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Modern Food Processing 

June 2013


editorial

Asia in high spirits!

T

he Indian beverage industry is on a high and how! Fast urbanisation, growing affluent consumers, changing lifestyles etc are adding more fizz to this. According to the Indian Beverage Association, this industry is likely to continue its healthy growth trajectory and rise at a double-digit rate during the current year. In particular, the non-alcoholic ready-to-drink beverage market has been seeing an upsurge, recording a compounded annual growth rate of 13 per cent since 2009 and, in fact, is one segment that has successfully defied the recessionary trends witnessed almost across the world. In the light of this, the recently released Global Beverage Outlook to 2018 by Canadean – a globally reputed provider of in-depth market research information across a range of industries – provides interesting global perspectives and shifting trends in this sector. Looking back, Canadean’s provisional estimates for 2012 indicate that global commercial beverage growth was at par with that in 2011 with some of the global macro trends such as politico-financial turbulence, rise in commodity costs and increase in tax & VAT rates adversely impacting the retail prices in many key markets. In contrast to West Europe, Asia’s positive march continued, wherein soft drinks alone accounted for nearly 30 per cent of global incremental consumption. Going forward, the 2013 global market incremental volume prediction by Canadean not only indicates a significant shift in the global beverage map during the last decade, but also it objectively highlights how the Eurozone crisis has pulled down this sector in the European countries in recent years. Asia, on the other hand, is projected to add 1.5 times equivalent of the current West Europe beverage consumption by 2018, with more than half of global incremental volume in 2013 likely to arise from five Asian countries.

Canadean’s long-term forecasts point towards the continued positive growth of global commercial beverages at about 4 per cent, wherein the contribution of emerging markets in the volume growth will only gain further momentum. By 2018, Asia will account for almost half of total beverage consumption worldwide, an increase of ten percentage points over the last decade. Further analysis suggests that the continent will consume nearly 40 per cent of the world’s soft drinks and beer respectively, and nearly 80 per cent of spirits by 2018.

Editorial Advisory Board

Dr A S Abhiraman

Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd

Prof M Y Kamat

Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Dept, UICT, Mumbai

That said, the progressive marketers in India need to leverage the local tastes as well as invest in developing innovative and indigenous products to further drive the beverage consumption as raw material supply complicacies add to the other existing market challenges.

Manas R Bastia manas@network18publishing.com June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook: Filling & Sealing Technology Aseptic technology............................................................... 38

Caps and closures................................................................ 40 Plastic closures .................................................................... 42

38

Cover photo courtesy: Krones AG

Special Focus: Dairy Processing Packaged dairy products...................................................... 22

Novel sealing technologies.................................................. 44 Integrated packaging solution ............................................ 46 Net weight filling technology............................................. 48 Roundtable........................................................................... 50

UHT milk............................................................................ 24

Automation Trends

Interface - Ian Phillipps, VP and GM, South East Asia and India, Ecolab..................................... 30

Energy Management

Ice cream manufacturers...................................................... 28

Roundtable........................................................................... 32

Case Study - NestlĂŠ Deutschland: Adding new dimension to labelling and filling....................................... 52 Efficient pumping systems: Saving power, controlling costs................................................................... 54

Policies & Regulations

In Conversation With Souma Das, Managing Director & RVP Sales, Infor India Pvt Ltd................................... 18

Food storage policy: Need to take corrective measures to minimise food wastage.................................... 56

Strategy

Successful brand building: Making right sense of customer needs................................................................ 58

Tips & Tricks Facility Visit: Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd

Defining excellence with superior refining ......................34

Regular Sections

Editorial............................................................................. 5 News, Views & Analysis................................................... 10 Technology & Innovation................................................. 14 Technology Transfer......................................................... 16 Projects............................................................................. 62 Tenders............................................................................. 63 Event List......................................................................... 64 Book Review..................................................................... 70 Products ........................................................................... 72 List of Products ............................................................... 81 List of Advertisers ........................................................... 82

Preventing food contamination: Handy tips for maintaining hygiene during manufacturing ................ 60

Event Preview

PackPlus South 2013: Opening up the southern frontier for novel packaging technologies........................... 66

Event Report

IFFA 2013: Raising innovation quotient in meat processing .............................................................. 68

Highlights of Next Edition

Special Focus: Plant Safety & Maintenance Insight & Outlook: Edible Oils & Fats

Details on page no. 64

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and ÂŁ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Views and opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18)*, its publisher and/or editors. We at Network18 do our best to verify the information published but do not take any responsibility for the absolute accuracy of the information. Network18 does not accept the responsibility for any investment or other decision taken by readers on the basis of information provided herein. Network18 does not take responsibility for returning unsolicited material sent without due postal stamps for return postage. No part of this magazine can be reproduced without the prior written permission of the publisher. Network18 reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Network18. Senior Editor: Manas R Bastia Printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Network18, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Food Processing is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. MAHENG / 2008 / 25262. Network18 does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition.

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June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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News, Views & Analysis

Business performance

Focus on core areas help Umang Dairies boost business

Umang Dairies Ltd, a member unit of JK Organisation and a significant player in the dairy creamers segment, reported a robust growth in its sales and profit for the year ended March 31, 2013. Its revenue from operations for the year was ` 173.80 crore, up by 16 per cent over previous year (` 150.21 crore), and operating profits higher by 16 per cent at ` 18.29 crore (previous year ` 15.74 crore). The growth is mainly due to the focus on few key areas in the last few years. “During the last three years, we have invested a significant amount in updating and modernising our manufacturing facilities. As a result, Umang has emerged as one of the low-cost processors of milk in India. Besides, we have also expanded our capacity,” said R C Periwal, Director, Umang Dairies. Prasenjit Chakraborty

PACKAGING

Cermex opens plant in Pune

Barely one month after its integration in the new Gebo Cermex unit, Cermex, one of the leaders in secondar y packaging equipment, recently inaugurated a manufacturing facility in Pune. “Our industry gets more complex by the day. Our international coverage, proven knowhow and peerless client support allow us to handle projects of all sizes, in an unprecedented range of sectors. We treat every project individually, helping our clients to turn up the value and boost their productivity whatever the size of their operation,” said Marc Aury, Managing Director & President, Gebo Cermex.

Vegetable PROCESSING

Ruchi ties up with Japanese firms for value-added tomato products

Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd recently announced a joint venture ( JV) with Kagome Co Ltd, a leading tomato product company of Japan, and Mitsui & Co Ltd, one of the leading trading, investment and services companies, to revolutionise the Indian tomato market estimated to be producing 17 million tonne per year. Ruchi Soya will have 40 per cent stake in this JV, Ruchi Kagome, and rest 60 per cent will be held by a special purpose company created by Kagome and Mitsui. The company is looking at a revenue of ` 3.4 billion in five years. Currently, India is the second-largest producer of tomatoes in the world. However, only one per cent of that is processed. Dinesh Shahra, Founder and Managing Director, Ruchi Soya, said, “Ruchi Kagome is all set to tap the rapidly growing FMCG and processed foods business in the country. We are planning to launch a range of tomato products, based on world-class technology to be provided by Kagome. These products will be marketed in both, the B2B and B2C segments.” Ruchi Kagome plans to launch premium tomato puree, sauces, ketchup, salsa and other tomato-based products in India. It has identified land in Maharashtra to set up a manufacturing plant, with an initial investment of ` 44 crore, which is expected to be ready for commercial production by June 2014. Ruchi Kagome will work closely with Indian farmers to drive a tomato revolution in the country through higher yielding seed, sharing global knowledge to educate local tomato producers and setting up local support centre to handhold farming community in India. Mahua Roy

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Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Cermex is assembling three models of machines in Pune, from each major family of its product line, including one that is designed in India. Vertical Pick & Plakhe Case Packer is one of the three machines assembled in India. The two other machines are an automatic shrink-wrapper with sealing bar and a palletiser (P9 – 4 axis Gripping/ Transfer), chosen as a function of local industry needs. As a part of its strategy to expand in Asia, Cermex is gradually building a network in order to propose the most appropriate end-of-line solution for various applications. Today, the plants in Europe, India or China together give Cermex the potential to support the growth of end-of-line automation demand from Asian companies. To profit in full from this dynamic and to stay a step ahead of its competitors, the industrial plant in Pune is being accompanied by the opening of sales offices in Vietnam and Indonesia.

Business strategy

Basilur Tea plans to tap Indian market

Basilur Tea, one of the premier tea trading companies exporting the Ceylon Tea, recently announced plans to tap the Indian market. It has launched a new collection of luxury green teas under the range – Summer Teas, with variants including Cream Fantasy, Moroccan Mint and Summer Tea. The company is optimistic about demands arising in India. “The green tea industry has grown rapidly in the past two years and there is a demand coming from tier 2 and 3 cities for these premium teas. We have since expanded to all major cities such as Mumbai, Delhi, Bengaluru, Chennai, Pune, Hyderabad, Kolkata and are in the process of further expanding to more cities,” said Raghav Gupta, Director, Basilur Tea India. Basilur retails over 150 products, over 100 different tea blends, supplying to 44 countries. Mahua Roy


News, Views & Analysis

QSR industry

Dunkin’ Donuts launches Dunkaccino in India

Dunkin’ Donuts has launched its signature international ice blended cold coffee, Dunkaccino, in India. Made by blending

the unique Dunkin’ espresso coffee with ice, milk and great flavours, this indulgent range is a differentiated offering for the discerning consumer. The Dunkin’ espresso coffee is made with 100 per cent Arabica beans of the highest quality, dark roasted to perfection. Dunkaccino makes its debut with four new delicious variants - Choco, Frosted Mint, Caramel Butterscotch and Muesli apart from the existing variant of classic Dunkaccino.

Ice cream innovations

Vadilal launches Artisan range

Vadilal has launched Artisan range of products under which it will offer ice cream log, ice cream pastry, ice cream sandwich, cookie pie sandwich, ice cream bar (called as sneak-a-bar) and Kewara Mataka Kulfi. Capitalising on the increasing demand for fruit-based products in India, the company is also launching new range of ice candies made with real fruit pulp in exotic flavours such as cranberry, kiwi and mixed fruit under the Falala brand name. New variants of Badabite, Flingo and Ice Trooper brands have also been put in the market along with smaller 140 ml packs of its highly successful Gourmet brand for on-the-go consumer. Rajesh Gandhi, Managing Director, Vadilal Industries Ltd, said, “This year we have come up with another dozen odd new products and variants in the premium category. The high-spending and better educated youth and kids categories in India have been our main target audience since past few years.” Avani Jain

Food ingredients

New launch from Arla to transform Indian bakery industry Arla Foods Ingredients has recently developed a ‘toolbox’ of natural improvement solutions offering bakers optimised production processes, better quality endproducts, reduced waste and cleaner labels. “We believe that our Nutrilac Natural Improvers will enable us to tap into a much greater market in India than previously. Until now, we have only focussed on supplying milk proteins for vegetarian

and/or eggless cakes. But this new ‘toolbox’ of natural improvers will enable bakers in India make good products even better. This might mean helping them to optimise production processes, stabilise existing ingredients or improve eating quality during a product’s shelf-life,” explained John Kjaer, Global Sales Manager – Bakery, Arla Foods Ingredients. Mahua Roy

NEW PACKAGING

Vegit adds flavour to its packaging

To stimulate the senses of consumers of any age, Vegit, the agro division of Merino Group, has unveiled new brand imagery with a refreshed packaging for its snack mixes, with a new tagline called ‘Hamara Mix, Aapka Twist’. The refreshed packaging for Vegit is designed to enhance the value and brand awareness of Vegit ready-tocook food solutions.

Product innovation

McDonald’s launches a range of burgers

McDonald’s has introduced Masala Grill, a range of grilled vegetarian and non-vegetarian products inspired by the kebabs of the province in Pakistan formerly called the Northwest Frontier Province. These products are wrapped in roasted chilli sauce, a speciallydeveloped condiment, and are available both a la carte and in meal combos. The range comprises two products, namely the Veg Masala Grill (priced at ` 45), which is a blend of potatoes and a soya patty flavoured with aromatic spices, and the Chicken Masala Grill (priced at ` 55), which comprises a chicken mince patty seasoned with Indian herbs and spices. Vikram Bakshi, Joint Venture Partner & Managing Director, McDonald’s India (North & East), said, “The Masala Grill range is the result of our commitment to introduce local flavours that connect with customers’ taste preference, but in the McDonald’s format of a burger.” AGRIBUSINESS

Adani Wilmar launches packaged gram flour

Adani Wilmar has ventured into the besan (gram flour) category with the launch of Fortune Besan as it aims to become a strong player in the integrated agri-business industry in India. It is competitively priced at ` 36 for 500 gm and ` 72 for 1 kg pack. Manish Iyer, AGM, Marketing & Strategy, Adani Wilmar Ltd, said, “With the launch of the Fortune Besan, we aim at providing quality products to all households at competitive prices. We aim at leveraging our already established distribution channels and offer the new product Fortune Besan along with our existing range of products.” June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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News, Views & Analysis

Food ingredients

BENEO positive about new rice starches in India

Edible oils

Ruchi Soya plans new launches

Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd, one of the leading players in the edible oil sector in India, plans to launch a new blend of edible oil for the Western region. “Looking at the demand arising from the Maharashtra region, we plan to launch a new soya-cum-palm oil blend,” disclosed Amar Sharma, General Manager, Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd, who heads operations at the company’s Patalganga refinery. Other products manufactured currently at this site include its various brands of soyabean, sunflower, palm and groundnut oil. Also, the facility has recently seen an investment of ` 40 crore towards the development of a 4.42 MW turbine, thus helping it achieve self-sufficiency of energy source. Mahua Roy

Product innovations

Krones to display labelling systems at ProPak Asia 2013

BENEO, one of the leading manufacturers of functional ingredients, recently introduced its range of rice starches for baby foods. The company is optimistic about this product in India. “Rice and milk are two major staples in the Indian diet, thus it is not surprising that both ingredients are well received by the market as a whole. When babies enter

the weaning stage, the introduction of rice starch to their diet is definitely a perfect choice of healthy carbohydrate,” said Koen Van Praet, Managing Director, BENEO. Test trials have shown that vegetable and fruit jarred baby food with BENEO’s baby food rice starch have improved product stability. In addition, the ingredient’s small particle size creates a creamy texture without any effect on the end-product’s taste or colour. “Rice starches for baby food applications have a neutral taste and an excellent flavour release. Therefore, in applications where flavours are added, dosages of flavours can be lowered,” added Van Praet. Mahua Roy

BEVERAGES

PepsiCo launches 7UP Nimbooz Masala Soda

PepsiCo India has launched 7UP Nimbooz Masala Soda, a new variant of its lemon flavoured drink 7UP, in North India. The product will initially make its way in Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Delhi and Rajasthan and will be available across retail and sub-retail outlets in a convenient format of 600 ml PET bottles at a minimum introductory price of ` 28 per bottle. Ruchira Jaitly, Category Director - Flavours, PepsiCo India, said, “When it comes to masala soda drink, consumers are looking for hygiene, convenience, refreshing taste, affordability and year around availability. 7UP Nimbooz Masala Soda brings all these novelties as a branded offering.” Celebration

BERICAP’S 1-piece closure technology completes 15 successful years

Krones AG, Germany, will display its labelling system in Pro Pak Asia 2013, scheduled to be held from 12-15 June, 2013, in Bangkok. Krones is offering latest solutions in labelling technology and will showcase Starmatic labeller. Cold-glue labellers from Krones are characterised by the variability of their design in allowing modifications, the diversity of the possibilities for their use and high machine availability. Krones is engaged in constructing rotary type machines and high-performance labelling stations, these machines have reached an unrivalled level of quality. 12

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

In 1998, BERICAP introduced 1-piece polyethylene closures with DoubleSeal technology to the beverage market. Since then BERICAP has emerged as a leading beverage closure manufacturer in the world. The success of the BERICAP 1-piece beverage closure over the last 15 years has been based on its DoubleSeal technology, with an

inner and outer seal delivering superior performance even under extreme weather conditions. It offers the 1-piece beverage closure BERICAP DoubleSeal SuperShorty for the standard PCO 1881 neck finish. The design of this closure not only ensures safe sealing, but also safe venting for bottles of up to 3 litre in size.

Appointment

Bosch Packaging announces new leadership for robotics unit

Frank Souyris has been appointed as General Manager for the Robotics Unit at Bosch Packaging Technology SA in Romanel, Switzerland. He succeeds Dr Marc-Olivier Demaurex, President, Bosch Packaging Technology. Outlining his priority, he said, “I can still see the excitement in the eyes of the people involved in robotic applications for the packaging sector. It is this energy that we will continue to foster and promote as we look to serve our customers with opportunities to increase their competitive advantage.”


News, Views & Analysis

Metal Packaging

Ardagh and Bonduelle launches next generation food can

After ten years in development Ardagh, a leading global packaging player, and Bonduelle, world leader in ready-touse vegetables, have launched a new food can, which delivers enhanced consumer appeal, together with significant environmental benefits. The development represents a significant advance in DWI can production and processing technology. New design features have enhanced the can’s appeal to the consumer. The new sleek surface of the can allows for premium label application or for direct printing onto the can. A

further benefit to the consumer, as identified by consumer research, is the sense of freshness that comes on opening the can, created by the ‘psshht’ sound effect of the vacuum release. The new 400-gm can uses 15 per cent less material than the current best-in-class can, thanks to an astounding 43 per cent reduction in the can wall thickness. Ardagh estimates that if 1 billion cans were to convert to the new design, the material saving would be equivalent to the weight of metal in the Eiffel Tower, claims the press release.

Health ingredients

Naturex launches new products at Vitafoods Europe

Naturex has launched Svetol, its top-selling slimming ingredient in the US, in Europe at the recently concluded Vitafoods Europe exhibition. Developed from decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, Svetol is clinically proven to inhibit glucose-6-phosphatase and increase the rate of fat release from the adipose tissue – a unique mechanism that results in highly effective weight management. The ingredient is produced using Naturex’s proprietary extraction process, which ensures a unique and specific profile of active molecules, in particular chlorogenic acids. Antoine Dauby, Marketing Director, Naturex, said, “Svetol is a real success story for Naturex. Even though it is an ingredient, it has managed to gain a high level of recognition among consumers across North America. We are confident Svetol presents a huge opportunity for companies in Europe.” At the show, Naturex also launched Europe’s first clinically proven – and proanthocyanidin (PAC) standardised – organic cranberry powder targeting urinary tract health. New Pacran Organic is an extension to the existing range of Pacran ingredients, which are clinically proven to reduce the recurrence of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Rules & regulations

GFSI recognises Global Aquaculture Alliance The Global Food Safety Initiative’s (GFSI) board of directors announced that the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) Seafood Processing Standard Issue 2 has been re-benchmarked by GFSI’s benchmark committee against the scope of EI processing of perishable animal products, and achieved recognition against the sixth edition of the GFSI guidance document. During the re-benchmarking process, GFSI’s benchmark committee compared the requirements for food safety cheme

ownership, management and supporting systems outline in the sixth edition of GFSI’s guidance document against the detailed documentation and objective evidence provided by the GAA Seafood Processing Standard for each requirement. This process comprises numerous exchanges of documents until the benchmark committee was satisfied that the requirements outlined in the guidance document had been met and the requirements contained in the GAA documentation were equivalent.

