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Modern Food Processing

August 2012


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EDITORIAL

Reaping the agro advantage

A

gro-processing has certainly come of age, going by its significant impact not only on the economy of India but also on several economic strata of the country. If implemented appropriately to its full potential, it can save millions of tonnes of food from being wasted every year, boost food security of the nation, improve livelihoods of low-income groups as well as empower women pan-India. From the perspective of an entrepreneur in agro-processing, it is a rather long journey from running a traditional, small-scale food processing unit to managing a well-integrated modern industry with high probability of catering to global consumers. And, what s(h)e needs include technical assistance, access to affordable finance, actionable business advice, reliable market information and reach, among others. A deeper analysis reveals how agro-processing has rapidly evolved in recent years from the simple subsistence-level farming to commercial agriculture by producing numerous value-added processed foods. Another important aspect that merits mention here is the strategic shift in the ‘business’ outlook of the agro-processor from a predominantly inward-looking approach to a boundaryless trade aspiration. Let’s do a reality check. While India stands tall in the world map as one of the leading producers of agricultural and livestock commodities, its share in global trade of processed food is a meagre 1.6 per cent with value addition of only about 20 per cent. This huge gap points towards several shortcomings in the agro-value chain of the country. These include low productivity levels or yield per hectare, a largely unorganised food processing industry, poor connectivity between public and private sector, outdated policies in food processing, limited market linkages and inadequate infrastructure, to name a few. All these sad statistics call for prompt and timely action as well as effective implementation of the proposed policies to seamlessly amalgamate small-scale agro-processing entrepreneurs into the expansive maze of modern agribusinesses with liberalisation of existing marketing and investment measures. At the same time, there is a need to put in place practical regulatory frameworks for managing contracts with farmers.

Editorial Advisory Board Dr A S Abhiraman

Hopefully, this will help in achieving the Vision 2015 of the Ministry of Food Processing Industries that envisages an increase in processing of perishables to 20 per cent, a rise in value addition to 34 per cent and India’s share growing in international trade to 3 per cent. Then, agro-processing can truly propel India to become the food basket of the world!

Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd

Prof M Y Kamat Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Dept, UICT, Mumbai

Manas R Bastia manas@infomedia18.in

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook: Fish Processing and Aquaculture Fish processing industry ..................................................... 42

28 Photo: Joshua Navalkar; Assisted by: Hemal Patel; Cover location courtesy: HyperCITY Retail India Ltd (Malad outlet, Mumbai)

Fish marketing .................................................................... 48 Fishery industry ................................................................. 50 Cage farming ....................................................................... 54

Special Focus: Agro-processing

Interface - M R Francis, GM, Naik Frozen Foods Pvt Ltd ..... 56

Agro-processing industry ................................................... 24

Roundtable .......................................................................... 58

Private labels of agri-products ............................................ 28

Carbonated drinks market.................................................. 60

Packaged flour market........................................................ 30

Monsoon logistics ............................................................... 62

Minor millets ...................................................................... 32

Automation Trends

Interface - Dhirubhai Patel, Chairman & Managing Director, Champion Agro Ltd ......................... 34 Roundtable .......................................................................... 36

In Conversation With

Robotics in food packaging: Well-armed with efficiency for better productivity ........................................ 66

Energy Management Case study - Mother Dairy, Gandhinagar: Waving the ‘green’ flag to total energy efficiency ............ 68

Policies & Regulations Ron Pringle, Vice President and General Manager, Ecolab India ....................20

Decontrolling sugar industry: A sweet deal for long-term stability ............................................................. 70

Strategy Facility Visit: NHC Foods Ltd

Indian food services segment: Brand-building vital for augmenting business ..................................................... 73

Spicing up growth with right blend of quality and technology ................................................................... 38

Tips & Tricks

Regular Sections Editorial ............................................................................ 7 News, Views & Analysis .................................................. 12 Technology & Innovation ................................................ 16 Technology Transfer ........................................................ 18 Projects ............................................................................ 75 Tenders ............................................................................ 76 Event List ........................................................................ 77 Book Review .................................................................... 79 Products .......................................................................... 80 List of Products .............................................................. 86 List of Advertisers .......................................................... 88

Fish production: Eco-friendly fishing methods to attain sustainability ........................................................ 74

Event Report Dairy Show 2012: Opening new avenues for farmers to milk profits........................................................ 78 y sar r e iv nn ial Highlights of Next Edition th A pec 7 S Food & beverage industry: Indian entrepreneurial excellence Details on page no. 77

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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Views and opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18)*, its publisher and/or editors. We at Network18 do our best to verify the information published but do not take any responsibility for the absolute accuracy of the information. Network18 does not accept the responsibility for any investment or other decision taken by readers on the basis of information provided herein. Network18 does not take responsibility for returning unsolicited material sent without due postal stamps for return postage. No part of this magazine can be reproduced without the prior written permission of the publisher. Network18 reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Network18. Senior Editor: Manas R Bastia Printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Network18, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Food Processing is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. MAHENG / 2008 / 25262. Network18 does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. *Ownership of this magazine stands transferred from Infomedia18 Ltd (Infomedia18) to Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18) in pursuance of the scheme of arrangement between Network18 and Infomedia18 and their respective shareholders and creditors, as approved by the Hon’ble High Court of Delhi and the necessary approval of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting is being obtained.

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

BRANDED PULSES

Tata Chemicals bets big on unpolished branded dals

EXPANSION PLANS

Champion Agro on rapid growth drive Champion Agro Ltd plans to aggressively foray into North India and open 400 agro-malls across India in the next three years. Planning to invest ` 100 crore for this expansion drive, the company has also opened marketing offices in Delhi and Solan in Himachal Pradesh. To actively spearhead its rapidly growing Fruit & Vegetable Division, Champion Agro recently appointed Dr Omveer Singh as the CEO of Champion Agro Fresh Pvt Ltd who was earlier heading the Agri-Business & CSR Division of Field Fresh (A Bharti Group company). Dhirubhai Patel, Chairman & Managing Director, Champion Agro Ltd, said, “The company plans to open 20 district level malls, agri-excellence centres and integrated storage facilities, which will become hub as well as connecting point for nearby centres. It aims to provide exhaustive services package to the farmers and has a vision to provide a strong forward as well as backward linkage from farm to fork in the industry.” Avani Jain

Tata Chemicals Ltd has a vision of making Tata I-Shakti unpolished dals a household phenomenon in all metro cities in the country by the end of fiscal 2012-13. “The idea right now is to give the end-user a quality product, which is superior and hygienic. At an initial stage of a product lifecycle, it is imperative to have enough awareness generation on the benefits of unpolished dals. The consumer is looking for a quality product that is healthy,

besides being good in taste and that is the reason we are focussed on delivering unpolished pulses,” said Parag Gadre – Head, Sales and Marketing, Consumer Products Business, Tata Chemicals. According to Ashvini Hiran, COO, Consumer Products Division, Tata Chemicals, “The pulses market in India is dominated by polished dals, which undergo polishing by various external means. With mass awareness on the availability of Tata i-Shakti unpolished dals across India, we aim to revolutionise the pulses buying behaviour and consumption pattern of Indian households.” Mahua Roy

DAIRY PRODUCT

Parag Milk to launch Go Lassi in more cities Parag Milk is gearing up to introduce Go Lassi, which was launched in Mumbai and Pune in May this year, in other markets such as Bengaluru and Chennai. “We are satisfied with the response from the consumers of Mumbai and Pune. In fact, it was a soft launch in these two cities. Now, we will be aggressive in these two markets as well,” said Nirmal Chaudhary, Manager, Marketing & Advertising, Parag Milk Foods Pvt Ltd. Go Lassi is available in four flavours like kesar & elaichi, rose & kewda, vanilla badam & pista and alphonso mango. “We value our customers and offer them best innovative products through our world-class infrastructure so that they experience world-class product in India, and Go Lassi is one such offering to our valued consumers,” he claimed. Prasenjit Chakraborty

NU TS

POST-HARVEST TECHNOLOGY

Paramount Farms positions nuts as snacking item

CIPHET bags major ICAR sponsored project

In a segment dominated by ready-to-eat (RTE) products and freshly baked/fried items, Paramount Farms has positioned its brand Wonderful comprising nuts such as almonds, pistachios, etc as a healthy snacking option. Concentrating on Indian palates, the Wonderful Almonds range has been introduced in flavours such as roasted salted, salt and pepper, and natural raw. The Wonderful Pistachios range is available in roasted salted, salt and pepper, and sweet chilli flavours. “Indians appreciate almonds for their health benefits; and we believe that as more consumers learn about heart health, weight management and nutritional benefits of pistachios, they will begin to fully appreciate the health benefits of pistachios as well,” said Milin Chatterjee, Dy General Manager – Marketing, Paramount Farms. Mahua Roy

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Modern Food Processing | August 2012

The Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET) has bagged a ` 2.68 crore worth project for the development of spectroscopy methods for detection and quantification of adulterants and contaminants in fruit juices and milk. The Indian Council of Agriculture Research’s (ICAR) National Fund would be sponsoring the project. “The main objective of the project is to detect and quantify all kinds of adulterants including the artificial milk in natural milk and sugars in apple/ mango juice,” stated Dr S N Jha, Head, Agricultural Structures and Environmental Control Division (AS&EC), CIPHET. The project would be completed in three years. Avani Jain


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

FOOD SAFET Y

Ecolab organises seminar for dairy industry in Anand

MARKET FORECAST

Indian bottled water market to touch ` 10,000-crore mark The Indian bottled water market (both organised and unorganised sector), which is currently valued at ` 8,000 crore, is on the threshold of being worth ` 10,000 crore in the current fiscal 2012-13, according to a research report titled ‘The Indian bottled water market: Unveiling its thirst’ released by Ikon Marketing Consultants. The country’s bottled water market is registering a growth of 19 per cent per annum. Yatindra R Sharma, Managing Director, KHS Machinery Pvt Ltd, observed, “The demand for bottled water is increasing mainly due to the rising awareness among consumers about clean drinking water. Further, many new brands have entered the market in the recent past and thus the industry is growing tremendously not only in India but in other parts of the world as well.” Avani Jain

The Chief Guest of the seminar, Rahul Kumar, addressing the audience Ecolab, in association with Vidya Dairy, recently organised a one-day seminar on ‘The importance of food safety & hygiene in dairy industry’ in Anand, Gujarat. Eminent personalities from the industry and key stakeholders attended the conference, which focussed on technologically advanced hygiene & food safety solutions. Ron Pringle, Vice President & General Manager, Ecolab India, stated, “The main purpose of organising this event was to create awareness about hygiene and food safety among the dairy companies in India. We wanted the people to know about the different programmes available and how they can benefit from them. This

conference created an open platform where dairy industry members came together and shared their views on food safety and hygiene in the industry.” The Chief Guest, Rahul Kumar, Managing Director, Amul Dairy, said, “There is need for proper sanitation in dairy business. It is important for the dairy technologists to know about cleanliness as it is important for ensuring product quality. So, this conference created awareness about this issue.” Various speakers presented their views on different topics related to food safety and hygiene in the dairy industry. Some of the speakers present at the seminar included Sham S Chaudhary, Former General Manager (Quality), Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation; B P Rao, General Manager - Liquid Processing Business Line, GEA Process Engineering (India) Pvt Ltd; Peter Gatchell, Technical Specialist New Zealand, Ecolab; Albert Lee, Food & Beverage Application Manager, Asia, Ecolab; etc. Avani Jain

QSR CHAIN

RTE MARKET

M.O.D. plans to double store count by end of fiscal year

Morarka Organic Foods launches tomato soup

Singapore-based gourmet donut brand, Mad Over Donuts (M.O.D.) currently operating 37 stores all over India in a diminutive span of less than 4 years, plans extensive expansion by doubling the count of stores in this fiscal year. “M.O.D. has a strong foothold in cities like New Delhi & NCR, Mumbai, Pune and Bengaluru and are soon looking forward to opening new stores in other metropolitan cities like Ahmedabad, Tarak Bhattacharya Chandigarh, Chennai, Hyderabad and others in this fiscal year,” said Tarak Bhattacharya, COO, Mad Over Donuts. Apart from geographical store expansions, the company is looking at extending its product portfolio.

Morarka Organic Foods has launched Down to Earth brand chunky tomato soup under its range of vegetable soups in international foods category. Mukesh Gupta, Director, Morarka Group, said, “The soup, which is different from the others in the segment, is an organic product. Its sweet and fresh taste redefines the average soup while chunks of tomato give it a hearty appearance.”

Mahua Roy

Avani Jain

NU TRACEU TICALS

RECOGNITION

MonaVie eyes production facility in India

Britannia Industries wins award for quality performance

MonaVie has spotted the immense market potential for its products in India and has definite plans to boost investment of approximately ` 100 crore in the Indian operations over the next 3-5 years, with most of the investment earmarked for setting

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up its own manufacturing facility, customised R&D set-up to localise product offerings, increase distribution & logistics network, training & development of human resources and opening up the possibility of community commerce initiatives.

Britannia Industries has been awarded the Global Performance Excellence Award (GPEA) by Asia-Pacific Quality Organization at its Chicago HQ. Britannia is the only Indian food and manufacturing company to receive this award.


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

FOOD LABELLING

FOOD PACKAGING

Zebra Technologies introduces ZT200 printer series

Bosch to acquire Ampack Ammann

Zebra Technologies Corporation, a global leader in technologies that extend realtime visibility into business operations, announced the release of the ZT200 printer series, a new line of printers intended for light industrial and commercial applications. “Designed with ease-of-use in mind, the ZT200 series offers reliable printing for a wide variety of applications.

Whether one is adopting barcoding for the first time, upgrading printers or replacing printer models, this series offers the right choice for most labelling applications. ZT200 is used in various processes in the food processing industry,” said Sachin Tare, Head-Indian Subcontinent, Zebra Technologies Corporation. It is majorly used to label pallets, crates, or individual items with barcodes, text and lot numbers. Besides, it is also used in asset management, cross-docking, inventory management, sample tracking, receiving/ shipping, reverse logistics, work-in-process tracking, compliance labelling, information labels, order labelling, quality control etc in various other sectors. Prasenjit Chakraborty

Bosch, the leading global supplier of technology and services, has signed an agreement to acquire the Germanybased Ampack Ammann, which develops, manufactures, and sells filling and packaging machines for liquid and paste-like foodstuffs. The planned takeover is subject to approval by the antitrust authorities. Equipment developed and produced by Ampack Ammann includes cup and bottle filling machines as well as dosing systems and peripheral machinery. The equipment is mainly used to fill and pack highly sensitive food such as dairy products, baby food, and hospital food, but also dosable products such as cereals.

ETHNIC SNACKS

TRADE SHOW

Garden Namkeens opens facility at Bhiwandi

India Foodex 2012 to be held in Bengaluru

Garden Namkeens, a CavinKare brand, has opened its facility at Bhiwandi, Maharashtra. Spread across eight acres, the factory deploys latest technology to cater to the brand’s current and future requirements. The investment for the plant is ` 80 crore and has a capacity of 1,200 metric tonne, which will be scaled up to 1,800 metric tonne as demand increases. T D Mohan, Joint Managing Director, CavinKare Pvt Ltd, said, “With this plant, we can now pursue aggressive growth for Garden Namkeens products across the country and also introduce a wide range of other products within salted snacks and sweets categories.”

The Media Today Group will organise the 4 th edition of India Foodex, along with the concurrent shows, from August 25-27, 2012, at Palace Grounds, Bengaluru. “The main attraction of this year will be the biggest grain processing technology display from Turkey and other European nations, which are coming to explore trade opportunities in the growing flour milling market, rice processing, grain storage solutions and value-addition of cereals like snacks, breakfast foods and pasta,” stated S Jafar Naqvi, Chief Co-ordinator, India Foodex. There will be significant display of farm mechanisation, diversification opportunities, pre- and post-harvest management of food crops, valueaddition, food processing, marketing and retailing in the concurrent event, Graintech India.

FOOD SAFET Y

SPICES

FERA and Waters open training lab

NHC Foods plans new manufacturing facility

The Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) based in York, UK, and Waters Corporation based in the US have announced the opening of a new laboratorybased training facility, combining their respective regulatory, scientific and industry expertise to solve the global food safety challenge. The training facility, based near York, will primarily train those concerned with exporting foods to Europe. The training facility collaboration with FERA is the second in a network of international food safety training laboratories established in partnership with Waters. The first IFSTL was opened in the US in September 2011 by the US Food and Drug Administration, University of Maryland and Waters.

With an investment of ` 15-20 crore, NHC Foods, one of the new entrants in the B2C spices market in India, plans a new manufacturing facility in Mundhra by 2014. It already has another facility close to Pardi, near Valsad, in Gujarat. This new unit will be smaller than the Valsad plant and will cater to production of spices, packaged pulses and instant mixes. “By 2014, we expect a turnover of ` 200 crore, and plan to make our Saaz brand of spices pan-India. Our target is to launch 65 variants of Saaz,” said Apoorva Shah, Managing Director, NHC Foods. Besides this, the company is also concentrating on new product categories like instant mixes and whole spices. In addition, it plans to import seasonings and bring them to India. This will effectively complement the product portfolio of NHC Foods. The company also plans to foray into the ready-to-eat segment. Mahua Roy

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

Tegra 7755E offers improved detection of foreign particles present in food Key Technology has introduced an enhanced vision capability for its popular Tegra in-air colour sorters. Featuring twice the number of cameras as other Tegra sorters with the same width, the new Tegra 7755E achieves improved line-of-sight for better all-around viewing with virtually no hidden areas. Designed for customers looking to improve product quality and food safety, this sorter’s full-object view increases detection and removal of foreign materials (FM) and defects, with the greatest advantage in small defect removal. “Previously, half-wide Tegra sorters with a 30-inch (750-mm) wide platform featured two cameras – one at top and one bottom. Now, we have designed a half-wide Tegra sorter with four cameras. Each camera scans the full width of the belt so the entire product zone is viewed from four sides, offering unprecedented whole object processing,” claimed Steve Johnson, Director, Marketing, Key Technology. He also added that compared to standard Tegra sorters, this enhanced sorter removes approximately 20 per cent more defects that are 1 mm and 2 mm in size, depending on the application. Key designed this new vision capability specifically for a carrot customer looking to remove smallest defects. The technology is ideal for a wide range of sliced, diced and whole fruits & vegetables as well as many potato products, snack foods, candies, nuts, and more. The half-wide Tegra sorts up to 16,500 lbs (7.5 metric tonne) per hour, depending on the product. Full-wide Tegra, with its 60-inch (1,500-mm) wide platform, sorts up to 33,000 lbs (15 metric tonne) per hour. Food processors with installed half-wide Tegra sorters can upgrade to the enhanced 7755E in the field.

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Modern Food Processing | August 2012

Gamma-cyclodextrin masks unpleasant taste in food and stabilises sensitive food ingredients WACKER has received approval from the European Commission for the use of gamma-cyclodextrin as a novel food ingredient for foodstuffs and beverages in the European Union (EU). Cyclodextrins are ring-shaped sugar molecules, bioengineered from plant-based raw materials such as corn or potato. When applied to food, these can mask unpleasant taste, stabilise sensitive food ingredients such as vitamins or increase the bioavailability of certain active agents. EU approval of gamma-cyclodextrin thus opens up a series of new applications in the European food industry for WACKER. “The EU approval is a positive one for us and a further step towards strengthening our position as global market leader for cyclodextrins,” said Dr Gerhard Schmid, President, WACKER Biosolutions. He further added, “Gamma-cyclodextrin will now open up completely new applications for our customers in the European food industry.” Cyclodextrin molecules’ special feature is their ring shape and this creates an interior cavity in which cyclodextrins can take up other, primarily hydrophobic substances. This makes cyclodextrins highly attractive for functional uses in the food industry as they can mask the taste and odour of functional additives, protect or stabilise sensitive substances against various external influences and substantially increase the bioavailability of active ingredients. A natural degradation product of starch, cyclodextrins are not only free of allergens, but also purely vegetarian; they are bioengineered with the aid of enzymes from renewable raw materials such as corn starch and potato starch. Cyclodextrins are approved for food applications in numerous countries.

