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INDUSTRY WATCH - Chemical World

March 2012


EDITORIAL

A cradle-to-cradle approach

E

nsuring Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) is no longer a ‘soft subject’ in industrial parlance. Thanks to its direct impact on workforce productivity and employee morale, it has fast emerged as one of the strategic pillars for strengthening organisational excellence across the globe. In particular for the chemical industry, the purview of OHS can span right from having a site-specific safety system at the production facility to hazardous waste management while complying with a range of local, national and international chemical safety rules and regulations in a costeffective manner all along. In quite a few mission-critical situations, the dearth of adequate safety gear and, worse, the preparedness of the staffers to battle and win over the imminent danger have been reportedly debatable. All these point towards the high probability of violation of safety norms apart from numerous corporate governance guidelines and lack of constant diligence of risk management. Given this scenario, it is high time to adopt an integrated approach. This will hopefully offer superior safety standards, well-equipped & trained staffers, etc by virtue of next-gen products and processes. That said, it is imperative to put into action adequate checks and balances to ensure that the intended reform measures deliver the goods in a focussed & timely manner. While on one hand, it is essential to make the best use of our planet’s limited resources by virtue of applying several sciences and technologies, on the other, the processes involved and the effects thereof need to be safe and sustainable. In this backdrop, one needs to have a clear and complete perspective of various nuances of industrial safety, especially in an atmosphere as sensitive as chemical production, transportation and delivery. Perhaps, the time is ripe to not only set new goals for the discipline of chemistry but also chart out new directions for the chemical industry. An important tool in this endeavour would be how best we leverage our ever-increasing ecological and physiological knowledge to redefine our quest for novel, versatile and productive chemistries in a cradle-to-cradle approach.

Editorial Advisory Board PothenP aul Former Chairman, Aker Powergas Pvt Ltd

Apart from reducing our current over-reliance on fossil fuels, there has to be more concerted efforts in bettering ways and means of recycling. This will significantly conserve raw materials besides safeguarding the eco-system. Go on and have an informative read on safety and maintenance in Special Focus of this edition!

D P Misra Director, TCE Consulting Engineers Ltd and Former Director General, ICC

P D Samudra Executive Director (Sales) & Member of the Board, Uhde India Pvt Ltd

Manas R Bastia manas@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Chemical World

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46

44

28 Cover illustration: Sachin Pandit

Insight & Outlook: Specialty/Fine Chemicals Specialty chemicals ............................................................. 44

Special Focus: Safety & Maintenance

Rubber chemicals ................................................................ 46

Handling hazardous chemicals........................................... 28

Technical textile.................................................................. 50

Safety training .................................................................... 30

Exports market ................................................................... 52

Corrosion mitigation technology........................................ 34

Interface - Sethuram Belur Krishnamurthy, GM, Dow Coating Materials (DCM), South East Asia and Indian Sub-Continent ........................................................ 54

Interface - Shrikant Kulkarni, GM - OHES Division, 3M India ....................................... 36 Roundtable .......................................................................... 38

Interface - Olivier Faussadier, Vice President & General Manager, OMNOVA Solutions ........................... 56

In Conversation With

Automation Trends

Manish Kiri, Managing Director, Kiri Industries Ltd ...................................... 24

Case Study - Sudarshan Chemical Industries: Automated workflow processes for better customer service ................. 57

Energy Management Condensing boiler: A right approach to energy efficiency ............................................................ 58

Policies & Regulations

Facility Visit: Jotun India Pvt Ltd ‘Lean’ing on the principles of safety and sustainability..... 40

PCPIR policy: Yet to deliver the desired yield .................. 62

Strategy Best HR practices: Talent retention through recognition ............................................................ 64

Regular Sections Editorial ........................................................................ 5 News, Views & Analysis .............................................. 10 Technology & Innovation............................................ 18 Technology Transfer .................................................... 22 Projects ........................................................................ 67 Event List .................................................................... 68 Book Review ................................................................ 74 Products ...................................................................... 75 List of Products .......................................................... 85 List of Advertisers ...................................................... 86

Tips & Tricks Fire safety: Need for a reality check on preventive mechanisms .................................................. 66

Event Report R Engineering Expo Aurangabad 2012: Creating yet another success story..................................................... 70 R The Fifth Annual India Chemical Industry Outlook Conference: Catalysing progress of chemical industry..... 73

Highlights of Next Edition Details on page no. 68, 70

Special Focus: IT for Chemical Process Industry Insight & Outlook: Alternative Energy/Fuels

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise March 2012 | Chemical World

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Business Insights Technologies Opportunities

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March 2012 | Chemical World

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

RESEARCH INITIATIVE

Taloja centre to be the hub for Aditya Birla Group’s global R&D activities

Kumar Mangalam Birla (centre) along with Rajiv Dube (right) and Dr Luca Fontana

The $ 35-billion Aditya Birla Group (ABG) will use Aditya Birla Science and Technology Company’s (ABSTC) R&D Centre at Taloja (Maharashtra) as a hub to consolidate its research and development (R&D) activities for all its businesses, which include chemicals, carbon black, textiles, paper & pulp, metals, etc. “ABSTC will be the hub of our global group R&D network inclusive of Novelis and Colombian Tech centres in North America, Thai Chemical Epoxy R&D Center in Rayong (Thailand), Pulp Laboratories of Domsjo in Sweden and several others,” elaborated Kumar Mangalam Birla, Chairman, ABG. Till date, ABG has invested about ` 250 on this multi-disciplinary technology centre, which will give fillip to the Group’s R&D efforts by focussing on basic research and supplementing the already existing research activities of various businesses. “In

MEGA PROJECT

addition to our corporate laboratories that focus on long-term research, fundamental understanding and breakthrough technologies, Birla Carbon, Ultratech, Aditya Birla Retail and Novelis have also established business R&D footprints at this site. The chemical business is at an advanced stage of creating a footprint. Grasim’s Pulp and Fiber Business will also be locating its product and process R&D team at this site. Hence, we hope to have most of our major businesses base some of their R&D activities here,” informed Rajiv Dube, Director – Corporate R&D Centre, ABG. ABSTC, which has already filed more than 55 patents, will also look at collaborating with research institutes and technology start-up to develop and commercialise new technologies. “We are talking to some of the technology institutes in India and globally to determine the scope of collaborative research in areas of mutual interest,” said Dube. Dr Luca Fontana, CEO, ABSTC, added, “The Centre will maximise core competency in science and engineering. We will also provide services such as contract research to non-group entities in future.” Rakesh Rao

TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

Honeywell India Technology Centre to focus on energy efficiency With the launch of a new technology centre in India, Honeywell is aiming at expanding its technology development capabilities in key areas including refining, petrochemical, low global-warming and nylon technologies and applications. The Centre, located at Gurgaon, is Honeywell’s fifth major technology location in the world. It features pilot Jaipal Reddy, Union Minister for plants for developing and demonstrating refining Petroleum & Natural Gas, lighting & petrochemical process technology by UOP, the inaugural lamp part of Honeywell’s Performance Materials and Technologies (PMT) strategic business group. Honeywell invested $ 34 million in the 8,830sq m Centre. “Our key focus at Honeywell India Technology Centre (HITC) is energy efficiency. In refining and petrochemical sector, we are also working towards the technology to produce high-quality diesel with lower sulfur content. Another highlight is our next generation hydrocracking catalysts to offer better yields and higher diesel and jet fuel product quality,” elaborated Dr Simon Hobbs, Director, HITC. Mahua Roy

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Chemical World | March 2012

LANXESS to construct world’s largest Nd-PBR plant in Singapore LANXESS will lay foundation for a new neodymium polybutadiene rubber (Nd-PBR) plant in Singapore on September 11 this year. According to the company, the facility will be the largest of its kind in the world with an investment of around Euro 200 million. LANXESS had conducted a feasibility study to evaluate potential locations for the plant in Asia. Ultimately, it zeroed down to Singapore because of raw materials supply, excellent infrastructure, highly-skilled workforce, large seaport and close proximity to key customers in the booming Asia region. “I am delighted to announce that it is now full steam ahead for the second-largest investment project in our company’s history,” said Dr Axel C Heitmann, Chairman of the Board of Management, LANXESS. Petrochemical Corporation of Singapore Pvt Ltd has agreed on a long-term supply of butadiene to LANXESS. Butadiene is the raw material LANXESS needs to produce Nd-PBR. PAINT INGREDIENT

Clariant expands product basket for paint industry Clariant Chemicals recently introduced new generation Terpolymer Mowilith® emulsions to the Indian market. The products in this series include Mowilith LDM 2466 and Mowilith LDM 2455. These are water-based and aim to offer cost-benefit for interior, exterior, premium, economy and soft/textured paints in comparison to pure acrylics and styrene-acrylics. “Improving efficiency is an important consideration among India’s paint and coatings community. In line with this, we are pleased to be able to offer our new generation of terpolymers to the Indian market, to support the manufacture of high performance paints with excellent cost benefits,” said Asis Patnaik, Head - Emulsions, Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd.


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY

REGULATORY ISSUES

Technology from QUA eliminates use of hazardous chemicals QUA, one of the leading membrane manufacturers globally, recently launched advanced membrane products of international quality, which include Q-SEP® ultrafiltration membranes and FEDI® electrodeionisation in India. Electrodeionisation technology, which replaces the conventional mixed bed polishers, is well-adapted in the western world. However, it is still emerging in India. “This technology eliminates the use of hazardous chemicals required to regenerate mixed bed polishers and resulting wastewater,” said Abhijeet S Puranik, Head - Sales and Marketing, Qua Water Technologies Pvt Ltd. The company recently received the prestigious NSF certification. This certification is mandatory in counties like the US towards drinking water applications. “QUA is the first and so far the only manufacturer in India to receive NSF certification. We see a big potential in the Indian market for our technologies, which are applied to a diverse range of

industrial and infrastructure projects in water & wastewater treatment applications. Our local manufacturing capability along with sales and service support creates a great value and reliability for our OEM partners, distributors and end-users in India,” added Puranik. Q-SEP Hollow Fiber UF modules are used for applications like pretreatment to reverse osmosis systems, purification of water for potable applications, filtration of industrial water, and wastewater recycle & reuse. The modules contain UF membranes manufactured with QUA’s patented Cloud Point Precipitation method. Advantages of Q-SEP UF over conventional media filtration include improved filtrate quality; SDI typically less than 1; removal of virus, bacteria & germs as well as microbiological and colloidal matter; improvement of downstream RO performance; and consistent treated water quality, irrespective of changes in feedwater quality.

DCPC plans to give fillip to PCPIR policy The Department of Chemical & Petrochemicals (DCPC), Ministry of Chemicals & Fertilisers, Government of India (GoI), is planning to take a series of steps to put the Petroleum, Chemicals and Petrochemical Investment Region (PCPIR) projects on fast track. “The PCPIR policy is going to change slightly and we have reviewed it. Certain changes will be made to the policy so that the implementation is faster, because there is generally a feeling that it has not taken off as it should have. It is facing minor problems, which we are in the process of correcting,” said Jose Cyriac, Secretary, DCPC, GoI. Except for Dahej PCPIR, other projects (Haldia, Paradip and Vizag) have failed to progress as per the expected growth trajectory mainly due to lack of feedstocks. To solve this challenge, DCPC is planning to encourage the anchor tenants at the PCPIRs to boost their production for ensuring adequate feedstock for the downstream and ancillary units. In addition, the fifth PCPIR is being mulled at Cuddalore. Mahua Roy

Mahua Roy

PETROCHEMICALS

EXPANSION MODE

BASF to build TDI plant at Ludwigshafen

WACKER expands production facilities in China

BASF has announced a Euro 1- billion project to build a single-train 3,00,000 tonne per annum (TPA) production plant for toluene diisocyanate (TDI), used in polyurethane production, at its Ludwigshafen integrated complex in Germany. BASF plans to close down its 80,000 TPA TDI production plant in Schwarzheide, Germany, when the new plant goes on stream in 2014. The project includes an expansion of associated plants at Ludwigshafen. BASF will construct a new hydrogen chloride recycling plant and expand plants for nitric acid, chlorine and synthesis gas. 12

Chemical World | March 2012

WACKER’s Nanjing site

Wacker Chemie AG is expanding its Chinese polymer activities by investing around Euro 40 million in building two new production facilities at its Nanjing site. The Munich-based chemical group is expanding the site’s existing facilities

for vinyl acetate-ethylene copolymer (VAE) dispersions by adding a new reactor with an annual capacity of 60,000 metric tonne (MT). This measure will double Nanjing’s VAE dispersion capacity to approximately 1,20,000 MT per year, making the complex one of the biggest of its kind in China. The new reactor is scheduled to come on stream in mid-2013. At Nanjing, WACKER is also building a new plant to produce polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) solid resins with an annual capacity of 20,000 MT. This plant is due for completion in early 2013.


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

SME RATINGS

CHEMICAL DISTRIBU TION

SMERA’s rating to give boost to Everest Blower business

Brenntag eyes ingredients segment for growth

An NSIC-D&B-SMERA: SE rating, assigned by SME Rating Agency of India Ltd (SMERA), for Everest Blower Systems is likely to open up more business opportunities for the company. “The team of SMERA conducted audits at our works on the basis of which they were Amit Kapur able to gather critical information, which was relied upon to assign the suitable rating. This rating has great importance, and in fact, many public sector banks allow finance at concessional rate of interest. We got this rating done as a part of external audit on our capabilities and limitations, and feel that a third party government auditing agency has endorsed our systems for good financial and engineering practices. This would enable us to take our efforts further in the positive direction,” said Amit Kapur, Director, Everest Group. Everest Blower Systems’ engineering and financial practices were recognised by SMERA, which assigns ratings after considering and analysing financial as well as non-financial or qualitative aspects of the rated entity. “The strength of the company include professional and experienced management, significant increase in revenue, operating profit margin and net profit margin over last three years, better debt equity ratio (as compared to industry standard) and substantial increase in tangible net worth,” added Kapur. Interestingly, Everest Blower Systems is the youngest company of the Everest Group.

Brenntag, the global leader in chemical distribution, is gearing up to tap into the burgeoning market in India. As a part of its strategy to grow its business in the country, it recently inaugurated a new head office in Mumbai. “At present, we have a strong presence in India, and we are looking forward to nurture this market further by focussing on growing segments like food and beverages (F&B), personal care, pharmaceuticals, etc. By expanding our local presence in major cities like Mumbai, we are supporting our strategy of being the leading chemical distributor in both specialty and industrial chemicals,” commented Steven Holland, CEO, Brenntag Group. With in-house F&B and personal care technical application laboratories, the new office offers value-added services to Brenntag’s customers by meeting specific requirements for the formulation and customisation of various blends of ingredients and chemicals. Like all of Brenntag’s offices, compliance with local as well as international standards on health, safety and the environment at the workplace is a priority. For Brenntag, which established its local presence in 2008, the new office adds to the company’s six existing offices in India.

Prasenjit Chakraborty

Rakesh Rao

Brenntag officials during the inauguration of new office

MARKET FORECAST

AGROCHEMICALS

Specialty chemicals industry to grow to $ 80-100 billion by 2020

Insecticides India eyes 30 per cent marketshare by 2015

According to a report ‘Building a global scale specialty chemical industry in India’ by consultancy firm McKinsey and Oko Institute, Germany, “By 2020, the specialty chemicals industry in India will grow from $ 22 billion to between $ 80-100 billion.” The report stated that the global chemicals industry – the largest manufacturing industry in the world – registered sales worth $ 2.5 trillion in 2010, of which specialty chemicals comprised 20 per cent. It further states that about one-third of the global specialty chemicals business could move to Asia by 2020. “By 2020, approximately $ 350 billion of the projected $ 1 trillion global specialty chemicals industry could move to Asia (excluding Japan), driven by downstream demand and competitive manufacturing costs,” the firm noted. For the success of the industry in India, McKinsey has suggested that the sector needs to develop local products at the right price, use mergers & acquisitions and partnerships to grow, and build a strong value proposition to attract talent, among other factors.

With its brand Pulsor, Insecticides India Ltd (IIL), one of the fastest growing companies in the agrochemicals sector in India, is eyeing 10 per cent marketshare in the agrochemicals sector by end of 2012, and up to 30 per cent in three years. The company recently reached an agreement with Nissan Chemical Industries Ltd Japan for exclusive marketing of patented fungicide Pulsor. “We plan to have monopoly in the preventive as well as curative insecticides sector with Pulsor, and look forward to competing with other generic brands,” said Rajesh Aggarwal, Managing Director, IIL. He also said that the company’s Dahej facility will be fully operational by April 2012. “We are happy that we have been able to maintain a consistent growth trajectory over the years. With new tie-ups and increase in production capacities, we are sure that our profits would grow,” added Aggarwal. IIL recently posted a 21 per cent rise in revenues and a 16 per cent jump in the net profit for the first nine months of FY 2011-12, over the corresponding period last year. Mahua Roy

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Chemical World | March 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

LUBRICANTS

SPECIALT Y CHEMICALS

ExxonMobil showcases its Grease Technology at Lubricating Grease Conference

Ion Exchange expands product offerings for mining sector

L-R: Shankar Karnik, Asia-Pacific Mobil SHC Brand Advisor, ExxonMobil Lubricants and Specialties, and Paul Grives

ExxonMobil Lubricants Pvt Ltd showcased Mobil-branded greases from the ExxonMobil Fuels, Lubricants and Specialties Marketing Company, a division of Exxon Mobil Corporation, at the 14th annual Lubricating Grease Conference. Organised by the India chapter of the National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI), the event is a premier venue for grease-related industry stakeholders

in India. “Every day, our diverse line-up of Mobil-branded greases are relied on by successful companies across India that operate in a range of sectors, including automotive, aviation, construction, energy, general manufacturing, steel and mining,” said Paul Grives, Global Industrial Marketing Advisor, ExxonMobil’s Fuels, Lubricants and Specialties Marketing Company. Backed by more than 100 years of industry expertise, Mobil-branded greases are expertly formulated to meet a wide variety of operating conditions in both industrial and mobile equipment, including extreme applications such as high and low temperatures; water contamination; heavy or shock loads; or variable speeds. Mobil greases are available in a range of viscosity grades to offer customers added choice and flexibility.