Quality matters

Mettler-Toledo releases white paper on QC in packaging

To avoid consumer and legal issues that may arise if net weights fall below specifications, manufacturers often overfill bottles, jars, tubes, boxes and cans, incurring significant costs from unnecessary product giveaway. By implementing a robust statistical quality control (SQC) system, manufacturers can cut losses and enhance compliance. Mettler-Toledo clarifies the benefits of SQC systems in its new white paper, entitled ‘Package Quality Control – Net Content Control’. SQC systems apply statistical methods to process control, accurately calculating mean and standard deviation values as well as legallydefined tolerance limits. Using a data management framework based on SQC provides packagers with realtime assessments of production quality, detecting and correcting variations that occur during the packaging process. PACKAGING innovations

drinktec 2013 to showcase future trends in packaging

The final packaging and palletising systems that will be order of the day in future will be on show at drinktec 2013, the world’s leading trade fair for the beverage and liquid food industry, which is slated to take place from September 16-20, 2013, at the Messe München exhibition centre. The industry is facing twin challenge – consumers expect products that are not only packaged using minimum resources but which also protect contents securely. Manufacturers are tackling this challenge on a range of fronts: they are reducing the amount of material used in packaging; they are opting for recycled & renewable materials, and also bringing down their overall energy consumption. The machinery and equipment for mastering these challenges will be displayed at drinktec 2013. June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Technology & Innovation

CMB Engineering’s new website provides comprehensive technical resources to can makers CMB Engineering launched a new website for can-making. It has designed the new site to be a hub of information, technical resources and expertise that will enable can makers around the world to make better informed decisions on canmaking equipment to boost efficiency, flexibility and productivity on their lines. The site includes the company’s highly popular online spares ordering tool, which enables customers in every corner of the globe to log in at any time to order spare parts, avoiding unnecessary delays and downtime. Customers can access information on the latest innovations from CMB’s design team as well as articles and presentations from the company’s experts exploring everything from industry trends to the latest machine enhancements. CMB’s virtual reality presentation, seen for the first time by visitors at Cannex exhibition, allows customers to view and explore CMB’s machinery in 3D, to build a comprehensive understanding of the features and benefits of the company’s proven technologies. Interactive technology will enable customers to physically delve deeper into the engineering behind the machines, with a feature allowing them to reach into the 3D models, remove certain elements of the machine, and view moving parts in action, up close. “It is an exciting time for CMB Engineering, and we have invested significantly in new tools such as the new website and some incredible 3D technology to enable our customers to easily and quickly understand our technology, equipment and expertise, allowing them to access all three to their full benefit,” said Jim Cozier, General Manager, CMB Engineering.

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Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Atlantic Zeiser introduces cost-efficient printing solutions Atlantic Zeiser, a global solutions provider of dedicated personalisation and coding systems, has released the new DIGILINE Compact system for use in printing and encoding variable data on flat carton boxes, cardboard blanks and single sheets. This system is aimed at packaging companies and carton manufacturers, as well as service providers in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, FMCG (especially food and beverages), security printers, and small-format commercial printers. The DIGILINE Compact is an entry-level system that fills out Atlantic Zeiser’s portfolio of carton box and single-sheet printing solutions. It is a stand-alone system for late-stage short-run printing of serial numbers, codes and logos onto carton boxes, cardboard blanks and single sheets, such as sleeves and labels. “The DIGILINE Compact system is a cost-efficient system for end-of-line printing, and a welcome addition to our growing family of printing solutions,” said Viviane Schaaf, Product Manager-Packaging, Atlantic Zeiser. He added, “In addition, the system uses Atlantic Zeiser’s proven OMEGA drop-on-demand printing technology, which produces consistently high-quality personalised output.” The new system is flexible both in handling various carton and sheet sizes, as well as integrating with its associated coding equipment. For coding, the DIGILINE Compact is compatible with the complete range of Atlantic Zeiser’s OMEGA models, consisting of OMEGA 36, 36i (36 mm); OMEGA 72, 72i (72 mm); OMEGA 144 (144 mm) and OMEGA 210 (210 mm). The effective print width of the system depends on the OMEGA printer being used. It prints at speeds up to 60 m/min @ 360 dpi. The DIGILINE Compact is easy to work with in any production environment and enables short set-up times and quick format changes – thanks to the flexible feeder and stacker.

GEA CookStar offers outstanding performance and food safety The GEA Food Solutions has come out with GEA CookStar 1000 spiral which is a high-capacity, double-spiral cooker with two independently controlled cooking zones ideal for steaming, cooking and roasting a wide range of products. Its proven yet simple design ensures optimum cooking efficiency, boosts yield, enhances product quality and maximises profit. The two-zone concept of the GEA CookStar provides maximum flexibility in the cooking process, ensuring the best results for all kinds of products such as steam cooked, coated, marinated, enhanced browned products and many more. Individual management of temperature and dew-point per zone, combined with an efficient but smooth horizontal airflow, creates the optimum atmosphere for producing the most attractive and tasty products. The GEA CookStar offers outstanding performance, food safety and convenience. Its long belt combined with a horizontal airflow produces an exceptionally smooth cooking process, resulting in increased yield and highly appealing products. Moreover, the GEA CookStar’s efficiency in heat transfer, plus its short cooking time and individual cooking conditions per zone are unique ingredients that are set to become the industry standard for optimising yield.


technology transfer

Technology Offered As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

Beverage maker

An Indian firm is offering ‘three-in-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

technology to manufacture chitin and chitosan - important byproducts from the shell of shellfish. Chitin is the most important organic constituent of the exoskeletal material of invertebrates and an important economical source of this material is the shrimp processing industry. Areas of application Industries such as food processing, biotechnology, pharmacy and medicine Forms of transfer Consultancy, technology licensing

Chitin and chitosan

Retort pouch technology

An

Indian

company

is

offering

An

India-based

company

offers

technology for ready-to-serve fish curry in retortable pouch. The technology provides a method for preparing the ready-to-serve fish curry in retortable pouch with excellent storage stability and quality with a shelflife of more than one year at ambient temperature. The thermal processing conditions have been standardised for this product in order to make it safe for consumers. Areas of application Food, meat, fish processing Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, technology licensing

Technology Requested Coconut milk beverage

An Indian entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for producing & processing coconut milk beverage. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy

Corn processing

An Indian company is looking for a complete proposal/project report to set up a dry milling corn processing plant in Andhra Pradesh.

Targeted finished product is tinned corn, pop corn, corn flakes etc. It is also interested to import similar kind of plant & machinery to set up the same in India. Areas of application Corn processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Extruder pilot plant

An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food.

Areas of application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment

An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT) of United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP), APCTT Building, C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi - 110 016, Tel: 011-3097 3758 (Direct), 3097 3710 (Board), Fax: 011-2685 6274, E-mail: srinivasaraghavan@un.org, Web: www.apctt.org, For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

Share and Solicit Technology

The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. Here is an opportunity to be a part of this endeavour by sending your technology on offer or technology requirements. If you belong to any of these two categories, you are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details for publication. The write-up needs to be as per the format of this section with information about the particular technology offered or requested, its areas of application and forms of transfer. Contact us: Modern Food Processing, Network18 Media & Investments Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028.Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 l Fax: 022-3003 4499 l Email: spedit@network18publishing.com

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Modern Food Processing | June 2013


In Conversation With Souma Das

How is the demand scenario for IT solutions in food and beverage industry in India?

ERP solutions have been demanded heavily by the food and beverage (F&B) industry in India. However, times are changing as the industry evolves and aims to achieve maturity. Now, ERP solutions are just one part of the services basket demanded by companies operating in this industry. The F&B industry needs assistance in various other areas of expertise, most importantly, regulatory compliance as one needs to ensure safety, quality and health of consumers. With more and

those Stock Keeping Units (SKUs) that have crossed the stipulated expiry period. Thus, advanced tracking and traceability across the supply chain becomes critical. Besides, if something goes wrong with a product batch, there might arise a situation to exercise mass recall. All these can be possible with suitable automated solutions.

What are the critical benefits obtained from IT solutions?

IT solutions need to be looked at as a wholesome package and not just a cost management solution. Right from inventory management, to

of technologies. This opens up huge market opportunities for IT solutions. Microsegments such as dairy, nutraceuticals, brewed beverages (alcoholic), etc, deal with set formulations. The industry needs solutions that manage the lifecycle of these products. In such situations, sourcing of ingredients is a critical step, which can be managed using integrated IT solutions. In order to stay competitive in this market, one needs to change with the times, as consumers’ tastes keep changing. Quick remarket strategies are needed. Minimisation of wastage of resources and ingredients is rampant in this industry. This happens

IT solutions need to be integrated as an end-to-end solution system

...says Souma Das, Managing Director & RVP Sales, Infor India Pvt Ltd. In an interaction with Mahua Roy, he elaborates about the transformation that can be brought about in the food processing and retail industry through adoption of automated IT solutions. more processed and packaged foods now available across the globe and consumer behavioural changes in India, it is equally accompanied by a huge list of stricter governmental regulations. Most food items are perishable in nature, with a short shelf-life. There needs to be a system in place to recall

sourcing, production, warehousing, delivery, IT solutions need to be integrated as an end-to-end solution system to propel growth and profits. Developed nations have gone through the curve of learning, grasping and adoption. India is witnessing leapfrog growth and faster adoption

Which motivational book have you read recently? The biography of Steve Jobs

How do you handle stress?

I carry my work home, yes; but never carry my work pressure back home

What motivates you?

Turning things around is a challenging process, which I enjoy, and this motivates me. I believe in, “Love what you do and do what you love�.

18

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

when one is not able to channelise demand and supply. This can be avoided by automated solutions.

What are the top challenges faced by F&B companies for which you can offer solutions?

Compliance is one of the biggest challenges faced by F&B companies. The Indian food processing industry is increasingly looking at tapping the international markets. This huge export opportunity brings with it strict international food laws covering ingredient use, exit of SKUs, movement of perishable goods, etc. This is where most F&B companies are majorly struggling. The next problem cited is the subcontracting trend to SMEs. As a result, most of the times, quality management is an issue. Obtaining consistent quality of products from same source is a major issue. Another issue is related to the concept of QSRs, which is booming in the country. Most of these QSRs


Souma Das

operate with the ‘Mother Kitchen’ model. As such, the delivery management is the most complex and critical task. Managing the distribution network and process by integration of a transportation algorithm for management becomes an important aspect. There come peaks in one single day, when demand surges. The delivery van has to leave at a particular time, and thus the time taken to reach, route maps by when to reach, temperature maintenance, is a huge complex calculation. Automated solutions can provide the much-needed holistic integration. Finally, to stay ahead, the go-to-market time needs to be minimised by a company. Reformulations, PLC management, demand forecasting, dependent customer relationship management modules, etc, are extensively interlinked.

What are the demands arising out of SMEs when it comes to IT adoption?

The demands from SMEs are same as those of big companies; however, the prioritising of the same demands vary. Finance modules of ERPs are more sought-after by SMEs than manufacturing modules. Also, gradually, the supply chain and distribution modules are acquiring importance. The SMEs look for Just In Time ( JIT) approach for inventory management and deliveries. These vendors need to be in sync with quality management standards of the contacting companies. Some SMEs are in fact growing faster than some large organisations. When for example, a ` 5 crore business becomes ` 100 crore in five years, the complexity increases manifold. To manage the subsequent complexity from sourcing to production, it starts to impact the scale of the business. At such times, the need for automated IT solutions increases.

What is your contribution to retail operations?

Photo: Joshua Navalkar

Since retail operations happen via multiple channels (small/large format of modern retail as well as kirana stores), F&B companies need to handle large complexities. We are hugely present as a partner in F&B logistics in India. When it comes to retail operations, warehouse management solutions and demand planning & forecasting become critical. Aligning the demand forecasting with transportation is the next step, which needs to be adopted by retail majors. Unless the back-end of the supply chain is automated, there will be shortage and unavailability at the aisles. At retail end, expense management in-store is also important. Effective management of cash flow is critical as retail operations sometimes run on low margins. One of our star products, Infor 10x, offers a dashboard that enables viewing of every operation right from sourcing to delivery. This helps in speeding up of processes and removal of bottlenecks. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

19


An invite that rewards as well... Dear Reader, ‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry.

You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 1500 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 100 words.

The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format.

The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will be sent a complimentary copy of that particular edition.

Published by Network18 Media & Investments Ltd, ‘Modern Food Processing’ one of the leading monthly magazines exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the food processing industry. Well supported by a national

readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought

out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Publishing Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country), it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

Manas R Bastia Senior Editor

Network18 Media & Investments Ltd ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W) Mumbai 400 028 India

D +91 22 3003 4669 T +91 22 3024 5000 F +91 22 3003 4499 E manas@network18publishing.com W www.network18publishing.com


Special Focus

Dairy Processing Packaged dairy products Where ‘ethnic’ rules the roost....................................................................................................................22 UHT milk Paving the way to healthy growth.............................................................................................................24 Ice cream manufacturers Exploring new growth horizons beyond big cities....................................................................................28 Interface - Ian Phillipps, VP and GM, South East Asia and India, Ecolab “We see India as an emerging market for us”............................................................................................30 Roundtable Can India become a highly profitable destination for dairy processing?..................................................32

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

21


Special Focus Packaged dairy products

Where ‘ethnic’

rules the roost

Players in the dairy segment are increasingly looking at launching valueadded dairy products inspired by traditions of India. Lassi, mishti doi and the likes are the new revenue generators for this segment. Another interesting trend is that MNCs in this space are equally alluring consumers with their ethnic product basket.

Mahua Roy

O

ne of the first products launched by French dairy major Danone in India was packaged, flavoured lassi. Swiss giant Nestle recently rebranded its dairy range, including dahi as a+. NDDB-promoted Mother Dairy expanded its range of popular Bengali sweet delicacy, mishti doi, to Kolkata, the home of this sweet. Such bold measures taken by the movers & shakers of the dairy industry in India speak a lot about their confidence in the ethnic products range. After all, almost 90 per cent of dairy products consumed in India belong to the ethnic products range.

A massive behavioural change

Making an Indian consumer change his/ 22

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

her behaviour is a colossal task before marketers. Convincing the consumers about buying packaged alternatives of simple and traditional dairy products such as dahi, lassi, chaas (buttermilk), paneer, ghee was a daunting task before the industry. But, that was where the opportunity lay. “It was Amul, which first introduced the packaged curd concept in 1998, and the consumers have hooked on to the concept since then. It was virtually unimaginable for Indians who had grown up preparing dahi at their homes to turn packaged dahi into a planned purchase,” says R S Sodhi, Managing Director, GCMMF, the marketers of brand Amul. Today, the packaged curd is the most penetrated category after milk in the packaged dairy products sector, with almost 60 per cent penetration in the urban Section A and

B households, as per figures provided by Amul. A huge opportunity in the form of ethnic dairy products could not be ignored. These products, typically being mass products, have a huge potential in a country like India. And when offered with attributes of enormous convenience, safety, quality and consistency, there is no doubt we see new and innovative launches being accepted by consumers. “Today, consumers increasingly seek convenience. Due to lack of time for preparation, and quick availability, the demand is being driven rapidly. The consumers are making such packaged dairy products part of their regular purchases. More so, we see that even in the rural areas, the consumers have started adopting packaged dairy products. This is a welcome trend,” says Mahesh Israni, Chief Marketing Officer, Parag Milk Foods Pvt Ltd. It is thus no surprise that Indian as well as international dairy players are concentrating more on this range of products than milk powder and butter, which have more or less reached a plateau. “Products such as paneer, ghee, buttermilk, Indian ethnic sweets, etc, hold high potential. With innovations in packaging and improved shelf-life, the packaged sweet market has the potential of growing exponentially in the coming times,” adds Sodhi.

Innovation as differentiator

In a market characterised by mass consumption, there can be small differentiators that can be applied. But unfazed by the limitations, most

The fresh dairy produce marketers had been focussing on metros and markets close to their manufacturing facilities. However, the non-metro consumer is becoming demanding, which has now opened up a huge avenue of opportunity. R S Sodhi

Managing Director, GCMMF


Packaged dairy products

Today, consumer s increasingly seek convenience. Due to lack of time for preparation, and quick availability, the demand is being driven rapidly. The consumers are making such packaged dairy products part of their regular purchases. Mahesh Israni

Chief Marketing Officer, Parag Milk Foods Pvt Ltd

companies are launching products with innovative attributes to stand out. The most effective one is that of flavour baskets offered in dahi, lassi, and chaas. Another company Gopaljee Dairy Foods launched 6 Pm Masala Paneer in the ready-to-eat category as a health snack. “Paneer is a healthy option and, at the same time, satisfies the taste buds across different age groups. The 6 Pm Masala Paneer is a step further to save time as it comes with complete packaging of a small fork in it and right spices mixed,” says Radhey Shyam Dixit, Chairman and Managing Director, Gopaljee Dairy Foods Pvt Ltd. He adds “The Indian consumer is aware of the fact that one needs to live a healthy lifestyle; and hygiene is one of the most important aspects of a healthy diet. Packaged food today is aiming to serve this purpose.” Another kind of innovation comes in the form of new launches, thus replacing a certain habit of consumers. Nowadays, more and more dairy majors are gradually foraying into the packaged sweets arena. “Consumers are increasingly becoming quality-conscious and find risks in consuming sweets from

The Indian consumer is aware of the fact that one needs to live a healthy lifestyle; and hygiene is one of the most important aspects of a healthy diet. Packaged food today is aiming to serve this purpose. Radhey Shyam Dixit

Chairman and Managing Director, Gopaljee Dairy Foods Pvt Ltd

traditional sweetmeat shops Ethnic dairy category (India) owing to apprehensions of Category Growth rate Size (` crore) adulterations. Packaged sweets (in percentage) such as gulabjamun, rasgulla, Paneer 340 14 and shreekhand are gradually Curd 1,190 30 replacing the sweets sold Lassi, chaas 45 19 by traditional sweet makers. Source: MoFPI However, we still feel that there has allowed large players to successfully is huge untapped opportunity owing sell products such as packaged curd. to the entrenched culture of preparing On one side, there are companies these products at home or buying from that can produce hygienic dairy products, the neighbourhood vendors,” says Sodhi. and on the other, we have consumers Emphasising on non-urban willing to pay for it. This translates into markets a successful market for this industry. While the majority of the efforts by Today, almost 30 per cent of dairy dairy majors have revolved around products is being retailed through making the urban consumers habituated modern store formats, an increase from to the packaged ethnic dairy products, 18 per cent in 2007-2009. Apart from the non-urban areas too are reporting better storage conditions, modern retail an upsurge of demand. The aspirational, spaces provide better visibility and yet discerning, consumers from these in-store promotion. areas are open to experimentation Market dynamics when convenience and quality The current size of India’s dairy market are guaranteed. is around 21 million metric tonne, and But the biggest drawback in serving it is growing at 4 per cent CAGR , and these areas is the undersized cold is estimated to reach ` 5 lakh crore by chain logistics network in the country. 2015. The country is also the largest “Distribution of fresh dairy products producer of dairy products by volume, is a challenging task owing to complex constituting 15 per cent of the world’s logistics and perishable nature of the and 40 per cent of Asia’s output. Liquid products. It was for these reasons the milk production touched 116 million fresh dairy produce marketers had metric tonne in 2010-11. Danone is been focussing on metros and markets the latest MNC entrant in this market close to their manufacturing facilities. clearly dominated by the likes of However, the non-metro consumer is giants Amul, Mother Dairy, Nestlé and becoming demanding, which has now Britannia. New Zealand’s Fonterra too opened up a huge avenue of opportunity has made its entry into India. for brands like Amul. We are romping ITC recently announced its plan to up our distribution and retail network foray into dairy, while Reliance Retail to cater to this huge opportunity. We has Reliance Dairy Foods. There is also expect significant contribution from our a multitude of regional brands that are non-conventional markets in the coming equally strong in their home territories. times,” elaborates Sodhi. And, of course, not long ago was the Push offered by modern retail market greeted with news of Coca Cola Modern retail has served as a boon to and PepsiCo investing in dairy segment. the dairy industry. Large retailers are Thus, as the number of players increases upbeat about the market for value-added in this segment, the market dynamics in products in the dairy space. The fact that India will force them to launch a range this category did not exist about five of ethnic products as that is where the years ago is simply because there were big opportunity pie lies. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com very few chillers available. Modern retail June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

23


Special Focus UHT milk

Mahua Roy

A

post on a popular social networking site by a young mother was all about asking those on her network regarding the best packaged milk brand for her year-old daughter. She specifically asked about Ultra-Heat Treated (UHT) milk brands available in tetrahedron packages. This says a lot about the buying behaviour and market dynamics of this product. Earlier stacked as an emergency product in households, or used for specific preparations like sweets, UHT tetrahedron packaged milk today has turned into a planned purchase, although for a targeted set of audience. As per figures provided by a spokesperson from Chemicals, Materials & Foods Practice, Frost & Sullivan, the UHT milk market is estimated at 3,50,000-4,00,000 litre per day. Amul is the market leader in this format with a marketshare of around 34 to 35 per cent followed by Nestle (24 to 25 per cent) and Britannia (14 to 15 per cent). Other significant players in this sector include Danone Foods and Beverages India Pvt Ltd, CavinKare Group, Parag Milk Foods Pvt Ltd, etc. Here’s presenting the four striking features of this sector:

1

healthy growth

It is interesting to see consumers stack tetrahedron packages of milk at supermarkets. Even small retailers are reporting increasing demand for this product. Here’s helping you understand the crucial four observations on this category in India.

