and extending shelf life of food products. Proper packaging is critical for avoiding food spoilage. The vacuum sealing and gas injection technique prevents contaminating microbes to enter the container, thereby increasing the shelf life of the product. Areas of application Food processing industry, agro-based industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Share Your Technology Propositions The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. We offer you an opportunity to participate in this endeavour by publishing the best technology ideas. Technology developers/sellers are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details (with environmental benefits, if any) for publication in the Technology Transfer column of Modern Food Processing. R&D organisations, technical consultancy organisations and individuals assisting small and medium enterprises may send the relevant literature, indicating the scope & services and the areas of specification. Contact: Modern Food Processing Infomedia 18 Limited, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 z Fax: 022-3003 4499 z Email: spedit@infomedia18.in

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TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology Requested Coconut milk beverage

Food preservation

An Indian entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for producing & processing coconut milk beverage. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy

A Thailand-based food and fruit preserved trading firm is looking for efficient technology to extend the shelf-life and preserve food and fruit. Areas of application Food processing industry, confectionary industry, pastry industry Forms of transfer Others

Corn processing An Indian company is looking for a complete proposal/project report to set up a dry milling corn processing plant in Andhra Pradesh. Targeted finished product is tinned corn, pop corn, corn flakes etc. It is also interested to import similar kind of plant & machinery to set up the same in India. Areas of application Corn processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Extruder pilot plant An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food. Areas of Application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products. Area of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Fruit drinks-doy pack A firm from UAE is interested in acquiring the technology for manufacturing fruit juices and drinks using optimum formulation technology. The firm needs technology providers, consultants and price quotes for the project based on turnkey & know-how. Areas of applications Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Juice and food processing A company based in the UAE proposes to establish a food processing plant that would help process fruit juices, jam/jelly, juice concentrates & pulp. Through this plant, the company also wishes to obtain valuable by-products like cattle feed, fertiliser and raw materials for plywood. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Rice husk ash to silica precipitates An Indian company is seeking the technology to convert rice husk ash

into some useful matter like silica precipitate, as the rice husk is rich in silica content. Areas of application Agro-based mills, which burn rice husk for internal purposes Forms of transfer Others

Spice grinding and processing plant An Indian firm is seeking to set up a spice plant and requires turnkey project consultants for the same. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Virgin coconut oil production A Thai entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for production of virgin coconut oil. He has an abundant supply of coconuts and plans to set up a coconut oil production line with technical cooperation from technology providers. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Xylitol technology A company based in Thailand is seeking the technology for producing gum by utilising maize-waste. Areas of application Food industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations - Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016 Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Packaging machine

Digital paper moisture meter

Bosch offers ‘Transwrap 1650’ packaging machine for food and non-food industry. This product with its wide range of packaging solutions is suited for a variety of packaging needs, styles and budgets. The array of packaging options includes package styles like pillow bags and side gusseted bags along with many other options pertaining to heat sealing, polyethylene welding systems, antistatic devices, chain packages and hole punch devices. All these options can be activated through simple setting procedures via an intuitive human machine interface (HMI), offering user the flexibility which in turn shortens the changeover time. The machine is constructed of corrosion resistant material which extends the machine capability to pack aggressive products. It allows for easy integration of dosing devices (augers, weighers, and cup fillers), gas flushing devices, printers as well as check weighers along with various up and downstream equipment interfaces.

Cole-Parmer India offers the ‘Delmhorst P-2000’ digital paper moisture meter. This electrical resistance type moisture meter comes with three separate scales: paper, baled scrap paper and reference. The moisture scale range for paper is 4.318 per cent, for baled paper the range is 5-40 per cent, and for the reference scale it is 0-100. The meter measures through built-in pins and optional pin electrodes. The contact pins mounted on top of the meter provide 0.8 cm (5/16’’) penetration for testing paper tubes or corrugated stock. The meter also features an audible out-of-range alarm, internal calibration check, 100 data point memory, and average/maximum readings. This meter is provided with a 9V battery and hard plastic carrying case. Optional and replacement electrodes & accessories are also available. The paper moisture meter is ideal for testing paper materials such as paperboard, corrugated stock and paper tubes. Hence, it finds applications in the print & paper, packaging, food & beverage and manufacturing industries.