Ion Exchange (India) Ltd is expanding its specialty chemicals range for process application in the mining and mineral processing sector. These chemicals, which can help customers to improve process efficiencies and profitability, can be used in segments such as alumina refining and coal washeries. According to the company, product expansion is set to add value to the application industries. For instance, in alumina refining segment, its products help solid-liquid separation of fine alumina red mud particles and alumina impregnated caustic liquor. Specialty chemicals, developed through sustained R&D effort and technical collaborations, are backed by application support, engineering tools and service expertise for proper preparation of solution, dosages in PPM quantities and monitoring of relevant process parameters.

APPOINTMENT

NEW BUSINESS VENTURE

KMS appoints new Regional Commercial Manager, Singapore

AkzoNobel establishes wood finishes business in India

Koch Membrane Systems (KMS) has hired Ravichandran Subramanian as Regional Commercial Manager and will be responsible for developing the markets for all KMS products in South East Asia for both Ravichandran the Water & Wastewater Subramanian and the Industrial & Life Sciences Divisions of the company. “KMS is expanding its business activities in South East Asia in response to the growing demand for membrane-based products. Subramanian brings both the technical and commercial expertise needed for successful growth in this market,” said Imran Jaferey, Senior Vice President - Water & Wastewater, KMS. Subramanian has more than 15 years of industry experience in sales, management, and product management. During his previous assignments, he had worked with some of the leading companies such as Keppel Integrated Engineering (an environmental EPC company), EES Technology Pte Ltd (a water treatment OEM), Dow Chemical Pacific Singapore, etc.

AkzoNobel recently launched its Wood Finishes and Adhesives (WFA) business in India. According to the company, WFA has superior highsolids, water-borne, low-VOC and UV-cure technology – formulations that significantly reduce impact on the environment without sacrificing beauty and protection. “AkzoNobel’s WFA business is a global market leader and years of customer-service experience and technical expertise will help us immensely in executing our plans in the fast-growing Indian market,” said Ron Nandor, Global, Marketing Director, Wood Finishes and Adhesives, AkzoNobel. He added, “Another advantage and merit of our entry into India is that with the introduction of WFA products, we complement and complete the full spectrum of product offerings of the Performance Coatings business in India. AkzoNobel’s extensive retail and industrial network in India will facilitate us to build a robust wood finishes business in India.” Partha Basu, Non-Executive Director, Akzo Nobel Coatings India Pvt Ltd, said, “AkzoNobel’s growth ambitions in India are driven by its unwavering intent of becoming an integrated coatings solutions provider, a market leader in different product segments and meeting its strategic India goal of becoming a Euro 1 billion company by 2015.” The company claims that WFA’s product range in the wood industry features unique and innovative technologies for a wide range of applications such as furniture, cabinetry and joinery (kitchen and bath, doors and window frames) and flooring (solid wood, engineered wood, resilient flooring, PVC/vinyl flooring and parquet).

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Chemical World | March 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

REGULATORY COMPLIANCE

Clariant’s seminar emphasises complexity of REACH

GREEN INITIATIVES

Clariant recently organised a twoday seminar on ethical and sustainable operations in all business activities in Mumbai. Senior officials of Clariant across the globe had participated in the seminar. Much emphasis was laid on the benefits of in-depth knowledge of products with respect to REACH, other regulatory programmes, and the collection and recording of required data. Suppliers, who can meet the increased need for compliance, will benefit from robust relationships and improved ranking versus their competitors. Speaking at the seminar, Dr Robert Janssen, Group Procurement Services, Head of REACH Procurement, Clariant International AG, said, “Our goal is to share our knowledge and act in partnerships with suppliers here

LANXESS invests $ 10 million in BioAmber

in India; this will allow us all to minimise our exposure to risk and maximise our potential for growth and profitability in this exciting market. We are delighted with the attendance at this seminar and the enthusiasm with which it was received.” Speaking at the seminar, Dr Erika Kunz, Corporate Product Stewardship, Head, Corporate Registration and Evaluation of Chemicals, Clariant, GmbH, said, “Clariant has been aware of and involved, directly or through its industry associations, in the development of REACH for almost 10 years. This has put us in a good position in meeting and understanding REACH, as we do in other tough regulatory systems around the globe to which we have to comply.”

PLANTBASED CHEMISTRY

MWV Specialty and DRT form strategic alliance MWV Specialty Chemicals, a division of MeadWestvaco Corporation, has entered into a strategic alliance with DRT, the France-based manufacturer of rosin and turpentine derivatives from plant-based materials. “This partnership will certainly benefit our respective customers as it brings together two market leaders known for differentiated, innovative products and strong technical expertise. It also expands our manufacturing footprint, offering better access to key raw materials and overall improved service for our global customers,” said Christian MacIver, GM - Pine Chemicals, MWV Specialty Chemicals. The alliance is a manufacturing and distribution agreement for core products to both companies. The alliance will provide customers with access to additional materials, a dedicated team of technical experts in both Europe and North America, and state-ofthe-art research and applications development laboratories. “This alliance will benefit our customers as we work together to develop new and innovative products and improve facility efficiencies. It positions both our companies for future growth as we use our complementary strengths and expertise to create value for our customers,” said Eric Moussu, Director - Sales & Marketing, DRT. SILICONE BUSINESS

WACKER on an expansion drive in Korea

The Munich-based WACKER has successfully completed the expansion and relocation of its technical laboratories and

offices in South Korea. It has inaugurated the upgraded technical centre, with integrated training facility, near the capital Seoul. Under a single roof, the regional competence centre now houses research & development (R&D), applications technology and a facility for basic and advanced training in silicones and polymers applications. A new silicone laboratory has been built to research, in particular, high-tech products for the

LANXESS is strengthening its commitment to renewable raw materials by investing $ 10 million in BioAmber Inc, USA, as part of a private placement. Together, the two companies have developed plasticisers, whose cost-effectiveness and safety profile make them sustainable alternatives to phthalate-containing formulations. In addition, both companies are in talks to extend their partnership into further product areas in the future. “Our investment in BioAmber shows our commitment to launching a new generation of plasticisers that meet regulatory requirements and can also score in terms of sustainability,” said Jorge Nogueira, Head - Functional Chemicals Business Unit, LANXESS. LANXESS is strongly committed to using renewable raw materials to produce premium synthetic rubbers. At the end of 2011, LANXESS produced the world’s first bio-based EPDM rubber in Brazil. The Brazilian company Braskem supplies the raw material ethylene derived from sugarcane. The rubber is marketed under the name Keltan Eco. In addition, LANXESS has invested in the US biofuel and biochemical manufacturer Gevo Inc, which produces isobutanol from renewable resources such as corn.

electronics industry, while the technical centre for polymeric binders will concentrate primarily on applications for construction chemicals. The integrated WACKER Academy training facility will additionally offer an ideal platform for market-specific networking among customers, distribution partners and WACKER specialists. The South Korean technical centre will thus help to ensure an optimum supply of high-quality silicone and polymer products for the fast-growing markets in the region.

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TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

Iconics develops Energy AnalytiX to monitor energy cost Iconics has introduced Energy AnalytiX version 10.61, a software solution designed for industrial operations that require monitoring of energy cost, consumption and carbon released into the environment. The new version 10.61 includes a number of enhancements, including advanced energy data aggregation and summarisation; new ‘virtual’ meter type for calculated meters; new grouping support for meter type; external data import and processing; and the capability to provide summary calculations at 15-minute granularity. Besides, Energy AnalytiX version 10.61 offers manufacturing and process plants, utilities and commercial or government buildings an energy management system designed to improve visibility into energy usage patterns and energy reliability, as well as assist in forecasting energy consumption. When over-consumption is suspected, primary causes of energy inefficiencies or use rollup calculations can be analysed by groups of consumers. In addition, users can create custom KPIs and visualisation dashboards, as well as specialised reports using Energy AnalytiX. Reports can be scheduled based on date, time, value, alarms or on user ad hoc requests. Operators can be notified of energy issues via SMS, email, or phone alerts. In today’s competitive global economy, with soaring energy prices and increasing environmental regulations, the ability to quickly analyse and closely control operating costs has become more critical. Everyone is looking for ways to lower energy costs, reduce consumption and minimise carbon and environmental impact. One can create IT firewall-friendly, secure custom energy dashboards and kiosks to view energy reports analysing energy consumption patterns resource usage and progress on sustainability.

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Chemical World | March 2012

Emerson Process Management’s Rosemount Analytical 1066 series offers cost-effective measurement solutions Emerson Process Management recently launched the new family of Rosemount Analytical 1066 twowire liquid instruments featuring the broadest range of measurement parameters available, advanced communications capabilities, and unique ease-of-use features. The 1066 series has the latest version of Hart 7, and they are the industry’s first pH transmitters to be registered under the Interoperability Test Kit 6 (ITK6) from Foundation Fieldbus. The Rosemount Analytical 1066 family of transmitters can measure pH, ORP, resistivity/conductivity, per cent concentration, total dissolved solids, total chlorine, free chlorine, monochloramine, dissolved oxygen and dissolved ozone. A second sensor input allows continuous pH correction for free chlorine measurement. According to Dave Anderson, Marketing Director, Rosemount Analytical, Emerson Process Management, “The 1066 transmitters are feature-rich and cost-effective, and include many capabilities that we have implemented into our high-end instruments such as Smart pH sensor capability, which eliminates the need for field calibration.” The instruments’ Smart capabilities also enable them to accept pre-calibrated Rosemount Analytical Smart pH sensors, saving time and money for field technicians. The 1066 Foundation Fieldbus transmitter can use analog output function blocks to link to temperature and pressure measurements from the bus for temperature and pressure compensation, which can increase the accuracy and responsiveness of the measurement.

Titus’ onsite nitrogen generator helps reduce cost Titus Nitrogen has developed TNX Series of onsite nitrogen generators, which are designed to increase nitrogen production while reducing much of the upfront costs for capital equipment. Featuring a small footprint, the expandable TNX Series gives companies the flexibility to buy the capacity they need and increase capacity (up to a factor of four from base models) as needs grow. Utilising the state-of-the-art PRISM® membranes from Air Products and Chemicals, it offers a complete range of nitrogen generation products. These nitrogen generators are successfully meeting the needs of a wide range of applications that include chemical & petrochemical, pharmaceutical, electronics, laboratory sciences, metal processing, cutting & fabrication and food & beverage processing & packaging. The product has flexible capacity and purity capabilities — capacities from 10 to 2800 SCFH and purities ranging from 95 to 99.9 per cent. Front panel access for filter element replacement or oxygen analyser service (if applicable) makes TNX the most maintenance-friendly. Besides, it provides a full range of available options, including oxygen analyser with auto delivery, auto bypass system, nitrogen flow meter and hydrocarbon removal package for highly sensitive applications.


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

Edwards’ novel dry screw pumps save energy Edwards has introduced the GXS dry pump range. The range incorporates unique screw technology with a world leading high efficiency drive to achieve excellent vacuum performance and low running costs. The products are designed to perform in harsh industrial applications. Low cost of ownership is a key issue for vacuum pump operators, and the GXS provides ample savings on power and utilities consumptions. “In some cases, the product uses 48 per cent less energy than equivalent competitive pumps. This is achieved through the use of high efficiency, water cooled motors, built-in inverter drives, and advanced low-friction seals,” said the company. Purge gas usage is also minimised compared to other pump designs. The provision of full on-board controls and communications protocols as standard means that GXS pumps can be operated without any additional switchgear or control hardware, and can achieve a true plug-and-play functionality, saving time and money on installations. The enhanced reliability of the design and use of advanced bearing, sealing and lubricant technologies means that very long intervals between servicing can be realised, with up to five years between services being possible, giving significant savings on maintenance costs. The pumps also help reduce energy usage and minimise environmental impact. The new models are independently certified for hazardous environments, and can safely handle flammable and corrosive gases. They can pump up to one litre of liquid per minute continuously, and up to 25 litre slugs without stopping. In addition, temperature can be maintained at programmable levels, while noise levels are as low as 64 dB(A).

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Colder Products enhances safety features of chemical dispensing systems Colder Products Company has further enhanced its DrumQuik® PRO and DrumQuik® PUR chemical dispensing systems with the addition of a new tethered protective dust cover and extended shipping plug. The new products will help customers extend the use of the DrumQuik systems and enhance the systems’ safety benefits in a wide range of closed chemical dispensing applications. “The DrumQuik tethered cover is a convenient accessory that protects the coupler from dust when it is disconnected from a drum. The extended shipping plug isolates the DrumQuik dip-tube from air in the container to provide safe venting of chemical vapours that may have changed in pressure due to external changes in pressure or temperature,” said Thomas Braun, Business Manager, Chemical and Packaging, Colder Products Company. In addition to storing and protecting the DrumQuik coupler for extended use, the tethered cover provides a handy place to store the drum insert shipping plug when the coupler is connected. The tethered cover is made from rugged and durable virgin PVC for longer use. The DrumQuik extended shipping plug’s user-friendly design allows operators to easily relieve internal pressure before removing it and connecting the DrumQuik coupler. A leash attachment feature allows a securing lanyard to be easily connected to the shipping plug. Made with FDA-compliant materials, the shipping plug can be used with food-based liquids.

Agilent’s new hybrid system provides comprehensive information for complex samples and impurity analysis Agilent Technologies Inc announced the introduction of the 1260 Infinity Hybrid SFC/UHPLC system. This system enables intelligent screening for the most suitable method of separation and delivers comprehensive information for complex samples and impurity analysis. It is the first commercial instrument that performs both supercritical fluid chromatography and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography “Now, chromatographers can switch between Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) and System File Checker (SFC) on the same system without making a single hardware or method change,” said Stefan Schuette, Senior Director, Marketing, Liquid Chromatography Business, Agilent. According to him, users can have great confidence in the results from using these two orthogonal techniques. The 1260 Infinity Hybrid SFC/UHPLC system delivers LC-like sensitivity over the UHPLC power range. It is the only SFC system providing 600 bar capability. The hybrid system is economical because customers purchase only one instrument to perform both types of separations. It also conserves valuable bench space. In SFC mode, the instrument uses standard-grade gaseous CO2 for considerable cost savings over SFC-grade CO2. This is in addition to the reduced solvent consumption and waste generation of SFC compared to LC. Customers also have the option of purchasing just the SFC module as an upgrade to existing 1100, 1200 and 1260 LC systems.