DiviArm handles broad range of primary packaging Cermex has launched DiviArm, which is a continuous lane divider with guiding arm for distributing primary packaging such as bottles, containers, cans and cartons into lanes. Flexibility is the first asset of the DiviArm since it is capable of handling a broad range of primary packaging such as bottles, containers, cans and cartons. Accessibility to the setting points is achieved by cantilever frame structure, which is in line with this logic of flexibility. The permitted speed of the DiviArm is 60 cycles per minute (350 products/min). The compact footprint is another characteristic of this new lane divider, even though it manages up to 12 lanes. It is designed according to a total productive maintenance approach and modular architecture. The equipment is fitted with a guiding arm mounted on two axes. The transverse axis distributes products between lanes while the longitudinal axis synchronises the product progression so that products are guided at the speed of the lower conveyor without bumping. A system automatically empties the lane divider if the downstream machine stops so as to restart quickly, with no falling products and no loss of synchronisation. Product protection is reinforced by the wide scale of guide position adjustments and choice of material used to suit the product shape, resistance, label position, etc.


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY OFFERED As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

Beverage maker An Indian firm is offering ‘three-in-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

technology to manufacture chitin and chitosan - important byproducts from the shell of shellfish. Chitin is the most important organic constituent of the exoskeletal material of invertebrates and an important economical source of this material is the shrimp processing industry. Areas of application Industries such as food processing, biotechnology, pharmacy and medicine Forms of transfer Consultancy, technology licensing

Chitin and chitosan

Retort pouch technology

An

Indian

company

is

offering

An

India-based

company

offers

technology for ready-to-serve fish curry in retortable pouch. The technology provides a method for preparing the ready-to-serve fish curry in retortable pouch with excellent storage stability and quality with a shelflife of more than one year at ambient temperature. The thermal processing conditions have been standardised for this product in order to make it safe for consumers. Areas of application Food, meat, fish processing Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, technology licensing

TECHNOLOGY REQUESTED Coconut milk beverage An Indian entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for producing & processing coconut milk beverage. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy

Targeted finished product is tinned corn, pop corn, corn flakes etc. It is also interested to import similar kind of plant & machinery to set up the same in India. Areas of application Corn processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Corn processing An Indian company is looking for a complete proposal/project report to set up a dry milling corn processing plant in Andhra Pradesh.

Extruder pilot plant An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food.

Areas of application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT) of United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP), APCTT Building, C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi - 110 016, Tel: 011-3097 3758 (Direct), 3097 3710 (Board), Fax: 011-2685 6274, E-mail: srinivasaraghavan@un.org, Web: www.apctt.org, For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

Share and Solicit Technology The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. Here is an opportunity to be a part of this endeavour by sending your technology on offer or technology requirements. If you belong to any of these two categories, you are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details for publication. The write-up needs to be as per the format of this section with information about the particular technology offered or requested, its areas of application and forms of transfer. Contact us: Modern Food Processing, Network18 Media & Investments Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028.Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 l Fax: 022-3003 4499 l Email: spedit@infomedia18.in

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Modern Food Processing | August 2012


IN CONVERSATION WITH Ron Pringle

Technology combined with chemistry and services provided by us can help companies save water and energy ...says Ron Pringle, Vice President and General Manager, Ecolab India. In an interaction with Avani Jain, he underlines the significance of sustainability in food processing due to factors like scarce water resources and high energy prices.

What is the importance of sustainable development and how does Ecolab ensure this?

Courtesy: Ecolab India

These days, sustainability requirement is high in all the sectors as there is increasing focus on water and energy conservation. This is attributed to factors like scarce water resources and rising energy prices. Keeping this in mind, all our R&D activities focus on developing sustainable technologies and processes to aid industries in achieving their goal of sustainabilit y. So, we develop super-concentrate products, cleaning and sanitation programmes that use less amount of water & energy, and thereby lead to improvement

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Ron Pringle

in overall efficiency of the plant & processes. Thus, technology combined with chemistry and services provided by us can help companies save water and energy to a large extent.

What motivates you the most in life? Working for a company that is capable of making the world a cleaner, safer & healthier place as well as driving sustainability itself acts as a motivational force. Further, working in a team, sharing knowledge with the young talent in the industry also motivates me.

What was the toughest decision ever made by you? The toughest decision for me was to move to India leaving the family in UK. I took this decision because I was excited about my job in India and the challenges it posed. However, it was a tough call.

How do you deal with a tough situation? I ponder over the situation and do not make hasty judgements. I listen to others’ opinions and then take the decision and stick to it, whatever the situation may be.

What are the few things that you check before signing a deal? There are two things that need to be kept in mind. First, the deal should be fair for both the parties. Second, often, salesmen make promises at the spur of the moment without realising their company’s capabilities and strengths. So the most important thing is to examine ‘Are we capable of delivering what we promised?’

Which business etiquette you value the most? I think honesty is the one etiquette that can help you climb the ladder in any business. Scottish people are known to be blunt and direct, so I prefer to follow this principle while dealing with people.

How is the demand for hygiene and food safety, particularly in dairy processing industry? India has a well-established dairy industry. Taking into account consumers’ demand for quality products, dairy plants in the country are now demanding technologies for maintaining hygiene and food safety. Companies are increasingly adopting Clean-in-Place (CIP) method for maintaining hygiene in the plant. Earlier, people just used hot water for cleaning purposes but now they have moved beyond and are using acoustics for cleaning utensils, etc. Further, there are growing concerns about extending the shelf-life of milk from one day to fifteen days as seen in Europe and North America; and milk products from 2 days to 5-6 days. All these have led to rise in demand for safety and hygiene in the dairy processing industry. Thus, there are great opportunities for the dairy industry in India to implement best practices and technologies. Ecolab offers many solutions depending on the application, process and stage of milk processing. Most of the solutions are built around automation and employ unique technology to ensure that companies get good cleaning result the very first time.

How has the recent merger with Nalco helped Ecolab in providing new technologies for water efficiency? The merger with Nalco has proved to be wonderful for Ecolab because two likeminded companies have come together. Previously, what Ecolab lacked was global leadership in water technology but now Ecolab can leverage Nalco’s water expertise to help customers conserve water and environment. Thus, this would strengthen the company’s position in the global market. After the merger, Ecolab can also make use of 3D TRASAR technology from Nalco.

What are the leading innovations making headway in the segment? Remote censoring is one of the leading innovations in the segment and it is interesting to note that Nalco has got this technology already. Through this technology, Nalco is actually tracking sensors that are being used in America, Brazil and Europe as well as other parts of the world. Ecolab has plans to bring this technology into its core divisions.

What are the challenges and opportunities for the company? The biggest challenge is to create awareness and make the industry understand that there are alternative ways for saving energy and water, and a slight increase in chemical spend may result in far greater financial benefits in terms of enhanced food productivity and conservation of energy & water. Despite the challenges, there are many opportunities. As a company, we are capable of improving the productivity of food manufacturing plants, besides improving yield and shelf-life of products. This holds us in good stead.

What are your growth plans in India? Ecolab is growing at a healthy rate in India, and is recording doubledigit growth. Further, since the Indian economy is expanding, Ecolab’s business especially in the food & beverage segment in the country is growing continuously. In future, we are going to focus more on hospitality as well as food and beverage industry in the country.

What is your message to aspiring professionals? The industry is changing and new best practices are emerging. As India is growing and gaining recognition at the global stage, it is important that the individuals as well as companies move with time and embrace these best practices. Businessmen need to drive the change in the industry and open their eyes to look for new opportunities. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

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SPECIAL FOCUS

AGRO-PROCESSING AGRO-PROCESSING INDUSTRY Modernisation leading to a new era ................................................................................................. 24 PRIVATE LABELS OF AGRI-PRODUCTS Racing ahead of the pack! ............................................................................................................... 28 PACKAGED FLOUR MARKET Flooring consumers with innovations ............................................................................................... 30 MINOR MILLETS Future food for nutrition security ..................................................................................................... 32 INTERFACE - Dhirubhai Patel, Chairman & Managing Director, Champion Agro Ltd “The extent of value-addition of horticultural products in India has increased from 2 per cent to 6 per cent in the last five years” .................................................................................. 34 ROUNDTABLE Can packaged pulses compete with the unorganised sector? ........................................................... 36

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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SPECIAL FOCUS Agro-processing industry

Modernisation leading to a new era

beverages as compared to carbonated beverages in the last few years. All these indicate that the growth potential for the agro-processing business in India is substantially high. This is providing a direct impetus to the processing machinery industry, which is keeping up with the demands of processors, and ultimately this will be in the interest of the end-consumer. Further, a higher demand by consumers has led to a faster rate of production being required by manufacturers, eventually leading to a sustained demand for modernised equipment at par with global standards.

Courtesy: Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd

Market dynamics

With processed foods gaining huge popularity and thereby marketshare, the demand for agro-processing machinery is increasing by the day. The machinery segment has witnessed remarkable changes over the years with modernisation opening new avenues for agro-processing equipment and solution suppliers. It is, thus, seeing an upward trend in new technology development, which will definitely revolutionise the agro-food processing industry in India and mark the beginning of a new era. Avani Jain

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urrently, India ranks second in fruit production and third in vegetable production in the world. Also, India’s food processing industry is one of the largest in the world – it ranks fifth in terms of production, consumption, export and growth. According to a study by McKinsey & Company, the Indian food market is poised to touch $ 310 billion by 2015 and $ 344 billion in 2025, recording an approximate compounded annual growth rate of 4.1 per cent.

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Modern Food Processing | August 2012

The reasons for the boom in the food processing industry are many. Modernisation has led to changing food consumption patterns and increased spending on value-added products, spurred by increasing income levels, rapid urbanisation, rising number of working women and changing lifestyles. Further, consumer taste and preference is one of the major drivers for this industry. Moreover, increased healthconsciousness, changing demographics and lifestyles are driving demand for quality fruit products that can be consumed at ease. This is evident from the huge rise in demand for ‘pulpy’

The vegetable and fruit production contributes more than 30 per cent to the agricultural GDP. India accounts for 13 per cent of vegetables and 12 per cent of fruit production globally. If one considers agro-processing industry, in particular, then processing of fruits and vegetables is estimated to be around 2.2 per cent of the total production in the country. The major processed products are fruit pulp & juices, fruit-based ready-to-serve beverages, canned fruits & vegetables, jams, squashes, pickles, chutneys and dehydrated vegetables. The new arrivals in the segment comprise vegetable curries in retortable pouches, canned mushroom & mushroom products, dried fruits & vegetables and fruit juice concentrates. Thus, due to the growth in the agro-processing industry, the demand for machinery is also increasing since the last few years.

Evolution of the industry The rural landscape is undergoing a steady but dramatic change, which is directly impacting the agro-processing machinery sector. Earlier, most of the work was done by hand but now farmers prefer to use machines. Elaborating on the changes observed in the agroprocessing segment over the years, Dr Omveer Singh, CEO, Champion Agro Fresh, notes, “As an agriculture solutions provider, we have seen


Agro-processing industry

As an agriculture solutions provider, we have seen that there are significant changes in socioeconomic conditions, cultural environment, literacy levels and occupation of rural masses. Dr Omveer Singh CEO, Champion Agro Fresh

that there are significant changes in socio-economic conditions, cultural environment, literacy levels and occupation of rural masses. This has led to more awareness, thanks to increased exposure of media in rural areas, high disposable income/easy access to loans or financing demand for better quality agro-inputs etc.”

Technologies for boosting production at local level The agro-processing industry is highly decentralised, with large number of units in the small-scale sector having small capacities of up to 250 tonne per annum. Dr Dilip Jain, Senior Scientist, Central Arid Zone Research Institute (CAZRI), Jodhpur, says, “Since the agro-processing industry is highly organised, there is demand for modern technologies and equipment that can be employed effectively at the small-scale level. Institutes such as Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET), etc are coming up with new technologies, which can help the local farmers to increase their production.”

Since the agro-processing industr y is highly organised, there is demand for modern technologies and equipment that can be employed effectively at the small-scale level. Institutes such as CIPHET, etc are coming up with new technologies, which can help the local farmers to increase their production. Dr Dilip Jain Senior Scientist, Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur

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He adds, “Recently, a new technology – custard apple pulper is developed by CIPHET, Ludhiana, Punjab, in order to aid the custard apple processing technique. It is a machine for separating pulp, seeds and peels from custard apples, and contains three mechanisms, namely fruit-cutting, fruit-scooping and pulping mechanisms. Both the CIPHET and the new licensees are confident that they would prove to be a boon to the food processing industry.” Further, there is lot of demand for custard apple pulp in foreign markets, so this technology would provide a boost to exports. Dr Jain states, “Like CIPHET, CAZRI is also working on developing new technologies to aid fruit and vegetable processing. Recently,

New technologies being developed for fruit processing are in the area of value-added products like diced mango or strawberry, pulp, dessert preparation, etc. Department of Science & Technology (DST) asked us to develop post-harvest pineapple processing mechanisation system, which could be used by the farmers in Bengal. Thus, one can say that due to modernisation and farmers’ willingness to invest, the innovations in equipment for agro-processing industry are majorly driven by small-scale farmers.”

Innovations and challenges Keeping in mind the consumer demands, the R&D in this sector is concentrating more on developing new and better technologies. New technologies being developed for fruit processing are in the area of valueadded products like diced mango or strawberry, pulp, dessert preparation, etc. There is also focus on enhancing efficiency of the existing processing

Slowly and gradually, as modernisation is spreading its wings and farmers are becoming aware of new techniques, the demand for agro-processing solutions and equipment to increase productivity is definitely increasing. Bhrigu Mehta Director, Krutika Agro Produce Pvt Ltd

lines for pasteurisation, aseptic processing and concentration of pulp by use of energy-efficient heat exchanger designs and better process control. All these aim at ensuring better quality, and retaining aroma & nutritive value of the product. Despite the fact that modernisation has opened new avenues for the agroprocessing machinery market, there are many challenges that need to be dealt with before India can become a leading agro-processing country. Bhrigu Mehta, Director, Krutika Agro Produce Pvt Ltd, observes, “As compared to techniques employed by other nations, the technology available for agroproducers in India is limited. We are just at the beginning phase when it comes to agro-processing machinery and have a long way to go. But slowly and gradually, as modernisation is spreading its wings and farmers are becoming aware of new techniques, the demand for agro-processing solutions and equipment to increase productivity is definitely increasing.”

Promising future The food habits of Indian populace are the primary thrust factor for the agro-food processing industry. The agro-food processing machinery is, therefore, set on a high growth path. An efficient harvesting and post-harvest mechanisation system would ensure quality produce with low spoilage and result in benefits for the producer and processor. Thus, the future of agro-processing machinery industry appears bright. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS Private labels of agri-products

Photo: Joshua Navalkar; Assisted by: Hemal Patel; Location courtesy: HyperCITY Retail India Ltd (Malad outlet, Mumbai)

Racing ahead of the pack! Apart from establishing brand loyalty towards their stores, modern retail chains are also expanding and organising the market for agriproducts. Currently, low brand consciousness is associated with agri-products, a behaviour that retailers are making the most out of.

products. Greater freedom on setting up pricing strategy thereby has clear visibility into profit margins of private labels compared to a branded product,” says Shushmul Maheshwari, CEO, RNCOS E-Services, a market research company. The prices of in-house labels can be less anywhere between as little as 4-5 per cent to as much as 25 per cent compared to popular national brands. Direct sourcing from local vendors saves on distribution costs. Additionally, in the absence of any branding or marketing costs, attractive prices are passed on to consumers.

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Mahua Roy

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he agri-products aisle in a supermarket perhaps witnesses most easy decisions. For most shoppers, the only differentiator is the price. Modern retail chains are stocking up their own labels and introducing attractive deals & discounts, thus making the decision-making process even simpler. This is delighting the consumer but also giving sleepless nights to national brands. Private labels offer higher margins to retailers. According to experts, gross margins on private labels are, on an average, 25-30 per cent higher than on those of other displayed brands. In the FMCG category, margins on national brands are in the range of 12-17 per cent, whereas in-house brand can offer margins as high as 40 per

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cent. Here’s examining the top five advantages, which make private labels a clear favourite when it comes to agri-products.

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Competitive pricing

For a consumer today, it really does not matter whether the flour or rice or dal belongs to brand A or B. These are low-involvement categories and there is hardly any product differentiation. So eventually the shopper weighs his choices on the basis of pricing. Private labels can play the price game quite effectively. In fact, better deals also decide consumer loyalty towards a store, to some extent. “The proportion of private label agro-based products across the globe has been growing steadily over the past few years. This is mainly due to the upper hand that retailers have over branded

Consumer engagement

Consumer trial is a common sight at modern retail chains. A private label has the biggest advantage of this opportunity. “By actively conceptualising and executing comprehensive in-store branding and promotions, a retailer can ensure prominent shelf display for its in-house brands. We make our private labels a part of a combo offering or present a value deal so as to attract customers. We also offer select items complimentary along with a pre-determined ticket size, thus helping in trials,” elaborates Ajay Johri, Assistant Vice President (Marketing), SRS Ltd. In the modern retail environment, a major portion of brand marketing and communication happens at the store level. “Most retailers agree that as high as 80 per cent of purchase decisions are made at the store shelf, and thus the store is where they have maximum control. Retailers thus experiment with creation of multiple touch points within the store, through widespread in-store advertising and placement strategies,” says Ankur Shiv Bhandari, Managing Director-Indian sub-continent, Kantar Retail. When it comes to agriproducts, consumer trials, feedbacks and freebies are rampant. “Retailers selling private labelled agri-products can lure customers by embarking upon their own promotional offers. In a way, this also helps in reduced dependence


Private labels of agri-products

on brand names for sales in a modern trade outlet,” opines Maheshwari. National brands usually opt for a 360° promotional campaign, which includes television, radio, print & online media, etc. However, a retailer should typically concentrate on local or territorial advertising avenues such as radio, leaflets or newspaper inserts.

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Customisations and innovations

Those categories where consumers have less loyalty to better-known or promoted brands are the categories where retailers should try to push private labels. Commoditised items have low levels of product innovation and emotional involvement from the consumer. Thus, they are ideal candidates to become bankable in-store brands. However, commodities are the most difficult to brand. But given the regional variations in India, there is tremendous scope for customisation even in this category. “To be successful with private labels, retailers need to understand where private labels can add value. They should be able to successfully fill a void in the category either through valueaddition or obviously, competitive pricing,” states Bhandari. This is where customisations are highly spotted. The retail shelf and inventory management system is the first point of contact for studying consumer behaviour. By extrapolating buying behaviour, agri-products can be introduced innovatively for the consumer, be it in the form of specialised

Agri-products like sugar, atta, rice, spices, dry fruits etc are actively consumed and enjoy a frequent purchase cycle. They offer quick inventory turnaround and low shelf sitting time. Ajay Johri Assistant Vice President (Marketing), SRS Ltd

flour mixes or even spice mixes for different Indian preparations. Another form of widely exercised customisation is by way of experimentation with SKU sizes, a direct conclusion derived by studying buying behaviour. Thus, the retailer is offering not just convenience, but ensuring repeat purchases.

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Better control on inventory

If a private label agri-product has to compete and succeed against a national brand, visibility is the most important factor. Private labels benefit mostly by price comparisons. In order to drive sales, retailers, for instance, strategically position their private labels next to the most expensive competitor in the same category. Secondly, private labels have direct command over stocking. “Agri-products like sugar, atta, rice, spices, dry fruits etc are actively consumed and enjoy a frequent purchase cycle. They offer quick inventory turnaround and low shelf sitting time,” says Johri. However, maintaining a tight grip on inventory management is extremely essential when it comes to these key categories. Adds Maheshwari, “Agro-based products are more inclined towards spoilage if kept for a longer duration, therefore retailers selling private labelled agro-products can have control over the inventory, which acts as a major advantage to in-house brands.” But managing this is a tricky proposition, as there is usually a third party or contract manufacturer involved. “One needs to exercise caution when it comes to issues such as sourcing and selecting vendors, as keeping a tight watch on quality is of supreme importance. Since agri-products are perishables, maintaining freshness is the key. Hence, quick off-takes become important, and a slow movement is not acceptable. In fact, one needs to take an FMCG kind of an approach, wherein they see a high movement and do not sit on the shelf for too long. Managing this can be challenging at times, so

To be successful with private labels, retailers need to understand where private labels can add value. They should be able to successfully fill a void in the category either through value-addition or obviously, competitive pricing. Ankur Shiv Bhandari Managing Director-Indian sub-continent, Kantar Retail

introducing private labels needs to be a well-considered decision,” adds Johri.