2

No longer an emergency product

Definitely the biggest feature of this category is that it is increasingly becoming a regular item in the grocery list of consumers. Another observation is that the number of Stock Keeping Units (SKUs) bought per ticket at supermarkets is on the increase. “Though in many markets, trial of UHT tetrapak milk started as a backup when households run out of milk, today tetrapakaged milk has been incorporated in consumers’ 24

Paving the way to

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

shows that now consumers are regularly using tetrapakaged milk instead of using it only as a backup option,” says R S Sodhi, Managing Director, Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd (GCMMF), the marketers of brand Amul. To supplement this, Ashutosh Chakradeo, Head - Buying & Merchandising, HyperCITY, adds, “Yes, we saw an upsurge of 20 per cent over last year on the long-life liquid milk, which is called UHT milk. We sell around 60,000 litre at all our stores per month.” However, this may still be an urban or Section A phenomenon as of now. But as has been the case with other convenience products, it may not be very long to see the replication of this trend in other geographies. Adds an analyst from Chemicals, Materials & Foods Practice, Frost & Sullivan, “UHT milk is still widely used as an emergency product in India. However, among Section A urban consumers, the perception is slowly shifting towards its acceptance as a primary source of milk.”

daily requirement list. Consumers, especially in modern format stores, pick up the whole tray (containing 12 packs of 1 litre) of tetrapakaged milk. This

Convenience and safety

A bonus, bumper advantage of offering both convenience as well as superior safety to consumers, this product is a winner. “Tetrapakaged milk can be kept at room temperature for 180 days until opened. This gives the convenience to consumers of buying daily, weekly or even monthly requirement of milk at a time,” adds Sodhi. As almost all food categories commemorate over the ‘convenience’ tag, the consumer reaps the benefits at large. “Also, Amul UHT tetrapakaged milk is homogenised, which improves the milk’s richness, consistency and gives it a sparkling white colour. This


UHT milk

results in additional cups of tea/coffee/ milkshakes from the same amount of milk,” explains Sodhi. At a time when adulteration is the biggest issue in the milk segment, this product offers significant advantages. The highest level of safety is guaranteed to the consumer. “Tetrahedron packs are difficult to tamper with. If tampered, it will be evident from the exterior of the pack. As a result, adulteration worries are completely avoidable. Amul tetrapakaged milk is ultra-heat treated in aseptic conditions at highly sophisticated dairies, which makes it bacteria free and can be used directly from the pack even without boiling,” says Sodhi. Such attributes from packaged milk are making it a preferred choice for Section A consumers, who do not mind paying a premium for it.

3

Variants and SKUs

The Tetra Brik package segment is worth ` 150-170 crore, and nearly 75-80 per cent of the product basket constitutes regular toned

milk. But as opposed to polypouches, there is a strong case to go up the value chain by developing differentiated and enriched offerings in UHT milk. This product is a favourite when it comes to health-conscious consumers. With every launch of a brand in this category, it is complemented with another variant in the slim/toned category, which is a lowfat version of UHT milk. There are also opportunities to offer fortification. Apart from variants, players in this sector are also experimenting with SKU options. GCMMF introduced Amul tetrapak milk in a few markets (hilly areas) and this move was wholeheartedly welcomed by consumers. It followed aggressive pricing strategies and introduced the product in 200 ml packs at ` 10 price point. “Lower price point made the pack affordable to consumers furthermore, one-time usage dose of 200 ml along with the convenience in storage and use made this popular. Consumers started preferring it over milk powder as they could now use actual milk

Viewpoint: Tetrahedron packaged milk, a threat to polypacks? While UHT milk is still not a strong competitor for the polypack milk in India, i t s consumer acceptance is definitely growing in urban areas. However, it is still perceived as a premium product and caters primarily to Section A consumers. Currently, UHT milk is synonymous with milk in tetrapak. However, the launch of UHT milk in Aseptic Plastic Pillow Pouches (with a shelf-life of 120 days) is expected to convert consumers from pasteurised to UHT milk, given the similarity in packaging formats. This will require awareness building exercises to educate consumers on the benefits of UHT milk. Spokesperson from Chemicals, Materials & Foods Practice, Frost & Sullivan ....................................................................................................................................... Tetrapak milk has many advantages over milk in polypacks, one of them is tetrapak being tamper evident. Another advantage of tetrapak milk is its ease in storage and usage, which polypack milk does not offer. But easy availability of polypouch milk and its price point continues to lure consumers. Even in the Section A segment, people prefer polypouch milk of a reputed brand. The overall milk market is increasing and tetrapak segment is also growing fast, however, the share of the pie is still small and it would take some time for tetrapak to make a dent in polypouch milk sale even in Section A segment. R S Sodhi, Managing Director, Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd

26

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Yes, we saw an upsurge of 20 per cent over last year on the longlife liquid milk, which is called UHT milk. We sell around 60,000 litre at all our stores per month. Ashutosh Chakradeo

Head - Buying & Merchandising, HyperCITY

rather than the reconstituted milk from milk powder,” explains Sodhi. Also, Karnataka Cooperative Milk Producers’ Federation Ltd (KMF), the secondlargest co-operative dairy in the country, launched Nandini GoodLife toned milk in 100 ml tetrapak packages at a price point of ` 4.

4

Supply chain and storage issues resolved

Due to the processing technology used, UHT milk has a high shelf-life and unopened packs can last for several months without being spoilt. This makes them popular choice in areas with milk scarcity and inadequate cold chain infrastructure. From a marketing perspective, higher margins can be obtained on this product due to its storage efficiency, which circumvents the cold chain. “UHT milk is considered safe, has no preservatives and is readyto-drink without the need for boiling. Additionally, it also has a shelf-life of 120 to 180 days, allowing suppliers to look beyond the 250-km limit from the processing facility that is applicable to polypacks,” adds a spokesperson from Chemicals, Materials & Foods Practice, Frost & Sullivan. Another positive facet to this story is in the storage at retail outlets. “As refrigeration requirement is eliminated, retail outlets can save on added energy costs. At a retailer, we get logistics and storage convenience. Supply chain damages are resolved as this product is protected from environmental damage and adulteration,” adds Chakradeo. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com


Special Focus Ice cream manufacturers

Exploring new growth horizons beyond big cities

Making summers and ice creams synonymous, the ice cream industry is growing at a fast pace. With new marketing strategies, the prospects for this industry seem promising, especially in tier 2 and 3 cities where ice cream demand is increasing on a continuous basis. Thus, the companies in the segment are involved in adopting ways to popularise their brands in new markets for grabbing the largest marketshare all over India. Avani Jain

A

t present, the ice cream market size in India is nearly ` 2,000 crore. Growing at approximately 12-15 per cent, it is expected to cross $ 900 million by 201415. The branded market is estimated at approximately $ 200 million and is growing at 20-25 per cent. With rapid urbanisation and easy exposure to international trends, eating out and consuming food on the go are slowly becoming a way of life. Moreover, consumers have become more demanding and constantly seek innovations in terms of products, flavours etc. Consumption of impulse categories such as cups, cones and candies is growing at the rate of 40 per cent (annual growth rate). Indian companies in the ice cream segment are setting up parlours to offer good eating experience to their consumers and also increasing their media spends so as to spread higher level of awareness. Moreover, realising the potential of tier 2 and 3 cities, ice cream manufacturers are taking all the possible steps such as brand promotional activities, and increased R&D initiatives to penetrate into these markets and popularise their ice cream brands.

Investing in R&D initiatives

At present, India has the right climate for ice cream consumption. Yet, the per capita consumption in the country is low, which is approximately 300 ml per annum as against the world average of 2.3 litre per annum. This means a large untapped potential business awaits to be explored. Seeing this 28

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

enormous business opportunity, the war has already begun to grab a bigger part of this pie, with national players increasing their production, and international players trying to find a way to enter the Indian markets. To be part of this race for increasing the marketshare, it is almost inevitable for the ice cream manufacturers in the country to optimise their production systems, packaging technologies, cold chain management, compliance with quality standards as well as ensure the right marketing mix. Above all, capitalising on the tier 2 and 3 cities is the need of the hour. Thus, it has become imperative for the companies to continuously involve themselves in R&D activities to reach the helm and grab share in new markets. Kamal Desai, Vice President-Sales & Marketing, Havmor Ice Cream Ltd, says, “The demand for ice creams is growing in tier 2 and 3 markets. So keeping this in mind, we have launched new products such as 2-in-1 cup for ` 10, Khatta Meetha Aam Dolly for ` 10; two-litre Vanilla pack for just ` 180 etc.” Further, the company has a unique concept for their R&D activities. It is known for coming out with three new flavours every three months starting with the first quarter from January every year. For this constant innovation, the company adopts interesting ways and methods. For example, the company had organised a contest – ‘Mera Flavour’ in which customers were invited and asked about their kind of ice creams. Then they shared their recipes and based on those recipes, the company prepared ice creams. After testing those, the new flavours were displayed in its parlours and customers were again invited to taste them and vote


Ice cream manufacturers

for the best. In this way, three new flavours were launched. Thus, through such methods, the company is able to capitalise on the pulse of the consumers and bring them closer to their choices and requirements. Thus, it can be seen that almost all the companies in the segment aims at offering new varieties every summer. Be it small, large or co-operative, every one of them strives at providing new flavours to its customers to savour their scoop of ice cream and have the highest brand recall among customers. These steps not only increase their ice cream consumption, but also popularise them in all the markets including tier 2 and 3 cities. Thus, continuous R&D activities can help ice cream manufacturers gain a major marketshare and climb the ladder of success.

Right promotional activities

Ice cream manufacturing companies not only take up R&D initiatives to popularise

their brands in tier 2 and 3 cities, but also take up various promotional strategies as well. Desai avers, “The strategies adopted are better penetration through enhanced distribution. This is done by developing proper cold chain and distributor retailer network in these areas. Also, we have

The growth is expected to be up with consumers increasing their at-home consumption and substituting ice cream for traditional desserts. enhanced our branding and awareness activities in these areas through Point of Purchase (POP) at dealer outlets. Further, hoardings are put up at different locations in tier 2 and 3 cities, which are backed by print advertising in regional papers.”

He adds, “We provide special retailer and consumer schemes for value for money range in these markets during the season. These include steps like ‘Buy 1 Get 1 Free’ scheme in the take-home packs range.”

Scoopful of prospects

Owing to rapid urbanisation and changing lifestyle trends, the demand is increasing and is expected to grow further. The growth is expected to be up with consumers increasing their at-home consumption and substituting ice cream for traditional desserts. Single portion dairy ice cream and bulk ice cream are expected to be the fastest-growing categories. Further, the ice cream industry is expected to continue to expand robustly in India as purchasing power is increasing, and manufacturers are investing considerable amounts for making ice cream available in kirana stores or small retail outlets in tier 2 and 3 cities. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Special Focus Interface - Ian Phillipps

What types of products and services are offered by Ecolab to food & beverages companies?

Worldwide energy, water, food safety and environment are gaining prominence among manufacturers. Ecolab is a leading global player in water, hygiene and energy technologies & services that provide clean water, safe food, abundant energy and healthy environments. In India, as well, these factors are increasingly being discussed by manufacturers across industries. We are steering the resources and support needed to best position Ecolab in India

offerings. We work with milk processors and also at farm-end of the supply chain of dairy industry. We are getting into dairy market in India. We believe that we can add value to this market, which is growing and demands highend technologies to improve efficiency. We are looking forward to work closely with the dairy industry in India to offer solutions for their requirements. Looking at right hygiene solutions and operational efficiency as well as impact of water & energy on the industry are some of the areas that we are focussing on. We see India as an emerging market for us. We want to create awareness about best manufacturing and hygiene standards in the Indian dairy industry and partner with the industry to raise the quality to international standards.

the Indian dairy industry, we stand to gain with our knowledge of market conditions and technical know-how.

The range of packaged dairy products has increased manifold in India. What does that mean to Ecolab?

As companies diversify and increase their range of products, we can provide better long-term solutions. While dairy processors are under constant pressure to enhance their capabilities, they are also supposed to find ways to optimise their resources and reduce water & energy consumption. At the same time, dairies also have to address health and hygiene challenges. These increase the complexity for dairy processors. Ecolab can offer credible solutions to all these

We see India as an emerging market for us …says Ian Phillipps, Vice President and General Manager, South East Asia and India, Ecolab. In a tete-à-tete with Rakesh Rao, he discusses about opportunities in dairy industry and importance of having right strategies for energy, water and hygiene management. to provide our customers right solutions for their business requirements, which may be unique to this country. We not just offer products, but complete solutions to customers in the food & beverages sector. Customers are becoming conscious about total cost of operations. Energy, water and environmental impact are focus areas for our customers. As population grows, there is stress on water quality and scarcity, food safety and health. Our major focus is around energy, water and health. Brewery, beverages, dairies, etc are some of the core markets for us and we will continue to grow in these sectors.

How do you cater to the dairy industry?

Across Asia, Ecolab has strong presence in dairy with its integrated solution 30

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What are the challenges and opportunities in the dairy industry?

Although the market is small and fragmented, it has huge potential. We have presence on the ground, working closely with the dairy industry. This provides enormous opportunities for us to understand the needs of our customers and provide solutions to fulfill their requirements. Globally, we work with some of the leading dairy processors and offer them solutions across the supply chain, which is an added advantage for us. We look forward to work with dairy co-operatives as well as larger companies in India. Probably our best opportunity for adding value and adopting best practices come with economies of scale. As investments and scale of operations increase in

challenges since we have expertise in all these critical areas.

Are Indian food processors recognising the importance of food safety?

There has been a rise in awareness about hygiene, energy and safety among Indian food & beverage processors in last few years. Companies are aware about these challenges and they understand the importance to solve them for their as well as country’s future. Water quality & scarcity and rising cost of energy directly impact customers’ bottom line. It is important for us to focus on issues that are posing challenges to our customers. If we are not aligned with our customers’ needs, then we are missing the point. Email: rakesh.rao@network18publishing.com


Special Focus Roundtable

Can India become a highly profitable destination for dairy processing? India already enjoys the accolade of being the largest producer of milk, beating New Zealand few years back. But can it also become a global destination for processing of milk to value-added products? Mahua Roy speaks with experts to find out the plan of action to reach this goal.

Prof (Dr) Anil Kumar Srivastava Director and Vice-Chancellor, NDRI Karnal

R S Sodhi Managing Director, GCMMF

Tapas Chatterjee Managing Director, SSP Pvt Ltd

India has a unique pattern of production, processing and consumption of milk, which is not comparable with any large milk producing country. About 35 per cent of milk produced in India is processed. There is huge potential for processing and value addition, particularly in ethnic Indian products. Variants of traditional dairy products such as low-fat, low-calorie foods are witnessing rising demand. Also, the market for functional foods, probiotic dairy foods, fortified dairy products is growing at a rapid pace. The bakery industry is looking for good quality skimmed milk powder, whey protein isolates & concentrates, etc. Thus, there is huge potential for dairy industry, but extensive R&D efforts are required. Today, dairy industry needs to focus on new process development or modification for lowering the cost of processing, improving quality, enhancing shelf-life of products, etc.

The entire dairy industry needs to come together and promote dairy products in general, independent of brands. Besides, the entire world is watching India with an interest to explore our market. People are demanding more convenient products such as yoghurt. Consumers are gradually shifting from products like carbonated drinks to healthier variants. This is opening up opportunities for the dairy sector, which rests on the health platform. Today, the country requires appropriate technology to process and pack indigenous products made from milk. If such technology is made available and their shelf-life is increased up to six months, then it can revolutionise the entire dairy business scenario in the country. The ethnic products are massoriented and should be prioritised for launches; only then it will be possible to bear the cost of supply chain and distribution.

The dairy industry offers opportunities galore to the entrepreneurs globally. The sales of dairy products in India will nearly double its size to reach ` 5.1 trillion by 2016. The value of the Indian dairy industry is expected to touch ` 5 lakh crore by 2015, with milk output pegged at 190 million tonne at the end of the period. To remain competitive and maintain productivity, the industry needs to adopt energy-efficient measures as well as 3A sanitary standards for fabrication of equipment. Promising sub-sectors in the Indian dairy industry will be the ethnic range such as Indian milk-based traditional products – khoa, milk cake, gulab jamun, shrikhand, paneer, etc. The large-scale commercialisaition of these products will need advanced technology adoption. UHT milk and milk formulations sector is also promising. Quality, safety and health benefits will dictate technology adoption in this sector.

Editorial take

India is leading the bandwagon of dairy producers globally. However, the extent of processing and value-added products manufacturing is still low. Ethnic products segment offers ample opportunities. But, extensive research needs to go into process commercialisation, scaling up and shelf-life enhancement. Besides, significant investment in cold chain operations is needed to make India truly a hub of dairy processing.

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Facility Visit Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd

Mahua Roy

T

he Patalganga Unit of Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd is one of the 20 facilities of the company in India, which happens to be among the largest processors of edible oil. The company has a unique strategy of managing the operations at its manufacturing units. All its inland units have crushing and refining operations, whereas those close to the ports import crude oil and indulge in subsequent refining. The Patalganga Unit, situated around 60 km from Mumbai, falls in the latter category. The total refining capacity of the unit is 6 lakh Metric Tonne Per Annum (MTPA).

tin packaging, especially for institutional buyers. Interestingly, the tin packages is manufactured and fabricated in-house by the company, right at the site of packaging. “This strategy has helped us in enormous cost savings, as we are no longer dependent on external supply for packaging material, thanks to such constant supply,” explains Dr S K Jain, DGM (Quality Analysis), Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd. Of all the pack sizes, the flexible one sees maximum demand. “The demand for pouch packaging is maximum as it is used as a refill option once the 5-ltr PET jar is bought by the consumers,” says Dr Jain. The total packaging capacity is 500 Metric Tonne Per Day (MTPD), where 350 MTPD of soft oils are packaged,

Facts & Figures

o Total output: 2,200 TPD

o Total refining capacity: 6 lakh MTPA o Total area: 64.36 acre o Oils refined: Soyabean; sunflower; palm; groundnut o Brands manufactured: Ruchi Star; Ruchi Gold; Sunrich; Nutrela Soyumm; Mahakosh o Initial investment: ` 150 crore (in 2004) o Turnover: ` 14,000 crore, 105 per cent growth

Defining excellence with superior refining

With 40 SKUs and highly commercialised by-products, the Patalganga Unit of Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd is abuzz with activity in all of its three shifts of eight hours each, all-year round. It is indeed very rare to come across a player, which bags all three accolades of being one of the largest importers, exporters and processors of edible oil. Packaging saliency

The Patalganga facility of Ruchi Soya packages its own brands under three main pack sizes – 5-ltr PET jar packaging and 500-ml flexible pouch packaging for home consumption, mainly; and 15-ltr

while 150 MTPD of vanaspati/ hydrogenated fats are packaged. Another salient feature of this facility is that it is one of the reputed contract manufacturers and packagers of Bunge’s renowned Dalda brand. Adds Dr Jain, “Since we have excess

capacity, this becomes one of our revenue generators. Post critical value-addition of the vanaspati, we undertake its packaging also.” Besides vanaspati, the company also manufactures and packages soyabean and sunflower oils for Bunge.

Demand planning and operations

Filling operations of 15-ltr tin packages

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India offers a unique market for edible oil. This category sees a whopping 99 per cent penetration in Indian homes; however, there is huge fluctuation in the demand arising out of various geographies in the country. “While soyabean oil is favoured in Central India and rapeseed/mustard oil is a hot favourite in the Eastern region, the same trend cannot be predicted confidently to replicate in Western India. Via this facility, we serve Maharashtra and Goa, and we see minimal demand for these oils, whereas sunflower oil has huge demand here,” says Amar Sharma, General Manager, Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd.


Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd

500-ml flexible packaging operations

More so, the plant works at full capacity during months of religious and festive importance in this region, ie during Ganeshotsav and Diwali, as the demand suddenly rises manifold. The company strategy behind oil processing is interesting. “Import of oilseeds is

This strategy (ie, manufacturing and frabrication of tin packages right at the site of packaging) has helped us in enormous cost savings, as we are no longer dependent on external supply for packaging material. Dr S K Jain

DGM (Quality Analysis), Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd

banned in the country as these are being genetically-modified, even though they give 2.5-3 MT/hectare yield. The nonGM varieties can offer a maximum of 0.9-1 MT/hectare. What we can import is the crude oil,” says Dr Jain. As soya oilseeds are available between the months of October and February, the crushing-cum-refining units see tremendous activity. Then starts the season of mustard, which commences in February and continues until the onset of monsoon. During the rainy season, there is severe unavailability of oilseeds and that is when there is a boom in imports of crude oil and the refining process sees high capacity utilisation.