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY OFFERED As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

An Iranian firm is willing to offer activated carbon from coconut shells. Areas of application Food processing, pharmaceuticals, etc Forms of transfer Technology licensing

industries is offering precipitated calcium carbonate and turnkey projects for the same. Areas of application Plastics, paper, paints, rubber, inks Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services

Cresyl phosphate/tri phenyl

Phosphate esters

An Indian firm is offering consultancy for manufacturing plasticisers. Areas of application Photo films, chemicals, plastic industry, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy

An Indian firm is offering technology for manufacturing phosphate esters like tributyl phosphate. Area of application Specialty chemicals Forms of transfer Joint venture

Activated carbon

Ethanol An Iranian company is offering ethanol from molasses using the fermentation of sacharomyces cerevisiae. Ethyl alcohol is widely used for making many organic chemicals. Areas of application Chemical and energy industries Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Furfuryl alcohol technology An Indian firm offers technology for producing furfuryl alcohol from furfural by liquid hydrogenation as well as vapour hydrogenation, with a capacity of 6,000 tpa to 24,000 tpa. Areas of application Furan polymers, sealants & cements, urea-formaldehyde, & phenolic resins and foundry cores Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, technology licensing

Precipitated calcium carbonate An Indian consulting company for the chemicals, minerals & food processing 22

Chemical World | March 2012

Sodium hydrosulfite An Iranian company is willing to manufacture sodium hydrosulfite using chemical compounds. It is widely used as a stripping agent in dyes and in chemical industry. Area of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Sodium silicate from rice husk ash An Indian company is offering support for a complete project for production of sodium silicate from rice husk ash (RHA). The technology is versatile to produce sodium silicate of different SiO2/Na2O ratio. Areas of application Soaps & detergents, adhesive, pulp & paper, water proofing, construction chemicals, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, equipment supply, turnkey, etc

Sodium sulfide An Iranian firm is willing to offer sodium sulfide, which is used mainly in textile industry, paper mill, artificial silk and curriery. Areas of application Leather industry, textiles, curriery industries, paper mills, etc Forms of transfer Turnkey

Synthesis routes for organic chemicals An Indian firm is offering consultancy in design of synthesis routes for organic chemicals. Areas of application Pharma industry, specialty chemicals, plant protection chemicals, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy

Transformer oil unit An Indian company is willing to offer consultancy for making a transformer oil unit with domestic coal from its wastes. Area of application Transformers Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services

Wasteless processing techniques An Indian company is willing to offer consultancy for wasteless processing techniques for the chemical & packaging industries. Areas of application Packaging industry, transformer oil manufacturing industry, chlor alkali projects Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY REQUESTED Calcium carbonate A Saudi Arabian company needs the technical know-how for producing calcium carbonate from limestone. Areas of application Industries like chemical, textile, etc Forms of transfer Others

Glyoxal An Indian company is looking to switch the production technique for manufacturing 40 per cent glyoxal from its existing acetaldehyde-based method to the MEG-based glyoxal production. Areas of application Pharma & textile Forms of transfer Others

Inorganic chemicals An Indian company is interested in seeking the technology & process knowhow for production of potassium nitrate, chromium acetate, and magnesium hydroxide suspension. The company already produces inorganic chemicals and wants to add several other items. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Others

Lime An Indian company seeks to adopt new cost-effective technologies, which can

reduce carbon emissions and earn carbon credits, for manufacturing lime. Areas of application Quick lime and hydrated lime Forms of transfer Others

Lime plant A group of businessmen in Zambia is interested in setting up an 800 t/d of quick lime and 200 t/d of hydrated lime plant. Area of application Mining Forms of transfer Others

Manufacture of sodium hydrosulfite A company based in Pakistan is interested in establishing a joint venture for the manufacture of sodium hydrosulfite in Pakistan with either a Chinese or European manufacturer, who has the technological know-how and expertise in the field. Areas of application Industries like textile, paper and food Forms of transfer Others

Quaternary ammonium chloride An Indonesia-based company is planning to diversify into manufacturing of quaternary ammonium chloride. It is seeking technology along with the

supply of critical plant and machinery for the manufacture of the chemical 3-chloro-2hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride that is produced from epichhlorohydrin. Area of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Technical know-how, consultancy

Solvent dyes An Indian company has recently installed a manufacturing capacity of 2,400 mtpa and is looking to diversify its product range by including various solvent dyes in its product portfolio. The company is seeking process consultancy for this project. Areas of application Plastics, petroleum, solvents, etc Forms of transfer Others

Treatment of pollutants discharged during PTA production A Chinese organisation is looking for a recycling and pollution-free treatment technology to tackle the wastewater, exhaust gas, waste slag and noises generated in PTA production, thereby shifting from reduction of pollutant discharge to zero-discharge. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, etc

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016, Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org

For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer/seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

Share and Solicit Technology The mission of Chemical World is to spread the technology culture. Here is an opportunity to be a part of this endeavour by sending your technology on offer or technology requirements. If you belong to any of these two categories, you are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details for publication. The write-up needs to be as per the format of this section with information about the particular technology offered or requested, its areas of application and forms of transfer. Contact us: Chemical World, Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028 Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672, Fax: 022-3003 4499, Email: chemedit@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Chemical World

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IN CONVERSATION WITH Manish Kiri

…says Manish Kiri, Managing Director, Kiri Industries Ltd. In conversation with Avani Jain, he underlines the fact that the dyestuff industry is mainly exportoriented and, at present, the major export destinations include the developing countries due to flourishing of textile industry in these areas.

What is the current demand for dyes in India? The dyestuff industry is mainly export-oriented. Almost 70 per cent of the products manufactured in the country are exported. However, the exports deteriorated to a certain extent in the last quarter due to fluctuation in rupee. But with appreciation of rupee, the market is reviving. Further, India is a growing market and the consumption of dyes is rising due to increased usage in the textile industry. So, it is expected that in future, one will see more colours and related chemicals being produced in India.

What are the key growth drivers?

Photo: Vijaykumar Soneji

In the recent years, the market has seen a shift. A decade ago, the US and European countries were major producers of dyes, but now the manufacturing base is shifting to Asia. In addition, the textile and leather industries – where dyes have maximum usage – in developing countries are flourishing as compared to developed markets where these segments were focussed earlier. So the demand for dyes is witnessing growth in emerging markets. Thus, countries such as China, Bangladesh, India, Korea, Vietnam, Japan, Taiwan, etc,

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Manish Kiri

are developing as major manufacturing hubs for dyes. Moreover, since the consumption of cotton and polyester in the textile segment has gone up, the dye industry is growing in India. Further, closure of a number of manufacturing units in the developed nations due to high labour and manufacturing costs has also led to growth of this sector in the country.

What technological advancements have been witnessed by the industry over the years? There have been several changes in the last decade, ie technological advancements in terms of product development and methods facilitating increased compliance towards environmental norms. Moreover, manufacturing procedures and practices have become more efficient.

How successful has been the industry’s efforts towards sustainability? The overall awareness about the environment has increased. The compliance towards environmental norms is better today. The government and industry are jointly working towards reducing solid and liquid wastes generated during the manufacturing process. Companies are also employing technologies for reducing waste at source. Further, technologies like reverse osmosis, ultra-filtration methods, etc, for treating wastewater are adopted so as to attain the goal of zero discharge. Effluent treatment plants are also set up by the industry. Since the industry is export-oriented, even overseas customers are giving weightage to this issue. If we talk about Kiri Industries, it is coming out with a sustainability report by the end of the year. Further, by 2012-2013, the company plans to reduce solid waste generation by about 80 per cent.

Can you highlight some of the best practices to reduce waste? There are three ways of reducing waste. First, there needs to be a change

in a tough situation, one needs to have clear objectives and only then it becomes possible to confidently deal with a situation.

What motivates you the most in life? Over the years, I have developed an attitude towards facing challenges, which has been a major motivational factor in my life. Further, the zeal to try something new and different every time has kept me going all these years.

What was the toughest business decision taken by you? The acquisition of the DyStar Group was the toughest decision. The complexity of the project was such that it really demanded courage to move ahead; but we took the decision and proved it to be a success.

How do you deal with a tough situation? Desire to find simple ways to address a complex situation has helped me sail through every phase of life. Further,

in the processes as this can reduce the generation of waste at the origin. Second, companies need to adopt and invest in new technologies, which can treat waste and convert it into a byproduct or saleable product. Finally, the quality of incineration methods for non-treated waste should be strengthened.

What are the problem areas faced by the industry? At present, the biggest challenge is the supply-demand gap, ie the supplies have increased drastically in the recent years and to deal with that is a major task. Moreover, the industry is labour- and working capital-intensive. And with rising labour costs, the challenge lies in reducing the manufacturing cost as well

What are the things that you keep in mind while signing a new deal? While entering into any new deal or partnership, it is important to pay heed to the soft issues in addition to other areas. Thus, we try to look at the people and work culture in other organisation. Also, it is important to gauge whether the other company is able to deliver actual value to its customers or not. Based on that, I take the decision.

What was the turning point in your career? When I returned from the US, I had the choice of staying in India or go back and explore the opportunities in the US. I chose to stay in India, and that can be termed as the turning point in my career as well as life.

as manual work. Also, being an exportoriented industry, the recent fluctuation in currencies has highly affected the industry. Further, currency fluctuations are experienced in countries where we are exporting. Thus, customers are impacted, and in turn, we are affected.

What is your message to aspiring and upcoming entrepreneurs? In the past few years, India has become a land of opportunities as almost every sector is witnessing potential growth. Indian entrepreneurs are valued worldwide due to their exceptional skills. So, those who are planning to grow in India have good number of chances to succeed. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

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SPECIAL FOCUS

SAFETY & MAINTENANCE HANDLING HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS Adopt safety culture, prevent spillover ........................................................................................ 28 SAFETY TRAINING A panacea for accident-free plant operation.................................................................................... 30 CORROSION MITIGATION TECHNOLOGY Protection through real-time monitoring ........................................................................................ 34 INTERFACE  Shrikant Kulkarni, GM - OHES Division, 3M India “Legislation alone does not guarantee sustainable development”.................................................... 36 ROUNDTABLE How prepared are chemical manufacturing facilities to deal with disasters? .................................. 38

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SPECIAL FOCUS Handling hazardous chemicals

Productivity, profitability, process efficiency and turnover – somehow, all these numbers would make no sense if safety is excluded from the picture. The chemical industry is most prone to hazards and a simple realigning of basic strategies can promote it as a responsible one.

Concentrating deeply on the working of the three under-rated parameters of stocking, vendor management and leadership can go a long way in promoting a safe environment. One can buy the most exhaustive manuals and impart trainings, employ the most sophisticated processes & tools, however, one cannot ‘buy’ a safety culture; it needs to be nurtured.

Taking stock of the stocking methodology

Mahua Roy

C

reating a perfect balance of safety and productivity can be a strenuous, intricate and complex procedure. It cannot be denied that safety and productivity are complementary to each other. Also, it is indisputable that investments towards safety do reap long-term benefits. However, these benefits are not as evident or noticeable nor do they produce the rapid results associated with production investments. In other words, safety is an intangible asset. The chemical industry, in particular, dwells in the midst of hazards. “Different 28

Chemical World | March 2012

sequential steps in chemical business functions, commencing right from feedstock receipt, transferring, storage, handling through purification, processing, separation, finishing, sampling, quality control, equipment & facility maintenance till the final stages of product storage, transfer, distribution – all have inherent safety concerns. Any untoward incident, accident or mishap could be detrimental,” cautions K N K Murthy, Safety Consultant. Although the use of green practices and advanced technologies is opening up, without revisiting the foundations of a culture of safety, the chemical industry cannot call itself hazard-free.

Dealing with issues related to safety can involve advanced techniques for hazard analysis and prescriptive measures towards plant design and operations. It also involves rethinking of certain processes to make them inherently safer. It requires a detailed comprehension of tradeoffs and nuances associated with those processes. One of the basic processes is that of inventory management and stocking. Most globally renowned companies comply with international standards. For instance, at Clariant Chemicals India, the production assets as well as those related to raw materials and finished goods storage facilities are maintained according to a system of comprehensive global guidelines, which includes frequent ESHA audits by a global team of experts. “Our local organisation provides for internal audits and corrective actions, if required. Clariant follows some of the best practices in warehousing and is governed by its Corporate Safety guideline on warehousing standards. Storage of chemicals is based on their risk category. The guideline identifies clear requirements for each category of chemicals and compliance to these requirements are essential and binding in each manufacturing site of Clariant. The warehousing practices are also audited as part of the Global Safety Audit Programme carried out once every three years,” elaborates Peter Palm, Vice President & Managing Director, Clariant Chemicals India. To simplify matters and decode the complex guidelines, most companies


Handling hazardous chemicals

incorporate customisation of safety guidelines to suit local nuances. This helps in easy understanding of the goals and mindsets required to achieve those. The chemical industry is faced with the burden of managing hazardous items. A simple look at inventory best practices can ease this weight. Explains Murthy, “Minimisation of storage of hazardous materials close to the process areas like reactors, pumps, compressors, heaters, dryers, furnaces etc, is an important factor.” It seems like a natural thing to do, but is often neglected leading to accidents. “Besides, it is important to adopt storing and stacking patterns with respect to height, stability, manoeuvrability, access, moving space etc, considering emergency situations as well. And, of course, substitution of highly hazardous materials with less hazardous items or using the former under less severe conditions, solvent phase, lower concentration etc, are essential,” adds Murthy. Integrating these factors during the design stage itself saves cumbersome procedures at a later stage.

After all, accidents cause shutdowns, material loss, wastage, equipment damage and sometimes employee injuries or even fatalities. Besides, it can also damage the company’s public image and employee morale. Developing a responsible mindset towards such issues in your vendor should be a priority. “Clariant employs a combination of self-certification and external inspection of suppliers. The comprehensive checklist contains a large number of product quality and safety related points. Vendors who do not score a minimum number of points are removed from our approved list. Besides, special activities are rolled out for the enhanced qualification of our vendors. Recently, we conducted a workshop on REACH compliance,” says Palm. Regular interactions with vendors can turn profitable in more ways than one. The vendors can also apprise you on what is new and upcoming in the field of technology, thus helping you make an informed choice in future.

Leading the way Nurturing your vendor Your vendor is not just a supplier, he is a partner to your growth. To create a safety mindset, stakeholders at all levels must be involved and accountable – no exceptions. To foster an environment of safety, you will figuratively have to carry out the ‘upbringing’ of your vendor, nurturing him and acquainting him with the importance of safety. The cost involved with accidents alone should suffice to motivate company officials towards mandating safety as a mindset.

Minimisation of storage of hazardous materials close to the process areas like reactors, compressors, heaters, furnaces etc, is an important factor. Besides, it is important to adopt storing and stacking patterns with respect to height, manoeuvrability, moving space etc. K N K Murthy

Safety Consultant

Achieving the goals of best practices in process safety is essential for the chemical industry, which is plagued with a history of accidents. When guided with a strong leadership, a safety programme can be transformed into reality. It can satisfy shareholders with improved productivity and profitability; satisfy the community with fewer untoward incidents; and satisfy employees with a healthy and safe working environment. Companies aiming to establish a track record of exemplary safety need to focus on two sides of safety: on one side is the implementation of operating procedures and disciplines, while on the other is making safety a part of your work culture. Both are critical and indisputable, but the latter is relatively tough to achieve, mainly because it involves human behaviour. However, when efforts are successful eventually, it really pays off as safety behaviour becomes visibly automatic, like putting on a seatbelt. The role of leadership is significant in bringing about this mindset. The chemical industry has been associated in the past

Clariant follows some of the best practices in warehousing and is governed by its Corporate Safety guideline on warehousing standards. Storage of chemicals is based on their risk category. Peter Palm

Vice President & Managing Director, Clariant Chemicals India

with the deadliest of hazards. It is, thus, the responsibility of senior management to take active initiative in ensuring the implementation of standard safety measures in the chemical company. And this can be achieved through core emphasis on safety. There can be no room for complacency when it comes to safety, particularly as the chemical industry wrestles with unstinting structural changes, an evermore competitive business environment, and high public scrutiny. Effectual safety management involves the participation and ownership of various functions within any company – engineering, operations, maintenance and SHE departments. So what part are leaders expected to play? The corporate leadership needs to show deep commitment to all these aspects and the same amount of importance as that given to the financial affairs of the company. By being forthcoming enough and demonstrating that they take cognisance of the importance of safety, the leadership needs to offer commitment of sufficient time and resources to monitor and ensure safety. Most leaders convey the importance of safety to employees by regular interactions. They insist on ingraining it in their DNA. The fruits of such commitments are for all to see. “In 2010, we celebrated five million man-hours’ accident-free operations. We care for the welfare of all Clariant stakeholders, protect our environment and respect our communities. We never use shortcuts in safety procedures and live our Code of Conduct,” says Palm. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

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SPECIAL FOCUS Safety training

A panacea for

accident-free

plant operation

Training per se facilitates development of human resources, starting with imparting of basic/advanced education, (other than academic qualification). It also leads to knowledge enhancement, skill empowerment, competency build-up, attitude change, behavioural correction, employee motivation, performance excellence and career growth.

K N K Murthy

W

ith respect to occupational safety and loss prevention, training holds the key to success among all levels, categories and disciplines – topmost and middle management, supervisors and shoplevel workforce. Considering its impact, training must constitute a significant element of every organisation’s safety policy. Effective utilisation of training will enable to scale new heights in safety management. 30

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In a general industrial set-up, we talk about training the employees who fully fit into the category of ‘adults’. Accordingly, they will participate and make the best use of the learning when there is clear demonstration of how the training being imparted directly applies to their jobs and there are opportunities to apply the same knowledge or skill to solve problems.