5

Brand loyalty

But are private labels ensuring quality too? This question, which used to loom in the minds of shoppers, has been actively dismissed. Established, reputed and trusted business houses are usually the ones setting up modern trade outlets. A fair amount of brand equity thus already resides in the minds of consumers. And retailers strive heartily to keep up the name of their brand, without compromising on quality. Tangible efforts are taken to develop a relationship with the shopper. The traditional buying behaviour in terms of agri-products has been extended in the retail environment too. Indian shoppers prefer to touch and smell foodgrains before making a purchase. Working on that insight, most outlets thus display open containers of rice, wheat and other such agro-produce thereby encouraging customers to have a feel of the grains and check the quality. Similarly, some retail stores have grinding mills installed inside premises, which reassure freshness to customers. “The quality and price advantage delivers a superior value for money equation, as well as a positive consumer experience. So this automatically leads to higher retention levels,” concludes Johri. Such endeavours help in establishing brand loyalty towards a private label. This is then extended to an outlet becoming a preferred store. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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SPECIAL FOCUS Packaged flour market

in the last 3-4 years. The basmati rice segment is expected to grow at 25-30 per cent. So can the packaged flour market follow suit? Here’s presenting top five strategies to succeed in this market.

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Flooring consumers with innovations Branding a commodity becomes a tough job for any marketer. When it comes to wheat flour, Indian consumers rely on grinding mills. So what innovations in terms of marketing and product development need to be adopted by companies in this sector to promote packaged flour? Mahua Roy

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ere’s a fun memory game for our readers. Try visualising the modern retail store you frequent, or your local kirana outlet, or even television commercials. Now name ten brands of bath soap on the top of your mind. With all confidence one can say that you could name more than ten. Now let’s extend this to packaged flour. With similar confidence, one can say you could come up with three or four, excluding private labels. When we translate this scenario into marketing and branding jargon, this shows the amount of under-penetration in this market. The few companies that have ventured into this segment enjoy loyalty due to heavily televised commercials with catchy jingles, thereby ensuring recalls. According to a recent report by KPMG, branded flour sales in the country amount to around ` 4,000 crore, which makes up a

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measly 4 per cent of the market. The rest is sold loose. However, the good news is that, consumers’ switch to packaged flour is occurring at around 8 per cent per annum. National brands like Aashirvaad (from ITC); Shaktibhog; Annapurna (from HUL) and Pillsbury (from General Mills) account for sales amounting to ` 1,700 crore. So what is the reason behind companies shying away from this sector? Well, it all lies in the traditional habits of Indian consumers who are used to freshly ground wheat flour from mills. Modern trade outlets have converted this into an opportunity area, as most chains have an in-house grinding mill and can thus offer fresh flour to shoppers. Food processing companies have a lot more to do to convince consumers and establish loyalty. Another staple as wheat, packaged rice market, however, has seen tremendous growth in India. According to an AC Nielsen report, India’s packaged rice segment has been growing at 30 per cent

Find your forte in fortification

One of the reasons why branding a commodity becomes difficult is because of the lack in innovation and product differentiation. It is even trickier when it comes to wheat flour because the packaged form is not only an entirely new category, but actually a buying behaviour one attempts to create. However, the good news is that, health is the magic word in the food processing industry. Committing to fortification in flour is one way of garnering trust in consumers. “Indian consumers are increasingly becoming health conscious, hence the demand to add extra nutrition to regular rotis aids product innovations like multi-grain flour. Adding extra nutrition to regular rotis is viewed as the most basic change they can make in their lifestyle unlike drinking health juices or adding something extra to their diet or routine,” says Mittu Torka, Planning Executive, Saatchi & Saatchi, a premier ad-agency, which handles brand Pillsbury. Differentiating your fortification is also essential, else one will end up as a ‘me-too’ product. “Stabilisation, shelflife enhancement, texture & appearance improvement and enrichment are other points a manufacturer needs to concentrate upon,” adds Dr Jyoti Vora, Head, Department of Biochemistry, Food Science & Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai. A lot of R&D investment is required for product innovation in something as simplistic and significant as wheat flour.

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Tweak your marketing communication

Differentiation is required not just in product development, but also in the way a brand communicates with the potential consumers. While most brands will promote their wheat flour by emphasising


Packaged flour market

its effect on rotis; one needs to get creative and highlight other benefits of the packaged flour. “Beyond just product innovation at the atta level, brands can attempt to present rotis in exciting and innovative formats. Rotis are considered to be traditionally serious food, which children do not like to eat all the time. Hence, the brands can present to consumers innovative ways of making roti a tasty and healthy option such as roti pizza, frankies, multi-grain paratha etc,” elaborates Torka.

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Commit quality, quality and quality

This is one plus point that packaged flour can have over unbranded variants. These days when food safety issues are plaguing the food processing industry, safety and quality are the most desired attributes out of packaged food items. And this trend is being recognised largely, agrees Mallikarjuna S, Sr Manager – Marketing & Business Development, Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd, one of the leading companies

supplying grain processing machinery. He adds, “Food processing companies demand that the product be manufactured in a hygienic condition at the plant. They ask for enhanced quality deliverables and consistency of product. Also, companies are shifting towards more automated systems. They demand new technology to reduce production costs. Since the raw material for packaged flour is an agricultural product, we need to improve the technology at all levels.”

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Carve your niche, get premium

A premium variant can help create a noteworthy amount of differentiation in this market. “In the Indian context, the food that we eat also acts as a lifestyle statement. Hence, most people want to upgrade to the best quality food available in the market. With increasing incomes and smaller families, the buying capacity of consumers has increased, hence evoking the desire to not compromise. This aids the

launch of premium products in the market, which have benefits like superior softness,” adds Torka.

5

Be near to the third tier

Urban markets may be easy to crack. But opportunities and huge volumes lie in smaller cities where penetration of packaged products is significantly lower. “The tier-3 cities offer great potential wherein aspirations of people to live a modern lifestyle are rising. They want to be on par with the city dwellers in terms of their outlook, the products they use etc. Hence, tapping into the ever-increasing demands of these consumers will be helpful,” says Torka. Here comes the importance of effective strategies like developing ideal stockkeeping units, offering trial products at smaller price points, utilising the command of local health officials and other influencers towards benefits of quality packaged flour, and investing heavily on distribution. After all, availability is the key. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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SPECIAL FOCUS Minor millets

Future food for nutrition security

Courtesy: Joule Foods Ltd

Minor millets have been cultivated since time immemorial for food and fodder. Traditionally, millets were considered as poor man’s food. However, the advances in crop cultivation practices, technological developments and green revolution have contributed to vanishing harvests of millets. Owing to nutritional and nutraceutical potential of millets, their consumption needs to be revived for ensuring good health.

cent protein by weight. Millets are rich in vitamins like niacin, B6, folic acid, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. As per a recent survey, the death rate of children in India equals those in under developed countries like Nigeria and Somalia. This is due to lack of proteins and minerals in their foods. The main reason is lowering consumption of minor millets due to the current lifestyle. The production of rice, wheat, maize has increased and that of millets and pulses has decreased. Further, there is inadequate marketing of millets and most of the minor millets are being consumed by pet animals rather than human beings. Millet flours are subjected with high pressure steam by gradual decrease or increase of temperature at optimised holding time that leads to efficient gelatinisation by means of expanding carbohydrates materials. Thus, gradual release of glucose takes place by gelatinisation process, which lowers glucose level without adding any raising agents and enables easy digestion.

Value-addition to minor millets

Dr P Sathiya Moorthi and J Rajalakshmi

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illets are nutritious, healthy and versatile, and hence would be a worthy addition to one’s diet. These crops can be grown successfully in any type of land. Moreover, the grains possess remarkable ability to survive under severe drought. The nutritive value of millets is comparable to other staple cereals like wheat and rice. Some varieties of millets are nutritionally better than common cereals in protein, fat and mineral contents.

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Millets: The store-houses of nutrition By any nutritional parameter, millets have more fibre than rice and wheat. Finger millet has thirty times more calcium than rice while every other millet has at least twice the amount of calcium compared to rice. Foxtail and Little millet are rich in iron content. While many seek micronutrients such as β-carotene in pharmaceutical pills and capsules, millets offer it in abundant quantities. The much privileged rice, ironically, has zero quantity of this precious micronutrient. The protein content in millet is very close to that of wheat; both provide about 11 per

Most of the millets blend easily with common staple foods without any pronounced off flavours. They have mighty potential to be included in traditional and novel foods. The nonavailability of ready-to-use processed millet has limited its usage and acceptability, despite its nutritional superiority. There is a need to provide millet-based food products in the form of ready-to-use grains, convenience foods or mixes to meet the demands of the present day consumers. Moreover, value-addition to minor millets not only offers variety, convenience and quality food to consumers, but also helps in revival of millet cultivation. Refined wheat flour, whole wheat flour and soya flour can be blended with finger millet in different proportions, with wheat and refined wheat flour as the main ingredient to prepare various products.


Minor millets

Some of the products obtained from millets include cookies, porridges, flat breads, flakes, noodles, cakes, rusk, chapathi, vada, dosa. The acceptable levels of incorporation of millet flour were reported to be 20 per cent for noodles and 30 per cent for rusk, chapathi and dosa.

nutrient to nutrient, every single millet is extraordinarily superior to rice and wheat, and therefore is the solution for the malnutrition that affects a vast majority of the Indian population. Minor millets are claimed to be the future food for better health and nutrition security.

Market potential

References

At present, people are more aware of naturally processed food items and keep an eye on new product trends and hence it is no more difficult to market millet-based products. Intake of millets through cookies gives good palatability as well as attracts consumers. These kinds of processed cookies can be eaten by children as well as elder people. Utilisation of minor millets will enhance farming community without addition of pesticides and fertilisers. Value-addition of millets will help generate employment as well as improve health. In this fashion,

o Arora and Srivastava, 2002, “Suitability of millet-based food products for diabetics. J. Food Sci.and Tech”, 39 (4), 423-428. o Badi, S M and Hoseney, R.C., 1976, “Use of sorghum and pearl millet flours in cookies.Cereal Chem”, 53 (5) : 733-738. o Veena, B Chimmad, B V, Naik, R K and Shantakumar, G, 2004, “Development of barnyard millet-based traditional foods. Karnataka J. Agril. Sci”, 17 (3): 522-527. o Veena, B Chimmad, B V, Naik, R K and Shantakumar, G., 2005, “Physicochemical and nutritional studies in barnyard millet. Karnataka J. Agril. Sci.,” 18 (1): 101-105.

o Vijayalakshmi, P and Radha, R, 2006, “Effect of little millet supplementation on hyperlipidemia”, The Indian J. Nutr. and Diet., 43 (11) : 469-474. o Roopashree Ugare 2008, “Health benefits, storage quality and value-addition of barnyard millet”, Food Science And Nutrition, 10-84. o Poongodi, T, Vijayakumar, Jemima Beryl Mohankumar, Nazni, P and Rajeshwari, M, 2003, “Value-addition for minor millets and its glycemic load among normal and type 2 diabetic subjects. Paper presented at the 39 th national Nutritional Conference of NSI, Hyderabad, September.

Dr P Sathiya Moorthi is the Managing Partner and Technical Director of Vinzi Sperri and Joule Foods Ltd, Coimbatore. Email: sathiya.india@gmail.com J Rajalakshmi is the Process Engineer at Joule Foods Ltd, Coimbatore. Email: rajejayendhiran@gmail.com

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SPECIAL FOCUS Interface - Dhirubhai Patel

What are the leading innovations in the agroprocessing segment? The huge demand for fresh and highquality food has led to extensive research in order to develop technologies that can sustain the natural taste and flavour of foods, albeit adding extra nutrients and vitamins. Non-thermal technology has drawn great attention in this regard. Advancements in technology like visual appraisal method and invention of processing tools & equipment such as conveyor belts, washdown houses, and mop handles have paved the way for meeting quality requirements. Such developments in food technology have also helped in resolving the credibility issue and inculcated confidence among consumers, taking the industry to great

food processing sector being identified as a high priority industry in India, the agro-equipment sector is also gaining importance. Major developments are happening in the equipment sector as a consequence of the thrust on the food processing sector as a whole.

What are the different agricultural solutions provided by the company? The company started its operations with manufacturing facilities for agricultural irrigation system like turbine pumps, submersible pumps, mono-block pumps and electric motors. In its endeavour to be a complete agriculture solutions provider, the company introduced its own retail chain of agri-business centres and agri-clinics. This chain

serves farmers by facilitating all their agricultural needs and provides free agricultural consultancy services ranging from sowing to harvesting of crops. These retail chains also act as a onestop-shop for farmers. The company also aims to provide exhaustive services pack to the farmers and has a vision to provide a strong forward as well as backward linkage from farm to fork in the industry. In due course of time, the company has diversified its portfolio and ventured into processing of fresh fruits and vegetables along with the contract farming and horticulture parks.

What is your outlook for the agro-processing industry in India? The extent of value-addition of horticultural products in India has

“The major thrust of R&D has been on the processing of food rather than on developing equipment� heights. Moreover, vacuum cooling technology has brought overwhelming changes in the food processing industry. It is an effective method to cool down specific horticultural products such as vegetables and fruits to extend the storage life by dint of cutting down the deterioration of post-harvest yields.

How the growth of processing machinery has provided a boost to the industry? The technology available in India in the agro-food processing equipment sector is not much advanced when compared to the developed countries. In the agrifood sector in India, the major thrust of R&D has been on the processing of food rather than on developing equipment. Most of the technologies available in the agro-processing equipment sector that could be considered as globally competitive fall in the category of preharvest technologies. But now, with the

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‌says Dhirubhai Patel, Chairman & Managing Director, Champion Agro Ltd. In conversation with Avani Jain, he discusses the opportunities available for the agro-processing industry in India. He also highlights the leading innovations making headway in the segment.

increased from 2 per cent to 6 per cent in the last five years. These statistics are good but present a grim picture when compared with the developed countries such as the US and France, which have value-addition to the extent of 70 per cent and 50 per cent, respectively, with minimal wastages. Some of the challenges for the industry include need for distribution network & cold chain; backward-forward integration from farm to consumers; development of marketing channels. Other issues are development of linkages between industry, government and institutions; streamlining of food laws, etc. Despite challenges, there are growth opportunities as well. Increased urbanisation, improved standards of living, and many other factors, have positive impact on the food processing sector. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS Roundtable

Can packaged pulses compete with the unorganised sector? Pulses form an integral part of the Indian diet. But how easy is the penetration of branded pulses? When an established name like Tata shows activity in this space, will others follow suit? Mahua Roy speaks with a few experts and presents an outlook for the category.

Shushmul Maheshwari CEO, RNCOS E-Services

Rajneesh Krishna Senior Professor, Mudra Institute of Communications, Ahmedabad (MICA)

Parag Gadre Assistant Vice President, Marketing & Strategy, Tata Chemicals Ltd

Branded packaged pulses (organised market) account for around 10 per cent of total pulses market in India. Moreover, the share is expected to remain the same in the next few years as demand for branded packaged pulses is majorly confined to cities only, where consumers look for brand, labels, safety and hygiene. However, 70 per cent of the population, residing in rural and semi-urban areas, consumes pulses available in the local market and this trend is expected to continue in future. Thus, it will be a tough task for branded packaged pulses to compete with the unorganised sector. The effectiveness of branding a commodity like packaged pulses will entirely depend on how well the product gets positioned in the minds of customers. In other words, the communication has to be more relative in nature and should focus on creating awareness about the benefits of the products.

Pulses have traditionally not been sold in packaged format. In neighbourhood kirana stores, which draw the bulk of sales, the customer states the exact quantity desired and that is how purchases are made. The key takeaway from this is in the designing of strategic stock-keeping units. The last couple of years have seen a rise, though not a substantial one, in the packaged variety of pulses. With organised retail expected to rise to 12 per cent of total retail sales by 2014, the packaged form is bound to grow rapidly. But branding of pulses comes with an inherent challenge. It does not offer any actual tangible benefit in the packaged form. With pulses being expensive items on the grocery list, it is ultimately beneficial to the Indian consumers to have branded pulses competing with each other and with bulk produce to give consumers the best quality at the lowest price.

In today’s scenario, the pulses sector is largely unorganised. The customer does not have many options for packaged dal. So in the long run, the challenge will be in providing a differentiated product and giving value to consumers that can be perceivable. Values like protein retention in unpolished dals can be leveraged for product differentiation. Parallels can be drawn from oil, rice, flour (atta) industry and other staples in which the branded packaged segment is making inroads at a healthy growth rate, pr imar il y through upgradations in usership. Favourable macroeconomic indicators, rising disposable income, general awareness and less trust in loose food products will assist adoption of packed pulses. However, adoption of branded unpolished dals will be slower in tier 2 and tier 3 cities.

EDITORIAL TAKE This sector looks promising enough and the aspirational consumer is ready to pay a premium too. The trick lies in product innovation and developmental R&D to offer a differentiated product.

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FACILITY VISIT NHC Foods Ltd

FACTS AND FIGURES o Unit established in: 2010 o Manufacturing portfolio: Spices & spice powders, whole spice, processing, cleaning, sortex and grinding of whole spices. o Total area: 4.5 acre; Constructed area: 30,000 sq ft o Manufacturing capacity: Processing capacity 14,400 MTPA; Grinding capacity: 6,000 MT in a single shift o Markets operating in: Currently Mumbai, Maharashtra, Goa. Planning pan-India expansion soon o High volume products: Turmeric, chilli, coriander powder o High margin products: Spice blends

Red chilli powder manufacturing process

Spicing up growth with right blend of quality and technology What makes Indian cuisines favoured the world over are their distinctly different spices. Contributing largely to this is NHC Foods, with its vast product portfolio of basic and blended spices, manufactured at its facility near Valsad, Gujarat. Mahua Roy

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n the organised sector of spices, there are 176 brands present. Making a mark in this cluttered category calls for extreme innovation and unique product attributes, apart from a distinct communication. A new player in this field is NHC Foods with its Saaz brand of spices. The company has been present in the exports market for a long period and has recently forayed into the lucrative Indian B2C market. With new products in its pipeline, this is one company to watch out for.

Quality assurance with cost savings

Food safety testing lab

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The marketing communication of Saaz brand echoes of ‘Quality First’. It is equally reflected in the manufacturing process at the facility. With sophisticated machinery available for optical sorting

of raw material, quality is assured at every stage. A high-end laboratory is equipped with multiple technologies for not just quality assurance, but also food safety. “Apart from being costcompetitive, quality and freshness are two attributes that need to be delivered to the consumer,” says Apoorva Shah, Managing Director, NHC Foods Ltd. There is a lot of activity in this sector of spices due to presence of a large number of unorganised players. “Consumers are unaware of the importance of quality and food safety when it comes to commodities. They make decisions based on prices. However, attributes like shelf-life, freshness also need to be considered,” says Samir Sangoi, Vice President – Operations, NHC Foods Ltd. It is a challenge to compete with the unorganised sector as also big and established names operating in this market. Maintaining bottom lines and


NHC Foods Ltd

field are concentrating on. Though attractive packaging appeals to consumers, usability is also a feature that needs to be worked upon. Keeping this in mind, NHC Foods Ltd has come up with a unique product differentiation. “Most spices and blends (masala) in the 50 gm stock-keeping unit (SKU) come in box packaging. The plastic pouch, which contains the masala, is stuck onto the outer box. This is usually inconvenient for consumers who then have to store the box too. We then came with an innovation in packaging wherein we provide a detachable pouch inside the box,” explains Sangoi. The product uses high quality 360 GSM white paperback for outer packaging and a 3-layer detachable pouch inside. “This ensures quality, aroma retention and freshness for 12 months,” adds Shah.