Bosch India Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2299 9780, Fax: 080-2299 6189 Email: boschpackaging@in.bosch.com

Cole-Parmer India Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-6716 2222, Fax: 022-6716 2211 Email: response@coleparmer.in

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Water purification system Millipore (India) offers â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Direct-Q3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; water purification system. It is designed for simple and intuitive operation. The system guarantees the production of high-quality ultrapure water (Type I), providing a superior alternative to bottled water or DI water. In addition, the system produces pure (Type III) water that is stored in an integrated reservoir and can be used for basic applications. It saves on electricity, water consumption, maintenance and time. The system allows delivery of a fixed volume of Type I water and automatically shuts off once the selected volume has been delivered. For applications requiring low organic contaminant levels, it incorporates a dual wavelength UV lamp to produce water with <5 ppb TOC, making it suitable for HPLC, GC, ILC and TOC analyses. It is available with a built-in 185 and 254 nm UV lamp for production of low TOC water required by organic-sensitive applications. The maintenance is reduced to a simple cartridge change once or twice a year. Millipore India Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-3922 4000, 3922 4001, Fax: 080-2839 6345 Email: bioscience_info@milliporeindia.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Control valve Forbes Marshall offers â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ecotrolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, control valve, which is robust, compact and light in weight. It comes with a pneumatically operated, easy field reversible multispring diaphragm actuator and a sturdy, pipe-less and vibrationresistant mounted digital positioner. It is also available with handwheel (optional). Tubeless mounting, with the digital positioner and the option of bi-directional communication is the key feature of this control valve. The double use of auxiliary energy is by using pneumatic multi-spring diaphragm actuator with the option of permanent spring case ventilation. It is designed according to ANSI, with standardised trims. The prevention of leakage and bypass leakage is by a limited compressive load acting on both encapsulated gaskets. It is used in oil & gas, chemical & petrochemical, pharmaceuticals, distillery & food, fertiliser, steel & metal and power industries. Forbes Marshall Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2714 5595, Fax: 020-2714 7413/7593 Email: vmktg@forbesmarshall.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Beltweigher Hassia Packaging offers Flexi weigh beltweigher. It is used for weighing rice, sugar, tea, pulses, seeds and detergents. The product to be dosed is conveyed from the product hopper to the weighing bucket using a belt. The belt speeds are programmed to optimise both speed and accuracy. The weigher can be programmed to ensure that the minimum weight required is never breached. Also as an option, weighment data can be downloaded to a computer and analysed. It can be configured to achieve the exact speeds. This is achieved by selecting suitable number of weigh heads. This beltweigher can achieve an accuracy standard deviation of Âą3 g on a pack weight of 1 kg. For higher accuracy, special electronics can be used. It is available as a standalone unit or can be integrated with VFFS, HFFS, jar filler, can filler, carton filler and pick fill and seal systems. It is offered in three models. The small weigher can weigh up to 1 kg; medium weigher, up to 5 kg; and large weigher, up to 25 kg. Hassia Packaging Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 02137-302 802-06; Fax: 02137-302 819 Email: info@oystar.hassiapackaging.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Metal detector Technofour Electronics offers conveyorised metal detector for detection of metal contamination in food and pharmaceutical products. It is an Eddy current-based digital metal detection system, which also finds applications in chemical, cosmetic, garment, leather, rubber, and in many other industries. The metal detector consists of electronic unit, test coil, conveyor and rejection mechanism. The functions performed by the electronic unit are diagnostics, auto product compensation, set parameter retention on loss of power, buzzer and LED indication on detection of metal contamination, LCD bargraph/ numeric display to monitor noise and signal, etc. Rejection mechanisms offered by the company are conveyor stoppage, air nozzle, diverter arm, flap and pusher/puller. Technofour Electronics Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2605 8063/4/5 Fax: 020-2605 8073 Email: sales@teplindia.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Powder disperser Quadro Engineering Corp offers ‘Quadro Ytron® XC’ powder disperser for the preparation of ice-cream mix. It is an inline mixing and dispersion unit designed to incorporate large quantities of powder into a liquid stream (ie, single-pass) with minimal air entrainment. Not only does this innovative technology reduce dispersion times by 80 per cent, but product characteristics are consistent from batchto-batch and there is no plugging of screens, typical with other in-line blenders/dispersers. The company offers two sanitary models, which are designed to meet 3-A Sanitary Standards, offering liquid throughputs of up to 200 gpm. The company’s ‘ShearFX Series’ shear pump is available in four different models ranging from 10-75 hp depending on desired capacity, up to a maximum of 375 gpm. The multiple tooling styles are available allowing a balance between shear energy and pumping efficiency for each process. The design of the pump and tooling offers ease of installation and maintenance while meeting stringent CIP and SIP hygienic standards. All models comply with 3-A Sanitary Standards. Quadro Engineering Corp Waterloo – Canada Tel: 519-884 9660, Fax: 519-884-0253 Email: sales@quadro.com