Safety policy The safety policy of a company must reflect the aspect of effective, focussed and sustainable training to all stakeholders, which include employees, outsourced

personnel, service providers and even neighbouring public (especially when it comes to the aspect of their contribution to emergency preparedness and response plan). Next in sequential order are the ‘Four As’ as enumerated below. Aim: To ensure the availability of a fully trained and motivated group of employees over a stipulated time Attribute: To evolve appropriate systems, practices and procedures for training, improvement, monitoring and evaluating the results, and bringing them to desired standards/benchmarks Achievement: Improved work efficiency, standards, quality and competency levels of employees, thereby increasing both safety performance and productivity at the organisation Aplomb: Enhanced work culture, changed perceptions, improved attitude, corrected behaviour, ability among the trained to teach others, ensuring continual improvement and carrying forward the mission with sustainability The basic guidelines to ensure an effective training strategy in conformance with the conceptual approach cited above are mentioned below. First comes the formulation and issue of training policy among all employees covering elements such as: R Inclusion of training as an integral aspect of organisations’ safety integrated quality assurance programme R Notification of the tangible benefits, which can be achieved R Obligation on the part of employees to participate in relevant programmes as per the schedule through proactive approach. This must also highlight appropriate execution/enforcement strategy and how the diligent involvement of employees can help enhance the organisation’s growth as well as own career development. The next step involves establishment of training department. In most of the institutions this is an important wing of HR (personnel) department. Its roles and responsibilities include: R Creation of training centre and related facilities


Safety training

R Compilation of identified training needs and preparation of yearly training plan/listing of programmes and issue of schedules (well in advance in a calendar format) in consultation with safety department. In many organisations, the notification of identified training needs is linked with

AN APPROACH TO SAFE OPERATIONS Managerial/Supervisory R Top executive/managerial development/sensitisation R Supervisory competency enhancement R Hazard identification/risk assessment techniques, inspections/ surveys/audits R Control of work systems – standard operating procedures, permit-to-work, etc R Accident investigation/analysis/ retrieval R Specialised training for safety professionals R Emergency preparedness and response plan Shop-level workforce: Special R Philosophy of safety, probable accident causation factors/ prevention measures R Good housekeeping R Personal protective equipment – appraisal/demonstration and practice R Role of field personnel during emergency situations R Occupational health/hygiene Shop level workforce: Craftsmanship related R Plant operation/maintenance R Welding/cutting/other hot jobs R Entry into confined spaces R Work at heights R Material handling including hazardous chemicals R Machine shop safety R Electrical hazards and safeguards R Hand and portable tools

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the submission of annual performance appraisal for all employees by concerned departmental heads R Execution of the scheduled programmes both at central, section/ departmental and shop levels R Deputation of employees to programmes being organised by outside organisations or inviting them to conduct specific in-house sessions (to ensure participation by more number of persons) as deemed fit R Preparation of management information data on regular periodicity and solving any types of hassles with reference to the execution of training as scheduled with the help of higher management

Identification of training need Other than the general induction programmes, refreshers, open house or promotional meets, job-oriented training programmes are required to be formulated and executed. Important elements for execution of programmes include: R Selection of faculties (internal/ external as the case may be) and notification of programme schedules to them. Internal faculties can be developed through appropriate assistance, motivation etc. Faculties can be drawn from both officers/ workers cadre by spotting their talent and flair for communication. They must be given special training to acquire additional skill R Preparation and issue of reading material R Provision of audio/visual support system including computer-aided training facilities R Table top exercises/workshops/ practical demonstration (This is all the more significant to sustain interest/active involvement besides being a safeguard against boredom, tiredness among participants who are required to sit through for a longer time unlike their routine physically active nature of work) R Case studies, group discussions, brainstorming

R Quiz evaluation, accreditation and certification Administrative aspects to be considered to ensure effective execution and active participation include: R Nomination/relieving of participants considering the manpower availability (especially with reference to the availability of required duty post personnel on shift duties) R Proper sitting arrangements and personal comforts

Trained for safety Training is an area that requires special attention, care, motivational efforts and support since it deals with mortals. Their active involvement, acceptance and support are significant and the organisers/trainers must be willing to walk the extra mile in making the programme truly a twoway participative, focussed, receptive and interesting one. Top level executives/senior managers must set an example by finding time to participate in specially designed programmes related to their functions/status and responsibilities. Besides, they must try to be present during the launching of the programmes for their subordinates. This must be followed up through observation/ monitoring of the ongoing training exercises at various levels, interact with the HR wing/faculties, encourage the participants and seek feedback from participants. The next layer is interaction with the concerned supervisors and heads of departments and gauging the benefits gained by trainees & the organisation at large. K N K Murthy has been in the fertilisers and petrochemicals industry for 38 years and retired as Senior Manager (Safety) from Indian Petrochemicals Corporation Ltd, Vadodara. Currently, he works as a Safety Consultant and is associated with Mahatma Gandhi Labour Institute, Ahmedabad. He has done pioneering works in various aspects like hazard identification, safety audits/inspections/surveys, training, emergency preparedness planning, quality/environment standards (ISO), etc. He can be contacted on email: mohanaknk@yahoo.co.in


SPECIAL FOCUS Corrosion mitigation technology

Mahua Roy

C

orrosion has a massive economic as well as environmental impact on virtually all aspects of infrastructure, be it highways or bridges to water and wastewater systems, oil & gas installations. Besides, it cannot be ignored that effects of corrosion lead to severe damage and threat to public safety. Corrosion costs account for around 1-5 per cent of a nation’s GDP, as per Corrosion Control & Monitoring Consultancy Company. In the US, it is approximately 3.1 per cent. The annual cost of corrosion worldwide is estimated to be $ 2.2 trillion. This cost incorporates

Studying the underlying causes In the recent past, India has seen several investments in the oil & gas industry. Downstream processing mainly utilises corrosion-resistant alloys in its installations. The real effect of corrosion is seen in exploration & production (E&P). Elaborates Dr David Horsup, Vice President - Research & Development, Energy Services, Nalco - An Ecolab company, “In E&P processes, large amount of water is used. Also, this water is at a particularly high temperature. The combined effect leads to aggressive corrosion. More so, nowadays deeper wells are being explored, which are at a much hotter temperature.” Corrosion is the primary factor affecting the longevity

have an adverse effect upon the reliability of a plant. As industrialisation is happening at a fast pace, corrosion mitigation and management needs to be deliberated and implemented right at the design stage. Corrosion expert Mukul Gupta, Managing Director, Chemtreat India, notes, “Corrosion is a function of temperature, velocity, raw material composition and external atmospheric conditions. Quick industrialisation pace tends to ignore the location of an installation and its effects on corrosion. Coastal areas are preferred for new facilities as they ease logistics. However, industrial use of sea-water and the salinity in the air could be the major issue for corrosion.”

India loses ` 2 lakh crore ($ 45 billion) every year to corrosion of infrastructure, industrial equipment and other vital installations, as per a 2011 report by the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research. This figure raises questions about the immense under-utilisation of technologies that can help erase this colossal damage.

various direct and indirect effects due to corrosion, including premature deterioration or malfunctioning resulting in the need for maintenance, repair or replacement of damaged equipment. Other sources of costs come from lost production and prolonged shutdown of equipment as a result of corrosion. In certain cases, corrosion costs also include utilisation of additional capacity put to use due to unscheduled maintenance procedures. Currently, the industry maintains a reactive status to mitigation of corrosion. This outlook needs to be transformed, making the industry adopt predictive measures towards alleviation of corrosion. 34

Chemical World | March 2012

and reliability of pipelines that transport crucial energy sources throughout the nation. Contrary to the popular belief, corrosion occurs neither continuously nor at a uniform rate. Chemical impurities such as halides (especially chlorides and fluorides), sulfates and sulfides get adsorbed on metal surfaces and inhibit the natural passivation process. This causes a localised destruction of passive films and leads to pitting corrosion. Besides, environmental factors lead to corrosion by accelerating erosion. This can amplify the corrosion rate of stainless steel by several magnitudes through a synergistic effect. The occurrence of corrosion can

Technologies at a glance Corrosion monitoring is the most effective way of dealing with this menace. It includes a broad range of techniques to evaluate the degradation of metallic materials. These techniques can be categorised into two groups: those providing indications of the cumulative damage (off-line, retrospective) and those providing indications of the prevailing corrosion rate (usually on-line and continuous). Nalco - An Ecolab company’s advanced 3DT technology is developed on the continuous online monitoring method. Enabling sophisticated remote access of plants and immediate notification of hazards, this technology combines chemistry with technology.


Corrosion mitigation technology

Monitoring helps detect effects of corrosion. To prevent it, various technologies are in place. “New advanced materials like non-metals – composites, engineered polymers, reinforced plastics, conducting polymers – are significant advancements in material science, which should be widely employed to curb corrosion. The control process parameters taken into account are the corrosivity of the media involved. New chemistries like high-performing coatings and linings with better barrier properties are continuously evolving technologies, which should be more judiciously incorporated,” adds Gupta.

A closer look at the hurdles One of the significant reasons for the high cost of corrosion mitigation is that the marketplace for corrosion products and services is fragmented. It mainly comprises many smaller companies, which provide a limited number of services. In the wake of this, the government can certainly play a crucial role by partnering with bodies like National Association of Corrosion Engineers International India Section (NIIS), National Corrosion Council of India, and other international institutes. Besides, at this stage, it is important to create a general awareness and understanding about the losses due to corrosion. “Corrosion education is not yet taken as a full-time curriculum by institutes. Lack of information and qualified corrosion professionals is a major setback in combating the problem of corrosion, as a long-term measure,” asserts Gupta. Also, codes and standards laid down for the industry need to be revisited. Gupta adds, “The first step in implementing any new corrosion protection technology is educating the right set of people not only on its advantages, but also explaining the root cause of the problem in detail, and how the new technology would pre-empt and try to curb the issue. Besides, awareness about corrosion and its effects should be initiated right at inception stage of any project (construction stage).”

Opening up research avenues Dr Horsup puts forward that bacterial metabolism leads to acid formation. This process is seen largely in E&P activities. “This acid gets deposited on pipelines and is a major cause of corrosion. An interesting research avenue would include identification of specific bacterial strains, which cause this corrosion,” he adds. Identification of strains can then be used as data to develop counteracting measures. Also, composites constitute another lucrative area where work needs to be done at a larger scale. Says Gupta, “Continuous research in the field of composites, new materials, non-metals with the desired mechanical and electrical properties are the primary steps one could look at, to combat the issue of corrosion right at the nascent stage.” Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Chemical World

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SPECIAL FOCUS Interface - Shrikant Kulkarni

Apart from safety, which other factors do you consider while designing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)? Each PPE manufactured by 3M conforms to the highest levels of international and Indian safety standards. Apart from safety, strong emphasis is laid on the comfort and fit of a PPE. An ill-fitting PPE does not offer complete protection, thereby defeating the purpose of wearing a PPE. PPEs are generally uncomfortable to wear for long time. Keeping that in mind, our PPEs are designed to ensure comfort to users who need to wear those for longer periods.

countries and even some developed countries. Furthermore, though many rules like identification, notification and development of landfill sites were prescribed in 1989 under The Hazardous Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, the state governments are still unable to identify, notify and develop the required sites even today. However, an amendment enacted in 2000 placed the responsibility on industry associations as well as the government. One of the factors to consider with respect to industrial growth and pollution prevention is the activism of several NGOs. Public opinion and numerous public interest litigation pleas

however, can work as a driver towards conservation; for instance, those that are inbuilt in the approval system require industries to take environmental issues into consideration. Industries that are leaders on the environment front do not currently receive any specific advantages. Little special consideration is given even for processing their application for consents or authorisations. Consequently, there is no real driving force for the industries to adopt cleaner technologies and implementation of Environmental Management System standards ISO14000. The environmental awareness is still low. Awareness-creating campaigns,

Legislation alone does not guarantee sustainable development ‌says Shrikant Kulkarni, General Manager - Occupational Health and Environmental Safety (OHES) Division, 3M India. Conversing with Mahua Roy, he gives a round up about the status of health and safety emphasis in the Indian chemical industry.

We also work towards customising the fit of PPEs to suit various ethnic groups, especially in the case of eye protection. The fit of an eyewear could vary considerably from a Caucasian face to an Asian face. We factor in these scenarios through extensive research. Style is also considered in the design of PPEs without compromising on safety or protection.

How are the regulatory norms in India with regard to OHES? The significance of safety and health in the chemical industry is critical towards achieving productivity and maintaining an edge in the competitive scenario. In India, environmental rules and regulations pertaining to the chemical industry are stringent as compared to other developing 36

Chemical World | March 2012

against pollution have led to greater awareness among the industrialists, authorities and communities. Many of the measures to be adopted for solving environmental problems should be based on the experience already gained by the developed countries. Presently, there is little institutional impetus provided for the adoption of cleaner technologies and waste minimisation techniques. Process technologies, however, have their own economic returns that mitigate the need for extensive regulatory interference.

Which are the top problems faced by the sector that call for implementation of OHES solutions? Legislation alone does not guarantee sustainable development. The situation is extremely tricky in a country like India, where implementation is difficult. Rules,

however, have become rather popular and their visibility has increased over the past years.

What are the initiatives taken by 3M to promote OHES in the industry? 3M OHES is proactive in creating safety awareness in industry across various stakeholders – management, employees, EHS personnel. Some of our initiatives include: R Walk-through surveys to assess the presence of hazards and recommend appropriate protection R PPE maintenance camps R Safety seminars, shop-floor and worker training programmes R Safety guides (booklets) for employees in English, Hindi and multiple regional languages Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS Roundtable

How prepared are chemical manufacturing facilities to deal with disasters? Risks and hazards associated with chemical manufacturing are many. If safety is not taken into consideration, it can affect the reputation of a company, besides losing valuable assets and harming human lives. Mahua Roy takes stock of how the Indian chemical industry views safety and its preparedness towards unplanned disasters.

Amrendra Mishra Managing Director, Remmers India

Rajiv Vastupal Chairman and Managing Director, Rajiv Group

Sairam Iyer Manager – Operations, Jotun India Pvt Ltd

Thorough commitment of corporate management towards the organisation and its people is what we consider the most important pre-requisite for establishing safety at any facility. If the management considers the safety of its employees as major priority, it will adhere to and implement systems & processes that are vital for disaster management. At Remmers, the management has always taken the safety issues of its personnel at the highest standing and, hence has incorporated all the latest techniques for establishing the safety features in all its facilities. Incorporating the relevant aspects of safety, right from engineering design planning, is essential. The safety parameters should be established during the design planning stage itself in order to maximise the safety of a facility, its infrastructure and, most importantly, its people.

For hazardous inflammable chemical factories, the government has put forth certain criteria that need to be fulfilled. With respect to fire safety, various kinds of fire-fighting equipment, adequate water storage with pumping and piping facilities to spray the water are essential. The uniform that the workers at the factory wear need to be fire proof, especially for those working near hazardous vessels. Direct connectivity to fire station and smoke alarms are absolutely mandatory. Audit of all equipment should be done internally on a periodical basis by the fire safety department. For any industrial architecture, fire safety designing should be part of the plant design. It is imperative to have the machines placed appropriately with proper spacing. Proper passage should be provided for emergency exits and there should be at least dual, triple or four entry/exit points in plants & buildings, depending upon the size of the building.

Pre-requisites for disaster management at a chemical plant would include measures, right at the engineering design stage. Incorporating the philosophy of ‘inherent safety’ is of prime importance. This attitude proposes that an inherently safer design is one that avoids hazards instead of controlling them. This can be achieved by reducing the number of hazardous operations in the plant. It is true that Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and display of safety charts help to spread awareness among employees. But during times of stress, these measures are futile and, may be, ignored by employees working at a hazardous facility. This eventually leads to accidents. However, by designing a plant such that it does not allow any room for carelessness by employees, accidents and untoward calamities can be minimised. Besides, it is important to invest in disaster mitigation technologies. Safety is the biggest asset and needs to be taken seriously.

EDITORIAL TAKE The approach that hazards need to be eliminated or significantly reduced rather than controlled and managed is the one that will go a long way in dealing with untoward incidents. Thus, importance to safety should be given right at the designing stage of the plant. Investment for adoption of advanced technologies to ensure plant safety should not be considered an ‘added cost’.

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Chemical World | March 2012


FACILITY VISIT Jotun India Pvt Ltd

‘Lean’ing on the principles of safety and sustainability

Photo: Joshua Navalkar

Mumbai is proud of its engineering marvel: The Bandra-Worli Sea Link. Little do people know that Jotun India Pvt Ltd was a partner in making this structure stand tall for years to come. This company is also part of several other projects like Raipur Airport, ABG Shipyards, to name a few. The manufacturing facility of Jotun India is powered by technological expertise to face the challenges of tomorrow.

Powder coatings (PC) manufacturing

Mahua Roy egged at ` 21,000 crore, the Indian paints industry is growing at around 15 per cent per year. A company, which has grown over 200 per cent since commencement of its operations (in 2009) in India, Jotun is the newest member painting aspirations of serving this competitive market. Its

P

61,536 sq m facility located at Ranjangaon, Pune, hosts the manufacturing of marine, decorative, industrial (protective) and powder coatings. The striking and most interesting feature of this facility is its attention to lean manufacturing principles, coupled with safety. Besides, the engineering design of the plant has been so wellplanned that it has even taken into account future capacity expansions!

FACTS & FIGURES R Commencement of operations: 2009 (facility built in one year and three months) R Total investment: Around ` 100 crore R Area: 61,536 sq m R Total annual capacity: 50 million litre – wet paint; 10,000 tonne – powder coatings (when three shifts are functional) R Catering to: Markets such as India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka

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Chemical World | March 2012

PC testing area

Avoiding safety is not an option! “It is true that Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and display of safety charts help to spread awareness among employees regarding the importance of safety. But during times of stress, these measures are futile and may be ignored by employees working with hazardous chemicals or machinery. This eventually leads to accidents,” says Sairam Iyer, Manager – Operations, Jotun India. In order to leave no scope for the occurrence of untoward incidents, Iyer paid greatest attention to detail, employing every known principle of inherent safety design. He adds emphatically, “By designing a plant such that it does not allow any room for carelessness of employees, accidents and untoward calamities can be minimised. As per the designing of our plant, our


Jotun India Pvt Ltd

By designing a plant such that it does not allow any room for carelessness of employees, accidents and untoward calamities can be minimised. As per the designing of our plant, our employees cannot commit a mistake, even if they wanted to! Sairam Iyer

Manager – Operations

employees cannot commit a mistake, even if they wanted to!” The facility has two separate gates; one for the movement of employees and the other for materials. The entire manufacturing unit is encircled by a oneway, 9 metre wide road for the safe passage of vehicles. “One can put various signages like ‘Stop-See-Go’, or make markings on the road, but eliminating the root cause of the incidents is what is required. We took steps towards this,” explain Iyer. The material handling and forklift operation areas too are designed keeping the safety aspect in mind. The company has invested greatly towards the safety of personnel as well. For the solvent-based coatings area, the employees are provided with highly sophisticated and extremely safe fire retardant antistatic overalls as PPEs. Another interesting feature about advanced technological safety procedures employed by the company is the incorporation of high expansion foam generators. In case of unplanned emergencies, the smoke detectors would trigger these instruments, which are capable of filling the entire area with 7 metre of foam in three minutes flat. In the solvent-

Globally, as of 2010, water-borne technology has increased its share to 15 per cent penetration in protective coatings. We are optimistic that demand for water-based technology will grow in India. Anthony Wong Managing Director

based coatings area, low expansion foam deluge system is fitted to combat fire.