10 gm SKU of spice blends

high margins is all a play of strategic decisions. “One of our strategies is that we deliver to the distributors’ godowns directly. Along with cost savings, we also earn trust and loyalty of distributors. We soon plan the concept of a super stockist,” adds Shah. As of now the facility operates out of a single shift, but with growing demand, it plans double shifts to increase production.

Packaging innovations Packaging design is one of the areas, apart from pricing, that players in this

Spices consumption is largest in Gulf countries and we see it as an impor tant market. Apart from that, African countries and even China are also emerging as lucrative destinations. Besides, the US, Australia and Europe are mature markets with huge demands for Indian spices. Apoorva Shah Managing Director

Market dynamics For the commodities sector, general trade (mom and pop stores) is as important a distribution channel as is modern trade. The company is seeing a huge demand for the 10 gm SKU sachet via the general trade channel. “For example, let’s take pav bhaji masala, which is a favourite. One may not cook this dish every week, but probably once or twice a month. Thus, a 50 gm box pack stays unused for weeks at large. On the other hand, a 10 gm SKU provides a single-serve option,” elaborates Sangoi. Identifying this opportunity, the company offers all its spices and spice blends in 10 gm SKU also. In the modern trade channel, 50 gm boxes as well as 200 gm pouches are high volume, fast-moving products. The company also supplies to hotel, restaurant and catering (HoReCa) chains. “The demands of the HoReCa sector complement well with our deliverables, as we emphasise hugely on quality. This differentiates us from the others in this cluttered market,” adds Shah. The company has also been approached by quite a few big retail chains in India for private labelled

Most spices in the 50 gm SKU come in box packaging. The plastic pouch, which contains the masala, is stuck onto the outer box. This is usually inconvenient for consumers. We came with an innovation in packaging wherein we provide a detachable pouch inside the box. Samir Sangoi Vice President – Operations

products. It is already supplying private labels to supermarket chains abroad. When it comes to exports, NHC Foods is an established name. “Spices consumption is largest in Gulf countries and we see it as an important market. Apart from that, African countries and even China are also emerging as lucrative destinations. Besides, the US, Australia and Europe are mature markets with huge demands for Indian spices,” adds Shah.

Coming soon! NHC Foods plans to concentrate more on 15 gm and 20 gm SKUs, and make it more attractive & appealing to consumers. “As per the new packaging standards, for packages up to 25 gm, non-standard packaging quantity is allowed; so we plan to leverage on the demand for 15 gm and 20 gm SKUs largely,” says Sangoi. NHC Foods also has big plans to transform the spices market in India. “Our aim is to reach a total target of 65 variants,” says Shah. Not only that, the company plans to foray into other products as well, as it sees demands and opportunities there. “We plan to launch two new brands, Eat’mor and Indibite for the Indian market. Eat’mor will be our brand of RTE foods and Indibite will package whole spices,” says Sangoi. It also plans to import special seasonings from other countries as it will blend well with its existing product portfolio. Photo: Joshua Navalkar Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

FISH PROCESSING AND AQUACULTURE FISH PROCESSING INDUSTRY Eyeing a bigger catch in domestic market............................................................................................... 42 FISH MARKETING Exports, a lucrative proposition!............................................................................................................... 48 FISHERY INDUSTRY A sustainable approach to net profits ..................................................................................................... 50 CAGE FARMING Cultured to reap rapid economic benefits................................................................................................ 54 INTERFACE - M R Francis, General Manager, Naik Frozen Foods Pvt Ltd “The country needs to develop and expand cold chain facility to brighten the prospects of domestic market” ........................................................................................................... 56 ROUNDTABLE Is the global economic turmoil impacting seafood exports from India? ................................................. 58 CARBONATED DRINKS MARKET Changing consumer preferences redefining prospects ............................................................................. 60 MONSOON LOGISTICS How to rein in the rains? ......................................................................................................................... 62

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Fish processing industry

Eyeing a bigger catch in domestic market

Take the example of west coast region, which is mainly confined to export of few varieties such as ribbonfish and mackerels mainly from the last one decade or so. This pushes many units, especially small and mediumscale, towards uncertain future. Hence, it is time to focus on domestic market as it offers huge scope for any product category. And to become successful in the domestic market largely depends on fish processors. According to ASSOCHAM, the processed segment comprises about ` 8,000 crore, which is over 15 per cent of total size of the domestic marine and fish industry. It also said that there is huge scope for investments in packaged marine processing plant, operations in preservation, processing and export of coastal fish for the private sector as it holds vast, untapped marine resources with a great export potential.

Ways to emerge from deep waters

The domestic market is large enough for most of the products manufactured in India. However, success in this market largely depends on a thorough understanding of its needs. For processed fish segment, value-addition in terms of shelf-life while preserving taste and nutritious value; packaging & pricing aspects etc are of utmost importance to increase its share in the domestic market. Despite the growth of organised retail, this segment has not been able to reach out to masses. Prasenjit Chakraborty

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here is some trade off between the export and domestic market expansion. However, over the years, the fish processing segment has been able to export higher percentage of total production and even embrace diversification. “If fishermen could get higher value for their products by focussing on export market, we should not prevent it by imposing restrictions,” opines Dr Ramachandra Bhatta, Professor, Fisheries Economics, and Head of the Division (Fisheries Sciences), College of

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Fisheries, Mangalore. With an average annual output value of ` 42,178 crore, marine fisheries have been one of the major contributors to foreign exchange earning through export. India’s fish exports were worth over $ 2.8 billion in 20102011. Over 45 per cent of this export value came from marine capture fisheries and official targets are to raise this to $ 6 billion by 2015. A closer look says that India exports few varieties of fish, and depending always on export is a risky proposition. In this case, disappearance of a particular type of fish for one season may put many units in jeopardy.

Today, consumers are extremely healthconscious; hence quality control measures need to be adopted to meet health-related issues. Seafood includes chilled, frozen and ready-to-eat value-added products like retorted pouch processed fish curry and pasteurised crab meat etc. Utmost care should be taken to enhance quality by way of different processing methods such as salting, drying, freezing, canning, smoking etc. It is imperative to maintain hygiene until seafood reached the end-consumers. Technology is another area where there is enough scope to improve, which will ultimately provide thrust to the domestic fish processing market. In this direction, initiative has already been taken. For example, Tamil Nadu is all set to adopt Danish mid-sea processing technique for fishing. The ships will act as mother vessels and process the fish caught in high seas. Besides, plans are afoot to have a well-equipped fish processing park in Chennai. No doubt, India is among the largest producer of fish in the world mainly fresh water carp. And 90 per cent of the fish that is produced is consumed within the country. As far as marine fish is concerned the consumption is miniscule. Efforts need to be taken to create


Fish processing industry

awareness so that consumption increases in the domestic market. “Recently, farming of pangasius has also commenced in India, which is used for domestic consumption. The main species of export from India are farmed shrimps and sea-caught marine products,” says D B Ravi Reddy, President, Sea Food Exporters Association of India. One of the reasons for consumption of seafood is to augment the intake of protein, as such foods are rich in protein. Traditionally, the major protein consumed in India has been chicken, lamb and fresh water fish. Most households in India prefer fresh products as against frozen food products. “Due to the affinity for fresh products and constraints in logistics and storage, frozen products have not developed adequately within the country. If domestic consumption of shrimp has to grow, there must be greater acceptance of frozen products sold through the retail trade. With changing lifestyles and higher disposable incomes, we are noticing a changing trend towards increase of seafood in the domestic market,” points out Reddy.

Among these factors, smell has a dubious relationship with consumption as it contributes both positively and negatively. However, for other factors, there is a great scope for value-added processing. Since last few years, supermarkets and retail chains started selling processed fish; but these has not yet been able to reach out to the masses because of high degree of price difference between the product available at the local market and the packaged product. “Hence, price factor and other constraints are affecting the processed fish consumption in India. Value-addition should first aim at increasing consumption of fish among existing consumers. According to National Sample Survey (NSS) data, the consumption of processed fish is quite less among the existing consumers also. The consumption could be increased through identifying different market segments: such as fresh water carps in eastern India; marine fishes in southern India and dry fish products in northeastern India,” he points out.

Adding value, gaining profits Exploring domestic market Shelf-life, easy availability and procurement etc are the deciding factors when it comes to high consumption of any food. The lesson that one can learn from growing popularity of eggs and packaged fast food is that they are easy to procure, store and prepare. Packaged fast food such as instant noodles and eggs are available around the corner shops and have a reasonably good shelf-life even when not stored in ideal conditions. “If we compare this with fish and fish products, and the insight that we have got from various fish market surveys (the first one conducted by the Indian Institute of Management – Ahmedabad at the national level and at a later date Bay of Bengal Programme also conducted a study of consumer preference in Chennai), factors affecting consumption of fish include availability, longer time and skills needed for preparation; small bones making it unsuitable for children, and smell,” points out Dr Yugraj Singh Yadava, Director, Bay of Bengal Programme, InterGovernmental Organisation.

The primary objective of value-addition should be towards increasing the shelflife while reserving the taste and nutrition of fish with handy packaging (500 gm, 1,000 gm etc) of selected species. The cost should be close to the market price. The bones should be removed to attract the consumers. Fish can be supplied in ready-to-cook format. According to Dr Yadava, among the major states, Kerala has the highest monthly per capita fish consumption (1.913 kg), followed by West Bengal (0.768 kg) and Assam (0.631 kg). The secondary objective of valueaddition can be winning new consumers. This has to be done through tapping the market in northern and western India. A large population in urban areas consumes poultry and meat as major source of animal protein. Therefore, smell could be a deciding factor in these regions. Further processing and value-addition is needed to make fish-based products such as fillets, fries, chips, which are smell-free and ready-to-eat or ready-tocook. “However, a blanket value-addition

strategy is unlikely to work for the domestic market given the differentiated preference and price sensitivity of consumers. Therefore, value-added processing should be done at multi-level. The first level is to win the existing consumers by offering them processed fish of ensured quality comparable with fresh fish varieties and freedom from preparation within an acceptable price,” exhorts Dr Yadava. Traditionally, Indian communities are known for the consumption of fresh fish and some quantity of dry fish. Hence, there has to be a sustained effort to encourage improvement in hygiene and sanitation in the marketing and value-additions such as filleting etc. More R&D should be focussed on developing pharmaceutical products and utilisation of all wastes for producing some non-edible/edible value products. “Use of fish for fish meal should be discouraged. We are almost using 1 tonne of marine fish to produce 1 tonne of cultured fish by diverting marine fish for fish meal, which is used by the aqua-feed industry and depriving fish processors from producing high-quality dry fish. It is important to provide services like processing, branding, labelling, certification to small-scale enterprises that may be able to supply high-quality fish products,” exhorts Dr Bhatta.

Upgrading infrastructure Value-addition alone is not enough to popularise processed fish in the domestic market. Improvement in logistics has to be done simultaneously. An affordable and adequate cold chain & logistics infrastructure network needs to be established across the Indian hinterland to ensure seamless processing and supply of processed fish products within the country. In this direction, the government also needs to make arrangements for affordable and continuous electricity, proper roads, land etc to support the industry. It is essential to keep fish in refrigerated condition immediately after the catch, and then transported to processing plants. But in India, it is still a far cry. It is time to catch up with other countries! Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Fish marketing

Prasenjit Chakraborty

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ooking at the volume the Indian market offers, one may wonder why the fish processing industry is not concentrating much on the domestic market. No one can deny the volume but it is not the only factor that decides success of any product. For the fish processing industry, factors like diverse food habits, changing demographics, lack of supply chain etc have made it difficult to market the product in the domestic arena.

Food habits First let’s take the issue of food habits and culture, which have a strong influence on marketing of fish and fish products in the country. India is a country of mixed culture with diversified food habits. Except Kerala, fish consumption is low in other maritime states implying that a large section of people do not have fish. Although Gujarat produces the maximum marine fish, consumption within the state is low due to a predominant vegetarian population. Similarly, West Bengal is a coastal state, but freshwater fish is much preferred over marine fish (with exceptions such as pomfrets, seabass and shrimps). In most of the inland states too, freshwater fish is preferred over marine fish. A typical outcome of such diversity is that a unified domestic market for fish does not exist. Rather segmented local or regional markets rule the fisheries scenario and these regional markets are governed by different sets of preferences. Hence, to cater to the diverse need at this juncture is difficult. “Further, the demand for highvalue marine species such as tuna is limited or negligible in India, although tuna is one of the highly traded fish in international market,” says Dr Yugraj Singh Yadava,

a lucrative proposition! The absence of a unified approach coupled with fragmented market condition makes marketing of processed fish an arduous task in the domestic market. Besides, poor supply chain and sharp contrast in consumption pattern make the scenario even more complex. Due to this, domestic market is not a lucrative proposition for the fish processing industry. Director, Bay of Bengal Programme, InterGovernmental Organisation. Since marine fish is mainly consumed in the coastal states, such consumption pattern implies that without the export, there may be a supply glut for many important commercial varieties. Such supply glut would have driven the prices down, thus hurting the fishermen and the industry as a whole.

Changing demographics Religion, class, caste and changing demographics etc impact consumption of fish in the domestic market. Take the example of Chennai; there are many markets, which are developed in cluster forms. “Of late, the city has witnessed the growth of street markets, which were previously non-existent. This is mainly because of changing demographics owing to migration and growth of Chennai as a cosmopolitan city,” says Dr Yadava.

Exports during 2010-11 compared to 2009-10

Export details Quantity (in tonne) Value (in ` crore) Value (in $ million)

2010-11 8,13,091 12,901.47 2,856.92

2009-10 6,78,436 10,048.53 2,132.84

Growth (%) 19.85 28.39 33.95 Source: MPEDA

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However, wholesale and retail markets, which are decades old, were developed in response to traditional demographic pattern of Chennai. It also shows that fish consumers are not only evenly spread out but also exist in pockets. “This not only depicts the fragmentation of market in Chennai only but the entire country as well. Such developments make the marketing even more challenging on domestic front,” points out Dr Yadava. Further, domestic marketing of fish and fish products in India is undeveloped due to poor infrastructure and an equally poor cold chain.

Need for effective marketing strategy The whole marine fish supply chain system reveals that although women still dominate the scene, men from within and outside the community groups and super markets are entering the marketing business. An in-depth analysis reveals that women retailers make enormous, often unpaid contributions to promote sales by providing marketing support services, value-addition services etc. According to Dr Ramachandra Bhatta, Professor, Fisheries Economics, and


Fish marketing

Head of the Division (Fisheries Sciences), College of Fisheries, Mangalore, common property resource system developments in post-harvest system and increased profitability should be integrated with the community-based fisheries co-management system. In the absence of such integrated system, marine resources get over-exploited. “Any strategy to improve fisheries co-management should incorporate social capital in developing such a model,” he exhorts.

Role of government The traders and processors find it profitable to export rather than sell in the domestic market. “Although ribbon fish has vast domestic market in the north-eastern states, due to inefficient domestic marketing system a processor finds it more easy and profitable to export instead of transporting it to distant domestic markets,” points out Dr Bhatta. In order to achieve this, a steady marketing drive to aggressively promote processed marine fish should be undertaken. Value-addition and constant innovation of products (packaging, look, taste etc) are other elements to become successful in the domestic market. “Awareness campaigns on the benefits of seafood should be carried out without any delay. The adverse mindset of people about frozen seafoods should be changed. Creating awareness among the people on the benefits of seafood would help increase volume in the domestic market,” opines D B Ravi Reddy, President, Sea Food Exporters’ Association of India. However, J R Bangera, Ex-President, Federation of Karnataka Chamber of Commerce and Industry (FKCCI), emphasises on bringing new technology to the processing arena and at the same time remaining focussed on export. “I do not feel that we should reduce the exports of marine fish. It is imperative to continue exports of marine products. The sector should import latest technologies to infuse growth in the fish processing industry. This will also increase export earnings and reduce the balance of payment constraint,” he says. Another important reason for perceived importance of export is the existing government policies. One of the basic pillars of fisheries development, especially development of marine fisheries and aquaculture in India, is to promote export. The government has taken many institution-building measures in this regard and set up the Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA), which is dedicated to export promotion. There is no such dedicated agency to promote fish processing industry in the domestic market. India has a good number of fisheries colleges and research institutes manned by qualified fisheries scientists. “Transfer of technology from institutes to the private sector and a good private-public partnership model will play a significant role in fish processing and development of value-added market,” opines Reddy. Is it not time to pay concerted efforts on the domestic market? Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Fishery industry

A sustainable approach to net profits

Courtesy: CMFRI, Cochin

As per a recent Greenpeace report, 90 per cent of India’s fish resources have reached above maximum sustainable levels of exploitation. While many experts do not agree with this observation, they are unanimous in saying that India should adopt sustainable fishing methods to maintain its lead in the global fish trade.

the entire Indian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) at 3.9 million tonne, the official position is that total catches can continue to increase. This, however, would be dangerous, feels Hamid, given several warning signs that sustainability levels for a large number of species have, in fact, been breached. These warning signs include distinct fluctuations in key species as well as in total catches in some states, and a decline in the mean tropic level of the catch, indicating that the disappearance of larger predator species is leading to an ongoing shift in fishing pressure towards smaller, fast-producing species. Areeba observes, “The growth in total landings has been a result of the geographical expansion of fisheries, as fishers have moved farther offshore and farther away from their landing centres. According to some estimates, between 1970 and 2000, the area covered by marine fisheries in the Indian EEZ grew four times (Bhathal and Pauly, 2008). This expansion is believed to have met its natural limits and catches can be expected to first stagnate (as we are currently seeing) and ultimately decline. This decline will have serious consequences for the fisheries sector and consumers in India.”

Counter view Rakesh Rao

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n World Oceans Day ( June 8) this year, Greenpeace released a report – ‘Safeguard or squander? Deciding the future of India’s fisheries’ – stating that India may suffer a threat owing to depleting fish stocks and historical neglect of marine conservation. The growth of the fishery sector, which has been one of the major contributors to foreign exchange earnings through export, would be severely hampered due to the depleting fish stocks that would not only result in massive job losses but would also hurt ecology as well as the national GDP.

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Breaching the sustainability levels According to the report, about 90 per cent of Indian fish species are at or above maximum sustainable yields. “This has direct impact on fishermen and people living on the coasts who are dependent wholly on fishing for their livelihood. In India, so far Greenpeace has worked with fisher communities across the coasts and government to move towards a more sustainable management of fisheries,” explains Areeba Hamid, Campaigner, Greenpeace India. The rate of decline in species, however, varies from state to state. Given that estimates put the potential yield of

The findings of Greenpeace report contradict the government’s official statement that there is still scope for fish landings to increase despite the dangerously depleting fish stocks. Dr G Syda Rao, Director, Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI), Cochin, elaborates, “We do not agree with this observation. The maximum sustainable levels of exploitation are mainly determined by landing of the fish apart from other biological parameters. CMFRI is collecting the marine fisheries landing data for the past 60 years and we have the time series data. The Indian fisheries are in much better condition when compared to the world fisheries.” The major reason being that the average age of many of the marine fishes


Fishery industry

What needs to change is the fisheries management regime in the country, which focusses on individual stocks or species, and has not achieved the objective of ensuring that harvesting is sustainable in the long term. Areeba Hamid Campaigner, Greenpeace India

in India is around 2-3 years, he explains. Dr Rao adds, “Their growth rate is fast and they have the protracted spawning season extending almost 9 months in a year coupled with high fecundity; so that is how the Indian fisheries are maintaining the resilience. Only during some years there were little fluctuations in different parts of Indian coast and they need not be taken as benchmark and brand that fish resources have reached an end.” Contrary to some reports, which state that marine catch has been either stagnant or declining, Dr Rao claims that marine catch is gradually showing an upward trend in India compared to the other countries in the world, over the past few years. The increased catch is mainly due to the extension of the area of fishing beyond 200 m, depth with a better mobility by the fishermen. In general, he stresses, Indian marine fisheries are in good health and also require more directions towards management measures suitable to the Indian conditions.