Cleaning nozzle Industrial Equipwash offers fully automatic turbo tank cleaning nozzle powered by cleaning fluid. It is designed for large volumetric tanks/agitators in pharma, food, distillery, beverage, chemical and other process industries. The heart of the turbojet cleaner is an internal hydraulic motor, which makes the nozzles automatically perform a geared rotation around the horizontal and vertical axes. The number of cycles required for proper cleaning usually depends on the cleaning distance, cleaning procedure and cleaning agent. To control the RPM of the machine the flow rate is controlled through nozzles of various orifice sizes. A choice of nozzles is available to suit tank geometry and cleaning requirements. Industrial Equipwash Inc Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2679 7941, Fax: 022-2679 2936 Mob: 098692 31815 Email: iewi@vsnl.net

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Knives and blades Apex Shears offers food processing knives and blades, which include vegetable/ meat/poultry/chapati circular slicing blades, meat/fish processing bandsaw blades, bread slicing knives, etc. The company also manufactures all types of perforation and packaging knives, VFFS machine knives, potato chip slicing blades, 3-hole industrial razor blades as well as custom/ OEM blades as per user requirements for all machines and cutting applications. These blades are made from a variety of steels including food grade stainless steels, carbon steels and/or alloy steels suitably selected for the application. Apex Shears Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2379 1113, Fax: 022-2373 7707 Email: info@apexshears.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

Modern Food Processing

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 Air cooler................................................

 Exhibition - Engineering Expo..................  Invertor/variable frequency drives ............

 Air purifier ..............................................

 Exhibition - Frost & Sullivan 2010 India ........  Juicer ......................................................  Knives and blades ...................................

 Ammonia liquid chillers...........................

 Exhibition - HiTech Manufacturing Show .  Level controllers ......................................

 Animal feed technology ..........................

 Exhibition - Processing & Packaging Expo 2011 .....  Lipuid food processing............................

 Belt weigher............................................

 Extruded products...................................  Magnetic belt .........................................

 Biodiesel .................................................

 Extruder for papad machine....................  Magnetic equipment...............................

 Brewing machine ....................................

 Factory automation.................................  Magnetic plate........................................

 Bulk milk cooler ......................................

 Failure analysis ........................................  Magnetic traps........................................

 Butterfly valve .........................................

 Filler compositional analysis ....................  Masala mill .............................................

 Cap sealing machine ...............................

 Filtration equipment................................  Material identificaton..............................

 Chapati making machine ........................