Commercialisation of by-products

This facility displays one of the finest examples of revenue generations via commercialisation of by-products. The fractionation and refining of palmolein produces olein & stearin, which are used heavily in the chemical industry, especially Home and Personal Care (HPC) and food processing market. PepsiCo, HUL, Britannia, Parle Agro are major procurers of these by-products. “Stearin, on further fractionation and value-addition, leads to granule formation. This product is a cattle feed substitute and Ruchi Soya is the only producer of this in India. It is exported heavily to Germany and Malaysia,” elaborates Dr Jain.

While soyabean oil is favoured in Central India and rapeseed/mustard oil is a hot favourite in the Eastern region, the same trend cannot be predicted confidently to replicate in Western India. Looking at the demand arising from Maharashtra, we plan to launch a new soya-cum-palm oil blend. Amar Sharma

General Manager, Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd

Apart from this, soy-lecithin is a major by-product, which is supplied to the chocolate industry. Besides, tocopherol by-product, which is an essential vitamin, is procured by the pharma industry. The company is now working on another novel by-product commercialisation, tocotrienol.

Future investments

Studying the regional demand, the company plans to launch blended oil soon. “Looking at the demand arising from Maharashtra, we plan to launch a new soya-cum-palm oil blend,” says Sharma. Also, the facility has recently seen an investment of ` 40 crore towards the development of a 4.42 MW turbine, thus achieving self-sufficiency of energy source. “Of the 4.42 MW, 2 MW power will be utilised for captive consumption of the Patalganga Unit while the rest will be for grid supply,” says Sharma. Photo: Nachiket Gujar

Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com

Finished products being dispatched June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook

Filling & Sealing Technology Aseptic technology A fulfilling solution for juicy prospects..................................................................................................38 Caps and closures Increasing brand value through innovation............................................................................................40 Plastic closures Convenience and aesthetics call the shots.............................................................................................42 Novel sealing technologies Putting a seal of safety...........................................................................................................................44 Integrated packaging solution All-in-one pack for filling and capping applications.............................................................................46 Net weight filling technology A right tool to ensure accuracy in real-time production.......................................................................48 Piyush Bhandari, Director, Clearpack Singapore Pte Ltd Roundtable Are food and beverage manufacturers ready for new-age caps and closures?.......................................50

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook Aseptic technology

A fulfilling solution for juicy prospects

Photo courtesy: Krones AG

When it comes to filling systems, flexibility is not just about managing multiple sizes but it is also about having the widest range of products to fill. With consumers increasingly becoming health-conscious, aseptic filling offers an ideal option since beverages can be filled without using any preservatives.

Rakesh Rao

N

on-alcoholic beverages market in India, estimated at around $ 5 billion, is one of the fastest growing segments within food & beverages industry. Increasing middle-class population, rapid urbanisation and rising disposable income are some of the major factors fuelling this market. Riding high on this booming beverages market are filling technology providers. As beverage manufacturers experiment with their offerings (in terms of types of beverages and packaging containers) to meet the 38

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

evolving demands of the consumers, filling equipment providers are gearing up to tap these opportunities with their wide range of solutions.

Types of fillers

There are various types of filling technologies available in the market for food and beverage processors. Stefan Kraus, Product Manager - Filling Technology, Krones AG, elaborates, “Standard filling systems for beverage applications, for example, are height filling systems; systems with inductive- or mass-flow-meter; systems with automatic correction of the filling height, etc. Such

filling systems are integrated in standard machines, for example, for filling beer or spirits. The complexity of such systems is manageable; the products are not very sensitive. The system is designed and customised to meet the bottlers’ demands. So for resolving challenges, the bottler gets the right machine.” Sensitive products, such as milk, require different treatment. He opines, “If we are talking about sensitive beverages like milk applications for a shelf-life of 30-60 days, we are stepping into the ultraclean sector. In this area, we are protecting the product, that is milk, to achieve 60 days of shelf-life in the cooling chain. Another example is that of spritzers – in our region we have to handle a lot of different fruit juices mixed with carbonated water and without preservatives. For such demands, we will take a hygienic filling valve, for example, and combine it with machine components in hygienic design.” With growing demand for natural products from the consumer, aseptic technology is showing increased acceptance from beverage manufacturers. Kraus says, “Last but not the least, there is the aseptic case with its multifarious requirements: high acid or low acid application, etc. In the aseptic technology, one thing is absolutely clear: we work together with our customer in a partnership – with high performance Krones machinery, the customer gets the best equipment for the best products. The specifications of the customer and his philosophy are our main concern.”

Making the right choice

So which technology is better for filling applications? According to Kraus, this depends on the study (total costs of ownership) of your business case. One of the important objectives before food industry is increasing output costeffectively. In order to achieve this, one has to be extremely careful while selecting the type of technology for filling. Elaborating on this, Kraus says, “The parameters obtained for the selection of the right filling system are diverse. The product


Aseptic technology

Six-edge advantage

According to Shukla, factors driving demand for aseptic technology are: o Growing awareness on the use of preservatives o Less transportation cost o Easy to handle o Less labour cost o Recycling of the outer packaging material o Less storage space itself gives us the main criteria to select the right type of filling technology – what ingredients the product has, how sensitive is the product (pH value), are particles part of the product, etc.” However, growing demand for products with natural flavour is increasing the demand for aseptic processing technology.

Advantage aseptic filling

Aseptic filling technology is process of filling various types of beverages in aseptic environment to provide long shelf-life to beverage without any deterioration in microbiological structure and taste of beverage. Such filled products can be processed by dry aseptic and wet aseptic processes. By this process, one can pack wide range of beverages that may include juices, juice mix, milk, milk-based beverages, nutraceuticals and so on. Dharmendra Shukla, Additional General Manager (Food Solutions), Alfa Laval (India) Ltd, states, “Aseptic technology is easy to handle; involves less labour cost; machines

The parameters obtained for the selection of the right filling system are diverse. The product itself gives us the main criteria to select the right type of filling technology – what ingredients the product has, how sensitive is the product (pH value), etc. Stefan Kraus

Product Manager - Filling Technology, Krones AG

are compact and need less storage area.” While globally aseptic packaging is widely used on various types of containers, in India mostly beverages are aseptically packaged in cartons. But things are changing. Aseptic processing of beverages enhances the shelf-life of product without adding preservatives or extenders. Aseptically processed products do not need special environment for storage and there is convenience of transportation without cold chain, and above all, a tamperevident package. Hence, keeping in mind the growing consumer demand as well as benefits, the demand for aseptic processing is growing among beverage manufacturers. Shukla says, “Yes, there is growing demand for aseptic filling technology in India.” Kraus agrees, “The demand for aseptic is still increasing – driving this demand is the desire of the consumer for healthy products.”

Cost-effective technology?

Though aseptic tehnology offers many benefits, it requires a minimum production capacity to be cost-effective. This equipment also needs additional care of well-trained personnel in order to keep equipment working and guaranteeing product safety. But, aseptic processing technology can get a fillip as demand for products with natural flavour grows. Equipment suppliers are also working closely with SME manufacturers to better meet their unique requirements. Shukla elaborates, “Alfa Laval has come up with a monoblock aseptic system at a competitive and attractive price suitable for bulk aseptic packaging up to 1,500 kg of single strength fruit purees. This will help the processors to switch over from canning to aseptic to cater to the growing demand for aseptically packed product. This machine will be suitable to pack the aseptic bags for 3, 5, 10, 20 and 200 litre. The filling capacity will vary based on the size of packaging.”

Fill the fruit pieces as well

Sustainability and total cost of ownership are the main drivers for many beverage processors, who are looking for high-

Yes, there is growing demand for aseptic filling technology in India. Aseptic technology is easy to handle; involves less labour cost; machines are compact and need less storage area. Dharmendra Shukla

Additional General Manager (Food Solutions), Alfa Laval (India) Ltd

speed lines that focus on packaging optimisation. According to Kraus, some of the emerging trends in filling technology are: o Sustainable thinking and acting to pay the necessary respect to the nature (eg, Krones aseptic solutions with zero water consumption during production) o Efficiency – clever line design (eg, Krones Ergobloc) o Buy quality – to have a filling system with reproducable results over the whole lifecycle of the machine As consumers become more healthconscious, there is a significant growth in demand for aseptic filling of particles (fruit pieces). To meet this rising demand, companies are adding technologies for aseptic bottling of products with particles or pulp. Shukla says, “The ohmic aseptic technology is suitable for sterilisation and bulk packaging for the fruit pieces with drain weight up to 80 per cent. The sterilisation with this technology allows the fruit pieces to retain the shape. We have already sold one line in India for sterilisation and packaging of pineapple cubes aseptically in 200 ltr bag in drum system and this will be future technology to replace the canned products with aseptic.” To meet unique demands of Indian customers, equipment companies are now working on low-cost recyclable packaging material, which is effective for an aseptic environment. If successful, this will result in manifold increase in demand for aseptic fillers in future. Email: rakesh.rao@network18publishing.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook Caps and closures

In a competitive marketplace, simple positioning of food and beverage products will not work wonders in modern retail outlets. The packaging has to have a distinct appeal, which could attract consumers easily. In this direction, innovative caps and closures make a package unique and in turn increase the brand value.

well to the other packaging elements that it works in tandem with. According to Nichrome Team, Delhi, “Gone are the days when a simple positioning of bottles or tin containers with a simple label on the shelves was enough for product movement in stores. Flexible pouches with innovative caps and closures make the package unique and in turn increase brand value. Traditional packaging that include tins, jars, bottles are being replaced by standup pouches. Flexible packaging provides the freedom of experimenting with pack shapes and designs.� Again importance of closure or design element on a package depends on where the products are kept on the retail shelf. For example, visually appealing and eyecatching closures are especially important for products that appear on the lower shelves of supermarkets. As customers search the store shelves for familiar brands, the closure is often the most visible element of packaging found below eyelevel. When a customer looks down at the lower shelves, a closure decorated with memorable brand imaging and colours is a key tool for attracting consumer attention.

Creating brand value

Prasenjit Chakraborty

F

ood industry functioning is indeed challenging where innovation is the only constant. The industry needs to understand changing consumer requirements; focus on innovation; and put goods on the shelf at a price that works for manufacturers and customers. It has been seen that successful companies always respond fast to consumer needs. Today, the quality of products alone is not enough; it has to be complemented with convenient packaging. When it comes to convenient packaging, caps and closures play an important role for food manufacturers. Interestingly, the role of caps and closures is not limited to convenience but 40

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

also helps building a brand. For instance, a closure is often the doorway a consumer uses to access a packaged product. Here, it is imperative to have an attractive closure in terms of design, colour, etc. Closures can be made of plastic or metal depending on application and kinds of products. For example, jams and jellies are often sold in glass jars, so are pickles. This makes closure one of the only ways to create differentiation on crowded store shelves. Brand owners and retailers today are increasingly demanding closures that provide unique, high-quality visual appeal, and also facilitate customer interaction with products. The closure can be a key element that draws in consumer attention and serves an interactive function, so it must adapt

According to Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd, caps and closures, irrespective of material, are arguably the most important part of packaging. “If a particular container has attractive features in it, but the closure is not up to the mark, it could affect the overall customer experience for that

Significance of caps and closures

o Caps and closures offer pleasant visual appeal o Stand-up pouches replace conventional packaging o Rise in packaged food sales facilitate the demand for innovative caps and closures o Customised solutions available to meet specific requirements


Caps and closures

particular product. Also, in an industry as sensitive as the food industry, the closures have to be of high quality,” he points out. In a competitive market, it is essential to differentiate a brand, as it is an important strategy for marketing a product. Today, processed food manufacturing industry is exploring the area of caps and closures for achieving brand differentiation. As a result, the market has been witnessing the advent of innovative caps and closures. In today’s context, when it comes to caps and closures, leak-proofness is forgone conclusion. Apart from offering leak-proofness, caps and closures are expected to provide a pleasant visual appeal, easy convenience of opening as well as brand differentiation. “This is because once the closure has been opened, the product has a limited shelf-life. Another reason why the subject should be treated with importance is from a high level the first thing that comes in contact with the customer from a top view is always the closure. Hence, in order to

make a container standout, the closures have to be selected carefully,” says Kedia. As the scope increases for caps and closures, they are being customised to suit the needs of consumers belonging to different age brackets. Hence, they are continuously evolving to accommodate the preferences of dynamic consumers. For a brand, it is important to offer a product free from any kind of damage, defect or loss of quality when it reaches the consumer. “A reliable closure is an important part of the package as it needs to protect the product against loss of CO2 in case of a carbonated product, which is a measure for the quality of the product. The same closure must protect the product, in general, against ingress of oxygen or micro-organism, especially when we talk about bottled juices or teas. The closure must provide a safe venting in case of any overpressure, which occurred to avoid missiling, and could endanger the consumer. Last but not the least, the right closure must provide a consumer convenient low opening torque

A reliable closure is an important part of the package as it needs to protect the product against loss of CO2 in case of a carbonated product, which is a measure for the quality of the product. Pradeep Damle

General Manager, Bericap India Pvt Ltd

and it should be easy to re-close,” explains Pradeep Damle, General Manager, Bericap India Pvt Ltd.

The road ahead

In the days to come, market will witness several new innovations in caps and closures, which will ultimately help in brand building. What is important here is, innovation in caps and closures has become a necessity for brands to create differentiation and brand value, besides attracting consumers. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook Plastic closures

Prasenjit Chakraborty

A

ccording to Global Information Inc (GII), plastics will continue to account for the largest share of caps and closures demand and will also see the fastest growth. The global caps and closures industry is directly affected by container demand trends and changes in the container mix resulting from competition among various packaging media. Plastic containers, which typically use plastic closures, will continue to gain marketshare at the expense of metal, paperboard, and glass packaging. This is due to their cost advantages, shatter resistance, resealability, and graphics capabilities, as well as improved resin & processing technologies resulting in enhanced barrier properties, heat resistance and design flexibility.

Growth drivers

A closer look says that today all companies are going for easy packaging solutions with focus on innovation and costeffectiveness. Plastic caps are being used in flexible pouches that are easy to carry and use. Closures are majorly used for multi-use products. “There are several reasons for caps and closures gaining momentum in the food & beverage (packaging) industry. For example, the switch to short bottle necks is pushing resin savings for beverage manufacturers; opportunities in the food market are resulting in demand

Convenience and aesthetics call the shots Plastic caps & closures are witnessing a surge in demand mainly due to the aspects of convenience, cost-effectiveness and design flexibility. In addition, attractive looking caps & closures stand out in retail outlets, which ultimately draw the attention of consumers towards those products. 42

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

for dispensing and other value-added closures such as nondrip flip top pourer caps, boosted by convenience factor. The beverage segment will remain by far the single-largest caps and closures market. There will be more demand for value-added closures such as dispensing, child-resistant and tamper-evident types,” points out Pradeep Damle, General Manager, Bericap India Pvt Ltd. Convenience is another factor, which is facilitating the growth of plastic caps and closures market. GII notes that demand for metal caps and closures will exhibit below average growth, as they continue to lose marketshare to plastic closures. Furthermore, demand for metal crown caps, which are often used with glass bottles, will be restrained by weak gains in glass packaging. The heavy weight of glass containers and their risk of breakage will continue to limit gains, especially in export markets due to high shipping costs. Among other closure types, elastomer and rubber stopper demand will register strong gains, driven by widespread use with plastic vials and large volume parenteral packaging in the pharmaceutical, medical diagnostic, and other healthcare markets. Cork demand will see sluggish growth due to stiff competition from relatively less expensive synthetic corks and aluminium screw caps in the wine market.

Trends in Indian market

Caps and closures are important components of product packaging. Functionally they are the first ‘point of contact’ for customers, before the product is consumed. “Caps and closures help the product stand out on retail shelves, and marketers are looking closely at caps and c losures bec ause customers have started ‘differentiating’ based on caps and closure systems,” observes Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd. According to Damle, the Photo courtesy: Bericap


Plastic closures

Factors propelling growth

Some of the factors responsible for growing demand of plastic caps and closures are as follows:

o Single pack multiple time use: This is the main factor due to which plastic caps and closures are becoming popular. For products to be used again and again, it is necessary for the manufacturers to use reusable packing; and to maintain the taste & texture of the products, they need to be in resealable pouch. The most economical and best way is using plastic caps and closures. o Customer concerns: Earlier, most of the beverages were available in glass or plastic bottles. These were reusable; but cost of packaging and transportation were the major issues. These days, disposable packs such as bricks or doy, standup packs ensure safety, hygiene and comfort for the customer and still they are reusable. These packs also add to the aesthetics of product packaging. Caps and closures form an integral part of such packs. o Economy: Small or one-time use pouches caused inconvenience in terms of value to the user as well as manufacturer. Now, the products are available in large packs, ie in the sizes of 100 g-1 kg. These packs can be stored for multiple uses. Thus, the caps and closures play a major role. o Comfort: Apart from all the factors, consumers get the benefit of ‘squeeze till the last drop’ comfort. This offers value for money and gives them satisfaction of squeezing out till the last drop. Moreover, such packs offer comfort of use only as much you need – even a child can unscrew and squeeze out as much as he/she needs without wasting. Courtesy: Nichrome Team, Delhi

Indian market has been quite receptive to latest trends and innovations that were introduced. Citing an example, he said that the DoubleSeal SuperShorty, the HexaLite 29/11 and the HexaCap 26.7 thread size closure for still water have been garnering good responses from the market. It is important to mention here that DoubleSeal SuperShorty is available in two designs – one with a crown look and the other with a traditional Carbonated Soft Drink (CSD) appearance. According to Bericap, the DoubleSeal SuperShorty Crown is aimed

Caps and closures help the product stand out on retail shelves, and marketers are looking closely at caps and closures because customers have started ‘differentiating’ based on caps and closure systems. Vimal Kedia

Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd

not only at brewers, who fill beer into PET, but also at CSD manufacturers considering smaller packaging formats. “The DoubleSeal SuperShorty, which was launched in India in 2012, has been successful in the market. It is suitable for bottles up to 3 litre and instrumental in pushing the industry towards short neck PET bottles, with many sports beverages and flavoured waters now using the 28 mm standard for push-pull sports closures. Major brand owners that supply retail chains have already started to change over to the new neck-finish in order to save materials and reduce carbon footprint,” claims Damle. Its manufacturing facility is located in Pune and equipped to produce in excess of two billion closures per year, which clearly illustrates the importance of the Indian market to Bericap’s overall business. Similarly, in the beverages segment, Manjushree pioneered the research and development of short neck PET preform, which aids in light weighting of the package by reduction of height. “For these preforms, special closures

Apart from the need to equip their packaging lines with state-of-theart technology, the food industry should convince glass mill to provide with lighter, I would say greener, jars and pots with neck finishes suitable for plastic closures. Vikrant Atkare Manager - Sales, India, Barry-Wehmiller International Resources

called 1881 neck finish caps were used. These caps are made primarily using compression moulding technology, which is provided by SACMI, Italy,” says Kedia. According to him, in the food industry, companies such as Cadbury, GSK and Nestle emphasise a lot on the type of closure that they use for their products. “While GSK uses co-injection technology for producing two colour caps, Nestle has developed a special cap meant for sipper bottles, which is 100 per cent leak-proof. Development of this cap was a challenging task as achieving leak-proofness in a wide mouth container is high precision activity,” states Kedia.

The chosen ones

There is not even an iota of doubt that plastic closures are preferred by consumers. But there is scope for further developments. Vikrant Atkare, Manager - Sales, India, Barry-Wehmiller International Resources, feels that it is imperative to have new developments in plastic caps not only from supply side but also from end-users’ side. “Soft drinks producers rely on these closures, besides detergents and personal care products manufacturers. In the food industry, people who use glass jars are still struggling. Apart from the need to equip their packaging lines with stateof-the-art technology, the food industry should convince glass mill to provide with lighter, I would say greener, jars and pots with neck finishes suitable for plastic closures,” urges Atkare. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com

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Insight & Outlook Novel sealing technologies

Prasenjit Chakraborty

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he growth of caps and closures market can be purely attributed to technological innovations. As a result, the packaging industry is able to extend various solutions with regard to caps and closures to end-consumers. For instance, in flexible packaging, stand-up pouches of various shapes and sizes can be fitted with different types of caps and closures such as spouts, zippers, etc. There are different types of technologies associated with caps and closures. One of the important technologies in this area is

Addressing safety concerns

Since food safety has emerged as one of the most important issues, the packaging industry is leaving no stone unturned to provide the best possible solutions. In this direction, Nichrome is in licensing technology agreement with a Spanish company Totpack for manufacturing horizontal form fill seal machines, which can produce stand-up pouches with caps, spouts and zippers. This machine can also handle pouches with different shapes. Such pouches have high aesthetic and brand value on the retail shelves. The sealing technologies for such pouches are evolved to produce leak-proof pouches.

for whom we manufacture PET jars and bottles are also offered suitable caps; something that is not a standard industry practice. Among other value-additions done at Manjushree is the auto-insertion of wads inside caps. A wad is the foil that we remove to take out a product from its container. Wads are made up of paperboard, aluminium foil, polymer and a sandwich layer of wax,” says Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd. Caps with wads fitted in them are put into filled jars and are passed through induction sealing plates. Heat produced through electromagnetic induction transfers the foil onto the lip of the jar. The paperboard is retained inside the cap and the foil is transferred onto the jars and acts as air-tight seals.