Need for a holistic approach In order to maintain sustainable growth, the Greenpeace report has advocated

The maximum sustainable levels of exploitation are mainly determined by landing of the fish apart from other biological parameters. The Indian fisheries are in much better condition when compared to the world fisheries. Dr G Syda Rao Director, CMFRI

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the need to adopt effective fishery management methods on a long-term basis. Areeba elaborates, “What needs to change is the fisheries management regime in the country, which focusses on individual stocks or species, and has not achieved the objective of ensuring that harvesting is sustainable in the long term.” Fisheries are dependent on the productivity of the ecosystem, and also have an effect on the ecosystem. Acknowledging this, Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management (EBFM) has been emphasised in the FAO’s Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in 1995. EBFM models ensure that fishery management decisions do not adversely affect the ecosystem function and productivity, and maintain longterm sustainability. “An ecosystem approach to fisheries can also provide avenues to protect small-scale fisheries and rein in large-scale, non-selective fishing methods such as bottom trawling, as well as control land-based sources of marine pollution that impact fish stocks,” adds Areeba.

Taking proactive steps Dr Rao agrees that sustainable aquaculture provides good answer to fish production in India, where there is a good domestic market for fish compared to exports. In fact, government agencies such as CMFRI, Central Institute of Freshwater Aquaculture (CIFA), Central Inland Fisheries Research Institute (CIFRI), etc are taking many steps to promote sustainable aquaculture in India. “We give consultancy/training in sustainable aquaculture in the areas of breeding and culture technology of diversified fish & shellfish, selective breeding/genome manipulation, broodstock upgradation programme, aquaculture biotechnology, pearl culture, ornamental fish breeding and culture, fish feed preparation and feed analysis, disease diagnostics, and post-harvest processing of fish,” says Dr P Jayasankar, Director, CIFA. As a part of its strategy to encourage sustainable aquaculture/mariculture in India, CMFRI has started massive

Production rates, up to 40-50 tonne/ha/year, are not impossible, as shown by ‘suitchi’ catfish culture in Andhra Pradesh. However, such high production will certainly collapse. It is always desirable to have sustainable optimum production rates – for example, 4-5 tonne/ha/year. Dr P Jayasankar Director, CIFA

cage culture demonstrations in almost all maritime states in India. Dr Rao elaborates, “We were able to design, fabricate the indigenous cages suitable to our coastal conditions and test them at several places.”

Responsible farming Total fish production in the country is 8.15 million tonne, of which about 5.1 million tonne is from inland resources, and freshwater aquaculture alone contributes 4.15 million tonne. While the objective of effective aquaculture technique is to increase fish production, it should be achieved in a sustainable way. “Production rates, up to 40-50 tonne/ha/year, are not impossible, as shown by ‘suitchi’ catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) culture in Andhra Pradesh. However, such high production will certainly collapse. It is always desirable to have sustainable optimum production rates – for example, 4-5 tonne/ha/year. Certainly, the farming practices should be environmentfriendly. In other words, emphasis should be laid on responsible and sustainable farming,” opines Dr Jayasankar. Although the Greenpeace study could not ascertain the impact of depleting fish production on fish processing units, Areeba feels that it will be affected drastically if the fish landings continue to decline in the country. In this scenario, adoption of sustainable fishing methods will surely benefit the fish processing industry as it will provide them an assured supply of fish in the long run. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


Courtesy: CMFRI, Cochin

INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Cage farming

Cultured to reap rapid economic benefits India, which produces around 8.5 million tonne of fish, is aiming for an output of 10 million tonne in next couple of years. To do it sustainably and efficiently, the government and industry can adopt cage culture to improve productivity. Rakesh Rao

M

onsoon is probably the most unproductive time for fishermen due to the ban on fishing during this season. However, cage culture or farming can help make this season fruitful too as it could provide an alternative source of fish resources. No wonder that even government is taking steps to encourage farmers to adopt cage farming.

Back to basics In the aquaculture production system, fish are held in floating net pens and allows water to pass freely between the fish and the pond permitting water exchange and waste removal into the surrounding water. According to Dr G Syda Rao, Director, The Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI), Cochin, cage culture can be considered to offer a highly sustainable solution to increase fish production in India and also as a boon to the landless. “At the current level of production in India, the aim of the management of

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marine fisheries is to sustain the yield and not to increase the catches. Hence, the major thrust is to look into the seas, which were not at all exploited for culture purpose. We have a long coastline with many good areas suitable for cage culture,” he points out. CMFRI, one of the pioneers of cage culture in India, has developed the hatchery technologies for marine finfish like cobia, silver pompano and pearl spot. Moreover, the seed production technology for seabass was developed by Central Institute of Brackishwater Aquaculture (CIBA). “These technologies will aid in the sustainable production of seed of high value marine fish to some extent in India, if taken up by the private entrepreneurs,” says Dr Rao.

Overcoming cost pain In cage culture, an enclosure is created in the water body in which the juveniles of aquatic animals are kept, fed and grown to marketable size. Though sounds simple, in practice, cage farming is a complicated technique as thorough understanding of its structural, engineering, social and biological aspects

is required. In absence of trained professionals, the cage culture projects can go wrong. “There is not enough trained manpower in the country. In fact, the State Fisheries Officers are not much exposed to this technology,” says Dr W S Lakra, Director, Central Institute of Fisheries Education (CIFE), which has provided technical support for setting up cage culture project to the Chattisgarh Government and in Udaipur (Rajasthan). CIFE also conducts training on cage and pen culture for raising carp fingerlings and provide project consultancy for cage culture. In addition, cage farming is highly capital-intensive. Hence, right selection of species is imperative to make cage culture a successful venture. “As far as raising carp fingerling for stocking of ponds or reservoirs is concerned, it is the only way to provide in situ stocking to the open water bodies. Regarding table size fish, since it is a feed-based intensive culture system, only high-value species can be cultured in cages,” suggests Dr Lakra.

Success mantra Fish cultivated in cage culture, which is prevalent in Vietnam and Scandinavian countries, can fetch higher prices since no antibiotics are used. Though it is in nascent stage, there has been a rise in adoption of cage farming in India in last few years, which augurs well for the future of this industry. Opines Dr Rao, “In India, we have seen a constant rise in adoption in cage farming in the last 2-3 years. However, major adoption will take place only if all the states formulate an open sea water leasing policy as desired and directed by the Ministry of Agriculture. This will facilitate the protection of cages and financial help from the banks etc. We hope in the new Twelfth plan period this will happen and the cage culture will go a long way towards the production of high-value marine fish in India, contributing to nutritional security and food safety of the country.” Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Interface - M R Francis

How is the fish processing sector shaping up in India?

What is your plan for the domestic market?

The vision of Indian seafood industry to achieve an export turnover of over $ 4 billion can come true by looking at the present scenario and taking adequate measures to resolve problem areas. According to the projection of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) about world seafood, capture fisheries will stagnate in India, while aquaculture production is expected to increase. India with its vast and diverse aquaculture potential can aspire to become a world leader in seafood exports

Exporters have already started supplying frozen seafood items to various national and international giants like Metro, Walmart, Reliance, Spencer’s etc operating in India. When the outlook for domestic market improves and consumption increases, the problem lies with supply chain. Lack of cold chain space is detrimental to the growth of domestic market. The country needs to develop and expand cold chain facility to brighten the prospects of domestic segment and also to take it to new heights. This has to be financed by various institutions with active public and private participation.

going to increase in future too, which will fetch a good value for our products.

Which are the two important issues that need to be addressed on priority basis? There are many areas where exports have been restricted by various import barriers created by many countries. For example, recently People’s Republic of China attempted to ban Indian imports citing reasons of quality standards. They are insisting on 14 quality parameters to be tested in India for every consignment exported to China. One of the parameters is for testing antibiotic residue in fish products caught in sea, which is an

The country needs to develop and expand cold chain facility to brighten the prospects of domestic market …says M R Francis, General Manager, Naik Frozen Foods Pvt Ltd. During an interaction with Prasenjit Chakraborty, he emphasises on streamlining and popularising seafood products in the domestic market against the backdrop of falling international prices. by resorting to diversified and sustainable aquaculture. We should also add other products like freshwater shrimps, crabs, tilapia, cat fish etc, to our culture basket.

Do you think it is the right time to concentrate on domestic market? Demand for seafood in India is growing. The projection for seafood production in the country calls for efforts to streamline and popularise domestic markets targeting all major cities in the country. Domestic market has to be promoted to cushion the adverse impact of falling international prices.

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MPEDA can play a major role in this by increasing attractive subsidy in creating more cold chains in the country.

How is the demand for value-added products? Due to economic slowdown in Europe, the number of restaurant goers has been drastically dropping. However, there is a shift in increased sales in super markets with value-added products. Housewives prefer to carry ready-to-eat products from retail markets and cook for themselves. Hence, the quantity of value-added products like cooked products, vacuumpacked products has increased and it is

unnecessary exercise imposed on Indian exports. They are also insisting on 0.1 ppm cadmium level in seafood whereas the EU limit is 1 ppm. These unnecessary barriers affect the viability of our exports. Major fish items imported by China are ribbonfish and croaker. Each country bringing out different and diversified norms for seafood products would impact the growth propects of Indian seafood industry. Quality standards of seafoods the world over have to be streamlined and unified, and uniform global parameters to enter into any market worldwide hold the key to smooth and effective trade. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Roundtable

Is the global economic turmoil impacting seafood exports from India? It seems that seafood export from India has not been much affected against the backdrop of prevailing economic scenario globally. Of course, there is a shift in the preference and consumers are going for low-cost products. Prasenjit Chakraborty speaks to experts to find out how the seafood exports segment is facing the challenge and what is in store for exporters.

Anwar Hashim Managing Director, Abad Fisheries Pvt Ltd

Dr Ramachandra Bhatta Prof, Fisheries Economics, and Head of the Division (Fisheries Sciences), College of Fisheries, Mangalore

Dr Yugraj Singh Yadava Director, Bay of Bengal Programme, Inter-Governmental Organisation

Global financial turmoil has left its mark on the seafood industry as well, but not to the extent of non-food items. When consumers in every country kept away from purchasing a carpet or a handicraft, food requirements could not be compromised, and fish at lower prices was the most sought-after. Of course, expensive fish categories such as lobster or caviar was not selling but fish fillets, cephalopods and medium & small shrimp were consumed in increasing quantities. Exports from India registered a healthy growth from 2008 onwards touching $ 3.5 billion in 2011-12. The depreciating Rupee is boosting export figures but the export industry would be better off with a much stable currency. Coming years would be stormier with more controls coming from governments on catches, fish farming and production; and winners would be the ones having better facilities for production and marketing.

In my opinion, India has benefitted from the market access policies of the WTO, which resulted in declining tariffs. However, in the years to come, India will face a tough environment due to nontrade barriers such as Sanitary and Phyto-sanitary Agreement (SPS) and technical barriers to trade. Global recession will also affect fish trade although its impact on India may not be significant. The average tariff for clothing and fishery (as raw material) products are only 4 per cent. But the clothing and fishery products exported by developing countries (Bangladesh, India and Nepal) end up paying up to 20-25 per cent. There is not a single agency to implement SPS regulations. The SPS measures are maintained under a number of Acts. For food safety and quality, fish and fish products are mainly covered by the Food Safety and Standards Act, which is yet to be fully implemented.

According to the Marine Product Export Development Authority (MPEDA), in spite of the global turmoil, recent years were particularly good for Indian export. During 2010-11 for the first time in the history of marine product exports, the export earnings have crossed $ 2.8 billion. This is also the first time the export has crossed all previous records in quantity, Rupee value and Dollar terms. Exports aggregated to 8,13,091 tonne valued at ` 12,901.47 crore. However, there are changes in the composition of export basket, probably due to the contracts that Indian exporting houses have with their trading partners. However, there are also some changes in the export destinations as India has now entered markets in East and Far East countries apart from penetrating further in Arab countries. This is taken as a hedge against fluctuation in traditional markets such as Japan, the US and Europe.

EDITORIAL TAKE The impact of the current economic scenario may be with regard to the export of expensive seafood products. But overall, it has not affected the seafood export much. What is important is India has found new export destinations. This is really a healthy sign as new markets always bring in opportunities and at the same time reduce the dependency on one area or market.

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Carbonated drinks market

Changing consumer preferences redefining prospects

Carbonated drinks have become an essential part of the Indian lifestyle. Right from youngsters to the middle-aged, all relish aerated drinks, and a sumptuous treat remains incomplete without such zing thing. Also, delicacies like pizzas, burgers and French fries are much devoured and preferred with carbonated drinks only. Notably, with a handful of fast food joints in India, these beverages have gained much popularity among Indians. Shushmul Maheshwari

T

he Indian non-alcoholic beverage industry is thriving on the back of a huge consumer base. Around 50 per cent of the population is below 30 years of age, providing greater propensity towards these sparkling beverages. The carbonated or aerated drinks that form an inevitable part of people’s daily lives account for about 30 per cent of the total non-alcoholic beverage market. Also, this segment has been a major contributor towards the growth of non-alcoholic drinks market in India. Carbonated drinks account for almost 80 per cent of the total sales of soft drinks in India. It consists of cola products and non-cola products, of which the cola segment constitutes around 60 per cent share; non-cola segment includes approximately 30 per cent with the remaining share comprising energy drinks. At the end of 2011, the market was estimated to be worth

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` 62 billion, growing at a CAGR of around 5 per cent. The slow growth rate reflects the changing consumer preferences towards more nutritional beverages and fruit juices. Moreover, the emergence of non-aerated drinks as a substitute for carbonated drinks too has resulted in diminishing sales for this category.

Consumers redefining future Although India is a promising market for carbonated drinks, there lies a huge threat from the end-consumers who have become more aware about the illeffects of these fizzy drinks. Rather, in recent times, it has been observed that the Indian consumers have shifted to more nutritional products leading to a snail paced growth of the carbonated beverages segment. Certain recent trends are attributed to this changed behaviour of consumers towards the consumption of aerated drinks, which include health and fitness awareness, greater disposable income (particularly in urban areas), and lifestyle

changes. Health-related awareness with regard to obesity and overweight issues, especially among teenagers and young adults, has significantly propelled the sales of non-carbonated and energy drinks. Carbonated drinks market also squeezed due to the pesticide controversy. Products such as juices and health drinks are now fast becoming an essential part of breakfast table among urban families. Beverage corporations have tracked these trends and have innovated their product portfolio to meet the expectations of consumers. Coca Cola’s Diet Coke is an apt example in this regard. Although the carbonated drinks’ sparkle has faded in the wake of healthconscious drinks, soft drink companies are leaving no stone unturned to gain the maximum chunk of marketshare. Efforts are being continuously made to revamp the craze for carbonated drinks. Currently, Coca-Cola and Pepsi are the unrivalled leaders, together grabbing around 95 per cent marketshare. Other leading carbonated drinks brands include Thums Up, Sprite, etc.

Moves to mop-up volumes Years of research on the Indian demographics, the tastes and consumption pattern of the natives have bore fruits, and consequent efforts by beverage makers can be witnessed to leverage the opportunity in the Indian carbonated drinks’ market that is the fastest growing among all the nations. In the carbonated drinks segment, the lime-lemon category in India has been growing by 16-17 per cent a year, ahead of colas at about 11-12 per cent and orange drinks at 8-9 per cent. Apart from being a familiar flavour that Indians consume at home (in the form of nimbu paani), lime-lemon drinks are considered ideal thirst quenchers. Tapping this growth opportunity, Coca-Cola is all set to revive Citra, a popular clear lime drink that the company bought and phased out during the 1990s to establish its own brand Sprite. In a surprising move, the cola giant is re-launching Citra at almost 20 per cent lower price than its counterparts.


Carbonated drinks market

PepsiCo too is anxious to gain profitability in the carbonated drinks market. To attract the health-conscious populace, it has introduced new innovative products. It has recently unveiled Pepsi NEXT – a mid-calorie beverage containing 60 per cent less sugar than regular Pepsi-Cola. The soda, coming in handy Pepsi’s trademark peppy blue can, is supplemented by an aggressive ad campaign targeting calorieconscious customers, who in recent years have replaced carbonated drinks with tea, flavoured water and sports drinks. Besides, other regional players have adopted several strategies to gain the carbonated drinks marketshare. For instance, Kalimark, the popular soft drink manufacturer from South, has launched a lemonade-flavoured carbonated drink called Solo. However, the company is more excited to launch another offering called Paneer soda, which is a rosewater carbonated drink. The company intends to sell a 500 ml PET bottle for ` 25. Coca-Cola too has launched Schweppes 300 ml cans in two variants – Tonic Water and Soda Water.

Miles to go India has shown a substantial increase in the consumption of carbonated drinks since the past few years. Indeed, the country has come out as one of the rapidly growing carbonated drinks markets worldwide. Though, due to rapid urbanisation, high incomes and changing lifestyles, the country offers lucrative opportunities to new entrants. However, there still exist some constraints, which Indian carbonated drinks market (Billion Rupees), 2011 & 2015 76 62

2011

2015 Source: RNCOS

may hold back the potential growth of this industry in future. Following are some of the roadblocks that are likely to affect the industry’s growth severely: o Lack of adequate infrastructure, such as proper storage, preservation and distribution facilities that result in wastage and value loss o Pricing remains an important factor in analysing the growth of this industry. Recently, the rate of VAT has been hiked on carbonated drinks in several places like Maharashtra, NCT and others. This will lead to price rise, which might adversely affect the sales o Rising number of allegations from health activists and environmental campaigners o Scarcity of water is hindering the progress of this industry o Rural area penetration is still a major constraint in the growth pace of carbonated drinks Looking at each of the above roadblock and closely analysing their root causes, the beverage companies need to take a multidimensional approach to sort out the issues. Few measures are as under: o Instead of shifting or adding whole new range of products, which involves bulky investments and risks, it is easier to modify the existing products by including new features. o Companies can come up with more visible package labels that clearly reflect the contained ingredients in the carbonated drinks, and thus avoid unnecessary allegations o To sort out the water scarcity issue, companies must develop quality water treatment and recycling plants that will not only check the prices but also mitigate health concerns o To increase rural penetration and introduce new customers to the carbonated drinks, manufacturers are trying attractive strategies. For instance, Coca Cola has launched Fanta Fun Taste powder sachet for ` 5 targeting the lower end of the market o Corporations are pumping in billions of dollars to strengthen the much-needed distribution channels and cold storage.

Brand-wise marketshare of carbonated drinks (2011)

17%

57%

16%

10%

Sprite

Pepsi

Coca Cola

Others

Source: RNCOS

Flavouring the future With consumers increasingly opting for healthier beverages, the carbonated drinks market in India is losing value share to flavoured drinks. Hence, the market is estimated to grow at a rate of around 5-6 per cent in the next few years. Growth will be driven by the increasing consumption of non-cola drinks, such as Sprite, Limca or Fanta. Introduction of health variants in carbonated drinks segment will also support the growth of carbonated drinks market in India. With continuous economic growth, modernisation and high per head disposable income will drive this market. Besides, it is anticipated that with the planned upcoming investments and research to offer better carbonated drinks, the segment will be successful in meeting consumer demands along with pushing the sales volumes of beverage makers. Shushmul Maheshwari is the Chief Executive of RNCOS E-Services Pvt Ltd, a market research & information analysis company with global presence. He has spent more than 15 years working in the senior management teams of both, Indian and multinational companies. He has gained expertise in research & analysis field and actively participated in various national and international conferences & discussions organised by business & trade-related associations. Email: shushmul@rncos.com

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Monsoon logistics

Mahua Roy

I

t is not a co-incidence that smaller price point stock keeping units (SKUs) and attractive promotions flood the FMCG (foods) category during monsoon. It forms an integral part of strategies to devise various contingency plans, which may stem out of any decline in volume sales in case a shortfall in rainfall hits crop yields; escalates food prices and impacts consumer spend.

Challenges during monsoon

which become increasingly difficult as the cases are wet, and the cardboard loses its strength,” says Behera. Purkayastha puts forward that cardboard packaging as well as storage of goods on the ground can create contamination, causing huge loss to the business. He explains further that replacing cardboard with plastic crates, storage on pallets and moving palletised loads in close bodied trucks are some of the risk mitigating techniques that are used globally.