 Flexible transparent PVC strip door..........  Material and food awards .......................

 Chocolate/cocoa making machine ...........

milling............................................ First Here  FlourFold

 Chorafali making machine.......................

 Food analysing & testing machine ...........  Measuring & monitoring relay.................

 Chow making machine ...........................

 Food conveying modular belt ..................  Metal detector ........................................

 Cleaning nozzle ......................................

 Food testing programmes .......................  Metallography ........................................

 Cleaning products...................................

 Foot sealer ..............................................  Microniser...............................................

 Cleaning section equipment ....................

 Forced convection unit air cooler.............  Mini dal mill ...........................................

 Colour sorting machine...........................

 Fuels .......................................................  Mini pulveriser with circulating system ....

 Compositional & trace metal analysis ......

 Gases......................................................  Mini vacuum machine.............................

 Control valve...........................................

 Gear oils .................................................  Mixer grinder ..........................................

 Conveyer belts ........................................

 Grain handling system ............................  Mixture for papad machine.....................

 Counters & power supplies .....................

 Gravy machine ........................................  Motion controls ......................................

 Dairy machines .......................................

 Grill magnet............................................  Multi-chamber pulveriser ........................

 Daliya making machine ...........................

 Grinding & dispersion system ..................  Noodle making machine .........................

 Dehumidifiers..........................................

 Gyratory screen .......................................  Oil milling ...............................................

 Digital paper moisture meter...................

 Hammer machine ...................................  Online vacuum machine..........................

 Doors......................................................

 Hand sealer.............................................  Packaging belt ........................................

 Mathiya making machine........................

Tel.: +91-22-3003 4685







Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in

Excellence in Chemicals.........................

Second Fold Here  Double chamber vacuum ........................  Heat exchanger.......................................





Please tick against the box of product(s) you are interested in:  Mention specific product/service you need,  Complete all the details on this form.  Tear the form & mail it to us. (It is a prepaid mail)



 Almond cutting machine ........................

 Packaging machine .................................

 Drawer magnet.......................................

 Heat resistant door .................................  Packaging printer belt .............................

 Drives .....................................................

 Hopper magnet ......................................  Panipuri making machine ........................

 Dry-cum-wet grinder...............................

 Hygiene products....................................  Papad making machine ...........................

 Dust control door ...................................

 Impact pulveriser.....................................  Pasta making machine ............................

 Electromagnetic feeder ...........................

 Industrial control & sensing devices.........  Peeler machine........................................

 Elevator belt............................................

 Industrial door ........................................  Petrol & fuel oils......................................

 Encoders.................................................

 Industrial type unit air cooler ..................  Photo electric sensors..............................

 Engine oils ..............................................

 Infeed moving belt..................................  Plastic pellets ..........................................

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 Evaporating units for cold rooms ............  Inspection belt ........................................

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PRODUCT INQUIRY FORM

 Accelerated ageing test...........................


Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

City:

Pin:

Tel:

Fax:

01 / 2011

Address:

Email:

 Plate heat exchanger...............................

 Refrigeration ...........................................

 Temperature controllers...........................

 Plug valve ...............................................

 RFID .......................................................

 Testing system.........................................

 Pneumatic valve ......................................

 Rice milling equipment............................

 Thermal processes...................................

 Polymer characterisation .........................

 Safety door .............................................

 Timers.....................................................

 Pounding machine ..................................

 Safety light curtains ................................

 Tin .......................................................

 Powder disperser.....................................

 Sanitation machines................................

 Transmission fluids ..................................

 Powder mill.............................................

 Screw compressor ...................................

 Universal type unit air cooler ...................

 Process tanks ..........................................

 Sealing machine......................................

 Vacuum cleaners.....................................

 Programmable logic controllers ...............

 Security systems ......................................

 Vacuum machine ....................................

 Programmable terminals .........................

 Shrink wrapping machine .......................

 Vegetable cutting machine......................