Closure technology

The advent of new technologies has facilitated caps and closures segment to offer innovative solutions to consumers. Apart from ensuring safety, caps and closures enhance the image of a product, which is essential to compete in the market. sealing. Sealing technology is important for product integrity, as any leakage or direct contact with the atmosphere will have a direct impact on the texture, taste and freshness of the product. Products such as ketchup, jam, pan masala, puree, juice, namkeen, etc lose the original form and flavour when they come into contact with air or moisture, hence losing out on the shelf-life. Sealing technologies are one of the ways to address the issue of food safety. Adulteration of food and beverages can be minimised, to a large extent, by employing sophisticated sealing technologies. Besides, issues like pilferage and counterfeit can be addressed. 44

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The competition in the market has forced players in the area of packaging to adopt new technologies fast. The technologies are instrumental in enabling them to expand their business as such technologies provide innovative solutions, which ultimately help end-consumers. Recently, Manjushree developed a closure suitable for packing spices and powder-based products, the cap of which opens in two ways – one for dispensing a small quantity and another for dispensing a larger amount of the product. These kinds of value-additions provide the customers flexibility and convenience in usage of products. “Almost all our clients

With the passage of time, closure technology is also evolving. Naturally, the industry has seen several innovations from different companies in closure segment as well. Take the example of Bericap, the basic technology it uses for the beverage industry is to use a 1-piece closure, which differs from 2-piece closures by not having an inside liner. Such a closure needs high application torques to be tight enough and for a safe transport on bumpy roads. The disadvantage for the consumer is, of course, high opening torques. “The 1-piece closure offers higher safety, when it comes to the opening angle and the break of integrity of the product. A 2-piece closure breaks the integrity of a filled product after about 15° turn of the closure; a 1-piece closure opens after about 160° turn, so the safety for the bottled product is much higher,” says Pradeep Damle, General Manager, Bericap India Pvt Ltd.

Benefits for beverage industry

As a quality measure, the content of CO2 in Carbonated Soft Drinks (CSD) after a certain time is important. Normally, there is about 8 gm CO2/litre when one bottles the CSD products. In hot countries like India, one can find products stored outside and subjected to high temperatures. How


Novel sealing technologies

can you maintain the CO2 content to ensure the quality of the filled product? Answers Damle, “Using a 1-piece closure from Bericap, equipped with the DoubleSeal system, which is designed with an inside boreseal and an outside seal covering the neck wall from both sides, the filled product will maintain most of its CO2. The package will remain tight and without any doubt the high inside pressure will be released correctly when opening the bottle and cause no danger for the people. However, bottles with 2-piece closure normally start venting under high temperature, pressure conditions, which means they lose CO2 earlier than 1-piece closure, which is not an advantage for the quality of the filled product,” explains Damle. According to him, the DoubleSeal SuperShorty also provides another advantage. In India, hot fill application with 28 mm necks is still used for some fillings. Thus, heavier necks and closures are needed. “Using a DoubleSeal

SuperShorty closure for the hot fill process, bottlers can save a significant amount of resin for the neck and closure when compared with current practice (closureneck combination) and can reduce weight up to 30 per cent,” he says.

Competition to plastics

Aluminium caps are primarily used for pharma and liquor applications, wherein metal caps are crimped alongside neck of the bottles ensuring a perfect seal. Apart from these two sectors, plastic closures are a hit among consumers as they are safe for children, aesthetically pleasing and a reflection of modern day packaging. “Notable examples of transition from aluminium to plastics include moving of Crocin PET bottle from aluminium closure to plastic Child Resistant Caps (CRC). Amrutanjan also migrated from the traditional glass bottle with aluminium cap to trendy plastic package,” says Kedia.

Aluminium packaging involves almost 100 per cent cans where lids are seamed. “Technologically speaking, there is no possibility to apply a plastic closure on a can, even if some cans have a plastic overcap to protect its opening from dirt. Some types of aluminium bottles have been introduced in markets such as Japan, Korea, the US; but they remain in premium segments due to their high cost. Some developments are underway to reduce their cost and open distribution to wider markets,” says Vikrant Atkare, Manager-Sales, India, Barry-Wehmiller International Resources. However, Manoj Gujaran, General Manager-Projects, Clearpack Group, believes that plastic caps are preferred more when compared with aluminium caps. “It is much easier to cap a bottle with plastic. On the other hand, aluminium capper would need a bit more handling and maintenance,” he concludes. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook Integrated packaging solution

All-in-one pack for filling and capping applications

milk, for example. Also, customer with a wide range of bottles/caps/products to be filled on the same line cannot take advantage of such system. Finally, you need fairly good production volume to justify the purchase of a blower,” explains Ricard.

Photo courtesy: Serac

Growing demand

Over the last few years, the gap between packaging manufacturing and filling has been diminishing. Food and beverage manufacturers have been demanding a complete solution – ie blowing, filling and capping – for their packaging needs. As a result, many companies are now offering integrated solutions that incorporate blowing, filling and capping operations. Rakesh Rao

A

s beverage processors look for ways to do more with available space in the factory, they are increasingly opting for integrated solutions for filling and capping of beverages. “Yes, we have seen the demand for monobloc system for blowing, filling and capping increasing in the past few years,” says Nicolas Ricard, Area Sales Manager, Serac Asia Sdn Bhd. It all started in the beverage business where the main aim was to save cost on logistics and transport of empty bottles. Indeed with very high speed lines, it did not make sense anymore to buy and transport empty bottles from elsewhere. “Today, this trend is also seen in other businesses such as dairy, personal care, etc. One of the main reasons is to save on logistics cost, but bottle shape and size matter. Energy saving, changeover time and efficiency are also good advantages of this solution,” Ricard adds.

Integrated approach

The flexibility of the integrated system allows the combination of all 46

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blowmoulder models with the complete range of fillers depending on the final product to be treated. “Until now, monobloc systems were reserved for high speed applications and their cost for medium speed application was not really making sense. Serac decided to step into the blow moulding business for this particular reason. Most of the new markets that are open to PET do not require very high speed lines; Serac can propose an inline blower linked to a rotary filler-capper at an affordable price. Our Combox, as we named it, brings the advantages of having monobloc blowingfilling-capping to medium speed production rate to markets that Serac historically covers,” says Ricard. Since this technology is still in its early days of development, it has some restrictions. First, integrated system can be applicable for only PET containers, and hence it cannot be used for all filling and sealing applications in food & beverages industry. “Only products and processes compatible with PET can use this technology. PET is not yet accepted and proven for long-life

In spite of its limitations, experts believe that demand for such systems will increase in future as packaging companies invest in developing solutions that can overcome these shortcomings. As a result, many packaging companies are now offering complete solution for filling applications. Take the example of Serac, which aims to evolve from a filling and capping machine manufacturer to complete systems provider. Ricard elaborates, “Serac has always put the filler at the centre of its business. We have grown around a technology, our net weight filling technology. We are the pioneer and still developing filling technology that brings various advantages to the end-user. In the past, we developed our range of capping system to propose monobloc fillercapper to our customer. At the time, this was a main step forward and it is now a standard.”

Integrated advantage

Advantages of integrated blowingfilling-capping system are: o Space saving due to its compactness and small overall dimensions o Operating flexibility as it can handle a wide range of bottles, necks and cap sizes o Improved ergonomics since only one operator controls the whole system o A preform treatment system, the short connection between blowing and filling; the overpressured environment guarantee high hygiene level Source: SIPA SPA


Integrated packaging solution

The company is doing the same today with its stretch blow moulder. “We have developed a high-quality blower to match our filler standards. We want our customers to feel as safe having a Serac blow moulder that they are with a Serac filler-capper. We have hired highly experienced engineers and developed a special production site. Our first machines are out, and have been a success,” adds Ricard. Similarly, SIPA SPA offers SincroBloc, a compact integrated system for high speed blowing/filling/capping. The system guarantees high-quality standard and output ranging from 14,000 to 52,800 bottles/hour.

India calling!

Though the demand for integrated filling system is yet to pick up in India, filling and capping machine providers believe that demand for such systems is bound to increase as consumption of beverages grow manifold. “Serac is not present in

the beverage business (carbonated drinks, water, etc), so apart from this, I will say that India is not yet a bottle consumer for Serac business (dairy, oil, home care, personal care, etc). Pouches are still the preferred package. However, we have received enquiries for our Combox in dairy, oil and personal care; it will just take a bit more time to materialise. We are confident,” opines Ricard. If packaging companies can develop cost-effective integrated systems, there will be more takers among the small & medium manufacturers, who play dominant role in the Indian food & beverages industry. In order to tap this potential market, companies are already moving in this direction. “We are bringing to the market a new solution – a machine for medium speed (up to 9,000 bph on 1L) production at reasonable cost. Rotary stretch blow moulders are just too expensive for those speeds but you still need a rotary filler-capper! An in-line machine

synchronised with a rotary machine, thanks to Serac engineers, and after a few patents, Serac proposes such systems bringing affordable and yet highly reliable Combox,” claims Ricard.

More than just PET

The market for PET containers is increasing mainly due to rise in demand for beverages in the emerging markets. Companies are also coming up with new bottle-making technologies. Filling and capping technology providers are now integrating such bottle-making machine into their system to offer comprehensive solution. As Ricard rightly sums up, “In near future, usage of PET containers in markets such as dairy, sauces, personal care, etc is expected to increase. At the same time, new technology to make bottles is being explored. Bottle manufacturing will enter the packaging lines more deeply in future, our focus is there.” Email: rakesh.rao@network18publishing.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Insight & Outlook Net weight filling technology

Piyush Bhandari

N

et weight filling technology is gaining popularity among a host of filling systems available in the market, along with level, volumetric, piston and gravity fillers. Each type of filling system is built around a certain core of applications. Using a load cell mounted directly underneath the loading plate, net weight filling system guarantees the highest accuracy of filling vis-à-vis other filling systems in the market today. The net weight filler is particularly apt for markets where the product is expensive, delicate, abrasive or aggressive in nature. Such products in the food & beverage market would include edible oils, sauces, syrups, dressings, dairy products and flat alcohol drinks, to name a few.

in temperature and pressure, which could directly affect the ‘in-flight’ product and hence the final weight. Moreover, this ensures that each filling cycle is independent to the next. Therefore, the filler constantly adjusts itself to attain the highest accuracy for the specified weight to be filled. The operative cycle of the net weight filler is systematic and designed for precision. When an empty bottle is transferred onto the load plate of the filler, the first step for the filler is to measure the empty bottle weight, also known as tare weight. The filler will record this tare weight and measure whether it is within the expected tolerance defined in the recipe. If the tare weight is outside the tolerance level, a signal is sent to that particular filling station not to fill the bottle for that cycle, and thereby reject it.

bottle with the product settled. The filler simply subtracts the tare weight from the final weight of the bottle to get the net weight of the liquid. The filler will record the weight and calculate data such as tolerance of the final weight and standard deviation. While the bottle proceeds to the capping station, the filling carousel continues to complete the cycle and accept the next bottle. In this process, the load cell is zero-set before receiving the next bottle.

Advantage galore

One big advantage of net weight filler is that it can provide statistical data of every filling station during every cycle for information tracking and analysis such as standard deviation, mean and median weight of the bottle, and performance of every nozzle can be derived. It will also

A right tool to ensure accuracy in real-time production A new revolution has begun in filling of high-value liquids in rigid containers (bottles or jerry cans) in India, with the market leaders moving to net weight filling technology from other volumetric fillers. This is because net weight filling system guarantees the highest accuracy in filling vis-à-vis other systems in the market today.

Considering that product give-away and compliance with label statements are of utmost importance when it comes to manufacturing, net weight filling is able to optimise the filling of these liquids with guaranteed high accuracy, making it one of the few filling systems to give the fastest return on investments.

How the technology works?

Essentially, net weight filling system works like an advanced electronic weighing scale underneath the bottle to know how much product has been filled into the bottle. The load cell is controlled by an electronic card, which would provide feedback on each filling cycle. This feedback is used to auto-correct itself using a well-designed algorithm for the next cycle. This is critical because product properties change due to change 48

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Once the tare weight is recorded and accepted by the filler, the nozzle is actuated to fill the product into the bottle. The bottle is filled with a laminar flow. Laminar flow ensures that there is constant flow with little turbulence during filling, which helps to avoid or reduce foaming due to product characteristics. Due to constant monitoring of filling process against a filling graph, this is also the stage where the filler is able to detect if product is leaking out of the bottle (due to leak in bottle or improper positioning of bottle). In such a case, the filling graph deviates from standard. When this happens, filling is stopped and bottle rejected at the end of cycle. At the next stage after filling, bottles are measured for the final weight once the nozzle has been closed. This is the final stage of measuring the weight of the

provide clear data of rejected bottles. Moreover, the data would clearly associate each reject to its related faults. In effect, the net weight filler is inherently an intelligent ‘checkweigher’ for the bottle also. Net weight fillers are built to be clean and hygienic in design due to its numerous food applications. There is no contact between the nozzle and the bottle, and the filler is designed to prevent product stagnation for hygienic reasons. Ultimately, net weight filling provides better savings for the manufacturer, which can be passed onto the end-customer in an increasingly competitive market. Piyush Bhandari is the Director of Clearpack Singapore Pte Ltd. He can be contacted at email: info@clearpack.com


Insight & Outlook Roundtable

Are food and beverage manufacturers ready for new-age caps and closures?

Consumers worldwide have become more demanding when it comes to safety and aesthetics of a product package. Hence, they look for convenient and attractive packaging. To address these aspects, new-age caps and closures can play an important role. Prasenjit Chakraborty talks to industry experts to find out their views on the same…

Harish Joshi Managing Director, Nichrome India Pvt Ltd

Vikrant Atkare Manager-Sales, India, Barry-Wehmiller International Resources

Vimal Kedia Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd

If you look into the issue, there are two options available with the food and beverage manufacturers. For instance, companies involved in the production of smaller volumes and many varieties can opt for ‘Pick-Fill’ systems where a premade spouted pouch or a premade special shape pouch can be used. These are typically medium output, say 30 packs per minute, machines. Similarly, for companies with bigger volumes, Horizontal Form Fill Seal (HFFS) machines, which apply spout or cap online, offer a better option. It has been observed that food and beverage companies are increasingly adopting the cap and spout type solutions for valueadded products.

If you see the investment trend, you will find that, apart from new can lines, all new investments made by beverage manufacturers are with respect to plastic closures. However, it seems that food industry is quite late in adopting such new technologies. Few big companies in food sector have adopted new-age caps and closures; but still a lot needs to be done. Some of the reasons for this is the lack of availability of suitable packages (jars and closures), slow speed, and low automation of most of the food packaging lines. Sometimes, closures are applied by hand, and metal closures with their stiffness are more suitable than plastic.

In any arena, adoption of any new technology or product, to a large extent, depends on awareness. So is the case with caps and closures segment. Till recently, food and beverage companies were bit lukewarm towards new-age caps and closures. However, this scenario is changing now. Companies are slowly realising the importance of closure systems and they are getting ready to equip themselves with auto-cappers, torque testing lab machine, etc. But the constraint is that unless these types of equipment are made in India and conform with European standards, companies may not be able to adopt these modern practices soon enough.

Editorial take

It seems that awareness about new-age caps and closures in India has not reached the desired level. The demand will rise only when endconsumers ask for it. Once demand rises, food and beverage companies will do everything to meet the requirements of their consumers.

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Automation Trends Case Study - Nestlé Deutschland

Adding new dimension to labelling and filling

Nestlé, a market leader in the instant coffee segment globally, placed a turnkey order for designing a complete coffee filling and packaging line with a single vendor at its German facility in Mainz. Krones had to combine new machines with existing units and outsourced third-party kit to optimum effect for creating a complete line operating at maximum efficiency.

and above all, the labelling technology involved had to be precisely matched to the new design concept. Trials using the Bonamatic labellers installed at all the plants showed that these had come up against their performative limits with the elaborate processes involved. As a sensible alternative, Nestlé opted for Topmodule labellers rated at 19,800 containers an hour, supplemented by a Checkmat featuring specially developed software and a dynamic upstream buffer.

Photo courtesy: Krones AG

One sizeable line replaces two smaller ones

Sabine Zamecnik-Uebelhoer

N

estlé Deutschland AG’s plant at Mainz produces the Nescafé brand, plus cocoa-based drinks such as Nesquik and Nestlé Finest Hot Chocolate, with about 400 staff achieving a total output of around 24,000 tonne of finished merchandise each year – from roasting the raw coffee beans, freezing and spray drying, all the way through to filling and end-of-the-line packaging. The products are sold not only in Germany, but all over Europe and in Asia. Until the beginning of 2011, the facility in Mainz packaged its Nescafé on a Nescafé Classic line for 50-, 100- and 200-gram jars at speeds of up to 320 jars a minute (19,200 jars an hour) plus two Nescafé Gold lines, each rated at 200 jars a minute (12,000 jars an hour), one of them capable of handling both square and round jars. When in 2009, the Nestlé 52

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Group kicked off the Ergos project by relaunching the container for Nescafé Gold, thought also had to be given at the facility in Mainz as well to revamping the labelling and filling capabilities for Nescafé Gold.

A new standard of labelling

The goal of Nestlé’s Ergos project was to set a new standard in labelling excellence for a glass package of instant coffee, designed to stand out distinctively from its competitors on the supermarket shelves. In close co-operation with Krones and the glassworks of the supply chain, Nestlé Product Technology Centre in Orbe, Switzerland, developed a new, highly attractive container shape, which was called 24 K – with concave recesses on four sides and flattened at the edges, the jar is dressed in high, narrow body and back labels affixed by cold gluing, and self-adhesive side and lid labels for product specifications. Label, adhesive,

This configuration was to be the same for all facilities in which the new Ergos concept for Nescafé Gold had been earmarked for implementation, which included the plant in Mainz. However, since for historical reasons it housed two relatively small lines, each rated at 12,000 containers an hour, with total capacity higher than the output actually required, Nestlé Deutschland AG decided to replace the two smaller lines in their entirety with one large one. Nestlé Mainz placed the requisite order with Krones, whose labelling technology and bulk glass depalletising kit had already proved its worth in the line filling Nescafé Classic installed back in 2002. As the turnkey vendor involved, Krones’ task was to co-ordinate existing machinery with its own new machines and kit from other vendors. An existing fulls inspector had been earmarked for continued use, as were a linear air rinser, induction sealing units and a pallet wrapper. Krones integrated a filler from the Optima company, which specialises in powder filling, and a closer from Zalkin. The remaining kit supplied by Krones was manufactured in-house. “Our lines are usually given a U-shaped layout. The containers are passed from the dry end to the separate filling zone, and back into the packaging segment,” explains Bernhard Rau, Foreperson in the filling and packaging hall. The pallets of bulk glass are fed in, and the film is removed, after which a Krones Pressant bulk glass sweep-off


Case Study - NestlĂŠ Deutschland

depalletiser moves them layer by layer onto a mass conveyor. After they have been spaced out and turned upside down, they are blown out with dry air in a linear glass cleaner. The containers are now passed to the separate hygiene zone, where the coffee powder, after having being fed into an overhead funnel, descends by gravity to a rotary volumetric filler with 32 filling valves, which fills the actual jars. As the reference machine, the filler runs at 320 jars a minute for 50- and 100-gram containers, and at 280 jars a minute for 200-gram jars. To ensure aroma retention, the jars are then sealed with a membrane and closed with a turning lid.

foreign bodies, using X-rays. The jars are then dressed on the Topmodule labeller, beginning with an Autocol station, which applies pressure-sensitive labels to the lid, followed by two coldglue stations for the front and back labels, and another pressure-sensitive labelling station for stickers on the side of the lid. Two Checkmat cameras then inspect the precise label position and monitor the presence of front and back labels, by running a comparison routine with defined points on the container. Incorrectly labelled containers are rejected; they total about one per cent, and are essentially attributable to the print quality of the labels concerned.