Apart from logistical challenges, One of the most difficult quarters for the FMCG Countering drop in product integrity faces issues due industry (especially foods) is the one around monsoon. demand to increased humidity. Categories This season sees a lot of strategising to counter Few effective and quick such as bakery products are highly strategies can help FMCG affected. “Due to high humidity in dropping demands, falling margins and challenging companies maintain constant the air, we are wary of fungus and, environments to maintain the supply chain continuity. margins and sales during thereby take all possible measures monsoons. Some of these are to ensure and control the humidity consumption. Contamination can happen as follows: within the manufacturing facilities. Also, at any point during its journey. Choice of Keep price rise on hold: Late or as hygiene being the basic constraint, it packaging solution and material handling decline in monsoons tend to reduce bottom is important for the bakery industry to plays an important role in overcoming these lines and outputs. However, introducing a maintain the standard of cleanliness at challenges,” elaborates Devdip Purkayastha, price hike during this sensitive timing is factories as well as the outlets,” opines President, CHEP India. seen as a disastrous strategy. Consumers Qusai Khorakiwala, Director, Monginis Handling wet pallets will easily shift to low-priced brands. Foods Pvt Ltd. During monsoon, one of the biggest Maintain steady distribution: Also Fresh and perishable produce face challenges faced is that of handling wet it is important to keep distribution in dangers of quick rotting. “In terms of pallets during logistics operations. “Wet check. Stocking your product at modern preserving freshness and quality, products pallets and the runner boards under the and general trade outlets should not be that get affected the most are grains & pallets tend to break easy if not handled overlooked, citing logistical challenges. pulses; bakery products and pickles get properly. Another issue is case integrity; if Availability is the key to successful mouldy; fruits & vegetables rot quickly as the cardboard boxes accumulate moisture, monsoon strategies. Similarly, one should most of them need chilled environment,” the cases tend to collapse under their own be careful enough to build up rural logistics says Asim Behera, General Manager – weight. This creates a mess when you have in this period as constant availability of India, Swisslog. to store them in racks. Imagine you have your product will differentiate it. An integral part of maintaining a 6 feet high pallet stored at Level 10 and Promote heavily: In this competitive steady volumes during monsoon is by the cases have collapsed. Retrieving it is a market, when marketers are struggling with boosting distribution, keeping in mind disaster waiting to happen,” adds Behera. logistics and drop in demands, introducing the challenging environments during the Another major issue is palletising or attractive promotional packs is a brilliant season. Devising logistical solutions can depalletising wet cases. This area is now strategy. Instead of mass-marketing, bring down a large amount of wastage and seeing increased adoption of automation. concentrated target groups need to be contamination. “Water contamination and “In most modern warehouses today, made aware of such promotions at strategic the adverse effect on products are the main palletising and depalletising is done via touch points, thereby boosting volumes. challenges faced during monsoon. Goods are robots. Thus the throughput increases Concentration on smaller price points is stored, handled and moved multiple times manifold. Most palletising equipment seen as a good strategy in this season. across the supply chain as it moves from the Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in use suction, scraping, sliding techniques, production location to its ultimate point of

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MFP_August_2012_ Goma_Tab-2_64


AUTOMATION TRENDS Robotics in food packaging

Courtesy: Messe Frankfurt GmbH / Petra Welzel

Well-armed with efficiency for better productivity

products from that of their competitors, which is impacting their product lifecycles. Globalisation has thrown never before seen challenges. Also, surging middle class is driving demands and manufacturers need to continuously scale up to grab this opportunity. Manufacturing assets that are highly productive, versatile to adopt changing products are the order of the day. Packaging industry is not an exception. Speed, accuracy/consistency, flexibility to manage variety of products are some of the common needs across all packaging machineries. Thus, automation and robotics play a pivotal role in meeting all these requirements of manufacturing sector to enhance its business performance.”

Advantages galore

The untapped potential in food packaging segment and the desire to increase efficiency have led the companies in this area to invest huge amount of money in automation equipment. There are various benefits offered by automation solutions that include cost-effectiveness and higher returns on investments. Avani Jain

W

ith increased consumption of processed food, the demand for packaging has also grown manifold. Today, for processed food manufacturers, packaging is as important as their food products and thus, across the world, corporations have started making efforts towards employing automation in packaging so as to increase efficiency and productivity. The use of automation and robotics in food packaging is a growing trend as it ensures better productivity and efficiency through a combination of speed and

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accuracy. Over the past few years, food packaging technology has undergone a remarkable change due to the changing needs of the Indian consumer. The modern Indian consumer looks forward to buying quality products that are attractively packed and yet are hygienic and safe. This can be ensured through implementation of automation solutions and robotics systems in food packaging. Thus, in present times, packaging section is getting more digitised and new technology is helping in increasing flexibility, accuracy and speed of production. Khalil Nathani, General ManagerOEM, Rockwell Automation India Pvt Ltd, says, “Manufacturers are continuously innovating in order to differentiate their

One of the biggest advantages of using automated equipment and robotics in food packaging is the fact that these help in ensuring safety and hygiene. Avoiding human touch, wastage etc are the key aspects for ensuring hygienic food packaging, and automation equipment like robots and the like play an important role in ensuring this. Anil Bayati, Officer on Special Duty, Mother Dairy, Gandhinagar (a unit of GCMMF Ltd), notes, “The use of automation equipment makes processes more hygienic as everything is system controlled and no human intervention is needed. Further, it ensures ease in operations when the companies go for large-scale production. Automation equipment makes it easier to handle mass production. Thus, it assumes much importance in all the food processing and packaging sectors.” The other benefits include enhanced competitiveness of food packaging companies in both domestic as well as international markets.

Robotics gaining ground With the advent of automation and robotics in the 21st century, it is no surprise that many food packaging companies are turning towards the use of robotics, for instance robotic palletisers. The obvious benefit is improved efficiency and increased profit. Based on


Robotics in food packaging

the robotic palletiser’s ease of operation, flexibility and repeatability, it can become a key factor in determining a plant’s ability to achieve its objectives. Robotic palletisers have evolved rapidly over the last few years. Nathani avers, “Earlier, robots were used only to perform high-speed repetitive tasks to increase productivity. But with evolution of vision systems and precision actuation systems and convergence of these technologies with Kinematics have impacted the intelligence and usage of robots across wide spectrum of applications. Further, flexibility in selection of pay load, reach & duty of the robotic arm combined with integration of vision system and selection of choice of end effector has opened up tremendous application avenues in packaging as they handle different product types in packaging process.” Today, robotic palletisers alleviate the need for manual stacking of bags, cartons or drums onto a pallet and are also used

for increasing end-of-line productivity. They are ideally suited to applications involving production from one, two or more lines where flexibility is required and space is at a premium. Of all the benefits offered by robotic palletiser, precision and safety assumes much importance. In most cases, a robotic palletiser provides a better alternative to manual palletising technology due to many factors including reduced OH&S, increased output, continuous and automated monitoring of operations, safer working environment, less damage due to smoother bag handling, flexibility to handle a large range of products, adaptable to new products, reliable and measurable return on investment within two years. Nathani notes, “Robotic palletisers offer capabilities to meet the versatility, productivity and consistency demands of modern manufacturing requirements. Thus, all these technologies help to considerably enhance the quality and consistency of packing.”

Moving in the right direction Robotics is just one example of automation in food packaging. The opportunity areas for automation in this industry are plenty. There are several unexplored segments where robotics and automated equipment can be introduced. The nature of food packaging industry makes it perfect customer for automation solutions. The competitiveness of the food packaging industry demand products with short turnaround time and unique innovations. Thus, the flexibility offered by automation solutions makes them ideal in the food packaging industry. Further, automation solutions such as robotics enable food processing companies to manage increasing variations in package configurations. Variation is driven by consumer demands and the consistent need to differentiate brands. Thus, the ability to produce a wider range of products more competitively drives food packaging companies towards automation solutions. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT Case study - Mother Dairy, Gandhinagar

Photo: Aamir Kadri; Location courtesy: Mother Dairy, Gandhinagar

Waving the ‘green’ flag to total energy efficiency

In the present scenario, where there is shortfall of power throughout the country, adopting energy-efficient measures has become one of the major goals of the food processing industry including the dairy segment. Setting an example for the rest of dairy plants in the country, Mother Dairy, Gandhinagar (MDG) - a unit of Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation (GCMMF) Ltd has adopted total energy management approach, thereby leading to sustainability. Avani Jain

D

ue to rising energy prices, every segment of the food processing industry is now adopting various measures for ensuring energy-efficiency. Dairy segment is also no exception. It is continuously trying to reduce its energy consumption and move towards sustainability. The total energy management approach adopted by MDG is a remarkable example as to how a dairy plant can reduce its energy usage through employment of new technologies, and above all, the strong will of the management to become energy-efficient.

Concept of tri-generation MDG is highly energy-conscious and has taken various steps to ensure sustainable development. It has adopted four productivity

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enhancement techniques, of which one is total energy management. A K Dhagat, General Manager, MDG, notes, “We believe in green manufacturing practices and hence make use of green fuels. Further, we undertake energy consumption audit every three years and based on the recommendations, we adopt new strategies. We try to achieve 100 per cent energy-efficiency in our operations.” The main aim of MDG is to pursue the green path by way of 3Rs – reducing, reusing and recycling. Thus, it emphasises on the use of green fuel, for instance natural gas. The company uses renewable energy – biogas generated from anaerobic digesters in effluent treatment plant (ETP). It indulges in self-generation through tri-generation. These efforts towards saving energy have resulted in 50 per cent reduction of carbon dioxide emissions for generated electricity and continuous reduction in specific energy consumption. The tri-generation concept revolves around utilising three forms of energy from natural gas, ie direct combustion energy from natural gas in gas engine utilised for generation of power; energy from exhaust gas of engine utilised in waste heat recovery boiler for generation of steam; and energy from engine jacket water used to generate chilled water through single effect hot water-fired vapour absorption chiller. For this, MDG has established tri-generation plant – green fuel captive power plant. This plant runs on natural gas and the installed capacity of this is 3.6 MW. It enables to generate cheaper and incessant power.

Strategic saving MDG has adopted various fuel-saving measures such as installation of new 10 tonne/hour (TPH) boiler with economiser and reverse osmosis (RO) plant for boiler make-up water, steam line modification to increase Waste Heat Recovery Boiler (WHRB) steam generation and use of powder condensate for CIP. The new boiler is highly efficient. Dhagat observes, “The boiler runs on natural gas, and leads to overall heat efficiency ie 103 per cent by recovering exhaust heat.” It ensures high efficiency compared to oil boilers due to inclusion of pressurised as well as condensing economisers. The boiler leads to direct energy saving and reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. Sameer Saxena, Assistant GM, MDG, adds, “MDG has also followed the green building concept for its new godown. We have installed turbo ventilators and the design is such that the main source of lighting is natural light.” The turbo ventilators can save electricity up to 4,380 KWH/year and natural lighting can save 7,665 KWH/year. The company is environment-conscious and is constantly taking steps towards sustainability. It is for the same reason that it has recently bagged Green Manufacturing Excellence Award 2012. MDG has adopted all the possible steps for reducing its fuel and power consumption. Other dairy plants can take inspiration from this while exploring ways to reduce their energy consumption and move towards sustainability. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in


POLICIES & REGULATIONS Decontrolling sugar industry

A sweet deal for long-term stability Sugar is one of the few industries highly controlled by stringent government regulations. The industry has been advocating decontrol of the sector to increase productivity and enhance exports. The government is consulting with all the stakeholders to take this crucial policy decision. Rakesh Rao

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ugar sector is the country’s second-largest agrobased industry, providing employment to about 50 million farmers. Experts have been, for long, urging decontrol of this industry to make it more competitive globally and increase efficiency across the supply chain. “The sugar industry requires immediate reforms for a freer environment to operate and grow like in other countries and like the other industries in India. Some of the reforms that the sugar industry has been demanding for are removal of levy sugar obligation, abolition of regulated release mechanism, linkage of cane price with sugar price, no compulsory packing of sugar in jute bags and freer exportimport policy,” says Abinash Verma, Director General, Indian Sugar Mills Association (ISMA). Sugar is probably the only sector in the country, which is under such tight government controls. The Government of India constituted an expert

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committee, which is headed by Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council Chairman C Rangarajan, to look into the demand of industry. Verma informs, “The Prime Minister, Dr Manmohan Singh, constituted this committee in January this year so that all the aspects of decontrol of the sugar sector including its impact on several stakeholders could be reviewed and studied before taking a final policy direction on freeing the sector. Accordingly, all aspects of the sugarcane and sugar sector are being studied by the committee, including a study of the success of Brazilian sugar industry after deregulation, so that a holistic view of the needs of Indian sugar sector could be taken for the benefit of all concerned.”

Phasing out controls While industry and the farming community in some major sugar producing countries have prospered in an open business environment, in India the fortunes of cane crushing mills are chained by dispensable controls. “ISMA

is of strong opinion that government controls are aggravating the cyclicality in sugarcane/sugar production, increasing the volatility of sugar prices in the domestic market, causing high burden of sugar inventory on mills and mounting cane price arrears. Sugar mills are not able to undertake research and investments in the sector, which could increase cane yields for better realisation to farmers too,” opines Verma. Though the industry expects some aspects of decontrol to happen in India, the process is far too complex and will take some time to resolve. The process may get further delayed due to political compulsion. Hence, experts feel decontrol may take place in phases. Verma says, “ISMA wants total decontrol, but considering some political compulsions of the government, agrees that this may be implemented in a phased manner. If decontrol is to happen in phases, ISMA wants immediate freedom to sell sugar in the open market, doing away with the levy obligation from mills to supply sugar at discounted price for Public Distribution System in the first phase and freer export-import policy.”

Aiding farmers Unpaid cane bills running into a few thousand crores at regular intervals are incontrovertible proof that the present dispensation is not working. If the government decides to decontrol sugar industry, experts feel that farmers will get better and timely payment for their sugarcane. “There will be no issue of cane price arrears once the sector is decontrolled. The arrears went up to ` 10,000 crore this year. After abolition of regulated release mechanism and with mills being able to plan their sugar sells, inventory and cash flows, the payments to farmers could be made on time. Once the government procures its levy sugar requirement from open market without burdening the sugar mills to bear the financial burden of supplying levy sugar at much low cost and with lower sugar inventory, cost of production could be controlled giving margins to mills, which


Decontrolling sugar industry

Decontrol is that sweet pill that the sugar sector, cane farmers and thousands of people who are dependent on cane farming require to make their lives sweeter every day. Abinash Verma Director General, Indian Sugar Mills Association

will ensure better price to farmers,” explains Verma. Cane is a cash crop. If farmers get right price and on-time payment from the mill owners, then it will encourage farmers to stay with the crop and not move their land to wheat or maize. Industry is optimistic that the Rangarajan Committee will recommend a formula establishing a linkage between cane and sugar prices. “Cane price-sugar price linkage will control the cyclicality in sugarcane production helping the farmers with a stable price and timely payments. Overall, with a more stable sugar industry, cane farmers will certainly benefit directly as also indirectly with better seeds and higher yields too. It is a much-needed reform push for the farmers. In fact farmer bodies have also favoured sector decontrol,” observes Verma.

A balancing act Linking cane price to the price of sugar and byproducts is one of the most commonly used remunerative methods adopted by many countries such as Latin America, Thailand, etc. There is a clear formula that defines every year what share the industry and the farmer will get in the realisation from sales. However, the Government of India will have to frame policy, which can balance the interests of consumers, farmers and the industry. Verma opines, “Once the sugar sector is decontrolled, the main task for the government will be to ensure that consumers get adequate sugar at reasonable prices and farmers get remunerative payment on time. With cane price-sugar price linkage, the farmers would be assured of a reasonable price on

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time. With a reformed sugar sector and investments in the sector, sugar supplies would be good to meet the consumer demands. The government will have to cushion price shocks in the market and for that a similar mechanism as what is applied to other essential commodities in the country could be adopted.”

Managing exports better The Indian sugar industry has made significant progress. While sugar production has increased considerably (due to better yields and efficiency), India has also exported large quantity of sugar. However, controls on exports of sugar are hampering the growth of industry in the global market. In addition, late approvals of exports have also affected the industry. Verma says, “The industry has suffered huge losses due to delays in government permissions to allow exports when the international prices were high. Last year, the industry suffered a loss of around ` 300 crore due to delay in permission to export 5 lakh tonne under open general licence (OGL) as well as delay in the notification, by which time, price in the international market was already on a decline. The Empowered Group of Minister allowed a third tranche of 10 lakh tonne of sugar exports on March 26 this year, but the final nod was given only after two months. As a result, crucial time was lost on sugar exports and we failed to leverage the international markets.” If the sugar industry is deregulated, experts feel that such export opportunities will not be lost. “Once the sector is decontrolled, the sugar industry will have the freedom to develop its own exportimport strategies on a long-term basis. Further, India could be seen by the importers as a reliable source for sugar exports, without the concern and hiccups of sudden bans or stoppages in exports or imports. Reputation and confidence of India will only go up,” says Verma. A free hand by the government would also help industry work on the product mix of exports better. He adds, “The demand in the international market

is more for refined sugar and raw sugar, whereas white sugar demand is almost negligible. But, because of timing of permission and lack of clarity on a longterm basis, we end up exporting more white sugar, produced by sugar mills, due to lack of planning. Today, the Indian sugar industry has no proper planning for exports. Decontrol will also help us export by-products in more quantities. At the moment ethanol export is almost negligible.”

On a sweet note Once the sugar industry is decontrolled, the seasonal and monthly price fluctuations in the domestic market could be managed better. The sugar industry can plan its sugar sales cash flows more effectively, which will help payment to cane farmers on time, without any delays and hiccups. Verma says, “Once the farmer is confident that his payments would be on time and he will get the matching remuneration for his produce, the farmer will not switch over to other crops, which in turn will maintain a steady supply of sugar in the market. This will break the cyclicality factor, which has affected the sugar industry historically, and thereby reduce price volatility, if any, due to demandsupply mismatch.” Given the right set of policies, the industry has the potential to become a sustainable supplier of sugar to the world market in future. From the consumers’ point of view, the government, in a decontrol regime, will have to ensure that exports stay within comfort level, so that the domestic market is not impacted by shortages at any point. The challenge, therefore, will be to get all the constituents on board for a smooth transition to a new cane price fixing mechanism under which rewards for farmers will move in tandem with sugar prices. “Decontrol is that sweet pill that the sugar sector, cane farmers and thousands of people who are dependent on cane farming require to make their lives sweeter every day,” concludes Verma. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


Indian food services segment STRATEGY

Prasenjit Chakraborty

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he Indian fast food market has been registering a healthy growth over the last few years. However, it is observed that the global players like McDonald’s, KFC, and Domino’s Pizza etc are ruling the roost in QSR segment. The market is all set to grow further because of burgeoning middle class, rise in malls and multiplexes, increased spending by youth, among others. Naturally, the question is how the home-grown food service players could augment their share in the fastgrowing market?

Brand-building vital for augmenting business Patience is the cornerstone of success in the Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) business. Apart from this, brand image plays a crucial role. Due to paucity of fund, Indian players are roping in local media and online advertising for building their brands.

The dynamics of QSR The fundamental of any business, especially QSR, is to have patience and infuse money for years to scale up the business without looking for profit. The scaling up process also involves brand-building. Clearly, one has to be financially sound to sustain the business in initial years. Hence, sustainability is one of the main challenges for the Indian players. “The nature of business is such that any company in this sector needs to spend initial years in establishing the scalability of the business, so that expansion into multi-city multi-store model can be implemented smoothly. Most companies, which are building pan-India brands in the Indian QSR space, are in this phase or are just beginning to expand,” points out Kiran Nadkarni, CEO, Kaati Zone. It is important to mention here that Kaati Zone spent six years to establish scalability and has created multi-city presence only from 2011. “The challenges facing the Indian QSR industry are high real estate rentals and high turnover of manpower at outlet level,” he says. Another challenge in this direction is to adapt Indian cuisine to the fast food model. This is because the cooking of Indian cuisine is a complex process and

involves several ingredients. This makes assembly line production complex. Other issues like high rent of real estate, lack of cold storage etc also compound the problem further for Indian players. “It is not difficult to adapt Indian foods to QSR format. However, since the QSR industry is in its early stages, not many players have attempted adapting Indian foods to a highly scalable format in the past. Some of us have now achieved this task and are now witnessing rapid growth,” he opines.