Keenness towards leanness It is rare that one gets to see actual demonstration of the principles of lean manufacturing and plant design. This facility incorporates most aspects towards promotion of leanness, such that maximum process efficiency is attained. One notices that the beams and columns are all located on the exterior; this way the effective area of the manufacturing unit is dramatically increased. Right from raw material inventory area to processing, packaging and dispatch, there is no step for which one would have to go backwards. The raw material and finished goods are colour-coded, besides bearing detailed information. “Colour coding enables easy identification of inventory, which eases the workflow of forklift operators. The entire operations are based on first-in-first-out principles,” says Iyer.

The market in India The core values of product development in this company are driven by sustainability and environment-friendliness. Anthony Wong, Managing Director, Jotun India, says, “We are upbeat about our progress and opportunities in all the four business segments in India – marine, decorative, industrial and powder coatings. Our customers like what we offer in terms of quality products & services and what we stand for in terms of our commitments and focus on Health, Safety & Environment.” In response to the increased market demand for more environmentally sustainable products, the company has recently developed Lady Effects range, which is a premium, scratch-resistant, matt-finish interior paint. “Although it is not marketed specifically as a healthier or environment-friendly product, it is nevertheless formulated to be consistent with the market demands,” says Wong. In addition, Jotun has also launched heatreflective architectural coatings under the brand name Jotashied Extreme in paints, and Cool Shades in powder coatings. Besides, assisting ship owners to reduce

Tracking of inventory

fuel costs and corresponding carbon emissions, the company has refined its premium acrylic anti-fouling marine coatings range – SeaQuantum.

Future of water-based coatings The paint and coatings industry is raw material-intensive (about 70 per cent is raw material cost). With high percentage of the raw material linked to petrochemical sources, it is quite vulnerable to global crude oil price fluctuations. Besides, there are challenges regarding the availability of other raw materials. In this scenario, water-based coatings are garnering a lot of importance worldwide. “Globally, as of 2010, water-borne technology has increased its share to 15 per cent penetration in protective coatings. We are optimistic that demand for water-based technology will grow in India,” asserts Wong. It is just a mindset change, which is required to boost acceptance of waterbased technology, echoes Iyer. “There is a misconception that water-based coatings do not give the desired level of properties or are as efficient as solventbased ones. This needs to be urgently addressed, besides raising awareness about the long-term environmental benefits of water-based coatings. Once technological innovations develop further, the prices of water-based coatings would eventually come down,” Iyer concludes. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Chemical World

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

SPECIALTY/FINE CHEMICALS SPECIALTY CHEMICALS On a strong foundation for better future.......................................................................................... 44 RUBBER CHEMICALS On an accelerated growth path ......................................................................................................... 46 TECHNICAL TEXTILE A touch of ‘specialty’ in chemical business ....................................................................................... 50 EXPORTS MARKET Innovative solutions must for gaining competitive edge ................................................................. 52 INTERFACE  Sethuram Belur Krishnamurthy, GM, Dow Coating Materials (DCM), South East Asia and Indian Sub-Continent “Every market in the world is price-sensitive”.................................................................................. 54 INTERFACE  Olivier Faussadier, Vice President & GM, OMNOVA Solutions “Being in India is essential to build a sustainable growth plan”....................................................... 56

March 2012 | Chemical World

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Specialty chemicals

strong

On a foundation for

Courtesy: MC-Bauchemie

better future Use of waterproof concrete and latest sealing solutions for leak-free metro-tunnel systems

Anticipating the potential in the Indian construction chemicals sector, major players are leaving no stone unturned to increase their marketshare. Adopting effective strategies, focussing on R&D, introducing innovative products, etc, are some of the activities being witnessed in the construction chemicals market in the country. No doubt in the days to come, this segment is going to be one of the most vibrant in the Indian specialty chemicals industry. Prasenjit Chakraborty

C

onstruction chemicals comprise a wide range of products for every industry and construction type. These are used in concrete, the secondmost used material in the world. This clearly indicates that such chemicals will be widely used in infrastructure projects like roads, irrigation projects, power sector, railways, building construction, etc. There are also construction chemicals for industries like floorings and grouts. So as the industrial growth accelerates, the demand for flooring will go up augmenting the sales and turnovers of companies that deal with such products. There are products for repairs, rehabilitation and retrofitting. So any old structure that requires rehabilitation will need to use construction chemicals. Protection of concrete f rom 44

Chemical World | March 2012

environmental pollution is another area, which opens doors for usage of specialty chemicals. “Modern injection technologies can stop leakages in dams or water retaining structures and can save valuable water resources. As and when the awareness will increase, almost all the civil engineering and industry sector will help fuel the growth of construction chemicals industry. Modern day constructions cannot evolve without construction chemicals,” points out Sunny Surlaker, Head, Admixtures Division, MC-Bauchemie (India) Pvt Ltd. In short, construction chemicals are a boon, which help us preserve structures during initial construction by protecting them during its lifecycle; repairing and rehabilitating them to increase life near the end of their lifecycle. These chemicals thus open up a whole new era of modernised, durable and sustainable construction.

Specific roles of construction chemicals in infrastructure According to Surlaker, construction of durable structures for infrastructure, or otherwise, is absolutely not possible without the appropriate usage of construction chemicals. “One of the basic reasons behind the evolution of this industry was to remove the inherent disadvantages associated with cement hydration and the porous nature of hardened concrete,” he says. Though cement is the best construction material available, it has inherent shrinkage and cracking mechanisms that lower the lifecycle of any construction. Construction chemicals were designed and introduced to remove these defects. Taking due cognisance of the fact, various companies are offering products to address the issue. For instance, MC-Bauchemie has a complete range of construction chemicals. “Specifically, our coatings enhance life expectancy of civil engineering using crack bridging and carbonation-resistant properties while maintaining breathability of concrete. We have new generation, environmentfriendly polymer silicate-based coatings to resist pH from 1 to 14. Other popular systems are injection technologies to cater to every type of water entry and soil stabilisation,” claims Surlaker. He further adds, “We have used these systems in several dams in India to stop loss of water resources. For concrete road construction, we have new generation admixtures and additives. We have curing compounds that stop water evaporation and lower the surface temperature of the concrete by solar reflectance, thereby reducing cracking. We feel such technologies should be made mandatory by consultants and government bodies to obtain quality roads,” he points out.

Intumescent coating Today, use of steel structure is rampant in airport terminal buildings, shopping centres, theatres, etc. It is said that intumescent coatings are the ideal way to combine an attractive architectural appearance with fire safety. Although


Specialty chemicals

steel does not burn, it loses its strength when exposed to temperature above 500o C. “As a result, steel structure becomes unstable due to the effects of fire, and buildings can collapse. Intumescent coating can form highly efficient foam based on micro-porous carbon. It forms spontaneously, homogenously and rapidly at about 200o C,” says EngHeng Khoo, Head-Sales, Asia-Pacific, Clariant (Singapore) Pte Ltd. If there are no space restrictions, the foam may be up to 100 times thicker than the original coating and has a strong heat insulation effect. Therefore, intumescent coatings are often used to protect steel structures. According to Khoo, an intumescent system is a combination of various compounds that in the event of fire react together as a result of the temperature increase to form a carbon foam. “This foam attains a thickness 10 to 100 times that of the originally applied coating and isolates the substrate material through its low thermal conductivity,” he points out. Clariant supplies ammonium polyphosphate, which is a key raw material for intumescent coatings. This product is marketed under the brand name Exolit AP.

Development strategies A quality product alone is not enough to become successful in the market. It has to have the support of effective marketing strategies. Especially, when the segment (construction chemicals) is in a nascent stage, the role of marketing is even more Temperature of steel over time in a typical fire with and without intumescent coating 1000 Unprotected steel

Critical temperature: Steel loses its strength

Temperature [oC]

500

Time [min]

Steel with intumescent coating

30

60

90

Source: Clariant

important. Naturally companies catering to the segment has come out with plans to popularise their products in the market. For instance, MC-Bauchemie believes in marketing systems and technologies. “We cater to the qualityconscious segment of the market and not the price-sensitive segment. Our customers keep coming back to us again and again that translates to revenues from the technology-conscious sector,” asserts Surlaker. The company has presence in most high-tech range of the industry. “We solve problems and supply systems through free technical assistance. Besides, we conduct training programme for engineers as well as our clients, which builds partnership and establishes a healthy relationship with our clients,” he says. Frequent innovation of products is one of the cornerstones of its success. This facilitates increase in sales and getting reputed clients. “We continuously go in for innovations and new developments rather than stagnating with conventional products. Hence, only quality-conscious clients buy from us. We cater to prestigious projects where otherwise the problems are unsolvable,” claims Surlaker. In the recent past, MC-Bauchemie has introduced several innovative technologies, like acid resisting concrete, dense packing concrete based on Quantz Technology, and very low pore volume thick coatings for drinking water and wastewater industry based on dynamic sync crystallisation, to name a few. Similarly, Pidilite Industries is focussing more on protective coatings and structural waterproofing arenas, as the segments are witnessing growth in India. Apart from this, it offers enhanced services to customers. “One of our main focus areas is on growing protective coatings and structural waterproofing segments. We now have built up the products and support structure to work on specifications with the consulting organisations, the contracting fraternity and offer support to application contracting,” says K Padmakar, Head-Product Management, Construction Chemicals Division, Pidilite Industries Ltd.

CONCRETE FACTS R New technologies are capable of stopping leakages in dams or structures that retain water R Construction chemicals can eliminate inherent disadvantage associated with cement hydration R Coatings can protect steel from fire

Research-based foundation The growth of any segment is always associated with R&D. This means higher the growth higher the R&D activities. The construction chemicals segment is no exception. Says Padmakar, “The R&D activities in India are geared up to meet increasing needs arising in the construction sector. It can now find alternative raw materials to suit the temperatures in the sub-continent and also address the durability factor.” MC-Bauchemie Germany has presence in India for over two decades. “We use their experience, expertise and international exposure. Innovation and new developments hold the key in today’s market development. By virtue of collaboration, we are immediately exposed to new technologies,” says Surlaker. Most of the R&D activities are to adapt internationally available technologies to local conditions. MC-Bauchemie Germany has an ‘Indian Room’ to cross-test technologies for use in local conditions for long-term storage, stability of application and performance. “Besides, local innovations to meet market requirements are always in progress and MC is one of the few companies with training centre and development laboratory to cater to India’s concrete technology needs,” he says. Specialty chemical manufacturers have realised that the key factor is to identify the needs of the construction industry and come out with suitable products. With due emphasis being given to infrastructure development by the government, one can anticipate manifold growth in the construction chemicals sector in near future. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Chemical World

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Rubber chemicals

Factors such as high demand for passenger vehicles, increasing prices of natural rubber, etc, have led to rise in consumption of synthetic rubber in the country. Seeing this opportunity many multinational specialty chemical companies have increased their focus on the Indian market. Rakesh Rao

T

he demand for rubber has been growing in India, driving on the back of robust growth in the automotive sector, which accounts for about 50 per cent of the total rubber consumption in the country. In addition, steady rise in industrial production has also raised the consumption of rubber in India. The non-tyre consumers of rubber include tubes, footwear, belts and hoses, latex products, etc. At the same time, rising prices of natural rubber (NR) have forced end-users to turn to synthetic rubber industry to meet their demands. “For industrial applications, NR and synthetic rubbers will co-exist. However, synthetic rubber has been proven to have excellent properties and superior performance for special purpose applications like withstanding heat, temperature, mechanical abrasion, consistency of performance, etc. Hence, it is gaining acceptance among industries that are increasingly faced with such challenging situations. We estimate that with increasing prices of NR, share of synthetic rubber is expected to increase up to 35-40 per cent over the next decade. Currently, the share of synthetic rubber is low as compared to developed countries,” opines Dr Joerg Strassburger, Managing Director and Country Representative, LANXESS India.

Synthetic vs natural: Who will win the race? Rubber is an important component of tyre manufacturing. Experts feel that NR provides better properties in terms of flexibility, low heat build-up during use and durability. Hence, more than 70 per cent of NR goes into tyre-making. With the rise in NR prices, tyre manufacturers are looking at a viable alternative in synthetic rubber. “Tyre manufacturers use both NR and synthetic rubber. The amounts vary according to the type of tyre. For example, more NR is used in earth mover and airplane tyres while more synthetic rubber is used in passenger car tyres. The materials have different properties that impact the performance of the tyre in different ways. Thus, most tyres have a blend of both,” explains 46

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Keith Price, Director - National Media Relations & Business Communications, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company. Hence, specialty chemical giants like LANXESS are gearing up to tap this burgeoning demand for synthetic rubber. “LANXESS, a world leader in the synthetic rubber market, is leading in developing processes and technologies and offer highly innovative solutions for all fields of applications,” claims Dr Strassburger. LANXESS, a global player in butyl rubber production, is further expanding its network to serve the increasing demand for the high-performance synthetic rubber used in premium tyre and non-tyre applications.

Bolstering demand The growth in rubber is also opening scores of opportunities for the suppliers of chemicals. Subir Sen, Managing Director, PMC Rubber Chemicals India – a part of the US-based PMC Group that acquired ICI India’s rubber chemicals business in December 2005, opines, “Since we acquired the ICI’s Rubber Chemical’s business, we have grown it in double-digit percentage every year and our growth have outpaced the growth of the industry. This growth is the result of our focussed investments in the business. We are fully aware of the high growth of synthetic rubber in India and are in the process of formulating our strategy in the synthetic rubber market.” Expressing similar views, Rajesh Gupta, Director of Commercial Sales, Asia-Pacific, Solutia, says, “Demand for synthetic rubber is up in India and is driven by the increased production of automotive tyres. Solutia does not manufacture synthetic rubber but rather sells rubber chemicals that help in the curing and processing of rubber. Solutia’s Crystex insoluble sulfur is a vulcanising agent that prevents sulfur migration and bloom during rubber processing and is important for tyre performance. The proven consistency, performance and reliability of Crystex assure customers of reliable product outcomes each and every time.” To take advantage of the growing demand for rubber, chemical manufacturers are also expanding their capacity of rubber chemicals. For example, LANXESS has relocated its rubber chemicals plant to Jhagadia (Gujarat) in March 2010 and also upgraded it. The company is not just using this site to produce rubber chemicals


Rubber chemicals

For industrial applications, NR and synthetic rubbers will co-exist. However, synthetic rubber has been proven to have excellent properties and superior performance for special purpose applications like withstanding heat, temperature, mechanical abrasion, consistency of performance, etc. Dr Joerg Strassburger

Managing Director and Country Representative, LANXESS India

for domestic market, but also to cater to its global requirements. Dr Strassburger explains, “The products manufactured at our plant in Jhagadia are supplied to the domestic market as well as to markets worldwide. Around 30-40 per cent of the total rubber chemicals production is exported from the site.”

Collaborative efforts To expand their business in India, many multinational specialty chemical companies are working in close collaboration with the rubber and tyre manufacturers. Gupta opines, “Solutia caters to the local rubber industry in India, primarily automotive tyre manufacturers. Our business with the Indian tyre industry has grown over the last three years and we are well-positioned to continue our work and collaboration with local Indian tyre companies for product development and supply.” Despite availability of synthetic rubber, NR continues to be an essential composite in many products because of its

The demand for rubber chemicals in India is growing and will continue to grow, as the country produces ever increasing numbers of transportation vehicles. We see a lot of pent-up demand and do not believe it to be flattening out soon. Subir Sen

Managing Director, PMC Rubber Chemicals India

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superior tear and heat resistance qualities. However, specialty chemical manufacturers are working on improving the quality of synthetic rubber so that it can be used more in place of NR. Dr Strassburger says, “At LANXESS, we continuously innovate to develop advanced rubber polymers, rubber chemicals and additives, which can meet customer needs effectively. LANXESS offers a wide range of premium grades of synthetic rubber that serve the growing demand for high-performance rubber in challenging applications like gasket seals or conveyor belts in fast-operating machines.” Even the tyre manufacturers are drawing up plans for sustainable development to meet the future requirements of the endusers. Price explains, “Synthetic rubber uses oil as a raw material, which is a key factor in its price. Isoprene, which is used to produce synthetic rubber, is a by-product of the oil refining process. Goodyear is also working on alternatives to both natural and oil-derived synthetic rubber. For example, we are working to develop bio-isoprene, a synthetic rubber made from renewable raw materials including sugarcane, corn and switchgrass.”

All-round developments The growing number of passenger cars will continue to drive the demand for rubber chemicals in the country. “There has been a steady increase of rubber chemicals in India driven by rise in Passenger Car Radial (PCR) and Truck & Bus Radial (TBR) production capacities over the last three years. The growth drivers are increased demand and new capacities for PCR & TBR; improved road conditions leading to more transportation of goods by road; growth in passenger car production and the increase of radialisation,” points out Gupta. Hence, one can expect more investments in the rubber chemicals sector in near future. Sen concurs, “The demand for rubber chemicals in India is growing and will continue to grow, as the country produces ever-increasing numbers of transportation vehicles. We see a lot of pent-up demand and do not believe it to be flattening out soon.”