 Proximity sensors ....................................

 Slate belt ................................................

 Vermicelli making machine......................

 Punching machine ..................................

 Spice mill ................................................

 Vibration motor ......................................

 PVC strip door ........................................

 Stirrer .....................................................

 Vision sensors .........................................

 Rail tankers .............................................

 Stretch wrapping machine ......................

 Washing elevator ....................................

 Rare earth tubes .....................................

 Switching relays ......................................

 Water purification system........................

 Refrigerant pumps ..................................

 Tanks & silos ...........................................

 Water purifier .........................................

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se this form for FREE additional Information on advertisements published in this issue. We will send your inquiries to the advertisers and ask them to send you the details or contact you directly.



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Tel.: +91-22-3003 4640



Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in 

 A G Engineers ............................................................................. 

IPACK-IMA SPA............................................................................

 Arctic India Sales......................................................................... 

Jas Enterprises.............................................................................

First Fold Here

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd .......................................................

 Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd................................................................... 

Livewire ......................................................................................

 Diversey India Pvt Ltd .................................................................. 

Media Today Pvt Ltd....................................................................

 Engineering Expo ........................................................................ 

Misumi India Pvt Ltd ...................................................................

 Eureka Forbes Limited ................................................................. 

Monarch Appliances ...................................................................

 Frost & Sullivan ........................................................................... 

Omron Automation Pvt Ltd .........................................................

 FX Multitech Pvt Ltd.................................................................... 

Omtech Food Engg. ....................................................................



 Bonfiglioli Transmissions (Pvt) Ltd ................................................ 

 Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co., Ltd............................................ 

Plast World .................................................................................

 Hi Tech........................................................................................ 

Shah Brothers .............................................................................

 Hindustan Tin Work Ltd .............................................................. 

Shiva Analyticals (India) Limited...................................................

 HRS Process Systems Ltd ............................................................. 

Siemens Ltd ................................................................................

 IDMC Limited.............................................................................. 

Smart Logistics............................................................................

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Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

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Tel:

Fax:

01 / 2011

Address:

Email:

Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J.K. Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028, INDIA.

INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Special Projects POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

BR Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

Business Reply Inland

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA


PRODUCT INDEX Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Accelerated ageing test .......................... 79