Quadruple labelling and position monitoring

Palletising

A newly created Accutable buffering section provides up to two minutes of buffering time for the downstream machines. First, a fulls inspector monitors the closed containers for

The containers then leave the hygiene area and are passed back to the dry end, with a jar line distributor allocating them among up to six lanes as the infeed flow to the Variopac Pro packer. The tray packer produces half-depth trays with

downstream film-wrapping in a hotair shrink tunnel or full-depth trays without film. Depending on the size of the jar concerned, packs are created here holding two times three, three times four or two times five jars. Over the course of a downstream buffering section, the trays are turned; self-adhesive labels are affixed to the film showing the bestbefore date; and then the trays are turned again. The palletising layers are formed by a Robobox pack grouping unit. The layers are fed to a Modulpal palletiser, which creates the stacks, while layer pads are inserted to stabilise them. The completed pallet of fulls is then wrapped to secure it for transportation. The entire line is monitored by a Krones line diagnostic system. Sabine Zamecnik-Uebelhoer is Global Key Account Manager - NestlĂŠ, Sales Division at Krones AG. Email: info@krones.com

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Energy Management Efficient pumping systems

aving power, controlling

Achieving energy efficiency by totally eliminating wastage and enhancing process efficiency is a much-needed strategy to reduce manufacturing costs. Hence, in the food processing segment, use of energy-efficient equipment is gaining popularity. And in this context, usage of appropriate pumping systems can help attain energy savings to a large extent. Avani Jain

E

nergy concerns affect one and all. New legislations are compelling the world to adopt higher efficiency standards in all the processing segments, and food processing segment is no exception. To get started on the road to energy efficiency, one needs to first take a step back to see the bigger picture and understand that energy usage, process control, and equipment reliability are all interrelated. It is here that the importance of right pumping systems can be better understood as the amount of excess energy used by a pump system can seriously impact a plant’s productivity as well as long-term sustainability. At a food processing facility, pumps are primarily used for cleaning operations and cooling. These can account for up to 15 per cent of the load in various facilities. Thus, the drive to save energy in pump systems is not just about conservation or environmental concerns but primarily a bottom line issue. Significant opportunities exist to reduce pumping system energy consumption 54

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through smart design, retrofitting and operating practices. Gradually, the food processing industry is realising the importance of appropriate pumping systems for energy efficiency and is taking the required steps. A K Dhagat, General Manager, Mother Dairy, Gandhinagar (a unit of GCMMF Ltd), notes, “We have reduced our energy consumption to a large extent. We undertake energy consumption audit every three years and based on the recommendations, we adopt new strategies and try to achieve 100 per cent energy efficiency in our operations. Hence, we have installed energy-efficient pumps for cooling towers & condensers, and replaced Vapour Absorption Machine cooling water pumps.”

The selection criteria

Normally, a company may not consider pumping systems to save on energy cost. But, it is estimated that pumping systems account for the second-largest expense for any process industry. Pumps actually consume around 10 per cent of the world’s energy, more, in fact, than any other type of equipment. Hence, it is imperative to

optimise inefficient pumping systems to save energy and reduce overall cost of processing. Pumps need to be designed to operate near their Best Efficiency Point (BEP) to ensure smooth flow through the system with minimum energy use and maximum reliability. Pump system efficiency depends on the performance of motor, pump, pipe and valves. Proper selection of pumps & motor (without oversizing) and proper pipe size can keep the pump set close to BEP. While high-capacity, low-head pumps have reasonably good efficiency, medium and low-capacity pumps have relatively low efficiency. Process engineers calculate the flow that the pump has to handle and the head it has to develop. The manufacturer then selects the pump that meets the process engineer’s specification at around its BEP.

The right pumping system

Quality counts, so it is important to choose a well-designed pump. Close tolerances and optimised internal designs are the key to maximising performance, and this calls for a robust construction. Less robust pumps, often made from


Efficient pumping systems

thinner material, tend to expand and contract under pressure, requiring larger clearances and resulting in lower efficiency. The critical issue is selecting the right pump for the specific task. One needs to consider overall system design in addition to pump design. Even with high-quality pumps, actual pump performance can vary dramatically from application to application. Further, the critical aspect of energy efficiency in a pumping system is the matching of pump sets to load. Most pumping systems have excessive operating costs as they use more energy than they should. Larger than necessary pumps are specified in the name of safety and reliability, resulting in pump systems that operate sub-optimally. It has been observed that oversizing is the single biggest culprit of pumps wasting energy. Thus, it is important to conduct efficiency tests on priority pumps in a plant; identify misapplied or oversized pumps; estimate energy savings; and

determine the cost-effectiveness of each improvement. The wastage of energy due to oversizing of pump can be taken care at the design stage itself by proper selection of pump with duty point lying in the range of 80-110 per cent of BEP, with a provision of Variable Speed Drive (VSD) arrangement and use of highly efficient motors. Significant energy savings can be achieved in a pump system by reducing the pump rotational speed. VSD is a device that controls the rotational speed of motor-driven equipment. Variable Frequency Drive (VFD), the most common type of VSD, efficiently meets varying process requirements by adjusting the frequency and voltage of the power supplied to an AC motor to enable it to operate over a wide speed range. External sensors monitor flow and/or pressure and then transmit a signal to a controller that adjusts the frequency and speed to match process requirements. Thus, they help in saving 30-40 per cent of energy.

Need for a comprehensive approach

For most applications, the market for high-efficiency pumps and energyefficient motors exists. However, these are expensive because of their sophisticated design and superior materials. Since energy constitutes major cost in the entire life cycle of a pumping system, initial installation should not be the sole criterion for purchasing a pump. A Life Cycle Cost (LCC) approach should be employed while procuring a pump, which should be extended to the electric motor. LCC includes capital, operating and maintenance costs over the lifeline of the pump. Efficient pump systems can ensure energy efficiency if one considers proper selection, sizing, operation and maintenance of pumps. Ensuring that a pump operates close to BEP under all situations is the key to energy conservation in pumping systems. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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POLICIES & REGULATIONS Food storage policy

Prasenjit Chakraborty

T

he government has taken a number of steps to address the problems pertaining to storage and preservation of food products. The steps include encouraging reforms in agricultural marketing sector to facilitate private sector investments, and implementation of schemes from the Central Government. In order to reduce loss, Grameen Bhandaran Yojana is being implemented under which rural godowns are being established to provide scientific storage facilities for arresting losses in terms of wastage and quality.

anyone investing ` 10 crore will get ` 25 lakh as subsidy. As a result, only small godowns are being constructed that are not serving the purpose. India requires large godowns to stock its grain.” According to Kaul, last year has witnessed one of the important developments – subsidy has become proportionate to the capacity of the warehouse. Now subsidy is 15 per cent of the capital cost up to a capacity of 30,000 tonne. “It is much better now. Earlier, the maximum subsidy was available up to 2,000 tonne. As a result of this, small godowns were constructed. So, it has created an impact in warehousing. This is already under implementation,” he adds.

70-75 per cent of the capital cost is by way of debt or loan that is borne by NABARD using RIDF. These funds are being given for interest rate subversion. During last year, this facility was given to government agencies only. Now for the first time, private sector players have also come under this,” says Kaul. There is every possibility that the sector will attract more investments after the government’s decision to include private sector as well.

Ensuring food security

Another important development is that the government for its own requirement has been implementing

Need to take corrective measures

to minimise food wastage

In the recent past, the government has taken initiatives to encourage the entry of private sector in the food storage and preservation arena in a big way. Such initiatives are certainly positive signs for addressing the issue of food spoilage. But how pragmatic is the Grameen Bhandaran Yojana? Is the scheme able to provide desired results? Sanjay Kaul, Managing Director and CEO, National Collateral Management Services Ltd, replies, “The Grameen Bhandaran Yojana scheme is not attracting investment from large companies. It is because the maximum subsidy for this scheme is ` 25 lakh, irrespective of the capacity of the warehouse. It means

Last year has witnessed one of the important developments – subsidy has become proportionate to the capacity of the warehouse. Now subsidy is 15 per cent of the capital cost up to a capacity of 30,000 tonne. Earlier, the maximum subsidy was available up to 2,000 tonne. Sanjay Kaul

Managing Director and CEO, National Collateral Management Services Ltd

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Major initiatives

The Union Finance Minister announced in the Budget speech this year that ` 5,000 crore will be earmarked out of NABARD’s Rural Infrastructure Development Fund (RIDF) not as subsidy but giving interest rate concession towards creation of warehouses. “I am hopeful that the scheme details will be announced soon. Basically, under the scheme if someone takes a long-term loan at 11 per cent through NABARD, then he/she will get 1.50 per cent interest rate concession. Instead of 11 per cent, he/she will have to pay 9.50 per cent,” points out Kaul. According to him, two elements are important when it comes to warehousing. One is capital cost subsidy, which is already there with Grameen Bhandaran Yojana, and second is extending the benefits to private sector as well. “If one takes a loan, normally

Tenure Guarantee Scheme. “Under the scheme, private sector can put up the warehouse and assurance is given by the Food Corporation of India (FCI) that up to 10 years, it will ensure utilisation. So far, about 15 million tonne has been tended out. Of this, capacity for 5 to 6 million tonne has already been constructed. And in some cases, we are doing stock management of such godowns,” says Kaul. The government has also announced Viability Gap Funding Scheme (details are not yet notified) under which private sector will be encouraged to construct modern silos where grains will not be stored in bags, but in bulk quantities. The modern silos will boost storage and shelf-life of grains. If everything goes in the right direction, it will uplift the storage and preservation scenario of food grains in the country. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com


Strategy Successful brand building

Chandrashekhar Badve

I

mpulse purchases in retail account for as much as 85 per cent of the total sales across sectors, especially in the FMCG and food retail sector. It is important to understand that facilitation of a sale is the end-game of all marketing activities, without which marketing activities remain futile. Although brands understand that all activities may not directly lead to sales, each standalone marketing activity has its own unified purpose, eventually leading to attracting a consumer to buy a particular brand. Many consumers may not be able to identify the one reason, which attracts them to certain brands, as promotional activities create conscious and subconscious allure. But, these are the activities that create an engagement leading to a long-lasting impact on the client. The brand packaging and design is the moment of truth for products to woo their prospective customers. The amalgamation of great ideas of impact and insight-based brand packaging & design is integral to creation of a robust brand impression. This impact shows up in one’s shopping bags with brands one never intended to purchase.

Making

right sense of customer

needs How do brands get on people’s shopping lists? More importantly, how do brands get into their homes that were never planned to buy? Understanding the reasons why some brands win one’s heart, while others struggle to woo consumers holds the key to creating champion brands. The secret lies in creation and implementation of innovative ideas of impact. In retail, these ideas play a crucial role in facilitating a brand purchase.

Impressing customers

It is important to explore the aspects that lead to creation of brand impression. Today, brands are employing consumer mapping techniques to obtain insights that would enable the brands to understand their consumers’ preferences, needs and behaviour. These insights are aligned with the buying process of consumers to create marketing strategies. Consumer insights enable brands to identify growth opportunities by understanding the attitudinal ‘why’ behind the ‘what’ of demand. These insights can help strengthen market optimisation of brands in terms of spends, focus and communication. Improving efficiency is crucial in mature markets where brands have to move from a customer hunting/ search to a customer cultivation approach. 58

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

At the outset, this approach seems to be a strong methodology in building brand engagement. But, it is important to understand the different ways in which consumers absorb and react to brand activities. Consumers engage with brand activities through the five senses – vision, hearing, taste, smell and feel. Consciously and subconsciously, the brand activities create customised engagement between consumers and the brand. The five senses through which consumers absorb information need to be analysed and innovated upon for an impact. This holds true not only for brand packaging and design, but across all the initiatives a brand entails through the course of wooing its future brand users. Brand perception and consumer gut-feel create a strong bond between a consumer and a brand. The consumers’ gut-feel is an outcome of past experiences/feedback, and how they relate to the brand. A strong bond can be created by the brand if it can prove its worth to customers and that it understands their needs. This should be brought out by the brand design and packaging; the five senses support to build this perception among consumers. Brands that understand which of the five senses are the most important in their category for its consumers, and the brands that innovate on this basis succeed. Across all marketing and brand initiatives, especially in brand packaging, a thorough understanding of the target market is an integral part and should be the first step in creating brand ideas. Insights-based idea development is the core of creating successful marketing techniques and helps not only in idea development but also in its implementation. The level of understanding that a brand has about its target market is the difference between an idea and an idea of impact.

Role of innovation Courtesy: Lokusdesign

Innovation needs to be a continuous process in brand engagement, and consumer is the best source for


Successful brand building

inspiring innovation. Consumers may not be able to define a strategy or outline a solution; but in most cases, they can definitely carve out a starting point to initiate innovation. This can be highlighted in the way Smirnoff Lime Vodka understood the consumer aspects of importance and used those aspects as an origin of innovation to create ideas of impact. By understanding through consumer insights that customers in this category base their buying decisions on smell, the brand was able to create a unique innovation to highlight this aspect of consumer importance. The sense of smell was the core focal point of engagement. This innovation led to a strong and instant impact among target audience. To utilise the sense of smell for facilitating and supporting buying decision, Smirnoff Lime Vodka created a unique flavour spray tester mounted on a 180 ml bottle. The spray tester was administered similar to the way the

personal care industry uses to initiate buying decisions. This strategy included a Below the Line (BTL) approach where an off-premise product promoter, situated around various liquor and wine shops, sprays the flavour on a tester card and then asks the consumer to smell it. This approach, clubbed with visual and design elements around the activity, created an instant curiosity, and the innovative smell-based strategy prompted an instant brand impact. As the consumers had gone to the wine and liquor stores with an intention of purchase, this flavour ‘smell’ testing activity resulted into a faster brand attraction and quicker buyer conversion. As an idea of impact, this initiative not only created a brand-connect among the target market segment, but also initiated a 32 per cent growth in sales through a shortened buying cycle. Engaging audiences through the five senses through innovative ideas will create long-lasting brand impressions.

These impressions have a better ability to build a brand relationship with the consumers and create an environment that lead to purchase. Similar to the way Smirnoff was able to highlight and innovate around the sense of smell, brands need to understand the senses of importance in their sector; traditionally in the food and retail sector, the sense of smell, sight, and touch are the most important senses to initiate brand dialogues. Understanding the principal senses within any category can give a pivot to instigating innovation. Brand and packaging design centered on innovation and impact will create customer gratification and brand triumph. Chandrashekhar Badve is the Founder Director of Lokusdesign, a design consultanc y recently recognised for its innovation in marketing for the Smirnoff Lime Vodka campaign. Email: shekhar.badve@lokusdesign.com

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Tips & Tricks Preventing food contamination

Handy tips for maintaining hygiene during manufacturing Workers in any food processing environment face a number of hazards, including sharp-edged tools, temperature extremes, grease, bacteria and harsh solutions & chemicals used to clean and sanitise processing areas. Proper hand hygiene is the first line of defence against food contamination in a food processing plant. Here are some practical tips for protection of hands during food processing so as to ensure food as well as employee safety.

1

Installing washbasins: An adequate number of conveniently located sinks for the sole purpose of hand washing should be located in areas where food is handled or processed. Each hand washing station should be equipped with hot and cold water under pressure; liquid soap & single-use paper towels in a dispenser; and an uncovered plastic-lined waste container. Further, hand washing sinks should be separate from those used for equipment cleaning and other operations.

2

Hand washing: Every person engaged in handling food or food processing utensils & equipment should wash his/ her hands frequently and thoroughly. Hands are to be washed before commencing work, after using washroom facilities, smoking, eating or at any other time hands may be soiled or contaminated. Where required, employees must use disinfectant hand dips.

3

Using hand sanitisers: The highest percentage of germs on hands tends to be underneath the nails and cuticle, with the second-highest proportion being between the fingers. Sanitisers should be used immediately after washing to ensure all these areas are taken care of. When hand sanitising, use enough of the product to completely wet the hands, and then rub hands for 15 seconds, thoroughly rubbing the formulation into the skin. Then air dry.

4

Drying devices: Suitable drying devices should be installed at the wash basins and towels should be made available. Devices or fixtures, such as water control valves, designed and constructed to protect against 60

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

recontamination of clean, sanitised hand should be installed at the food processing facility.

5

Wearing gloves: Gloves should be worn where necessary, and if worn, must be clean. Several factors contribute to glove comfort, including fit, flexibility, dexterity and tactile sensitivity. The correct glove for the task should be designed specifically for the application. When selecting gloves that will come into direct contact with food, manufacturers and processors should make sure the glove materials meet Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards for food contact.

6

Using temporary disposable gloves: When these types of gloves are used for handling food, the following protocol should be followed: Hands should be thoroughly washed before putting on gloves. And when changing into a fresh pair, gloves should be changed frequently during continual use, (eg, when they become soiled or torn), and prior to commencing a different task. Gloves should be stored and handled in a manner that minimises contamination. Hand washing after glove use also provides an extra level of protection and assurance. The signs system: Readily understandable signs directing employees handling unprotected food/food packaging materials, or food contact surfaces to wash and, where appropriate, sanitise their hands before they start work, after each absence from post of duty, and when their hands may have become soiled or contaminated are imperative. These signs may be posted in the processing rooms and in all other areas where employees may handle such food, materials or surfaces.

7

Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


Projects

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the food & beverages industry. Food processing unit

Milk powder

Punjab State Cooperative Supply and Marketing Federation Ltd (Markfed)

Rajasthan Cooperative Dairy Federation Ltd

Project type New facility Project news Markfed is setting up a food processing unit at Churwali, near Jalandhar. Project location Churwali, Punjab Project cost Not known Implementation stage Ongoing

Project type New facility Project news Rajasthan Cooperative Dairy Federation Ltd is setting up a new milk powder plant (30 MTPD capacity) in Jaipur. Project location Govindgarh, Jaipur Project cost Not known Implementation stage Ongoing

Contact details: Markfed House Sector 35-B, Chandigarh 160035 Tel: 0172-2660095/96 Fax: 0172-2609471 Email: business@markfedpunjab.com ---------------------------------------Food park

Contact details: Rajasthan Cooperative Dairy Federation Ltd Saras Sankul, Jawaharlal Nehru Marg Rajasthan, Jaipur Tel: 0141-2702501 Email: dpm-rcdf@rajasthan.gov.in ---------------------------------------Sugar

Project type New facility Project news Anil Mega Food Park is setting up an integrated food processing facility, spread over an area of 200 acre of land, in Gujarat. Project location Vadodara, Gujarat Project cost ` 200 crore Implementation stage Ongoing

Project type New facility Project news Olam Agro India Ltd is planning to set up 5,000 TCD sugar manufacturing unit in Madhya Pradesh. Project location Narsinghpur, Madhya Pradesh Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning

Anil Mega Food Park

Contact details: Anil Corporate House Off Judges Bungalow Road, Bodakdev Ahmedabad 380054 Tel: 079-40281000 Fax: 079-40281001 Email: info@anilmegafoodpark.com

Olam Agro India Ltd

Contact details: Olam Agro India Ltd DLF Building No. 8, Tower A Ground Floor, Phase II, Cyber City Gurgaon 122002, Haryana Tel: 0124-4839999 Fax: 0124-4839977 Email: india@olamnet.com

Refrigeration in dairy

Kerala Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd

Project type Facility expansion Project news Kerala Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd is carrying out an expansion of its refrigeration plant for Ernakulam dairy at Thripunithura. Project location Thripunithura, Kerala Project cost Not known Implementation stage Ongoing Contact details Kerala Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd Milma Bhavan, Pattom Palace PO Thiruvananthapuram 695 004 Tel: 0471-2555981/85 Email: gopalakurup@milma.com ---------------------------------------Tomato processing

Ruchi Kagome

Project type New facility Project news Ruchi Kagome is setting up tomato processing plant in Maharashtra (commercial production by June 2014). Project location Maharashtra Project cost ` 44 crore Implementation stage Ongoing Contact details Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd 614, Tulsiani Chambers, Nariman Point Mumbai 400021 Tel: 022-66560600 Email: ruchisoya@ruchigroup.com

Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com

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Tenders

Latest Popular Tenders brought to you by www.tendersinfo.com High pressure food processing system

Org : National Food Research Institute TRN : 15567119 Desc : Supply of high pressure food processing system, agriculture produce washer and sanitiser with electrolysed water and ozonised water system BOD : June 14, 2013 Loc : Japan BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Vending machines

Org : Stichting Het Deltion College TRN : 15517747 Desc : Supply and installation of vending machines, providing automatic accessories (including snacks, soft drinks, etc) and associated services like maintenance BOD : June 14, 2013 Loc : Nieuwegracht, The Netherlands BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Industrial kitchen equipment