Demand for synthetic rubber is up in India and is driven by the increased production of automotive tyres. There has been a steady increase for rubber chemicals in India driven by rise in passenger car radial and truck & bus radial production capacities over the last three years. Rajesh Gupta

Director of Commercial Sales, Asia-Pacific, Solutia

To further consolidate its position in the rubber chemicals industry, PMC Rubber Chemicals intends to up investments in this space. Sen elaborates, “We continue to focus on our customers with valueadded services and products. We have recently brought out couple of formulated products exclusively for the industry that are gaining steady acceptance in the market. We have definite development plan in the rubber chemicals that would unfold in 2012 helping the company grow not only organically but also inorganically by adopting specific product/market strategy.” While automotive segment will be the key sector for boosting rubber consumption, growing demand for industrial products is also aiding this development. “The rubber chemicals industry in India is projected to grow at a rate of 9-10 per cent CAGR over the next decade. The tyre and tube market for both passenger and commercial vehicles forms a large customer segment for rubber chemicals from LANXESS. The healthy growth rate of the automobile industry and that of industrial products like belts, hoses are clear triggers for the demand of rubber chemicals. Trends like radialisation of tyres and increased usage of high-performance tyres act as consistent drivers for rubber processing chemicals. While the tyre industry is a major demand driver, the non-tyre components like window profiles, seals, belts, hoses and various other moulded products also form a sizeable chunk,” concludes Dr Strassburger. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Technical textile

A touch of

‘specialty’in chemical business

Specialty chemicals are core to the development of technical textiles, which are used for specific enduse applications. Rapid ascent of this sector on the textile horizon in India has opened floodgates of opportunities for specialty chemical manufacturers. Rakesh Rao

T

echnical textile is considered to be the future growth area for the textile industry with huge potential in domestic as well as overseas markets. According to Indian Technical Textile Association, the sector, presently at a nascent stage in India, is experiencing a growth rate of 10-20 per cent and the domestic consumption market alone is expected to exceed $ 13 billion by 2012-13. Shekhar Singh, General Manager - Colour, Atul Ltd, says, “Technical textiles is considered as the sunrise sector of the Indian textile industry and is the fastest growing segment in textiles at about 11 per cent.” Technical textile, which accounts for over 25 per cent of all textile consumption in weight terms, encompasses immense range and diversity of raw materials, processes, products and applications. These textiles, which provide technical performance and functional properties to the end-user segments, require specialty 50

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chemicals to enhance their attributes and features. Hence, many specialty chemical companies view this segment with renewed interest. “Yes, companies like Clariant can contribute to this industry. As Clariant has a strong presence in Europe, which has a developed technical textile industry, we know how to tackle the challenges faced by this industry in meeting various requirements. This is a potential growth area for us in India,” opines P Rajasekaran, Head - Textile Chemicals Business, Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd.

Technically perfect According to Rajasekaran, there are three main areas for growth in technical textiles – automotive textiles (car upholstery, car seats, etc), protective textiles (tents, uniforms and institutional wear), and home textiles (table cloth, bath mat, carpets and non-woven). Global majors are firming up plans to explore the Indian technical textiles industry by leveraging on their experience in the developed markets. Clariant India, which has products to cater

to this industry and technical support from Switzerland/Germany, has a separate business group handling technical textiles market globally and in India. Clariant has also set up a pilot coating facility at its application centre at Thane (Maharashtra) looking into the developments in this market, he adds. Since technical textiles are used for specialised functions, specialty chemical manufacturers are opening up application labs to meet the requirements of domestic customers. “Within the last two years, Momentive started manufacturing operations in Chennai, India. This facility significantly improves our capability and infrastructure to provide excellent products and services to textile customers in India. In addition, an R&D centre in Bengaluru continues to develop new products and expand our platform silicone technologies,” opines C W Ryou, Global Marketing Director - Textiles, Leather & Non-woven, Momentive Performance Materials Inc. Similarly, domestic companies are looking at collaboration to expand their


Technical textile

offerings to technical textiles market. Atul Ltd, a leading colorant manufacturer in India, has already implemented and established strategic collaborations with global experts from Germany – M Dohmen and Rudolf GmbH. Atul, with its existing range of specialty vat dyes ideally suited for Indutech, IR remission (camouflage printing) along with high light & wash fast disperse dyes from M Dohmen (for Mobiltech & Sport-tech) and collaboration with Rudolf Chemie for supporting specialty effect chemicals, is already exploring the market and establishing customer base of technical textile manufacturers in India. “We are also offering products free from Per Fluoro Octanoic Acid (PFOA)/Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), which are based on C-6 chemistry. These products offer best ecological safety and reliable protection & comfort,” adds Singh.

On an eco-friendly path With environment-consciousness growing among the technical textile manufacturers, specialty chemical suppliers are offering their expertise to achieve this target. Rajasekaran says, “Environmentconsciousness is high in textiles, especially in apparel and home textiles. In technical textiles, the function of the end-product is the most important. Many of the applications may or may not be in direct exposure to humans. With the further development of technical textiles in India, this will be an area, which will demand answers.” However, chemical suppliers like Clariant can fulfill these requirements. For example, Rajasekaran says, Clariant has in its range zero and low-formaldehyde binders such as Appretan E Series (Ecological) suitable for all segments, PFOA-free fluorocarbons for protective wear, new concepts in flame retardants, which can do away with restricted substances. “In addition, Clariant has a range of aqueous-based coatings and is in the process of development of specific polymer-based coatings, both of which create a low load on the environment,” he avers.

Similarly,Atul Ltd,with its commitment to eco-conservation, sustainability and use of renewable resources, is focussing on products conforming to international norms & regulations like Oekotex, Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), REACH, Bluesign, etc.

Emerging opportunities Experts feel that the chemical finishing area conferring specialty effects like rain & stain repellent, flame retardant, moisture management, antimicrobial, UV protection, etc is expected to grow faster. Singh elaborates, “Today, with growing incomes, Indian consumer is also looking for superior functionality and more comfort, and we must ensure that the best of the products are available to them. We also expect Mobiltech & Sport-tech to be the fastest growing segment within this group.” In addition to eco-friendly textile goods and applications, the multi-performances and functions for textiles, which improve the quality of life, are the key emerging trends in the technical textile space. And suppliers are developing new products to meet these developments. A case in point is Momentive, which is developing new applications for silicone fluids ranging from apparel textiles to technical textiles for use in India and around the world. Ryou says, “Momentive’s silicone fluids are ‘textile enhancers’ imparting multiperformances and functions for apparel technical textiles such as sportswear, leisurewear and underwear in the Indian market. Recently, it launched a fluorofree water repellent for geo-textiles and architectural textiles as well as the apparel technical textiles.”

Aiding growth The technical textile industry does look up to the specialty chemical industries because when certain functions are demanded of technical textiles, this is achieved through the chemical industry. Rajasekaran explains, “The current market in India is big for packing cloth, which has a low emphasis on chemicals. Looking into the future, the market is expected to grow in medical textiles, protective textiles and automotive

TYPES OF TECHNICAL TEXTILES Depending on the product characteristics, functional requirements and end-use applications, these have been grouped into 12 segments: R Agrotech (agriculture, horticulture and forestry) R Buildtech (construction) R Clothtech (shoes and clothing) R Geotech (geo-textiles, civil engineering) R Hometech (furniture, upholstery, interior furnishing, household textiles, etc) R Indutech (filtration, cleaning and other industrial uses) R Medtech (medical, healthcare and hygiene) R Mobiltech (automobiles, shipping, railways and aerospace) R Oekotech (environmental protection) R Packtech (packaging) R Protech (person and property protection) R Sport-tech (sport and leisure) Source: Reliance Industries

textiles. These industries demand various functions such as anti-bacterial finish, soil release, blood repellant, air permeability, mildew protection, mosquito protection, UV protection, flame protection, etc.” According to a recently released study of the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM), the technical textile industry has grown from ` 50,000 crore in 2010-11 to ` 75,000 crore in 2011-12. This is further expected to grow to over ` 1,00,000 crore by 2012-13 due to huge growth in auto and other related sectors. This is likely to open up the floodgates of opportunities for the manufacturers of specialty chemicals, which are critical to give functionality and required quality. Rajasekaran rightly sums up, “The demand and durability requirements are completely different from apparel segments. Hence, specialty chemicals will have a big role to play here.” Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Exports market

The export scenario of specialty chemicals from India is far from satisfactory. Primary reasons for this are lack of investment in R&D and innovation. In the era of customised demands, innovation by companies and industry-friendly policies from government hold the key to boost exports. Prasenjit Chakraborty

H

eavily dependent on end-user industries, the Indian specialty chemicals segment has recorded more or less uniform growth over the years. During the economic crisis, specialty chemicals used in certain specific exportoriented industries suffered major losses. Post-recession, however, with a surging demand in key consumer industries such as construction, automobiles and textiles, among others, specialty chemicals have been able to record pre-downturn growth rate. Coupled with growth, customised demands from consumers have also increased tremendously. “Now, specialty chemicals have to be manufactured

SPECIALTY CHECK Specialty chemical segment is witnessing surge in customised demand, and to meet this demand, industry needs: R To concentrate on select business segment R To increase investment in R&D R To ensure constant availability of raw materials R More industry-friendly policies

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must for gaining competitive edge

keeping in mind consumer requirements. The main strategy will be, therefore, continuous innovation at low costs to maintain a competitive edge among world suppliers,” exhorts Satish W Wagh, Chairman, CHEMEXCIL. Over the years, chemical product trade is increasingly getting specialised all over the world. Innovation is increasingly becoming an important factor to focus on core competence and to become a leading player in specialty products. “In the above context, it is essential for the Indian chemical manufacturers to focus on select business segments where competitive advantage exists,” points out Wagh. Such strategies would help Indian chemical manufacturers to establish relations with their customers in profitable segments and exit non-competitive segments. There are many issues that need to be addressed to augment the export of specialty chemicals. Investments in R&D, innovation, energy and feedstock, logistics, regulation and climate change, etc, are some of the issues that ought to be taken care of. “Of these, the most important issues are investments in R&D and innovation. These will be key to Indian exporters for success in the export market,” observes Wagh. According to Dr Kishore M Shah, President, Indian Specialty Chemical

Manufacturers’ Association, availability of raw materials and efficient logistics are two important issues for the growth of export of specialty chemicals. “An exporter has certain commitments (like time-frame of sending the product etc) towards the importer. And to make it happen, availability of raw materials is extremely important. Unfortunately, specialty chemical manufacturers have been facing problems with regard to raw materials. Logistics is another issue that needs immediate attention. Unavailability of containers delays the delivery of products to overseas destination,” he explains.

Investment scenario One of the biggest hurdles facing the specialty chemicals sector is low investment in R&D. “R&D is indeed an area that has been largely neglected. Backdated and obsolete technologies from the West are often adopted by the Indian chemical industry. Another associated problem is patent protection. Only undertaking R&D initiatives is not enough; the research material has to be protected as well,” rues Wagh. This aspect is a major concern for domestic companies, and especially for pharmaceutical segment, which is developing globally-reputed generics.


Exports market

In order to ensure the overall development of the industry and bridge the existing technological divide, it is imperative to develop long-term strategies for sustaining innovative R&D initiatives. It is important to form foreign collaborations to undertake R&D activities, and thereby ensure technology upgradation. Notably, with 100 per cent FDI being permissible in the domestic chemical industry, the prospects of bolstering R&D activities in collaboration with overseas companies look bright. “Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) can be signed with chemical associations abroad to ensure sharing of skill, technology and knowledge,” he suggests.

Government, the facilitator The government role must be to facilitate, regulate, motivate and sustain the sector through various policies to allow ease of manufacturing and reduce hurdles in exports. It must realise that this segment is largely under-represented in terms of investment opportunities, and has

more growth potential than other segments in the chemical industry in the coming years. Wagh strongly believes that India has the potential to emerge as a global hub for manufacturing specialty chemicals by 2020 by catering to local needs and exploiting its growing market abroad. “This segment was severely affected during the global economic slowdown. However, post-recession it has successfully recovered due to growth being witnessed in several industries that it caters to such as infrastructure, automobile and textiles, among others. Currently, it is growing at 15 per cent per annum, which is faster compared to other segments within the industry,” he says. Consumer demand has reached new heights, necessitating regular product innovation. Therefore, the specialty chemicals segment is now required to customise products as per consumer requirements, which demands huge investments in R&D to undertake technology upgradation and ensure

product innovation. Moreover, proper understanding about global needs is also important to manufacture goods for the international market. To achieve this end, effective channels are required to reach out to consumers. In order to boost the quality and quantity, and encourage entrepreneurs to foray into the emerging segments of the domestic chemical industry like specialty chemicals and also assist them to export, the government has to come up with friendly policies and create better infrastructure and logistics. The FDI policy, for instance, will help in technology upgradation, and funds will be available to undertake effective R&D initiatives. In the ultimate analysis, it will be prudent for the companies to take their own initiatives rather than depending on the government. Of course, policy decision plays a major role for any industry segment to grow. But it is the individual approach that will determine the future. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Interface - Sethuram Belur Krishnamurthy

How is the coatings market in India shaping up? The Indian coatings market is positive and growing well. The needs of our customers are changing rapidly; and DCM is one of the largest coating players in the market and is also at the forefront of driving these changes. Demand for high-quality paint is increasing due to better consumer awareness and we are able to deliver some of the best quality coating solutions to the market. Another important dimension shaping the industry is the demand for environment-friendly paints. To cater to this need, DCM offers low odour and low volatile organic compounds (VOCs) products, which our customers use to make paints with low environmental footprint.

How does the Indian market differ from that of the developed world in terms of price, consumer expectations, etc? Every market in the world is price-sensitive. However, the critical questions that arise include are we catering to the needs of the market? Are we providing solutions that end-consumers want? At DCM, we are more than just a material provider; we are a solutions company and we collaborate with our customers to solve their toughest technical challenges. We pride ourselves as ‘Experts in the Science of Solutions’. If customers want to convert a product from solvent-based to water-based, we work with them closely to understand their exact requirements. We work so closely with them that we practically join their technical team. Recently, we launched a new range of high gloss water-based enamels, which have

Every market in the world is price-sensitive …says Sethuram Belur Krishnamur thy, General Manager, Dow Coating Materials (DCM), South East Asia and Indian Sub-Continent. In an interaction with Prasenjit Chakraborty, he discusses the company’s contributions to the coatings industry and the emerging trends in this segment.

As far as coatings market is concerned, what are the two important changes you have observed? A number of changes have impacted the coatings market. One of the challenges is the increasing price of raw materials like Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) for example. The ever-increasing prices are driving up the costs of our customers and lowering their margins. In anticipation of these changes, Dow has developed Evoque, which is a technology that increases the efficiency of TiO2, thus enabling our customers to get equal performance using less TiO2 or better performance with the same amount. The second important change that is driving the market is the need to be more sustainable. Today, customers are becoming more environmentally conscious and are actively looking for products that have a lower environmental impact. In response to this, the industry is now shifting from solvent- to waterbased paints, especially in the industrial space. 54

Chemical World | March 2012

traditionally been solvent-based. If you take markets like South East Asia or developed Western markets, this product is readily available, as water-based products are a standard practice in these countries. But in India, it is new and we have good technology to facilitate the change. Price is one of the requirements for anything, but there are other requirements that are equally important.

Increasing focus on infrastructure in India has opened up new vistas for specialty chemicals in India. What is your take on this? Requirements in infrastructure today are going up significantly. The performance bar for our products is constantly being raised by discerning customers as well as stringent legislations. For example, coatings used in industrial applications are typically solvent-based and that market is still growing in India. Outside India, we have been successful in other markets – China, the US, Europe, South East Asia – in offering waterbased products in infrastructure segment. The opportunity is so


Sethuram Belur Krishnamurthy

significant that Dow recently launched the new maintenance and protective coatings business segment as well as the Oudra series of protective industrial coatings, which protects equipment in the harshest weather conditions. The market in India is slowly coming round to the benefits of our water-borne technology and DCM is at the forefront of that change by proactively working with our customers and educating the market on the benefits of using waterbased products rather than solvent-based products in the infrastructure segment.

What role specialty chemicals play in infrastructure development? Let’s take our Oudra series of protective industrial coatings as an example. Our products help protect equipment in the harshest weather conditions up to Category 4. What this means is that industrial equipment, oil pipelines, bridges are better able to withstand what Mother

Nature can throw at them, last longer, and require less effort to maintain. Our Fastrack range of water-based road marking paints has helped the industry move from solvent-based to water-based paints with improved night visibility. This gives motorists a safer drive while being more durable, which means that there is no need to repaint it that often. The Fastrack products are already used in airports in other countries to improve runway visibility for pilots as well, visibly demonstrating how coatings are a key enabler for infrastructure development.

How important is Asia in Dow Coating’s entire business? About 30 per cent of our sales today come from the technologies that were developed in Asia, for Asian market. For example, formaldehyde abatement paints that absorb formaldehyde (a known carcinogen) from the air and release it as

water vapour were developed in China, and is now slowly gaining acceptance in the West. Our laboratory facilities like our Shanghai Dow Center are constantly testing new products and we have a strong innovation pipeline, which helps to set DCM apart as an innovator.

Do you have any Indiaspecific plans? We will continue to invest in India because we see tremendous potential for this market. We are bringing in new technologies and adapting them for the Indian market. We are also investing in people and resources, so that we can collaborate closely with our customers to provide the best coating solutions for India. Most importantly, we want to spread the word that it is time to rethink coatings because paint can do much more now than just provide a decorative or protective benefit to end-consumers. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Interface - Olivier Faussadier

Could you brief us on OMNOVA Solutions’ business in India? In February 2012, Eliokem India became officially known as OMNOVA Solutions India after the acquisition of Eliokem by OMNOVA Solutions in December 2010. This business was the former polymer division of Apar Industries that was bought by Eliokem International in 2008. The integration of Apar within Eliokem was facilitated by the long-shared co-operation of both

and footwear producers as well as the tyre companies. The growth of demand servicing any industry is essential to any business. Thus, the demand growth in India for the market served by us is a key element for success of our long-term development plan.