Food testing programmes............................. 39

Papad making machine ................................ 41

Air cooler........................................................ 5

Foot sealer.................................................... 79

Pasta making machine .................................. 13

Air purifier .................................................... 17

Forced convection unit air cooler .................... 5

Peeler machine ............................................. 77

Almond cutting machine .............................. 41

Fuels ............................................................. 79

Petrol & fuel oils ........................................... 79

Ammonia liquid chillers ................................ 10

Gases ....................................................... 79

Photo electric sensors ..................................... 3

Animal feed technology................................ 13

Gear oils ....................................................... 79

Plastic pellets ................................................ 13

Belt weigher ............................................ 78

Grain handling system .................................. 13

Plate heat exchanger .................................... 10

Biodiesel ....................................................... 79

Gravy machine.............................................. 41

Plug valve ..................................................... 10

Brewing machine .......................................... 13

Grill magnet ................................................. 78

Pneumatic valve ............................................ 10

Bulk milk cooler ............................................ 10

Grinding & dispersion system ....................... 13

Polymer characterisation ............................... 79

Butterfly valve ............................................... 10

Gyratory screen............................................. 78

Pounding machine........................................ 41

Cap sealing machine............................... 79

Hammer machine.................................... 41

Powder disperser .......................................... 80

Chapati making machine .............................. 41 Chocolate/cocoa making machine................. 13 Chorafali making machine ............................ 41 Chow making machine ................................. 41 Cleaning nozzle ............................................ 80 Cleaning products......................................... 59 Cleaning section equipment.......................... 13 Colour sorting machine ................................ 13 Compositional & trace metal analysis............ 79 Control valve................................................. 77 Conveyer belts ..........................................4, 77 Counters & power supplies ............................. 3 Dairy machines........................................ 10 Daliya making machine................................. 41 Dehumidifiers................................................ 77 Digital paper moisture meter ........................ 75 Doors............................................................ 76 Double chamber vacuum .............................. 79 Drawer magnet............................................. 78 Drives .........................................................7, 9 Dry-cum-wet grinder..................................... 41 Dust control door ......................................... 76 Electromagnetic feeder........................... 78 Elevator belt ................................................. 77 Encoders......................................................... 3 Engine oils .................................................... 79 Evaporating units for cold rooms.................... 5 Exhibition - Engineering Expo .................45, 63 Exhibition - Frost & Sullivan 2010 India Excellence in Chemicals................................... 6 Exhibition - HiTech Manufacturing Show ...... 52 Exhibition - Processing & Packaging Expo 2011.... 75 Extruded products ........................................ 13 Extruder for papad machine ......................... 41 Factory automation ............................... FIC Failure analysis.............................................. 79 Filler compositional analysis .......................... 79 Filtration equipment ..................................... BC Flexible transparent PVC strip door ............... 76 Flour milling ................................................. 13 Food analysing & testing machine ................ BC Food conveying modular belt ....................... 77

Hand sealer .................................................. 79

Powder mill .................................................. 77

Heat exchanger............................................ BIC

Process tanks ................................................ 10

Heat resistant door ....................................... 76

Programmable logic controllers....................... 3

Hopper magnet ............................................ 78

Programmable terminals ................................. 3

Hygiene products.......................................... 59

Proximity sensors ............................................ 3

Impact pulveriser .................................... 41

Punching machine ........................................ 77

Industrial control & sensing devices ................ 3

PVC strip door .............................................. 76

Industrial door .............................................. 76

Rail tankers ............................................. 10

Industrial type unit air cooler .......................... 5

Rare earth tubes ........................................... 78

Infeed moving belt ....................................... 77

Refrigerant pumps ........................................ 10

Inspection belt .............................................. 77

Refrigeration ................................................. 10

Invertor/variable frequency drives .................... 3

RFID................................................................ 3

Juicer ....................................................... 41

Rice milling equipment ................................. 13

Knives and blades ................................... 84

Safety door ............................................. 76

Level controllers........................................ 3

Safety light curtains ........................................ 3

Lipuid food processing.................................. BC

Sanitation machines...................................... 59

Magnetic belt.......................................... 77

Screw compressor......................................... 10

Magnetic equipment .................................... 78

Sealing machine ........................................... 79

Magnetic plate ............................................. 78

Security systems............................................ 17

Magnetic traps ............................................. 78

Shrink wrapping machine ............................. 79

Masala mill ................................................... 41 Material identificaton.................................... 79 Material and food awards .............................. 6 Mathiya making machine.............................. 41 Measuring & monitoring relay ........................ 3 Metal detector .............................................. 79 Metallography .............................................. 79 Microniser..................................................... 77 Mini dal mill ................................................. 41 Mini pulveriser with circulating system.......... 41 Mini vacuum machine .................................. 79 Mixer grinder ................................................ 41 Mixture for papad machine .......................... 41 Motion controls .............................................. 3 Multi-chamber pulveriser .............................. 41 Noodle making machine......................... 41 Oil milling................................................ 13 Online vacuum machine ............................... 79 Packaging belt ........................................ 77 Packaging machine .................................75, 79 Packaging printer belt................................... 77 Panipuri making machine ............................. 41

Slate belt ...................................................... 77 Spice mill ...................................................... 41 Stirrer ........................................................... 41 Stretch wrapping machine ............................ 79 Switching relays .............................................. 3 Tanks & silos ........................................... 10 Temperature controllers .................................. 3 Testing system .............................................. 79 Thermal processes......................................... 13 Timers............................................................. 3 Tin ................................................................ 51 Transmission fluids........................................ 79 Universal type unit air cooler ................... 5 Vacuum cleaners ..................................... 17 Vacuum machine.......................................... 79 Vegetable cutting machine ........................... 41 Vermicelli making machine ........................... 41 Vibration motor ............................................ 78 Vision sensors ................................................. 3 Washing elevator .................................... 77 Water purification system ............................. 76 Water purifier ............................................... 17

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

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January 2011 | Modern Food Processing

89


ADVERTISERS’ LIST

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

A G Engineers

4

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co., Ltd.