Org : Kuntien Hankintapalvelut KuHa Oy TRN : 16085331 Desc : The frame of the target are in the municipalities acquired catering kitchen equipment BOD : June 18, 2013 Loc : Suupantie BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Table top wet grinder

Org : Tamil Nadu Civil Supplies Corporation TRN : 16137481 Desc : Supply of table top wet grinder BOD : June 19, 2013 Loc : Chennai BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Domestic electric food mixer

Org : Tamil Nadu Civil Supplies Corporation TRN : 16137497

Desc : Supply of domestic electric food mixer BOD : June 19, 2013 Loc : Tamil Nadu BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Pneumatic grain sowing tillage

Org : Tarim Isletmeleri Genel Müdürlügünden TRN : 15925547 Desc : Tenders invited for purchase of 10 PCS 8 M BOD : June 20, 2013 Loc : Ankara BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Mini food processing pulverising machinery

Org : CG Rajya Beej Evam Krishi Vikas Nigam Ltd TRN : 15833175 Desc : Supply of mini food processing pulverising machinery for general cereals and minor millets, mini rice & mini dal mill BOD : June 27, 2013 Loc : Chhattisgarh BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Milk processing practical training laboratory equipment

Org : Utenos regioninis profesinio mokymo centras TRN : 16139266 Desc : Tenders invited for food industry laboratories for practical training of milk processing BOD : June 27, 2013 Loc : Utena, Lithuania BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Seed grading and processing unit

Org : CG Rajya Beej Evam Krishi Vikas Nigam Ltd TRN : 15833176 Desc : Supply of seed grading and processing unit (1 tph to 5 tph) BOD : June 29, 2013 Loc : Chhattisgarh BT : Domestic

Org: Organisation’s name, TRN: Tendersinfo Ref No, Desc: Description, BOD: Bid Opening Date, Loc: Location, BT: Bidding Type Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Event List

National Ahmedabad

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

Pune

Gujarat September 20-23, 2013

Maharashtra October 18-21, 2013

Ludhiana

Aurangabad

Punjab December 20-23, 2013

Maharashtra January 10-13, 2014

Chennai

Jaipur

Indore

Kolkata

Tamil Nadu Rajasthan November 14-17, 2013 Nov 29 - Dec 02, 2013 Madhya Pradesh Jan 31 – Feb 03, 2014

West Bengal February 21-24, 2014

For details

Network18 Media & Investments Ltd

Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. • Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: engexpo@network18publishing.com

Food Technology Show

Tradeshow to be held along with PackPlus South will provide a one-stop shop for food & drink technology, quality assurance, packaging, retail solutions, food safety and laboratory equipment; July 05-08 2013; at Hyderabad International Trade Exposition Centre, Hyderabad For details contact: Print Packaging.Com Pvt Ltd F 101, Tower No. 7, 1st Floor International Infotech Park Vashi, Navi Mumbai Tel: 022-27812619, Fax: 022-27812578 Email: info@packplus.in

India Foodex 2013

International exhibition focussing on food products, food processing, grain milling and packaging technology; August 23-25, 2013; at Bangalore International Exhibition Centre, Bengaluru For details contact: Media Today Pvt Ltd T-30, 1st Floor Khirki Extention, Malviya Nagar New Delhi Tel: 011-26681671/26682045 Fax: 011-26681671/26682045 Email: indiafoodexgmail.com

Intelpack 2013

A tradeshow that will provide a launchpad for the packaging industry; September 12-14, 2013; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Intel Trade Fairs & Expositions Pvt Ltd 113, New Sonal Link Industrial Estate Building No.2, Link Road Malad (W), Mumbai Tel: 022-28803977 Email: info@intelexpo.com

Indian Ice-Cream Congress & Expo

An event dedicated to the new developments in technologies for the ice cream industry; September 20, 2013; at Ahmedabad For details contact: Indian Ice Cream Manufacturers Association 301-A, Diamond Kiran, Shrikant Dhadve Marg Mira Road (E), Mumbai Tel: 76988-69800 Email: info@iicma.in

International Taiwan International Halal Expo

Specialised event for companies dealing with halal certified products; June 26-29, 2013; at Taipei World Trade Center Taipei, Taiwan For details contact: Taiwan External Trade Development Council Bureau of Foreign Trade Ministry of Economicas Affairs, ROC 1 Hu Kou Street, Taipei, Taiwan Tel: +(886)-(2)-23510271 Fax: +(886)-(2)-23517080 Email: foodtaipei@taitra.org.tw

Guangzhou International Coffee Equipment & Supplies Fair

Specialised exhibition-cum-tradeshow for the coffee processing and retail industry; June 27–29, 2013; at China

Import & Export Fair, Pazhou Complex, Guangzhou, China For details contact: Guangzhou Huazhan Exhibition Planning Company Ltd Suite H, 9th Floor, Jinsui Tower, No. 900 Guangzhou Avenue Mid Guangzhou, Guangdong, China Tel: +(86)-(20)-38866965 Email: hosfair@hosfair.com

Expofruit

Event focussing on new technologies for the agro-processing sector; July 10-12, 2013; at Expocenter, Mossoro, Brazil For details contact: Expofruit Rod BR 110 - KM 47 - PO Box 137

Mossoro, Brazil Tel: +55-84-33126939 Email: expofruit@gmail.com

Food Ingredients Philippines

Specialised exhibition-cum-conference displaying latest developments in the field of food and beverage ingredients; July 11-13, 2013; at SMX Convention Center, Pasay, Philippines For details contact: Ubm Asia Ltd 17/F China Resources Building 26 Harbour Road Wan Chai, China (Hong Kong S.A.R.) Tel: +(852)-(2)-8276211 Fax: +(852)-(3)-7497310 Email: matthias.baur@ubm.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

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Event Preview PackPlus South 2013

Opening up the southern frontier for novel packaging technologies

The fast-paced growth in the Indian food processing industry is resulting in rising demand for new technologies to increase production. In such a scenario, the Food Technology Show at PackPlus South 2013 to be held in Hyderabad from July 5-8 can serve as an ideal platform for suppliers of modern machinery and technologies to demonstrate their products for the benefit of food processing companies, thereby helping them meet the growing domestic and export market demands.

Avani Jain

T

he processed food segment in India is growing continuously and currently witnessing a rate of 14.9 per cent. This growth is expected to increase to 25 per cent CAGR in 2014. The potential for processed foods is estimated to reach ` 9,800 billion ($ 210 billion) in 2014-15 from ` 3,300 billion ($ 70 billion) in 2009-10. In such a scenario, the Food Technology Show 2013 becomes an ideal platform for the suppliers of high-end food processing equipment, integrated packaging lines and ancillary equipment that can meet the requirements of food processing companies to cater to the growing domestic and export market demands. The show will bring together the decision makers, entrepreneurs and technologists in the food processing & packaging 66

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

sector in direct contact with the worldclass suppliers of equipment. The event will be a part of PackPlus South 2013 exhibition at HITEX International Exhibition Center, Hyderabad, to be held from July 5-8, 2013. It will help equipment manufacturers to explore the rising opportunities in the South.

PackPlus South 2013

The Indian packaging industry is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12.3 per cent that will make it the fourth-largest global market in packaging industry, with sales of $ 42.7 billion. The huge scope of innovation and investment has opened doors for several multinational companies, and the Indian players are leveraging on the optimistic environment. In such a scenario, PackPlus South 2013 will give a global business platform to the industry. More than 150 companies have already signed up for PackPlus South

2013. CorruPack 2013 will be running parallel with this event. It would be accompanied by International CorruPack Conclave and PackAge Conclave. PackPlus South 2013 is the first packaging industry exhibition in the country to be associated with UFI, which is the association of the world’s leading tradeshow organisers and fairground owners, major national and international exhibition associations and selected partners of the exhibition industry. “We initiated the process of bringing total transparency in our operations with the independent audit. The UFI approved label will provide an assurance to PackPlus South 2013 exhibitors and visitors that they will benefit from a professionally planned and managed event,” says Neetu Arora, Director, Print-Packaging.Com (P) Ltd, the organiser of the show.

Looking ahead

India has the largest global consumer market of 1.2 billion, with over 600 million consumers below the age of 40 years. It has a potential to become the major food basket of the world. Hence, large-scale modernisation and upgradation of technology & systems are the need of the hour and food processing companies are embracing modern technologies rapidly. The Food Technology Show at PackPlus South 2013 intends to bring together proficiency in the field of food processing and packaging to provide a platform for effective exchange of ideas and technology. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


Event Report IFFA 2013

Raising innovation quotient in meat processing Recently concluded international meat processing event, IFFA 2013, organised by Messe Frankfurt, showcased latest developments in meat processing ranging from sausage production to transportation. The 2013 edition of IFFA surpassed all its previous records in terms of number of exhibitors, visitors and total area of exhibition space. Photo courtesy: Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH / Petra Welzel

Photo courtesy: Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH / Jochen Günther

Ribbon cutting ceremony

Prasenjit Chakraborty

I

FFA 2013, held from May 4-9, in Frankfurt, once again demonstrated the latest trends and developments in the area of meat processing from all over the world – and this time it was even bigger with optimised venue planning. The spectrum ranged from traditional sausage production to industrial slaughtering including processing, refrigeration, storage, packaging and transportation.

IFFA at a glance

o o o o

960 companies showcased latest innovations

1,10,000 sq mt exhibition space 47 countries participated 57 per cent exhibitors from outside Germany

o

60,000 visitors, of which

61 per cent were from overseas

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Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Visitors thronging the halls to explore technologies on display

Impressive growth figures

No doubt, IFFA has been hailed as one of the best events for the meat processing industry. The trade fair consolidated its position further this year. According to the organisers, this time the event saw over 60,000 visitors – an increase of 2.5 per cent compared to its last edition. Of the total visitors, 61 per cent were international visitors; and 57 per cent of exhibitors were from outside Germany. About 960 companies from 47 countries presented their latest products to the trade visitors. Particular mention must be made of the high level of internationality at this year’s event. Additionally, the exhibition space occupied rose by six per cent to 1,10,000 sq mt. “At this year’s IFFA, there were only winners. Exhibitors and visitors were pleased with the arrangements and the results achieved. The increase in all main indices reflects the high level of dynamism in the sector,” said Wolfgang Marzin, President and Chief Executive Officer, Messe Frankfurt. He added, “IFFA is unrivalled as the leading innovation platform and meeting

place for the meat processing sector.” The majority of visitors came from the Russian Federation, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Poland, Austria, the US, Switzerland and China. There were also large number of visitors from Australia, South America and East Europe. For the FKMcertified industry, the large proportion of international visitors is an important factor for the positive rating given to the fair. “As in the past, this year’s IFFA demonstrated impressively that it is the world’s leading event for the meat processing sector. The level of internationality has risen again, the number of visitors is up and, in particular, the visitor standard was high. The top decision makers of companies of all sizes from Germany and the whole world were present at the event. And this shows its unequivocal focus on meat; IFFA is held in high regard by all experts,” said Berthold Gassmann, Chairman, Meat Processing Machines Association of the Federation of German Machine and Plant Manufacturers (Verband Deutscher Maschinen und Anlagenbau – VDMA).


IFFA 2013

Another attraction of the event was Meat Vision Congress held on May 3 for the first time in the history of IFFA. The Congress emphasised on sustainability in the meat processing sector. Eminent speakers from reputed institutes also participated in the event. As at the previous edition of the fair, one of the biggest groups of visitors was from the butchers’ trade. Speaking on its behalf, Heinz-Werner Süss, President, the German Butchers’ Association (Deutscher Fleischer-Verband – DFV), said, “Three successful special shows, seven great competitions, innumerable productive discussions with colleagues from home and abroad, as well as countless new impressions, impulses and ideas – IFFA 2013 was no less important and valuable for me as a master butcher and company owner than as a representative of the German butchers’ trade.” According to the organisers, both exhibitors and visitors gave the world’s leading trade fair top ratings for quality.

On the exhibitor side, the positive overall rating rose from 81 to 86 per cent and, on the visitor side, from 94 to no less than 97 per cent. The Messe Frankfurt poll reveals a positive view of the economic situation in the sector. About 89 per cent of exhibitors rated the event as being satisfactory to good, an increase of five percentage points. The views from the visitor side are similar with 88 per cent giving a satisfactory to good rating. Commenting on IFFA, Ruben Varea, Manager Sales, Asia-Pacific, said, “This serves as an important exhibition for us, as it provides an effective platform to promote our products to international audience.”

Sustainability focus

One of the main focus at this year’s leading trade fair for the meat processing sector was the sustainable use of energy and resources, wherein particular attention was paid to automation on the production side. Another important subject was food safety because hygiene, labelling and traceability along the

whole process chain are vital for consistent high quality in the meat processing sector. The highlights for the butchers’ trade included regionalism, convenience products and takeaway sales. Yet another focal point was on ingredients, spices, additives, casings and packaging materials, which are used in both the butchers’ trade and the meat processing industry. Other subjects discussed included clean labelling; the reduction or exchange of additives and allergens that have to be declared; artificial aromas; and ‘walking food’ – ie products catering to the way of life and eating habits of young target groups. In this case, the spotlight was on characteristic sauces or appealing takeaway packages. Besides, the event displayed the most recent systems solutions for production planning and production or process control as well as innovative process control technology & process automation. The next edition of IFFA will be held during May 7-12, 2016. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com

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Book Review

Science and technology of enrobed and filled chocolate, bakery and confectionery products Editor: Geoff Talbot Price: ` 11, 340

One of the most interesting and widely appreciated products among consumers today is enrobed and filled chocolates, bakery & confectionery products. Products, such as praline-filled chocolates or chocolate-coated biscuits, are proving to be widely accepted by consumers. This book provides a comprehensive overview of quality issues affecting these products and suggests efficient quality enhancement strategies. Divided into three parts, the first part deals with formulations of coatings and fillings with detailed chapters on chocolate manufacturing, confectionery fats, compound coatings and fat & sugar-based fillings. The second part includes critical product design issues such as oil, moisture & ethanol migration and chocolate & filling rheology. This part also provides special emphasis on shelf-life prediction and testing. The third section covers processing, packaging and storage; latest ingredient preparation and manufacturing technology. This book will be of high value to professionals in the chocolate, bakery and confectionery industry as also to food scientists and technologists pursuing further research in the said fields.

Irradiation of food commodities

This book presents the reader with comprehensive detailing towards the irradiation of food commodities. It covers a wide range of topics right from the detection techniques used and their applications, legislations related to the irradiation of food and food safety. An interesting feature of this book is the inclusion of a section dealing specifically with consumer opinion to substantiate the actual ramifications of each technology parameter. The first part of this book deals with the various legislations for food irradiation across the world. The next part mainly covers the different irradiation techniques. The third part is focussed on detection and risk assessment of irradiated food. There is extensive coverage on the detailed applications of irradiation on the various food items of plant and animal origin. This book offers vital information regarding meeting the government requirements as well as consumer acceptance when it comes to irradiated food. It will be a helpful tool to those pursuing and teaching courses on food science, as well as R&D and food safety scientists.

Author: Ioannis S Arvanitoyannis Price: ` 6,700

Reviewer: Tejas Padte, Lecturer, Ramnarain Ruia College

Available at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958, Telefax: 022-2203 4058, Email: thadam@vsnl.com 70

Modern Food Processing | June 2013


Products This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

Barcode reader

DataMan 300 barcode reader is powered to handle the most difficult to read Direct Part Mark (DPM) codes as well as challenging 1D linear barcodes and 2D data matrix codes indexed or high-speed lines. It features high read rate performance. It decodes 1D and 2D barcodes with enhanced 1DMax+ and 2DMax+ code-reading algorithms, reads the codes whatever is the mark type or surface and gives high read rates of even damaged 1D linear barcodes at much faster rate. Its tuning automatically adjusts the settings of lighting to find optimal light set-up for the part, and it supports industrial protocols and also supports RS-232 for integration into legacy systems. The controllable, field interchangeable red lighting module allows best possible lighting and ensures highest read rates of DPM codes. The blue lighting module creates optimal lighting for PV solar wafer code reading. C-mount, S-mount or a variable focus liquid lens provides maximum depth of field flexibility.

Cognex Sensors India Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-40147840 Email: sisd.support.asia@cognex.com Website: www.cognex.com

Cutter control system

Cutter control system for pouching machine aligns the cutter position exactly to the centre of the round corner on a real-time basis. The double cut system does not generate burrs in corner cut unit, ensuring the safety of consumers and improving the value of the pouches. The basic principle of the technology is a combination of the high-precision CCD camera, which monitors the shape of the round corner, computerised image analysis and the cutter control system that controls the cutter position accurately with a servo motor. When a cutter position should be changed due to misalignments of the print, for instance, the evolved high speed image analysis moves the cutter position so that the cutter cuts right in the middle of the round corner precisely and in real time. The new real-time cutter control system completes the image analysis significantly faster.

Reifenhauser (India) Marketing Ltd Mumbai – Maharashtra Tel: 022-26862711 Email: info@reifenhauserindia.com, deepak@reifenhauserindia.com Website: www.reifenhauserindia.com

Looking For A Specific Product?

Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MFP (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MFP Fryer and send it to 51818

72

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Fluid bed dryer

The fluid bed dryer is ideal for the rapid and even drying of chemical, pharmaceutical and food products. Its salient features are: 65 per cent open perforated air distribution plates along with Dutch weave mesh, on-line sampling port, 2.5 kg to 500 kg batch capacity, top spray granulation, explosion relief disc, uniform drying at low temperature, top mounted pneumatic cylinder (directly coupled) for shaking (without wire rope system), heating mode electrical/steam/thermic fluid, etc. Intrinsically safe earthing system ensures complete elimination of static charge; pneumatically operated inflatable seals are provided for filter bag and product container sealing with pressure switches & FRL to ensure fail-safe operation. All contact parts are SS 316 as per GMP standard. The machine finds application in chemicals, pharmaceutical and food products industries. Fluid bed dryer comes along with all documentation like DQ, IQ, OQ and FAT as part of standard procedure. Jay Pharma Equipments Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-32155790 Email: jkpharm1@gmail.com Website: www.jaypharmaequipments.com

Mixer

Convection mixer design meets the three important mixing requirements for ready to eat food preparation, which include freedom of movement, transport capabilities of the particles and weightless condition. The inherent design feature of the mixer supremacy meets the proper mixing, moisturisation and shortening effect requirement for manufacturing ready-to-eat foods. High degree homogeneous dry mixing of starchbased materials such as wheat, cornflour, potato with small proportion of flavours, fibres and nucleating agent can be achieved effectively by means of the basic configuration of twin paddle mixing operation feature of this mixer. The liquid shortening agent addition and moisture distribution to each and every particle of the dry blend material can be achieved with the manifold spray set-up provisions in the mixer. Flow distortion bar and pin mill system can help to enhance better moisture absorbing characteristic of the ingredients and also facilitate for the penetration of moisture in each and every particle. Toshniwal Systems & Instruments Pvt Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044 –26445626/8983/8558 Email: mixer@toshniwal.net Website: www.toshniwal.net


Products

Silicone transparent tubing

These transparent tubings are made from 100 per cent pure silicone rubber by using fully automatic state-of-the-art machineries and technologies. Silicone transparent tubings are manufactured under stringent quality control and have the following distinguished features: Made from medical grade silicone rubber, which complies with USP Class VI requirement & FDA 21 CFR 177.2600, temperature resistant from -80°C to 250°C (-110°F to 480°F), non-reactive to body tissue and fluid, non-adherence to tissue etc. It remains unaffected by most water soluble materials and is sterilisable by steam, dry heat, ethylene oxide (ET) and gamma radiation that resists oxidation, ozone and radiation. It has an indefinite shelf-life. Silicone sleeves are also manufactured. It finds application in food, pharma, chemical, medical, heavy engineering, thermal power stations and PSUs.

AMI Polymers Pvt Ltd Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 022-28555107/631 Mob: 09223290931 Email:amipolymer@vsnl.com Website: www.amipolymer.com

Steam cooker

Stephan universal mixer cooker from Germany come in models that include UM/ SK in 24, 60, 80, 130, 200 litre. The outputs range between 100-250- 500-1000 kg/hr. By the combination of all processing stages in one machine and in one programmed cycle, these cookers can complete the entire processing in a short time and reduce the number of transfer points. The various processing stages include size reduction, mixing, blending, emulsifying, direct/indirect steam heating, vacuum processing, cooling and de-moisturising with vacuum/condenser cooling. These cookers are compact and ideally suited for low-cost production of consistently highquality ethnic products such as processed cheese varieties, mithais, wet spice pastes, onion paste, gravies, ketchup, chilli sauces, mayonnaise–cold/ hot process, baby foods, soups, etc. Other models are also available for specific processes and higher outputs.