How has been the demand for rubber chemicals in India? The usage of synthetic rubbers has grown significantly after the liberalisation of the economy along with tremendous growth of industries such as automotive,

Pliolite HSR (high-styrene rubber). Today, the company maintains a leadership position in India. This is a direct result of well-established brands and customer loyalty that goes back to Goodyear. During the last three years, many investments have been made in the production site of Valia in Gujarat. Our Technology Center of Valia is a platform for further development. Shortly, OMNOVA India will be able to develop new technologies in latex applications such as making inroads in floor care, personal hygiene, haircare and laundry products that can prove to be a

Being in India is essential to build a sustainable growth plan ...says Olivier Faussadier, Vice President & General Manager, OMNOVA Solutions, and Head of Business in Europe, Middle East, Africa and India. In this interaction with Rakesh Rao, he highlights the Ohio-based company’s plans for India and market for specialty chemicals.

companies in the polymer field. Indeed, the emulsion polymerisation technology can be traced back to their common heritage with The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company.

With demand for synthetic rubber going up, how do you plan to tap this market? OMNOVA Solutions India is the sole manufacturer of nitrile rubbers in India. The company is specialised in the making of a variety of specialty resins, rubbers and lattices, through combinations of monomers as diverse as acrylics, acrylonitrile, styrene and butadiene. Its main customers are the automotive industry, the industrial rubber goods manufacturers, rice rollers 56

Chemical World | March 2012

construction, etc. The technical quality requirements in rubber products by the various user-industries have also influenced the growth of specialty rubbers like acrylics, silicones, etc. The growth of nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) usage has spurted with doubledigit growth over the recent years, mostly due to the requirements of automotive rubber components and is estimated at well above 25,000 metric tonne (MT) today. Moreover, all types of synthetic rubbers including the specialties have found their acceptance in India.

What are your growth plans for chemicals business in India? OMNOVA India has versatile manufacturing capabilities to produce synthetic rubbers using a swing plant and it produces Chemigum NBR bales, powders, polyblends, latex as well as

boon for future developments in Asia. As for the great potential of India and the abundant opportunities available in the sub-continent, the Indian rubber industry is experiencing a major change in its functioning; it has been growing at a rapid pace to avail of these opportunities by increasing its marketshare. In the recent past, many of the rubber user-industries and autocomponent manufacturers in India have undertaken expansion, modernisation, consolidation and also technical tie-ups. What matters today is to be in India. Being in India is essential to build a sustainable growth plan. The operations we have in synthetic polymerisation field in India along with an established commercial organisation are strong foundations we invest in for developing the future. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


Case Study - Sudarshan Chemical Industries AUTOMATION TRENDS

S

udarshan Chemical Industries Ltd has been a leading player in the colour and agrochemicals business for over 50 years. With more than 35 per cent marketshare, it is a major pigment supplier for manufacturers of paints, rubber products, plastics, textiles, inks, etc, in India. Over the last decade, the company has been aggressively extending its global reach, selling high-quality inorganic and organic pigments to customers in over 40 countries. “We want to establish Sudarshan Chemical as a leading chemical brand worldwide,” said P R Rathi, Vice Chairman and Managing Director, Sudarshan Chemical.

customer via automated workflow tools found in SAP CRM. This helps ensure that each customer’s needs are fully satisfied.”

our sales force was already familiar with SAP ERP,” asserted Rathi.

Looking forward to a bright future Aligning to best practices for rapid implementation

Today, SAP CRM is up and running at Sudarshan Chemical’s major manufacturing With a speedy implementation and sales locations. It has transformed the in mind, Sudarshan Chemical recompany’s sales operations by replacing engineered existing sales processes manually-driven sales tasks with automated to align with the application’s best standardised processes. “With SAP CRM, practices-based functionality. As a result, our sales branches are getting reliable, with real-time information from plants and warehouses,” stated Rathi. “Our sales force has immediate access to information regarding material availability, order status, production schedules, and more, so they can make the right decisions throughout the sales cycle.” Capitalising on potential Sudarshan Chemical Industries Ltd, a leading supplier Sudarshan Chemical is also of pigments to cross-industry manufacturers, adopted using automated alert functionality sales opportunities SAP Customer Relationship Management (SAP To better meet its growth to track the status of key customer CRM) application in order to support rapid global strategy, the company needed deliverables,enabling it,for example, to replace its highly manual expansion. As a result, it has dramatically accelerated to process sample requests and and isolated sales processes. customer-related processes and has fully integrated product matches much faster than Sales teams were relying on the former system by over 62 per its manual, disparate sales operations into the rest spreadsheets to track sales and cent. Resolution of customer issues of the business, thereby reducing inventory and to follow up customer leads and is faster as well. “We can constantly improving productivity. opportunities. Customer request monitor sales performance with completion was often performed SAP CRM, so we can speed up on an ad hoc basis. “Our customer sales order completion and manage management costs were high, our inventory more effectively. The and customer response times application has helped us refocus IMPROVED FASTER were slow. We were likely to lose our entire operation towards CUSTOMER RETURN ON SATISFACTION INVESTMENT potential business opportunities,” customer service, and it is a noted Rathi. difference our customers notice,” Sudarshan Chemical selected Rathi said. the SAP CRM application over In just six months, several other solutions. The best Sudarshan Chemical achieved thing about the application is that full ROI on its SAP CRM it scales rapidly to support growth deployment. To leverage the and has the best practices-based benefits enterprise-wide, it is FASTER TIGHTER functionality to support different now rolling out the application DECISION INVENTORY lines of businesses. In addition, to the remaining locations. Rathi MAKING CONTROL the software fully integrates with observed, “SAP CRM gives the company’s deployed SAP our sales force the flexibility to ERP application, which enables meet changing customer needs, the company’s sales force to while enabling it to focus on our leverage complete and reliable company’s growth strategy.” Courtesy: SAP AG the company was able to complete enterprise data. Rathi added, “Wherever the rollout of SAP CRM across our representatives are located, they can For details, contact on 10 locations in just three months. retrieve critical customer information. email:ranjana.mukherjee@sap.com “Training did not slow us down because They can also directly interact with the

AUTOMATED WORKFLOW PROCESSES FOR BETTER CUSTOMER SERVICE

CRM

March 2012 | Chemical World

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT Condensing boiler

Efficient boilers are crucial to ensure optimum usage of energy in a chemical facility. Condensing boilers can increase the efficiency, but the end-user has to consider factors such as additional cost, fuel availability, proper heat recovery systems, etc, before selecting the boiler.

Rakesh Rao

B

oiler technolog y has witnessed continuous evolution for decades. These developments were triggered to meet expectations of endusers through innovative solutions to address emerging challenges. One such technology is condensing boiler, which is considered to offer high efficiency (typically greater than 90 per cent) compared to conventional boilers by using optimally the waste heat in the flue gases to pre-heat the cold water entering the boiler.

Operating principle In normal conventional boilers, one can utilise the Net Calorific Value (NCV ) of the gas (89 per cent of the heat content of the gas). “The balance 11 per cent latent heat is lost as enthalpy loss along with the flue gas in the chimney. When 58

Chemical World | March 2012

vapour in the flue gas is condensed to liquid, heat will be liberated,” points out Anshul Deoras, Product Manager – Sales, Boiler Division, Forbes Marshall. With conventional pressurised economiser, Deoras says, one can guarantee 94 per cent efficiency (NCV basis) on gas firing as the stack temperature is dropped to 120°C. He adds, “In case of condensing, the stack temperature is dropped to 55°C. So there is efficiency gain due to decrease in stack temperature and enthalpy gain due to release of heat from condensation of water vapour in flue gases - ie the overall efficiency increases to above 100 per cent on NCV.”

Are condensing boilers more efficient? The vapours produced f rom the combustion process in a boiler contain energy. Flue gas condensate contains

approximately 1,000 Btus of energy per pound (latent heat of vapourisation). Instead of that energy remaining in the flue gas vapour phase and going up the stack, it is recaptured as sensible heat in the liquid phase. For one hour, every pound of condensate collected adds 1,000 Btu to the output capability of a boiler. For example, a 2,000,000 Btu/hr input boiler operating at an efficiency of 88 per cent would have an output of 1,760,000. The boiler is operated for an hour at this condition and 80 pounds of condensate is collected. The overall thermal efficiency of this boiler is actually 92 per cent. Since condensing boilers extract more of the heat energy in the gas than non-condensing boilers, they burn less gas for the same amount of heating requirements. This not only reduces fuel bills, but also results in lesser emissions of carbon dioxide – an acknowledged greenhouse gas.


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Condensing boiler

Although condensing boilers offer many advantages, it is important for the user to consider other parameters before selecting a boiler. Typically, condensing boilers are priced higher and the company has to put in place additional systems to capture and use the hot vapours. Any boiler can produce condensed flue gases, but not all boilers are designed and built to withstand the by-products associated with flue gas condensation. Only boilers that have heat exchangers designed and constructed to withstand the acidic qualities of flue gas condensate should be put into systems designed with water temperatures that would cause condensing to occur. Any system with return water temperature of less than 140°F should have full condensing boilers designed into it, otherwise the boilers are subject to heat exchanger failure from flue gas corrosion. Examples of materials that cannot withstand flue gas condensate are copper and cast iron.

Hence, the company has to ensure that its system is designed to take advantage of a boiler capable of operating in a condensing mode. Deoras rightly points out, “Condensing economisers are advantageous as they help maximise the efficiency of the boiler by recovering the latent heat of the vapour. However, it is also important to look at the overall investment cost and the utility of the heat recovery unit to heat any other media in the process.”

Fuel availability Condensing boilers require gas to operate with high efficiency. Deoras elaborates, “Condensing economisers can be installed only with natural gas. This is due to the absence of sulfur in natural gas. If a condensing economiser is installed on oil, it would lead to heavy condensation of fuel gases in the form of sulfuric acid and will lead to corrosion of the stack and the equipment. To

ensure maximum efficiency f rom condensing economiser, it is critical that the applications apart from feed water heating should be clear.” While demand for condensing boiler is increasing in many developed countries, its usage in India is low. Deoras says, “The market for this technology is not high currently. This is primarily due to the limitation of the gas availability in all the regions and also the application of the additional heat recovery unit. Hence, the demand will be driven purely by the fuel availability and the application in various industries.” With the Government of India aiming to increase contribution of gas in the overall energy basket in future, one can expect more installation of condensing boilers in the country. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in

Reference R The Fulton Companies

March 2012 | Chemical World

61


POLICIES & REGULATIONS PCPIR policy

Avani Jain

W

ith 62 per cent of contribution towards petrochemicals and 51 per cent towards the chemicals, Gujarat is a growth hub for petrochemical and chemical industries. This can be attributed to the government’s liberal policies, favourable licensing policy, low custom duties and uniform excise duty structure. In order to give further impetus to the burgeoning sectors, the Gujarat Inf rastructure Development Board (GIDB) has proposed to establish PCPIR at Bharuch district. It will serve as a processing hub for other existing Gujarat Industrial Development Corporation’s (GIDC) chemical estates, such as Jhagadia, Ankleshwar, Panoli, and the onsite chemical port terminal & LNG terminal at Dahej, Bharuch. Jaimin Vasa, President, Gujarat Chemical Association, and Managing Director, Vasa Pharmachem Pvt Ltd, says, “The presence of Special Investment Region (SIR) at Dahej and the ambitious scheme of Kalpsar water reservoir nearby this PCPIR will prove advantageous. Also, the proposed PCPIR is in a close vicinity of other chemical estates and onsite chemical port terminal & LNG terminal, which will add to its success. Further, Gujarat Government has already committed necessary funds for development of infrastructure, so the progress will not be stalled.” Till date, the Bharuch PCPIR has received huge amount of investments 62

Chemical World | March 2012

Gujarat is renowned as the heart of the chemical industry in India. The enterprising culture, supportive state government, and above all, adequate infrastructure are factors responsible for this growth. Further, the development of Petroleum, Chemicals & Petrochemical Investment Region (PCPIR) is likely to strengthen the sector even more. While everything seems positive about PCPIR, there are some issues that the government needs to address right at the initial stage.

and the state government has completed 60-70 per cent of land development. Petronet LNG is setting up a 1,200 MW power plant. ONGC Petro additionals Ltd (OPaL), a joint venture of ONGC and Gujarat State Petroleum Corporation, is the main anchor investor, with committed project investment of ` 16,400 crore.

Specialised units for success PCPIR is a specially delineated investment region planned for the establishment of manufacturing facilities for domestic and export-driven production of petroleum, chemicals and petrochemicals. Spread over an area of

453 sq km of brownfield area in the coastal belt of the Gulf of Khambhat, the PCPIR will be set up in Bharuch. With a capacity of 22 million metric tonne per annum (MTPA), the PCPIR is in the vicinity of the Dahej port and National Highway 8 connects it with Ahmedabad (182 km) and Mumbai (362 km) along with Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC). The nearest airport is located in Vadodara, which is 100 km, while Ahmedabad International Airport is 200 km away from the region. The PCPIR offers scope for future expansion possibilities to augment capacities to 30 MTPA for catering to LNG, dry bulk and liquid chemicals.

Issues to be addressed While everything seems positive about the pace at which the PCPIR is being developed in the state, there are few issues that the government needs to keep in mind. Vasa notes, “It is necessary to landfill the area in order to increase its height by 1.5–3 metre. This is because a large portion of area where the proposed PCPIR has to be built turns into a wetland during monsoon season. Government also needs to ensure effective effluent disposal scheme in the proposed PCPIR. Considering the scenario, the treated effluent will have to be discharged in the deep sea, which will attract a sizable capital and recurring cost, which an individual or association cannot meet alone. Thus, the government has to invest in this area also. These steps will ensure clean environment in the chemical zone.”


PCPIR policy

He further adds, “The government has to ensure that everyone gets access to the common amenities – basic infrastructure. Also, it has to see that everybody gets assured water and power supply. Further, efforts should be made to shift the existing chemical companies to this area as this will help them better utilise the facilities that are meant for these companies.” The proposed industrial Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in this PCPIR will include petrochemicals and downstream petrochemicals, synthetic organic chemicals, industrial gas producing sectors and other small industries. “Since there will be many major companies in that area, there needs to be a specific zone-based incentive scheme and soft loan from financial institution for chemical-based SMEs,” notes Vasa.

Building an investment hub The petroleum, chemicals and petrochemical industry in India is

well-established and has recorded a steady growth over the years. The industry offers a wide scope for development that contributes positively to economic growth and regional development. The outlook for the industry is bright with positive developments anticipated in various chemical sub-sectors. In order to promote investment in this sector and make the country an important hub for both domestic and international markets, the government has decided to set up PCPIR so as to attract major investments, both domestic and foreign. The PCPIR would reap the benefits of networking and greater efficiency through the use of common inf rastructure and support services. These would have highclass inf rastructure, and provide a competitive environment conducive for setting up businesses. They would thus give a boost to manufacturing,

augmentation of exports and generation of employment. It is for the same reason that PCPIR is being developed in Gujarat and few other states. With the development of PCPIR, Gujarat will create world-class infrastructure for the progress of the chemical industry. Vasa says, “The main benefits of PCPIR is that it will provide quality infrastructure and development to deal with the effluents in the region.” He adds further, “A cluster-based approach will help the government to provide basic amenities to all the industries in a particular area and this will encourage planned development in the state. This will also give a boost to the chemical industry in the state.” Thus, it can be said that the PCPIR can aid growth of the chemical industry, provided that the government resolves the aforesaid issues before it is too late. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

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STRATEGY Best HR practices

Mahua Roy

only look after retention, but also develop the career path of the employees. “Ensuring long-term growth and development of talent in the organisation is one of the key deliverables of the leadership team, and these leaders take personal initiatives in ensuring that the young talent get relevant inputs. As an organisation, we encourage our employees to engage with the senior leadership and share their experiences, so that their knowledge quotient grows,” agrees Sangeeta Pandey, Head-HR, Akzo Nobel India Ltd. Most companies have an exhaustive induction process, which acquaints the new joinees with the senior management team and helps in building a comfortable relationship. AkzoNobel conducts a structured six-month induction programme called ‘Campus to Corporate’ for its management trainees. “This programme supports the transition of young talent from trainees to indispensable individuals in the corporate world,” says Pandey.

A

fresh recruit recently posted a status message on a popular social networking site as, ‘My MD knows me by my name. What a wonderful feeling.’ This instantly received more than 100 ‘likes’ in a few moments, with his friends and family congratulating him. The simplicity of the post and subsequent responses makes one delve deeper into the psyche of the young recruit. He did not mention a monetary advantage being offered to him, in spite of which he was visibly happy.

When ‘the boss’ takes notice B Sudhakar, Chief Human Resources Officer, Tata Chemicals Ltd (TCL), says, “There is a direct correlation between management time invested in young talent and the output received from them. At TCL, senior leadership teams interact with the talent pool on a regular basis through planned communication meets.” He also believes that only when the talent is driven and monitored by the senior leadership team, it can be sustained, thus making the talent management process effective. A p p re c i a t i o n and attention from leaders enable the employees to look up to them and emulate their values. The senior leadership needs to not

Investing in the capability of individuals, providing them the right exposure and opportunities to learn through cross-functional projects are among the key non-financial motivators that help retain young talent. B Sudhakar

Chief Human Resources Officer, Tata Chemicals Ltd

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Decoding the reasons of attrition Though the absolute reason for attrition cannot be pinpointed to a particular factor, most HR personnel agree that the solution can be to make the workplace a better and exciting environment. However, sometimes, this becomes a challenge for the

As the chemical industry fights the high rate of attrition, nonfinancial motivators can play a big role in retention of young talent. Sometimes, acknowledgement from the CEO makes a bigger impact than the annual hefty bonus or quarterly monetary incentive.