Brand-building exercise Since a large base of consumers of QSR comprises youth, it is essential to have brand image. This is because younger

generation is brand-conscious. They prefer to go to a restaurant that has brand image. Again brand-building is a sustained process and involves cost. As it is an expensive proposition, Indian players prefer low-cost budget. “We are building the brand through local store marketing (in communities served by the outlet), local mass media like FM radio, and online advertising including social media sites. These are low-cost solutions appropriate for young companies,” opines Nadkarni. The factors responsible for the growth of QSR in India are nuclear families and the presence of international players. “The factors fuelling the growth of QSR in India are nuclear families with double incomes, longer commuting to work and longer working hours. Higher disposable incomes and customer aspirations to buy and consume branded goods are aiding the sector’s growth. The heavy media spend by international QSR giants in India is also helping to expand the sector,” says Nadkarni. His plan for next two years involves focussing on southern and western regions for expansion. “We are now present in six cities in these regions and will open up a few more outlets in the cities soon,” he reveals. Since QSR is relatively a new segment in India, finding an investor is difficult. Once the segment matures, the sentiment of investors may change; in that case getting finance will be easier. In the ultimate analysis, it is the patience that determines the success of an entrepreneur. “QSR ventures are long-haul businesses. The entrepreneur requires oodles of patience and perseverance to build a successful venture. Also, given the long-term nature of business, the venture capital firms rarely invest in this sector in the early stages of a company and the entrepreneur may need to bootstrap for extended periods or raise capital from family and friends,” exhorts Nadkarni. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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TIPS & TRICKS Fish production

ECO-F FISHIN RIENDLY G MET TO ATT HODS SUSTA AIN INABIL IT Y According to Greenpeace, globally, the oceans are at crisis point. Impact of this will be felt much more in Asia (including India), as the region dominates the global fishing industry. Over 85 per cent of all fishers and fish farmers in 2008 were Asian, as were six of the top ten producer countries in capture fishing. By adopting sustainable methods, the fishing community can increase fish production and enhance its earnings.

Areeba Hamid

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any of the Asian countries are substantial net exporters of fish – even above other important agricultural commodities. As global trade in fish and seafood has increased over the past decades, basic processing like filleting and de-heading has migrated to developing countries where cost of labour is low. Lakhs of people in India depend on fishing for their livelihood and, hence it is important to implement environment-friendly techniques to capture fish and thus ensuring sustainability in the long run. Following are some of the remedies for increasing fish production sustainably: Reining in the trawling industry: Regulations prohibiting trawling in near-shore waters need to be made uniform and strictly enforced. Currently, enforcement is largely absent except where the artisanal fishing community is well-organised. A gradual but drastic shrinking of the bottom trawling industry is required. This can be

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achieved first by capping licenses; retiring and scrapping older vessels; and ensuring that these are only replaced by selective & sustainable fishing gears and methods. In the medium term, for the health of India’s fisheries, bottom trawling needs to be eliminated completely. A move in that direction needs to be made now, with a goal to eliminate bottom trawling by 2020. Tackling overcapacity: Both mechanised and motorised boats across the Indian coast are at unsustainable numbers. Over-capacity has long been identified as a problem, but tackling it has not been easy. It is even more difficult to address the issue of over-capacity in the nonmechanised sector, but a start should be made with the most destructive sector viz bottom trawling. Enforce the seasonal fishing ban: Recent uniformity in the seasonal fishing bans on East and West coasts is a positive step, but this needs to be followed by

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enforcement. Further, the ban should cover the entire Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and not be restricted to territorial waters. This would mean that deep sea vessels including those operating under the Letter of Permit Scheme be confined to their port of registry during the seasonal ban. Demands from the traditional fishing community to extend the ban period must be seriously considered. Adopt an ecosystembased fisheries management model: For ecosystem-based fisheries management measures to work, particularly in inshore waters where fisheries pressures are high, they cannot follow the top-down prescriptive measures used thus far in India. Measures must be devised and implemented together with the local community. Communitybased fisheries management initiatives tend to have higher rates of success when it comes to regulating access to fisheries. Community-managed fisheries can span a range of measures, including gear restrictions, temporal (seasonal) or spatial restrictions and can include a patchwork of limited use areas and completely closed areas, either permanently or on a rotational basis, where rejuvenation can take place. Fish recovery areas/ marine reserves in deeper waters: The lack of closed areas where fishing is either prohibited or significantly regulated ensures that there are no ‘refuge’ areas where fish stocks can recover. As the trawling industry ventures further from the coast, and foreign vessels are allowed in the EEZ, the deeper waters that earlier served as ‘fish reserves’ are also being overfished. The science behind the fisheries benefits of closed areas is growing. Areas closed to all extraction, including fishing, allow the build-up of fish biomass and can be an effective fisheries management tool.

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Areeba Hamid is a Campaigner for Greenpeace India. Email: areeba.hamid@greenpeace.org


PROJECTS

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the food & beverages industry. Basmati rice

Dunar Foods Ltd Project type Capacity expansion Project news Dunar is in the business of procurement, processing and supply of basmati rice. It plans to invest in the expansion of its production capacity from 26 tph to 50 tph during the next two years. It will also invest in additional silo capacity of 60,000 metric tonne and rice husk-based power generation capacity of 3 MW in Karnal and a new rice husk-based power plant of 2 MW in Amritsar (in addition to the existing 1 MW capacity). Project location Haryana Project cost NA Implementation stage Ongoing Contact details: Dunar Foods Ltd Near CWC, Bazida Jattan Karnal 132 001, Haryana Tel: 0184-2220701 Fax: 0184-2220703 ---------------------------------------Dairy

National Dairy Development Board Project type New facility Project news The country’s apex body for milk co-operatives, National Dair y Development Board (NDDB), has proposed an investment of ` 1,50,000 million over the next five years for projects ranging from setting up new dairies in Saurashtra to funding research for breeding cows. NABARD will help the body in raising the required funds. The funds will be invested in new dairy projects, technology transfer, research and development of animal feed and

animal husbandry, and strengthening of supply networks and milk co-operatives in the country. Project location Saurashtra, Gujarat Project cost ` 1,50,000 million Implementation stage Planning Contact details: National Dairy Development Board PB 40, Anand 388001, Gujarat Tel: 2692-260148/149 Fax: 2692-260157 Email: anand@nddb.coop ---------------------------------------Dairy & packaging

Huishan Dairy Holding Ltd Project type New facility Project news This project to be implemented by Huishan consists of installation of canning and packaging machines with a capacity of 50 tonne per day to meet the growing demand for its products. It will also set up three new dairy farms comprising about 2,700 cows each within two years. Project location China Project cost $ 77.8 million Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Huishan Dairy Holding Ltd 99 Huishan Street Agriculture High-Tech Development Zone Shenyang, Liaoning, China 110164 Tel: +86(24) 88080078 ---------------------------------------Food processing and micro-irrigation

Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd ( JISL) Project type Capacity expansion and new facility

Project news JISL is planning an investment programme to expand its food processing and micro-irrigation facilities in India, through capacity expansion of existing production lines as well as building new production facilities. Project location Maharashtra Project cost NA Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd PO Box 72, NH.6, Bambhori Jalgaon 425 001, Maharashtra Tel: 0257- 225 8011, Fax: 0257- 225 8111 ---------------------------------------Fruit & vegetable market

Punjab Mandi Board Project type New facility Project news Ludhiana is set to have a state-of-the-art fruit and vegetables market, spread over 52 acres. According to the Punjab Mandi Board, it will be a state-of-the-art market, for which a pre-bid conference will be held soon. Five cold storages of 50 tonne each are being constructed. Six modern ripening chambers (for banana, mango and papaya) of a 10-tonne capacity each will also be installed. Project location Ludhiana Project cost ` 2,600 million Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Punjab Mandi Board SCO No 149-52, Sector 17-C Chandigarh 141 00, Punjab Tel: 0172-2704142, Fax: 0172-709120

Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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TENDERS

Latest Popular Tenders brought to you by www.tendersinfo.com SS multipurpose vat

Aluminium alloy milk can with milko tester

Org : Shahabad Dugdh Utpadak Sahkari Sangh Ltd TRN : 11813663 Desc : Supply, erection and commissioning of SS multipurpose vat – 02 nos; fabrication at site BOD : August 14, 2012 Loc : Bihar, India BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Org : Raipur Dugdh Utpadak Sahkari Sangh Ltd TRN : 11806768 Desc : Supply of aluminium alloy milk can 40 litre capacity with ISI mark and electronic milko tester BOD : August 14, 2012 Loc : Chhattisgarh, India BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

SS ghee settling tank Org : Shahabad Dugdh Utpadak Sahkari Sangh Ltd TRN : 11813665 Desc : Supply, erection and commissioning of SS ghee settling tank – 02 nos BOD : August 14, 2012 Loc : Bihar, India BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Cream ripening tank Org : Shahabad Dugdh Utpadak Sahkari Sangh Ltd TRN : 11813666 Desc : Supply, erection and commissioning of cream ripening tank BOD : August 14, 2012 Loc : Bihar, India BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Milk chiller Org : Shahabad Dugdh Utpadak Sahkari Sangh Ltd TRN : 11813667 Desc : Supply, erection and commissioning of milk chiller BOD : August 14, 2012 Loc : Bihar, India BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Homogeniser Org : Shahabad Dugdh Utpadak Sahkari Sangh Ltd TRN : 11813670 Desc : Supply, erection and commissioning of homogeniser BOD : August 14, 2012 Loc : Bihar, India BT : Domestic

Bakery equipment Org

: Orjan Mills Corporate Association/Jordan Enterprise Development Corporation TRN : 11827778 Desc : Supply, delivery, installation, training where applicable, and warranty service of the bakery equipment BOD : August 15, 2012 Loc : Jordan BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Trays, round pots and trays gastronorm Org : Ville de Châteauroux TRN : 11676535 Desc : Supply of trays, round pots and trays gastronorm needed to operate the production unit processor (CPU) (food containers) BOD : August 27, 2012 Loc : France BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Goods vehicles for milk Org

: Bengaluru Urban, Rura & Ramanagar Dist, Co-op. Milk Producers Societies Union Ltd TRN : 11743721 Desc : Goods vehicles for transportation and distribution of Nandini milk and milk products BOD : September 06, 2012 Loc : Karnataka, India BT : Domestic

Org: Organisation’s name, TRN: Tendersinfo Ref No, Desc: Description, BOD: Bid Opening Date, Loc: Location, BT: Bidding Type.

Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com

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EVENT LIST

NATIONAL AHMEDABAD

PUNE

CHENNAI

LUDHIANA

Gujarat, Oct 5-8, 2012

Maharashtra, Nov 2-5, 2012

Tamil Nadu, Nov 22-25, 2012

Punjab, Dec 21-24, 2012

INDORE

AURANGABAD

RUDRAPUR

HYDERABAD

Madhya Pradesh, Jan 11-14, 2013

Maharashtra, Feb 1-4, 2013

Uttarakhand, Feb 23-26, 2013

Andhra Pradesh, June 7-10, 2013

latest trends in packaging, packaging printing, processing, beverage and liquid food industries; November 06-08, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf India Pvt Ltd Centre Point Building, 7th floor Junction of S V Road & Juhu Tara Road Santacruz (W), Mumbai 400 054 Tel: 022-6678 9933 Email: messeduesseldorf@md-india.com

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Network18 Media & Investments Ltd

Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. • Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in

Fi India 2012 Exhibition with concurrent conference showcasing latest trends in food ingredient technologies; September 06-07, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: UBM India Pvt Ltd Sagar Tech Plaza, A 615-617, 6th Floor Andheri Kurla Road, Saki Naka Junction Andheri (E), Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600, Fax: 022-6612 2626/27 Email: info.india@ubm.com

International PackTech India and drink technology India

An international exhibition on food processing and packaging technology to

International PackTech India, along with drink technology India (dti), will showcase

For details contact: Print Packaging.Com Pvt Ltd F 101, Tower No 7 International Infotech Park Vashi Railway Station Navi Mumbai Tel: 022-2781 2619 Email: info@packplus.in

INTERNATIONAL

Technology forum and tradeshow for the food & beverage processing and packaging industry; August 16-20, 2012; at Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre (HKCEC), Hong Kong, China

For details contact: Sea Fare Expositions Inc, Seattle, USA Tel: +(1)-(206)-7895741 Fax: +(1)-(206)-7890504 Email: seafoodchina@seafare.com

For details contact Hong Kong Trade Development Council HKCEC, 1 Expo Drive, Hong Kong, China Tel:+(852)-(2)-25844333 Email: exhibitions@hktdc.org

Health Ingredients Europe One of the major tradeshows in Europe focussing on health ingredients for the growing functional foods industry; November 13-15, 2012; at Messe Frankfurt, Germany

China Fisheries & Seafood Expo Event showcasing the latest in marine technology and trends of seafood business; November 06-08, 2012; at Dalian World Expo Center, Dalian, China

Concurrent with Packplus 2012, this holistic show will feature the latest in food & beverage technologies, from processing, packaging, research, quality assurance, hygiene, among others; December 07-10, 2012; at India Expo Centre and Mart, Greater Noida

For details contact: G Vamshidhar Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd 1st Floor, 6-3-885/7/B, Somajiguda Circle Hyderabad 500 082 Tel: 040-6559 4411, Fax: 040-6668 4433 Email: g.vamshidhar@koelnmesse-india.com

International Foodtec India 2012

Hong Kong Food Expo

Food Technology Show

be held concurrently with Dairy Universe India, Sweet & SnackTec India, and PackEx India; September 11-13, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

For details contact: CMP Information Industrieweg 54, PO Box 200, 3600 AE Maarsen, The Netherlands

Tel:+(31)-(346)-559444 Fax:+(31)-(346)-573811 Email: jonathan.vis@ubm.com

Dubai Drink Technology Expo Specialised event featuring the latest in technologies & trends for the beverage industry; December 04-06, 2012; at Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Dubai, the UAE For details contact: INDEX Conferences & Exhibitions Organisation Dubai Health Care City Block B Office 203, 2nd Floor, Dubai, the UAE Tel: +971-4-3624717/149 Fax:+(971)-(4)-3624718 Email: drinkexpo@index.ae

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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EVENT REPORT Dairy Show 2012

Opening new avenues for farmers to milk profits The booming dairy industry in Andhra Pradesh calls for new technologies and equipment for boosting its growth. Catering to this demand, Dairy Show 2012 served as a platform for farmers to gather knowledge about latest technologies in animal husbandry and dairy processing.

India Dairy Association AP Chapter was also launched during the event by the Chief Guest. Talking about the growth of the dairy industry in Andhra Pradesh, Manmohan Singh, Principal Secretary (Animal Husbandry), said, “The dairy sector proves to be a gender equaliser, with women controlling a good part of the activity. Further, in drought situations, dairy sector comes in handy to farmers by providing timely incomes.”

Platform for opportunities

N Kiran Kumar Reddy, Chief Minister, Andhra Pradesh, lighting the lamp during inauguration

Avani Jain

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he dairy industry is booming in Andhra Pradesh. The State occupies second position in the country in terms of milk production and animal husbandry. The current milk production of the State is estimated at 11.25 million tonne and this is expected to reach 15 million tonne by 2020. Set against the backdrop of Andhra Pradesh’s emerging dairy sector, the maiden edition of Dairy Show 2012 proved to be a success, according to the organisers. The threeday event was held from July 13-15, 2012, at Hyderabad International Trade Expositions Ltd, Andhra Pradesh. It was organised jointly by Active Exhibitions & Conferences and HITEX in association with Government of Andhra Pradesh. The event was also supported by NABARD;

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Society of Elimination of Rural Poverty; Progressive Dairy Farmers Association, Andhra Pradesh & FAPCCI.

Event at a glance Dairy Show 2012 was inaugurated by the Chief Guest, N Kiran Kumar Reddy, Chief Minister, Andhra Pradesh, along with industry representatives and senior government officials. In his inaugural address, he asked the farmers to diversify into dairy farming as dairying has been positively impacting the rural income and changing rural lifestyles. He cited the example of how the income of farmers in Chittoor district went up after they expanded their activities to dairy farming and poultry. He further added, “Realising the importance of the allied sectors, the State has launched the ` 6,000-crore Milk Mission to promote the industry in a holistic way.” The

The event served as a perfect meeting place for hundreds of farmers from several districts of Andhra Pradesh, dairy equipment manufacturers and representatives from dairy industry who have been on the look out for latest technologies. Almost 40,000 visitors from all segments of dairy such as dairy farming and processing participated in the event. Over 300 products were displayed during the event. Apart from the expo for dairy equipment, technology and services by over 80 exhibitors, a live display of dairy animals – as many as 50 high-yielding cows and buffaloes from Andhra Pradesh, Haryana and Karnataka – was also organised alongside the event. In addition, the concurrent seminars on management and technology for dairy farming attracted over 500 delegates. About the response of the farmers, Vinod Menon, Event Convener, Active Exhibitions & Conferences, stated, “It could be described in one word, ie ‘overwhelming’ as the farmers could get all the information related to the industry under one roof.”

Packed with action First in its series, Dairy Show 2012 successfully provided a platform for the companies to showcase their latest technologies for the benefit of farmers of Andhra Pradesh so as to help them increase their yield. Thus, the event claimed to have opened new avenues for the dairy farming community not only in Andhra Pradesh but all over India. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in


BOOK REVIEW

Extracting bioactive compounds for food products: Theory and applications Edited by: M Angela A Meireles Price: ` 11,600

Functional foods and nutraceuticals are seeing an increasing demand in terms of market presence and product development. Most nutraceuticals make use of natural sources for ingredients. This book proves to be an important resource for R&D activities as it elaborates various extraction methods for bioactive compounds. From long-standing trusted and established processes like steam distillation to emerging novel techniques like supercritical fluid technology, it presents details of the engineering aspects as well. The chapters exhaustively provide the fundamentals of transport phenomena and thermodynamics. The acute view of thermodynamics, mass transfer and economical engineering builds a foundation that can be used to obtain high-quality bioactive extracts and purified compounds. The book demonstrates how to successfully optimise bioactive compound extraction methods and use them to create new & better natural food options. A literature review and replicable case studies of extraction processes are also included. Apart from food, the book covers bioactive compounds in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. This book will be helpful for food scientists & technologists and students.

Nutraceuticals face a lot of regulatory issues when it comes to different geographies. The ingredients, even though mostly natural sources, have to face a host of tests and regulatory approvals. This book collates all the necessary information regarding regulations specifically for functional foods and nutraceuticals in major countries of the world. It includes regulations from South America, Canada, European Union, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, Japan, Korea, China, India and Southeast Asia as well as the US. It provides a valuable resource for understanding the key considerations of operating in this rapidly expanding area of nutraceuticals. The USP of this book is its emphasis on the importance of GRAS status and DSHEA regulations and inclusion of insights on quality manufacturing techniques, cGMP and standardised analytical techniques. Besides, there is an entire unit on overcoming regulatory hurdles and significance of intellectual property, trademark & branding on marketing. This book will prove essential to professionals and consultants in the food processing industry.

Nutraceutical and functional food regulations: In the United States and around the world Edited by: Debasis Bagchi Price: ` 8,300

Reviewer: Tejas Padte, Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai

Available at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958, Telefax: 022-2203 4058, Email: thadam@vsnl.com

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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PRODUCTS This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

Z-type bucket elevator Z-type bucket elevator is equipped with 304 grade SS sheet and fitted with buckets of food grade which is made out of polypropylene, having volume of approximately 2.6 litre. The buckets fitted with bronze inserts allow easy movement of the stainless steel pins. It is provided with drive system consisting of torque limiter, electronic sensors, pneumatics, electronic console panel with V.F.D and control circuit that ensure long life and ease of use without causing any problem. Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0981-8377111/1209769 Email: nishantb@fabcon-india.com Website: www.fabcon-india.com

Cable management system Aeron FRP corrosion-free cable tray management system is developed for long-lasting performance in challenging environments where corrosion and chemical resistance and lasting mechanical performance are key requirements. Ladder type as well as perforated cable trays with wide range of sizes to select from are also offered. Also available is 100 per cent replacement of hot dipped GI cable tray.