TRICON Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020- 25652205/2451 Mob: 09890192832 Email: triconfood@gmail.com Website: www.stephan-asiapacific.com June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

73


Products

Hot beverage vending machine

This fullyvautomatic vending machine is used for dispensing hot beverages from instant soluble premix powders. The state-of-the-art brewing system features precise ingredient control system to ensure quality and satisfaction. This machine is ideal for both big and small organisations. Alphanumeric display on the front panel displays the machine status, counters and also presents a userfriendly menu for programming the premix grammage and water flow adjustment at the touch of a button. This has an in-built two litre storage tank and also has the option for using the 20 litre purified water bottle.

Jas Enterprises Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22743454, Mob: 09427417384 Email: info@jasenterprise.com

Portable thermometers

The microcontroller-based precision industrial portable thermometer (model DTM-22) is designed using the latest low power, high-speed microcontroller for accurate measurements of a wide range of temperature. The single instrument can accept multiple types of sensors, such as Pt-100 or J, K, R, S, or B-type of thermocouples. Various types of interchangeable probes can be used to measure the temperature of hot or cold flat/ rotating/vibrating surfaces, powder, liquid and gas, in furnaces, ovens, cold storages, etc. Libratherm Instruments Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-28963823 Email: libratherm@libratherm.com

Drain trap

The ball float drain trap is used for removing accumulated condensate automatically from compressed air systems. This is a reliable auto drain that works on the principle of buoyancy and hence does not depend on electrical power. Features include cast steel/CI housing, stainless steel internal, heavyduty and rugged construction suitable for rough and dusty conditions with a high pressure rating up to 16 kg/cm² (g) and discharge rate of maximum 1,600 kg/hr. Typical applications are in air receivers, air dryers, aftercoolers, heat exchangers, etc.

Pennant Engineering Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-26989709 Email: info@pennantindia.com, Website: www.pennantindia.com 74

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Block ice plant

The standard block ice-making plant is available in 9 sizes with a capacity range of 3 to 65 tonne of ice per 24 hours. Depending upon the size and customers’ specifications, the plant is designed for either 100 lb (45 kg) or 300 lb (135 kg) capacity cans. Manual or electric hoist for removing cans from the freezing tank is furnished depending upon the can dump system employed. Can fillers are suitable for large ice plants using can grid system. Grid system (optional) is provided for unloading up to 20 cans at a time. A sprinkler type can dump is provided for plants arranged to harvest 1 or 2 cans at a time. Industrial Refrigeration Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-22041185 Email: info@irl.co.in, Website: www.irl.co.in

Cooling tunnel

New 3 & 5 Tier cooling tunnels are available in either full stainless steel with food grade polypropylene belts and UHMWPE wear strips or mild steel frame with stainless steel contact parts also with food grade polypropylene belts and UHMWPE wear strips. Both the 3 & 5 Tier cooling tunnel come in 1,000 mm belt width and each belt is individually driven from its own invertor drive allowing maximum operating flexibility. The units can be supplied with or without air handling units, with or without refrigeration. A M P Rose (P) Ltd Bengaluru – Karnataka Tel: 080-28473611 Email: sales@amprose.co.in Website: www.amprose.co.in

Paper moisture meter

The Delmhorst P-2000 digital paper moisture meter comes with three separate scales: paper, baled scrap paper and reference. The moisture scale range for paper is 4.318 per cent, for baled paper the range is 5-40 per cent, and for the reference scale it is 0-100. The meter measures through built-in pins and optional pin electrodes. Contact pins mounted on top of the meter provide 0.8 cm (5/16’’) penetration for testing paper tubes or corrugated stock. Cole-Parmer India Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-67162222 Email: vinita.singh@coleparmer.in


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Products

Spices grinding plant

The spices grinding plant is offered in various capacities as per customers’ requirements. This plant is used for high capacity and single spice product line exclusively like dry red chillies, coriander, blended spices (masalas), turmeric, etc. The plant comprises pulveriser, conveyor, sieve, holding bin, blender, dust collector, etc, synchronised to give the desired output and quality. Depending on the process requirement, the equipment selection and process layout is done by experienced designers. Different capacity machines are available and manufactured as per customers’ requirements, eg 250 kg/hr, 500 kg/hr, 1,000 kg/hr, etc. Able Manufacturers Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-65974111, Mob: 09849271975 Email: ablemfrs@hotmail.com Website: www.processmachines.com

Double-twist wrapping machine

The model CW-300 double-twist wrapping machine has auto feeding system with vibrator. It has quick and easy changeable size. Two wrapper reels are provided for inner and outer requirements. Other features include no sweets – no wrapper system, low maintenance and easy to clean, product feed flow controlled by sensor, etc.

Makson Export Dist Surendranagar - Gujarat Tel: 02752-285991, Mob: 09825224488 Email: makson@makson-group.com Website: www.makson-group.com

Dispensing machine

This dispensing machine is mostly used for dispensing, counting of empty pouch, filled flat pouch, paper, paper bags, carton poly bags, etc. The speed of the machine ranges from 0 to 400 per/min. Range of the product is minimum 50 mm x 70 mm and maximum 210 mm x 350 mm. Thickness of the dispensing unit is 70 GSM paper to 10 mm thickness size (which should be flat). Counter and printer are available (as extra provision) if required.

Jacsons Engineers Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-25841814 Email: info@jacsonsengrs.com Website: www. jacsonsengrs.com June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

77


Products

Dairy homogeniser

The dairy homogeniser is fabricated using high-grade raw material and is known for high-performance, efficiency, ease-of-use and durability. This homogeniser requires low maintenance. The highpressure homogenisation is a process of increasing the consistency of a product by means of dispersion. Products displaced under the generation of highpressure are forced through homogensing valve gap. Cavitation turbulence and sheer force break the product into particles of size less than 1 micron. The dairy homogeniser finds application in industries such as dairy & icecream, food & beverage, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and chemical. Goma Engineering Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-41614161, Mob: 09322654236 Email: goma@vsnl.com Website: www.gomaengg.com

Drum sieve machine

As a pre-cleaner machine, the drum sieve machine is versatile, and used in the intake. This machine serves to separate coarse impurities, such as straw particles, string, paper, pieces of wood, maize, leaves and cobs, etc, in order to relieve downstream machine and

78

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

conveyors, and to protect them against operating faults and damage. Moreover, it is suitable for performing certain cleaning operations. Sifter International Faridabad - Haryana Tel: 0129-4060039, Mob: 09910097560 Email: sifter@ndb.vsnl.net.in Website: www.sifterinternational.com

Gravity filling machine

The semi-automatic gravity filling machine can fill both glass and PET bottles up to top lip. This is highly useful for batch production up to 8,500 bottles of 500 ml, 6000 to 7500 bottles of 1000 ml per shift. There is no requirement of power and any kind of major setting for different size and capacity of bottles. It works un-interruptedly for long run. The machine is used to fill water, fruit juice, oil, or any free-flowing liquid. The Royal Scientif ic Industries Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-22254749 Email: royal.scientific@yahoo.com


Products

Powder mixer

It is a new generation powder mixing equipment that helps to meet the customers’ current demands such as reduced sources and achieve excellency in quality improvement, low power consumption higher yield, short time operation with reduced maintenance cost. These mixers are ideally suited to handle solid, powder, flaky materials etc. Hence, it is widely used in applications such as food, animal feed, construction chemical, refractory industry, and so on. Apart from homogenous mixing, it helps in achieving the desired technical performance in the final product and its subsequent application.

Toshniwal Systems & Instruments Pvt Ltd Chennai – Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-26448983/8558 Email: mixer@toshniwal.net Website: www.toshniwal.net

Vision system

The In-Sight 7000 series of vision systems features powerful vision tools, autofocus, faster image capture, integrated lighting and lens and the capability to power and control a range of external lighting – all in a compact, industrial IP67 package that makes the system ideal for more applications than ever before. More options that can be included is a wide range of built-in communication protocols that are interface connected directly with the vision system. The compact In-Sight 7000 features built-in Ethernet, RS-232 serial and multiple discrete I/ Os.  The system can communicate directly to virtually any PLC or robot controller and manage multiple smart cameras remotely from a networked PC or HMI, simplifying implementation and reducing costs.  Field replaceable lighting with five different colour options is available.

Cognex Sensors India Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020- 40147840 Email: sisd.support.asia@cognex.com Website: www.cognex.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

Modern Food Processing

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

79


List of Products Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Acoustic enclosure...................................7, 65 Air audit blower................................................. 4 Air circuit breaker......................................... BIC Animal feed technology..................................BC Autoclave.......................................................... 15 Automatic rotary type cup fill.......................... 53 Banana ripening room................................... 6 Barcode reader.................................................. 72 Beverage preparation........................................ 51 Block ice plant................................................. 74 Box pouch.......................................................... 8 Brewing...........................................................BC Brookfield advance viscometer......................... 17 Brushes and bristle........................................... 55 Candy manufacturing machine.................... 77 Capping machine............................................. 27 Capsule filling machine.................................... 15 Cartoner........................................................... 15 Centrifugal fan................................................. 25 Centrifugal monoblock.................................... 73 Chiller........................................................ 61, 79 Chiller wheel.................................................... 47 Chocolate/cocoa..............................................BC CIP system......................................................... 3 Cleaning section equipment............................BC Cold room........................................................ 61 Colour sorting.................................................BC Compressor........................................................ 4 Condenser........................................................ 79 Condensing unit............................................... 61 Connecting clamp............................................ 69 Contactor and motor starter......................... BIC Control panel................................................... 61 Conveyor belt.......................................41, 55, 57 Cooling tunnel................................................. 74 Corner track..................................................... 69 Cream separator packing collar........................ 79 Cutter control system....................................... 72 Dairy homogeniser...................................... 78 Dehumidifier rental.......................................... 33 Dispensing machine......................................... 77 Door ................................................................. 73 Double-twist wrapping machine...................... 77 Drain trap......................................................... 74 Drive sprocket.................................................. 69 Drive/invertor................................................ BIC Drug and blood storage..................................... 6 Drum sieve machine........................................ 78 Dry van pump.............................................. 7, 65 Dry-break coupling............................................ 4 Dust control door............................................. 73 Ejector......................................................... 4 Engineering plastic component....................... 69 Evaporating unit.............................................. 61 Evaporator.................................................... 3, 79 Exhibiiton - Plastivision 2013......................... 80 Exhibition - India Foodex 2013...................... 78 Exhibition - Indian Ice-Cream Congress 2013 .36 Exhibition - Packplus South 2013.................. 67 Extruded product............................................BC Fall film evaporator with mechanical vapour recompression (MVR)................................. 29 Fall film evaporator with thermal vapour

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

recompression (TVR)....................................... 29 Filling machine................................................ 27 Flexible transparent PVC strip door................ 73 Flour milling...................................................BC Flow wrap......................................................FIC Fluid bed dryer................................................. 72 Forced air precooling room................................ 6 Frame support.................................................. 69 Fuelling system................................................... 4 Garlic specialised storage.............................. 6 Gear pump....................................................... 83 Grain handling................................................BC Gravity filling machine.................................... 78 Grinding and dispersion.................................BC Guide rail clamp.............................................. 69 Heat exchanger............................................. 3 Heat resistant door........................................... 73 Heat transfer equipment.................................. 25 High pressure blower....................................... 25 High pressure homogeniser............................. 71 HMI .............................................................. BIC Hot beverage vending machine........................ 74 Housing............................................................ 49 Human-machine interface............................ BIC Hydrocooler for fruits and vegetables................ 6 Hygienic piston pump........................................ 3 Ice candy plant............................................ 61 Ice cream and dairy products storage................ 6 Idler wheel return roller................................... 69 Industrial automation sensor............................ 59 Industrial chilling equipment........................... 61 Industrial door.................................................. 73 Insulated container........................................... 61 Insulated ice box.............................................. 47 Integrated machine safety solution.................. 31 Large diameter welded pipe......................... 79 Liquid process filter......................................... 49 Liquid sterile filling machine........................... 15 Loading arm....................................................... 4 Low humidity seed storage................................ 6 LVS .............................................................. BIC Mango ripening room................................... 6 Melt blown filter.............................................. 49 Membrane filter............................................... 49 Milk tank......................................................... 61 Mixer................................................................ 72 Modular belt.................................................... 69 Nylon can scrubber brush set....................... 79 Nylon flat transmission belt............................. 55 Oil milling.................................................BC Onion................................................................. 6 Paper moisture meter.................................. 74 Pasta ................................................................BC Plastic pellet....................................................BC Plastic sheet...................................................... 84 Plate heat exchanger gasket............................. 79 PLC .............................................................. BIC Pleated filter..................................................... 49 Polystyrene product.......................................... 84 Porous metal filter............................................ 49 Portable thermometer...................................... 74 Powder mixer................................................... 79 Power plant PHE gasket................................. 79

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Priming valve..................................................... 4 Process gas blower............................................ 25 Pump............................................4, 7, 65, 77, 83 Pure steam generator....................................... 15 PVC strip door................................................. 73 Rice milling equipment..............................BC Roots blower..........................................7, 65, 77 Rotary dry vacuum pump................................. 25 Rotary gear....................................................... 73 Rotary gear pump............................................ 83 Rotary lobe pump............................................ 73 Rs coaxial rheomdeter...................................... 17 S.S. pipeline gasket..................................... 79 Safety access equipment..................................... 4 Safety door....................................................... 73 Sanitary centrifugal.......................................... 73 Screw pump...................................................... 73 Seal machine.................................................... 53 Seamless pipe................................................... 79 Self priming monoblock................................... 73 Sensor............................................................... 59 Servo.............................................................. BIC Side bracket...................................................... 69 Silence flow package........................................ 25 Silicone transparent tubing.............................. 73 Spices grinding plant........................................ 77 Stainless steel pipe........................................... 79 Stainless steel slat chain................................... 69 Steam cooker.................................................... 73 Storage tank equipment..................................... 4 Submersible...................................................... 73 Tangential belt........................................... 55 Tank truck equipment....................................... 4 Temporary cooling........................................... 33 Thermal process..............................................BC Thermoplastic slat chain.................................. 69 Timing belt lattice........................................... 55 Trained manpower........................................... 33 Transmissions and ptos...................................... 4 Triplex plunger................................................. 73 Truck blower.................................................... 25 Tube ................................................................. 79 Tubular falling film evaporator system............ 29 Turn-key plant................................................. 29 Twin lobe roots blower.................................... 77 Two stage vacuum pump................................. 77 ‘U’ tube....................................................... 79 Vacuum belt dryer....................................... 29 Vacuum booster pump................................. 7, 65 Vacuum pump and system................................. 4 Vacuum system............................................ 7, 65 Vacuum tray dryer............................................ 29 Vertical inline................................................... 73 Vibro screening equipments manufacturer...... 45 Vision system................................................... 79 Water for injection generation still.............. 15 Water jetting...................................................... 4 Water ring vacuum pump................................ 77 Water treatment............................................... 51 Welded pipe..................................................... 79 Window hardener............................................ 61 Zeodration system...................................... 29

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

Looking For A Specific Product?

Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MFP (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MFP Fryer and send it to 51818

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

81


List of Advertisers Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

All India Plastics Mfrs Association

Pg No

80

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Essen Speciality Films Pvt. Ltd

84

Media Today Pvt Ltd

T: +91-22-28217324

T: +91-2827-252021

T: +91-11-41407851

E: pvi13@plastivision.org

E: sales@essenspeciality.com

E: indiafoodex@gmail.com

W: www.plastivision.org  

W: www.essenspeciality.com

W: www.indiafoodex.com

Anchor Health & Beauty Care Pvt Ltd 77

Everest Blower Systems

7, 65

T: +91-11-45457777 E: cnshah@anchorglobal.net

Ani Engineers

Mikrosen Control Devices Pvt Ltd

59

W: www.mikrosen.com

83

Galaxy Sivtek Pvt Ltd

45

Mitsibishi Electric India Pvt. Ltd.

T: +91-22-25691208

T: +91-20-27102000

E: anivarya@sancharnet.in

E: sales@galaxysivtek.com

E: info@mei-india.com

W: www.anivaryapumps.com

W: www.galaxysivtek.com

W: www.MitsubishiElectric.in

15

Gardner Denver Engineered Pro. (I) Ltd 4

Moksha Foods & Beverages Pvt.Ltd

T: +91-80-41768218

T: +91-79-40089312

T: +91-422-2680857

E: narendra.S@in.bosch.com

E: info.ahm@gardnerdenver.com

E: foodsales@mrbutlers.com

W: www.boschindia.com/pa

W: www.gardnerdenver.com

BRK Instruments India Llp

78

E: info@everestblowers.com

T: +91-2752-241479

Bosch Limited

Pg No

T: +91-422-4520335/336

W: www.everestblowers.com

17

Goma Engineering Pvt Ltd

71

Nilsan Nishotech Systems Pvt Ltd

BIC

55

51

T: +91-22-66141666

T: +91-22-41614161

T: +91-22-41515169

E: info@brkindia.net

E: process@goma.co.in

E: manohar@nilsan-nishotech.com

W: www.brkindia.net

W: www.goma.co.in

W: www.nilsan-nishotech.com

Bucher Unipektin Ag

29

HRS Process Systems Ltd

3

Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd

T: +41-44-857-2420

T: +91-20-66047894/95

T: +91-120-4225550

E: manuela.gremlich@bucherunipektin.com

E: info@hrsasia.co.in

E: nishantb@fabcon-india.com

W: www.bucherunipektin.com

W: www.hrsasia.co.in

W: www.fabcon-india.com

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd

BC

IC Ice Make Refrigeration Pvt Ltd

61

P P I Pumps Pvt Ltd

T: +91-80-22890000

T: +91-79-65426394

T: +91-79-25832273

E: mallikarjuna.s@buhlergroup.com

E: info@icemakeindia.com

E: sales@ppipumps.com

W: www.buhlergroup.com

W: www.icemakeindia.com

W: www.ppipumps.com

Clearpack India Pvt Ltd

FIC

IICMA 36

Plast World

T: +91-22-61134224

T: +91-22-28555069

T: +91-9376128372

E: alok@in.clearpack.com

E: iice@advanceinfomedia.com

E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com

W: www.clearpack.com

W: www.indianicecreamcongress.in

W: www.stripdoor.co.in

Dev Pumps & Systems

73

Mech-Air Industries

6

Princeware International Pvt Ltd

T: +91-79-26403839

T: +91-265-2285751

T: +91-22-24082288

E: info@devpumps.com

E: info@mechair.in

E: sales@princeware.net

W: www.devpumps.com

W: www.smtgrinders.com

W: www.princeware.net

Not applicable

82

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Modern Food Processing | June 2013

Our consistent advertisers

41

77

73

47

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover


List of Advertisers Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Print Packaging.Com Pvt Ltd

67

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

SS Packaging Industries

27

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Thermax Limited

49

T: +91-22-27812093

T: +91-11-45072942

T: +91-20-66476365

E: info@packplus.in

E: ssgroup@vsnl.net

E: varun.singh@thermaxindia.com

W: www.packplussouth.in

W: www.sspackaginggroup.com

W: www.thermaxindia.com

Reifenhauser India Marketing Ltd

8

Suraj Limited

79

Ultraplast Chainbelts Pvt. Ltd

T: +91-22-26862711

T: +91-79-27540720

T: +91-129-4113187

E: trupti@reifenhauserindia.com

E: suraj@surajgroup.com

E: info@ultraplast.in

W: www.reifenhauserindia.com

W: www.surajgroup.com

W: www.ultraplastindia.com

Rockwell Automation

31

Swam Pneumatics Pvt Ltd

25

Venus Trading Co.

T: +91-120-4671694

T: +91-120-4696222

T: +91-2692-261142

E: dghosh@ra.rockwell.com

E: swamatic@airtelmail.com

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Spectra Plast India Pvt Ltd

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Technical Drying Services (Asia) Pvt Ltd 33

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Not applicable

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BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

June 2013 | Modern Food Processing

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Registration No: MH / MR / WEST / 232 / 2012-2014; RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25262; Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001 Date of Mailing 3rd & 4th of Every Month Issue. Date Of Publication: 1st of Every Month

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Modern Food Processing June 2013  

Modern Food Processing is the leading monthly business magazine in India dedicated to the food processing industry. It keeps the key decisio...

Modern Food Processing June 2013  

Modern Food Processing is the leading monthly business magazine in India dedicated to the food processing industry. It keeps the key decisio...

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