T: +91-120-2866144

T: +886-4-896-5198

E: info@agengineers.net

E: guanyeu@ms39.hinet.net

W: www.agengineers.net

W: www.gy-1000.com.tw

Arctic India Sales

77

T: +91-11-23906777

Pg No

Hi Tech

BC

W: www.hortiexpo.com

52

Hindustan Tin Work Ltd

51

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd

13

79

E: sales@hindustantin.co.in

E: monarchappliances@gmail.com

HRS Process Systems Ltd

W: www.polysealindia.com

BIC

Omron Automation Pvt Ltd

E: sujit.pande@buhlergroup.com

E: cthe@hrsasia.co.in

W: www.buhlergroup.com

W: www.hrsasia.co.in

IDMC Limited

E: srirams@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com

Omtech Food Engg. 10

77

T: +91-9879670483

T: +91-22-66444222

T: +91-2692-225399

E: omtech.foodengg@gmail.com

W: www.diversey.com

E: idmc@idmc.coop

Plast World

Engineering Expo

45,63

T: +91-9376128372

W: www.idmc.coop

IPACK-IMA SPA

E: engexpo@infomedia18.in

25

T: +91-22-24368186 E: w.pereira@indiaitaly.com

41

T: +91-80-30251500 E: fandb@eurekaforbes.com W: www.eurekaforbes.com

6

E: foodkit@shahbros.com

T: +91-79-22743454

W: www.shahbros.com

E: info@jasenterprise.com

Shiva Analyticals (India) Limited

W: www.jasenterprise.com

T: +91-80-27971322

T: +91-22-40013419

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd

E: anishc@frost.com

T: +91-79-22970452

FX Multitech Pvt Ltd

39

T: +91-22-43560400

17 Jas Enterprises

W: www.stripdoor.co.in

Shah Brothers

W: www.engg-expo.com

Frost & Sullivan

76

E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com

T: +91-09920401226

Eureka Forbes Limited

3

T: +91-80-40726400 T: +91-20-25663581

59

Monarch Appliances T: +91-281-2461826

T: +91-80-22890000

Diversey India Pvt Ltd

T: +91-20-66470000

T: +91-11-49998888

W: www.hindustantin.biz

W: www.bonfiglioliindia.com

FIC

W: www.misumi-ec.com

T: +91-44-24781035 E: sales@bonfiglioliin.com

Misumi India Pvt Ltd

E: sales@misumi-ec.com

W: www.bryair.com

7

75

E: hortiexpo@gmail.com

E: hitech@infomedia18.in

Bonfiglioli Transmissions (Pvt) Ltd

Media Today Pvt Ltd

Pg No

T: +91-11-26682045

T: +91-09820373804

E: bryairmarketing@pahwa.com

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

78

79

E: gupta@shivatec-india.com W: www.shivatec-india.com

5

Siemens Ltd

E: info@jkmagnetics.com

T: +91-79-27910993

W: www.jkmagnetics.com

E: fxmultitech@gmail.com

Livewire

W: www.fxmultitech.com

E: livewire18@infomedia18.in

9

W: www.siemens.com/industry

Smart Logistics 83

8

T: +91-22-30034650 E: prachi.mutha@infomedia18.com Our consistent advertisers

FINALIZE SUPPLIERS @ 90

Modern Food Processing | January 2011

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Modern Food Processing - January 2011