(welded) 0.6 mm to 25 mm and (seamless) 0.8 mm to 25 mm. Length is up to 30 m long. Applications are in refinery, petrochemical, food, pharmaceutical, fertiliser, oil & gas, breweries, sugar industries, etc. Suraj Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-27911050 Email: suraj@surajgroup.com, Website: www.surajgroup.com

PTFE-lined valves Fluoropolymer FEP, PFA, PTFE, lined SGI/ WCB/SS pipes, valves and fittings are offered using technical knowhow and raw materials for appropriate application of the resin for successful results with international quality for the chemical industry. Features are low co-efficient of friction, chemical inertness, non-toxic approved by international food & drugs regulatory authorities, non-inflammable, self-sealant, excellent weathering resistant, zero water absorption, etc. Supremo Line & Control Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22205282 Email: supremoproduct@gmail.com Website: www.supremoproduct.com

Nitrogen generator

Aeron Composite Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-26565731, Mob: 09909988266 Email: info@aeroncomposite.com Website: www.aeroncomposite.com

Pipe/tube and U-tubes The stainless steel seamless and welded pipe, tube & U-tubes and large diameter welded pipes are available in various sizes, grades and specifications as per customers’ requirements. MOC is all austenitic, ferritic, duplex & super duplex stainless steel. Specification is as per ASTM, ASME, DIN, NFA, JIS standards. Size range is (welded) 6.0 mm OD to 1016 mm OD and (seamless) 6.0 mm OD to 323.9 mm OD. Thickness range is

The two towers of PSA modules are interconnected with automatic changeover valves through pneumatic signal given by solenoid valve which in turn get the electrical signal from the timer provided in the control panel. The outgoing nitrogen gas is sent to a surge vessel where the minimum nitrogen pressure will be maintained with the help of back pressure regulator. The product nitrogen will now be sent to the consumer point through pressure reducing valves at required pressure. Easy to install and maintain, purity of nitrogen up to 99.99% can be achieved. Air-N-Gas Process Technologies Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-40064451 Email: shailesh@air-n-gas.com, Website: www.Air-n-gas.com

Looking For A Specific Product? Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MFP (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MFP Fryer and send it to 51818 80

| August 2012 Modern Food Processing P


PRODUCTS

Automation platform A powerful and robust automation platform with new machine a u t o m a t i o n controller NJ Series integrates motion, sequencing, networking, RFID tracking, and vision inspection. It comprises a new software Sysmac Studio that includes configuration, programming, simulation and monitoring and a fast machine network etherCAT to control motion, vision, sensors and actuators. The NJ controller is designed for high speed and flexibility. It is scalable with 16, 32 and 64 axis CPUs. Response time of less than 1 ms can be achieved for application of up to 32 axes. Omron Automation Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-42288400 Mob: 09980943045 Email: enquiry@ap.omron.com Website: www.omron-ap.co.in

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PRODUCTS

Vibrator feeder Vibrator feeder consists of stainless steel 304, electromagnetic in nature and sizes (length, width etc.) as per requirement and rate of flow c alculations. It is equipped with enclosed coil or vibro motor based with screening, heavy base plate with suitable support, fibre glass and spring steel leaf spr ings for maximising the effect of vibrations. It is designed to handle any material of varying bulk densities and flow properties. It has advanced feature of electronic controller for vibration adjustment as per requirement and for synchronisation with other devices like conveyors, weighers, etc. Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0981-8377111/1209769 Email: nishantb@fabcon-india.com Website: www.fabcon-india.com

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PRODUCTS

Autoclave The fully-automatic autoclave comes with inside and outside chamber, carriers, flange, fly screw, cross-pin, heater, temperature controller and pressure gauge. The cover stand and jointless hydraulically die pressed lid are made of stainless steel. The lid is fitted with pressure gauge, safety valve, safety fusible plug, manual exhaust valve, vacuum breaker-cumpurge valve and quick release coupling for online pressure calibration check. It automatically enables reproducibility of results including purging of stale air, sterilising, hold time of sterilising period, cycle end with automatic exhaust of pressure. Medica Instrument Manufacturing Co Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-66189999 Email: info@medicainstrument.com Website: www.medicainstrument.com

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PRODUCTS

Rotary gear pump The model FTS highprecision fuel pressuring internal rotary gear pump comes with investment casting body and matches the most demanding application in boiler, burner, hydraulics, fuel pressing and injection. This pump is ideally suitable for handling liquids like LDO, FO, LSHS and HSD. It is provided with built-in pressure relief valve and external bypassing arrangement and is of flange mount type. It is available in capacities ranging from 150 lph to 2,500 lph with maximum operating pressure up to 35 kg/cm and temperature up to 200°C. It is used in food processing industry. Fluid Tech Systems Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22900100 Mob: 09825604142 Email: mail@rotofluidpumps.com Website: www.rotofluidpumps.com

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

Dear Reader,

A n i n v i t e t h a t r e wa r d s a s w e l l . . .

‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, wellwritten, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry. complimentary copy of that particular edition. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Published by Network18 Media & Studies and Product Write-ups. The length Investments Ltd, ‘Modern Food Processing’ one of the article should not exceed 1500 words, of the leading monthly magazines exclusively while that of a product write-up should not meant for producers and user fraternities of exceed 100 words. the food processing industry. Well supported The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will be sent a

by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Publishing Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country),

it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, writeups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

Manas R Bastia Senior Editor Network18 Media & Investments Ltd ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W) Mumbai 400 028 India

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Modern Food Processing | August 2012

D +91 22 3003 4669 T +91 22 3024 5000 F +91 22 3003 4499 E manas@infomedia18.in W www.infomedia18.in


PRODUCTS

Vibratory separators These separators/sif ters are widely used in industries such as foodstuff, ceramics, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, bio-chemicals, electronics, plastics, grinding, water treatment, recycling, etc. Specialised machinery and technical solutions that meet specified demands of the customers are also offered. Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co Ltd Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-8965198 Email: info@guan-yu.net Website: www.guan-yu.net

Stretch wrapping machine The Poly Seal stretch wrapping machine is used for stretch wrapping using stretch-cling film. The stretchy film is stretched around the product/ carton to cover the product. It is designed to enable cylindrical products to be wrapped with LD/LDPE stretch film. Features include robust construction, controllable cycle times, safety features incorporated, indigenous design, user-friendliness, low power consumption, variable speed, easy manipulation of load to provide bi-directional wrapping. The stretch wrapping machine is used to wrap computer components, cosmetic items, consumer goods, domestic pumps, electrical and electronic goods, engineering items, food products, garments, handicraft, pharmaceutical carbon, boxes, etc. Monarch Appliances Rajkot - Gujarat Tel: 0281-2461826 Mob: 09825215733 Email: info@monarchappliances.com Website: www.monarchappliances.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

Modern Food Processing

August 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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LIST OF PRODUCTS

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Grinding & dispersion ...................................BC Gyratory screen ............................................... 84 Ham processing ......................................... 67 Heat exchanger ........................................... 5, 59 Heat resistant door.......................................... 82 Heating bath ................................................... 19 Heavy industrial steel building........................ 47 Hex bolt .......................................................... 65 High pressure homogeniser ...................... 19, 64 High speed servo driven bagging machine ..... 83 Hopper magnet ............................................... 84 Hot plate ......................................................... 19 HPLC ............................................................. 51 IDEXX water microbiology ........................ 35 Induction sealing ............................................. 31 Industrial control & sensing device ..............FIC Industrial door................................................. 82 Industrial type unit air cooler.......................... 13 Informatics ...................................................... 51 INK adhesion .................................................. 31 Inline disperser ................................................ 19 Integrated machine safety solution ................. 22 Inverters/variable frequency drive .................FIC Kneading machine ..................................... 19 Label adhesion ........................................... 31 Laboratory reactor ........................................... 19 Laboratory software......................................... 19 Large diameter welded pipe ............................ 83 Level controller .............................................FIC Loading arm .................................................... 55 Magnetic equipment .................................. 84 Magnetic plate................................................. 84 Magnetic stirrer ............................................... 19 Magnetic traps ................................................ 84 Measuring & monitoring relay ....................FIC Meat ball forming machine ............................ 67 Meat processing .............................................. 67 Mills ................................................................ 19 Mixing & drying ............................................. 17 Mixing machine .............................................. 81 Mixing processing ........................................... 67 Motion control ..............................................FIC Multi-axis motioning controller...................... 83 Multi-level car park......................................... 47 Natural herbal sweetener .............................. 8 Nitrogen generator .......................................... 80 Nuts ................................................................ 65 Oil lubricated vacuum pump ...................... 81 Oil milling ......................................................BC Oval wheel flow meter .................................... 81 Overhead stirrer .............................................. 19 Panel meter ............................................... 87 Pasta making machine ...................................BC PCR diagnostic technology............................. 71 Peeling ............................................................. 81 Phase failure relay ........................................... 87 Photo-electric sensor .....................................FIC Pilot plant........................................................ 19 Pipe/tube and U-tube ..................................... 80 Plastic masterbatch .......................................... 49 Plastic pellet ...................................................BC Pollution control equipment ........................... 59 Polycarbonate sheet ......................................... 47 Power distribution ........................................... 25 Power management software .......................... 25 Pre-engineered steel building.......................... 47 Pre-FAB shelter .............................................. 47 Pressure sand filter .......................................... 37 Priming valves ................................................. 55 Product handling equipment .......................... 10

Aata master................................................ 53 Acoustic enclosure ............................................. 3 Activated carbon filter..................................... 37 Agitator ..................................................... 19, 59 Air audit blower .............................................. 55 Air cooled sealer.............................................. 31 Air cooler ........................................................ 13 Allen cap ......................................................... 65 Allen CSK ....................................................... 65 Analog timer ................................................... 87 Analytical instrumentation .............................. 51 Animal feed technology .................................BC Autoclave ......................................................... 83 Automation platform ...................................... 81 Batch disperser .......................................... 19 Blender and mixer ........................................... 67 Boiling/stirring ................................................ 67 Brewing ..........................................................BC Cable management system ......................... 80 Calorimeter ..................................................... 19 Chocolate/cocoa .............................................BC Cleaning section equipment...........................BC Coding and marking labelling machine ...... 9, 63 Cold form C & Z purlin ................................ 47 Colour masterbatch ......................................... 33 Column & chemistry ...................................... 51 Colour sorting ................................................BC Compressor ............................................... 13, 55 Conventional phase failure relay ..................... 87 Conveyor belt .................................................. 69 Conveyor system ....................................... 10, 81 Counter ........................................................... 87 Counters & power supplies...........................FIC Cutter/slicer............................................... 67, 81 Dairy plant ............................................. BIC Dal master ....................................................... 53 Dal polishing roller ......................................... 53 Dehydration equipment ............................ 67, 81 De-mineralisation plant .................................. 37 Disperser ......................................................... 19 Doors ............................................................... 82 Drawer magnet................................................ 84 Dry van pump ................................................... 3 Dry-break coupling ......................................... 55 Dust control door............................................ 82 Ejector....................................................... 55 Electro-de-ionisation ...................................... 37 Electromagnetic feeder.................................... 84 Empower ......................................................... 51 Encoder .........................................................FIC Evaporating units for cold room ..................... 13 Evaporator ................................................. 17, 59 Exhibition - International Foodtech 2012 ..... 44 Extruded product ...........................................BC Fastback revolution seasoning system ......... 10 Fastener ........................................................... 65 Fish processing ................................................ 67 Flexible transparent PVC strip door ............... 82 Flour machine stone........................................ 53 Flour milling ..................................................BC Food forming machine.................................... 67 Food pathogen detection system .................... 71 Food processing lines ................................. 67,81 Food processing machinery ............................... 4 Forced convection unit air cooler ................... 13 Fruits/vegetable processing ............................. 81 Fuelling systems .............................................. 55 Fully threaded bar ........................................... 65 Grain handling .........................................BC ... Grill magnet .................................................... 84

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Programmable logic controller ......................FIC Programmable terminal .................................FIC Proximity sensor ............................................FIC PTFE-lined valves .......................................... 80 Pump ........................................................... 3, 55 PVC strip door................................................ 82 Rare earth tube .......................................... 84 Relay .......................................................... 40, 87 Residential steel house .................................... 47 Reverse osmosis unit ....................................... 37 RFID .............................................................FIC Rice master ...................................................... 53 Rice milling equipment ..................................BC Rice roller ........................................................ 53 Roof vent ......................................................... 47 Roofing & cladding sheet ............................... 47 Roots blower ..................................................... 3 Rotary evaporator ............................................ 19 Rotary gear pump............................................ 84 Safety access equipment ............................. 55 Safety door ...................................................... 82 Safety light curtain ........................................FIC Sauanng making .............................................. 67 Sealer ............................................................... 31 Seamless pipe .................................................. 83 Self tapping & machine screw ........................ 65 Shaker.............................................................. 19 Silent operation ............................................... 83 Softening unit ................................................. 37 Solid-liquid mixer ........................................... 19 Spray dryer ...................................................... 59 Stainless steel & fastener ................................ 65 Stainless steel pipe........................................... 83 Storage tank equipment .................................. 55 Stretch wrapping machine .............................. 85 Structural floor decking sheet ......................... 47 Sugar herb ......................................................... 8 Surface treatment ............................................ 31 Switch gear ...................................................... 40 Switching relay ..............................................FIC Tank truck equipment ............................... 55 Temperature controller .......................... 87, FIC Temperature indicator..................................... 87 Temperature sensor ......................................... 40 Thermal process .............................................BC Thermoform fill seal machine......................... 57 Thermostat & vacuum dryer/mixer ................ 19 Timer...................................................... 40, FIC Titration system .............................................. 82 Total water management .................................. 6 TPU masterbatch ............................................ 33 Transmissions & PTOS ................................. 55 Tray sealer ....................................................... 85 Tube ................................................................ 83 ‘U’ tube ...................................................... 83 Ultra filtration system ..................................... 37 Universal type unit air cooler .......................... 13 UPLC .............................................................. 51 UPS ................................................................ 25 USS univent .................................................... 47 Vacuum booster pump ................................. 3 Vacuum pump & system ................................ 55 Vacuum system ................................................. 3 Vibration motor .............................................. 84 Vibrator feeder ................................................ 82 Vibratory separator .......................................... 85 Vision sensor .................................................FIC Water jetting ............................................. 55 Z-type bucket elevator ............................... 80

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

Looking For A Specific Product? Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MFP (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MFP Fryer and send it to 51818 86

| August 2012 Modern Food d Processing Proce


LIST OF ADVERTISERS

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Aakanksha Technologies 4 T: +91-09810193422 E: aakankshatechnologies@rediffmail.com W: www.pigo.biz Alok Masterbatches Ltd 33 T: +91-11-41612244 E: sales@alokindustries.com W: www.alokmasterbatches.com Bosch Limited 27 T: +91-832-669-2004 E: Amol.Matkar@in.bosch.com W: www.boschpackaging.com Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd BC T: +91-80-22890000 E: mallikarjuna.s@buhlergroup.com W: www.buhlergroup.com Eaton Power Quality Pvt Ltd 25 T: +91-11-42232329 E: eatonpowerqualityindia@eaton.com W: www.eaton.com/powerquality/india Enercon Asia Pacific Iss Pvt Ltd 31 T: +91-09600344430 E: info@enerconasiapacific.com W: www.enerconaciapacific.com Everest Blower Systems 3 T: +91-11-45457777 E: info@everestblowers.com W: www.everestblowers.com Food & Pharma Specialities 17 T: +91-120-4236204 E: info@foodpharma.in W: www.foodpharma.in FX Multitech Pvt Ltd 13 T: +91-79-27910993 E: fxmultitech@gmail.com W: www.fxmultitech.com Gardner Denver Engineered Pro. (I) Pvt Ltd 55 T: +91-79-40089312 E: info.ahm@gardnerdenver.com W: www.gardnerdenver.com Gelco Electronics Pvt Ltd 87 T: +91-79-22200902 E: info@gelco-world.com W: www.gelco-world.com General Industrial Controls Pvt Ltd 40 T: +91-20-30680003 E: marketing@gicindia.com W: www.gicindia.com Giantwell Machinery Co., Ltd. 81 T: +886-4-852-0178 E: paul@giantwell.com.tw W: www.giantwell.com.tw Goma Engineering Pvt Ltd 64 T: +91-22-41614161 E: process@goma.co.in W: www.goma.co.in

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Hanna Instruments India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-27746554/55/56. E: sales@hanna-india.com W: www.hannaindia.com Heat And Control T: +91-44-42103950 E: info@heatandcontrol.com W: www.heatandcontrol.com HRS Process Systems Ltd T: +91-20-66047894 E: info@hrsasia.co.in W: www.hrsasia.co.in IKA India Private Limited T: +91-80-26253900 E: process@ika.in W: www.ika.in ION Exchange (India) Ltd T: +91-22-39890909 E: food1@ionexchange.in W: www.ionindia.com Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-22970452 E: info@jkmagnetics.com W: www.jkmagnetics.com JH Bio Innovations Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-23418944 E: uday@jhindia.com W: www.jhindia.com Kinn Shang Hoo Iron Works T: +886-7-551-5397 E: ksh6671@ms27.hinet.net W: www.ksh.com.tw Koelnmesse Ya Tradefair Pvt Ltd T: +91-40-65707722 E: m.pathan@koelnmesse-india.com W: www.foodtecindia.com Markem-Image India Private Limited T: +91-120-4099500 E: salesindia@markem-imaje.com W: www.markem-imaje.com Mech-Air Industries T: +91-265-2280017 E: info@freshnpure.net W: www.freshnpure.net Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd. T: +91-80-40726400 E: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com Plast World T: +91-09376128372 E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com W: www.stripdoor.co.in Prayag Polytech Pvt Ltd T: +91-11-47262000 E: delhi@prayagmb.com W: www.prayagmb.com Our consistent advertisers

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Modern Food Processing | August 2012

Pg No

82

10

5

19

6

84

71

67

44

9; 63

8

FIC

82

49

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Raajratna Ventures Ltd 65 T: +91-79-27561915 E: domestic@raajfasteners.com W: www.raajfasteners.com Rac Equipment India (P) Ltd 85 T: +91-09311198333 E: racglobal@gmail.com Raj Process Equipment Pvt Ltd 59 T: +91-20-40710010 E: sales@rajprocessequipment.com W: www.rajprocessequipment.com Rockwell Automation 22 T: +91-120-4671694 E: dghosh@ra.rockwell.com W: www.rockwellautomation.com Shah Brothers 35 T: +91-22-24118874 E: ceo@shahbros.com W: www.shahbros.com SSP Pvt Limited BIC T: +91-129-4183700 E: info@sspindia.com W: www.sspindia.com Sterling Abrasives Ltd 53 T: +91-79-22870905 E: jigneshsengal@sterlingabrasives.com W: www.ricemaster.in Suraj Limited 83 T: +91-79-27540720 E: suraj@surajgroup.com W: www.surajgroup.com Toshniwal Instruments (Madras) Pvt Ltd 81 T: +91-44-26445626 E: sales@toshniwal.net W: www.toshniwal.net TSA Process Equipments Pvt Ltd 37 T: +91-250-3293221 E: base@tsapepl.com W: www.tsawatersystems.com Ultraplast Chainbelts Pvt. Ltd 69 T: +91-129-4113187 E: info@ultraplast.in W: www.ultraplastindia.com United Steel & Structurals Pvt. Ltd 47 T: +91-44-42321801 E: admin@unitedstructurals.com W: www.unitedstructurals.com V S International 83 T: +91-129-2254165 E: info@vspackit.com W: www.vspackit.com Veripack Solutions India Pvt Ltd 57 T: +91-22-66971133 E: makdum.j@veripackindia.com W: www.veripackindia.com Waters (India) Private Limited 51 T: +91-80-28371900 E: waters_india@waters.com W: www.waters.com

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover


Registration No: MH / MR / WEST / 232 / 2012-2014; RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25262; Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001 Date of Mailing 3rd & 4th of Every Month Issue. Date Of Publication: 28th of Every Month

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Modern Food Processing - August 2012  

'MODERN FOOD PROCESSING’ is the leading monthly business magazine in India exclusively for the food processing industry. It covers the lates...

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