The social fabric nowadays tempts young talent to make quick moves in pursuit of better roles and a better compensation. In such a situation, individuals are able to focus only on short-term gains at the expense of professional growth. Sangeeta Pandey

Head-HR, Akzo Nobel India Ltd


Best HR practices

chemical industry. Explains Sudhakar, “Sometimes, in order to develop the career path of an individual, he is offered a challenging role. But this may be at remote locations and plant sites, which might not seem interesting to the employee, more so when the opportunities for their spouses in those locations are minimal. Lack of mobility is creating a challenge as there is a huge gravitation towards city jobs.” Besides, there is a wide range of opportunities available for an individual today, which poses a challenge, opines Pandey. She also adds, “Among the other challenges faced by corporates, impatience on the part of young employees and, in some cases, their unwillingness to invest in building a long-term career with one organisation poses a grave risk. We also feel that the social fabric nowadays tempts young talent to make quick moves in pursuit of better roles and a better compensation. In such a situation, individuals are able

to focus only on short-term gains at the expense of professional growth.”

Showing trust in new talent Trust is the most under-rated nonfinancial motivator that can be exercised. In the chemical industry, this can be put to use quite efficiently. With ample amount of new projects being planned, the skills of the young talented workforce can be put to test. “By taking risks in offering critical positions to young talent early in their career can show them the amount of trust and responsibility endowed on them by the organisation. The challenge in the role and the associated learning in that role make the talent stay. Consistently providing them with opportunities, which will help them identify and pursue their passion, also helps. Another strategy that can be beneficial to both the company and the employee can be to explore short-term assignments in other functions/businesses/geographies,”

elaborates Sudhakar. Such opportunities also help develop leadership capabilities among young talent, with long-term benefits for the organisation. Creating roles and responsibilities by evaluating the merits of the candidate in the same company is a profitable move. If your design engineer is excited about branding and marketing initiatives, you can easily create a role for him in your own company before he starts looking elsewhere. “Investing in the capability of individuals, providing them the right exposure and opportunities to learn through crossfunctional projects are among the key non-financial motivators that help retain young talent,” agrees Sudhakar. A financial reward mainly generates short-term energy boosting. Also, in these tough times of economic crisis, non-financial motivators can turn highly beneficial to organisations. Besides, a reward bonus cannot touch the life of an employee the way recognition can. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

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TIPS & TRICKS Fire safety

NEED FOR A REALITY CHECK ON PREVENTIVE MECHANISMS Ensuring fire safety is a key issue in all chemical plants considering that a fire incident can cause fatalities, serious injuries and serious disruption to normal work activities. Though there are several safety legislations and fire-fighting equipment in place, the lacunae in the popular fire-fighting systems need to be understood to avoid mishaps.

F

ire is a subject, which everyone is aware of, but rarely understood properly because of its complexity. Its prevention is crucial, be it in domestic or industrial environment. However, in case of a fire breakout, proper management of fire becomes the priority for preventing loss to life and property. Several fire-fighting systems, such as, fire and smoke detectors, alarms, water sprinklers, fire-fighting engines, etc are used by safety personnel to bring the fire under control across industries, including chemicals. But, what is vital here is the proper handling of such equipment. Given below are some best practices for achieving the same.

It is mandatory to have all the ‘active fire protection’ systems in full working condition before being installed in commercial buildings. Some of the main reasons attributed to fire propagation include failure of water sprinklers or smoke and fire detectors, and even if these worked, the other issues were clogging of fine aperture opening of the sprinklers, the distance of the fire/ smoke or the direction of fire/smoke. These failures go undetected unless the regular mock fire drill is not conducted.

1

2

The mock drills are not normally conducted as the total facility like working table, computer systems, etc, get disturbed.

The installed ‘active fire protection’ systems have limitations and, hence ‘passive fire protection’ is suggested as it complements active fire protection. The additional advantage of the passive

3

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Chemical World | March 2012

types would be that fire is contained to a particular zone. One can use smoke detectors for warning in case of a fire. All fire detecting devices consist of a sensor to detect smoke and a loud electronic horn to warn. The alarm has a light source and a detector, which are placed some distance from each other. A light ray continuously passes from the source to the detector through the intervening clean air. In case of a fire, smoke particles are produced and get mixed in the air; thus changing the intensity of the light ray that is passing through the air gap. The system picks up this change in light intensity and does what it has been programmed to do.

4

Few mature companies consider a regular audit by an external, experienced auditor who knows the reasons for fire accidents and can prevent them proactively. Each facility needs careful observation and must suggest the preventive method to change the present

5

4 ‘A’, ie attitude, awareness, action and accountability. Though the concept of using fire-retardant component in industrial products is not prevalent in India, the use of the same will give occupants an additional time – more than 15 minutes – to escape.

6

Exposure to fire has significant effects on all building materials. Wood is consumed as fuel during a fire and steel yields as it gets heated to high temperatures. For concrete products, exposure to fire has, in many cases, been shown to have limited negative impact on the performance of the material.

7

Concrete is regularly used to achieve fire rating requirements of 1 to 4 hours, and has a good history of ease of repair after exposures to fire where the concrete has been heated to 260°C (500°F) or more. Concrete temperatures up to 95°C (200°F) have little effect on the strength and other properties of concrete.

8

In an event with fire exposure temperatures of 920°C (1700°F), the temperature within a concrete section at the depth of the clear cover protection (2 inch) may be below 260°C (500°F). This temperature is below the point at which steel reinforcement will begin to yield. With this type of exposure, it may be appropriate to consider value in a structural analysis to determine structural adequacy and surface repair strategies rather than total removal and replacement of the concrete.

9

Y B Mrithyunjaya is a Safety Consultant with over 35 years of industry experience. Email: ymrithyunjaya@hotmail.com


PROJECTS

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the chemical and allied industries. Butyl rubber

Reliance Sibur Elastomers Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news Reliance Industries Ltd and the Russiabased SIBUR, which is Eastern Europe’s largest petrochemicals company, have agreed to form a joint venture ( JV) to produce butyl rubber in India. The JV, named Reliance Sibur Elastomers Pvt Ltd, will produce 1 lakh tonne of the elastomer at Jamnagar in Gujarat. It will invest $ 450 million to construct the facility, which is expected to be commissioned in mid-2014. Project location Jamnagar, Gujarat Project cost $ 450 million Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Reliance Industries Ltd Makers Chambers - IV Nariman Point, Mumbai 400 021 Tel: 022-2278 5000 Email: tushar.pania@ril.com --------------------------------------------Coal tar

Himadri Chemicals and Industries Ltd Project type Capacity expansion Project news Himadri Chemicals is mulling ` 1,900crore investment in the next four years for coal tar capacity expansion and also foray into new by-products such as pitch coke. This expansion will be implemented in phases and funded through a mix of internal accruals and debt. The company will invest ` 1,200 crore to expand coal tar capacity to one million tonne by 2015, from the present 2.5 lakh tonne. Project location West Bengal Project cost ` 1,200 crore

Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Himadri Chemicals and Industries Ltd Fortuna Tower 23-A, Netaji Subhas Road 8th Floor, Kolkata 700 001 Tel: 033-2230 4363, Fax: 033-2230 9051 Email: info@himadri.com --------------------------------------------Di-ammonium phosphate

Gujarat State Fertilizers and Chemicals Project type Capacity expansion Project news Gujarat State Fertilizers and Chemicals (GSFC) has announced its plans to expand the capacity of its Di-Ammonium Phosphate (DAP) unit at Sikka in Jamnagar district. GSFC will invest ` 250 crore to expand capacity by 0.4 MT to produce complex fertilisers (blend of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium). The expansion is to be completed by 2014-15. Project location Sikka, Gujarat Project cost ` 250 crore Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Gujarat State Fertilizers & Chemicals Ltd P O Fertilizernagar 391 750 District Vadodara, Gujarat Tel: 0265-2242051, Fax: 0265-2240966 Email: info@gsfcltd.com --------------------------------------------Purified terephthalic acid

Indo Rama Synthetics (India) Ltd Project type New facility Project news Indo Rama Synthetics (India) Ltd and Indorama Ventures Public Company Ltd (IVL) of Thailand have signed a MoU to set up a state-of-the-art integrated

facility in India to manufacture Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA), Polyethylene Terepthalate (PET) and Polye Staple Fiber (PSP) plants. The MoU signed is the single-largest Thai investment in India. The project would involve an investment of $ 700 million and is likely to commence production in three years. Project location Not known Project cost $ 700 million Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Indo Rama Synthetics (India) Ltd 20th Floor, DLF Square DLF Phase II, NH 8 Gurgaon 122002, Haryana Tel: 0124-4997000, Fax: 0124-4997070 Email: corp@indorama-ind.com --------------------------------------------Refinery-cum-petrochemicals complex

GMR Holdings Project type New facility Project news The GMR Holdings Pvt Ltd will invest ` 30,000 crore to set up a 15-million tonne per annum greenfield refinery-cum-petrochemicals complex, including an integrated investment park at Kakinada. GMR Infrastructure would invest an additional ` 3,000 crore in a multi-product Special Economic Zone in the PCPIR. Project location Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh Project cost ` 30,000 crore Implementation stage Planning Contact details: GMR Group IBC Knowledge Park, Phase 2, ‘D’ Block 9th Floor, 4/1, Bannerghatta Road Bengaluru 560 029 Tel: 080-4043 2000 Email: info@gmrgroup.in

March 2012 | Chemical World

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EVENT LIST

NATIONAL AHMEDABAD

PUNE

CHENNAI

LUDHIANA

Gujarat, Oct 5-8, 2012

Maharashtra, Nov 2-5, 2012

Tamil Nadu, Nov 22-25, 2012

Punjab, Dec 21-24, 2012

INDORE

AURANGABAD

RUDRAPUR

Madhya Pradesh, Jan 11-14, 2013

Maharashtra, Feb 1-4, 2013

Uttarakhand, Feb 23-26, 2013

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Infomedia 18 Ltd

Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. • Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in

Vinyl India 2012

ChemProTech India 2012

One of the leading international conferences on PVC & chlor-alkali; April 12-13, 2012; at Hotel Grand Hyatt, Mumbai

International exhibition on chemical processing technology and equipment to be held concurrently with Chemspec India 2012; April 26-27, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

For details contact: ElitePlus Business Services Pvt Ltd 6th Floor, Radheya, 14th Road Khar (W), Mumbai 400 052 Tel: 022-2600 0555 Email: register@eliteplus.co.in

Lab Expo & Conferences Pune Industrial fair for lab equipment, technology and instrumentation; April 20-22, 2012; at Auto Cluster Development & Research Institute Ltd, Pune For details contact: Harish Arora, Paramount Exhibitors 679, Phase 7, S A S Nagar, Mohali 140 110 Tel: 0172-2274801 Fax: 0172-2274803 Email: contact@labexposindia.com

Aquatech India Focussed trade show on advanced technologies for wastewater management; April 25-27, 2012; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Sunil Chhibber Inter Ads-Brooks Exhibitions (India) Plot No 859, Phase-V Udyog Vihar Gurgaon 122 001 Tel: 0124-4524105 Fax: 0124-4381162 Email: info@interadsindia.com 68

Chemical World | March 2012

For details contact: Krunal Goda Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd #1102, 11th Floor, DLH Park, Near MTNL Office, S V Road, Goregaon (W) Mumbai 400 062 Tel: 022-2871 5207, Fax: 022-2871 5222 Email: k.goda@koelnmesse-india.com

India Oil & Gas Review Summit 2012 International conference and exhibition showcasing latest trends in oil & gas industry; September 06-07, 2012; at Hotel Taj Lands, Mumbai For details contact: Oil Asia Publications Pvt Ltd 530, Laxmi Plaza, Laxmi Industrial Estate New Link Road Andheri (W), Mumbai 400 053 Tel: 022-6681 4900 Fax: 022-2636 7676 Email: oilasia@vsnl.com

Informex India 2012 A tradeshow for bringing together buyers and sellers of chemicals, chemical technologies and related services; September 12-14, 2012; at Nehru Centre, Mumbai For details contact: UBM India Pvt Ltd

Sagar Tech Plaza A 615-617, 6th Floor Andheri-Kurla Road Saki Naka Junction, Andheri (E) Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600, Fax: 022-6612 2626/27 Email: info.india@ubm.com

India Chem 2012 Premier tradeshow for the chemical industry in India; October 04-06, 2012; at NSE Exhibition Complex, Mumbai For details contact: Mehul Tyagi, FICCI Federation House, 1 Tansen Marg New Delhi 110 001 Tel: 011-2376 5081/2373 8760 Fax: 011-2335 9734 Email: mehul@ficci.com

Watertech Expo & Conference An event to be held concurrently with Wastetech, Cleantech and Pollutech focussing on technologies for waste, wastewater and recycling; November 02-04; at Ahmedabad For details contact: Exhiference Media Pvt Ltd B-2 Basement, Kalyan Tower Near Vastrapur Lake Ahmedabad 380 015 Tel: 079-4003 9444/9431 Fax: 079-4003 9431 Email: marketing@exhiferencemedia.com

CPhI India 2012 International exhibition on pharmaceutical ingredients, machinery, equipment, outsourcing and bio-solutions; November 21-23, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: UBM India Pvt Ltd Sagar Tech Plaza A 615-617, 6th Floor Andheri-Kurla Road Saki Naka Junction, Andheri (E) Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600 Fax: 022-6612 2626/27 Email: info.india@ubm.com


INTERNATIONAL OWGA 2012 An exhibition and seminar focussing on latest developments in oil & gas processing technologies; April 16-18, 2012; at Oman International Exhibition Centre, Muscat

400 Interstate North Parkway, Suite 710 Atlanta, The US Tel: +1 (202) 462-6272 Fax: +1 (202) 462-1924 Email: info@american-coatings-show.com

For details contact: SABCO Building, Wattayah Muscat, Sultanate of Oman Tel: +(968)-2466 0124 Fax :+(968)-2466 0125/126 Email: info@omanexpo.com

Chemistry Oil & Gas 2012

Analytica

For details contact: Olga Akulinina Manager - Chemistry Oil & Gas ZAO Technics and Communications Post Box 34, Minsk, 220004 Rebublic of Belarus Tel: (+375 17) 306 06 06 Fax: (+375 17) 203 33 86 Email: chemistry@tc.by

Event to showcase technologies for analysis, quality control, laboratory technology; April 17-20, 2012; at New Munich Trade Fair Centre, Munich, Germany For details contact: IMAG AM Messesee-2, Munich, Germany Tel: +(49)-(89)-9492 2121 Fax: +(49)-(89)-9492 2350 Email: info@analytica.de

Specialised exhibition on cutting-edge products and technologies, equipment and materials for the chemical, oil and gas industries; May 15-18, 2012; at the Roofer Soccer Arena, Belarus

Dye+Chem Indonesia 2012 Trade show for dyes and fine & specialty chemicals; May 31-June 3, 2012, at Jakarta International Expo, Jakarta

Coatech Mexico Focussed event showcasing technological advancements in the coatings industry; May 02-04, 2012; at Expo Banamex, Mexico For details contact: Mauricio Cadena Giprex Mexico S.A. de C.V., Daniel Zambrano No. 525 Col., Monterrey, Mexico Tel: +(52)-(81)-8347 8560 Fax: +(52)-(81)-8346 2597 Email: mauricio.cadena@tsfactory.com.mx

American Coatings Show Symposium and technology showcase on coatings; May 08-12, 2012; at Indiana Convention Center, the US For details contact: Nuernberg Messe North America, Inc

For details contact: PT CEMS Indonesia 2608, Grand Kartini 57 Jalan Kartini Raya Jakarta, Indonesia Tel: +(62)–(21) 7003 3233 Fax: +(62)–(21) 3042 5226 Email: contact@cems-dyechem.com

World Gas Conference & Exhibition Event showcasing the latest in exploration, safety, refining, subsea production systems, drilling, transportation, etc; June 04-08, 2012; at Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For details contact: The CWC Group Ltd Regent House, Oyster Wharf 16-18 Lombard Road, London, The UK

EVENT LIST

Tel: +(44)-(20)-7978 0037 Fax: +(44)-(20)-7978 0099 Email: exhibition@wgc2012.com

Chemspec Europe An event dedicated to the fine and specialty chemicals industry; June 13-14, 2012; at Gran Via Exhibition Centre, Barcelona, Spain For details contact: Quartz Business Media Ltd Westgate House 120/130 Station Road, Redhill, Surrey The UK Tel: +44-1737-855000 Fax: +44-1737-855034 Email: michellebaalham@quartzltd.co.uk

ACHEMA One of the leading international events on chemical engineering, environmental protection and biotechnology; June 18-22, 2012; at Messe Frankfurt, Germany For details contact: Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH Ludwig-Erhard-Anlage 1, Frankfurt, Germany Tel: +(49)-(69)-7575000 Fax: +(49)-(69)-7575643 Email: rentalinquiries@dechema.de

TOG Expo 2012 Event focussing on latest technologies in the oil and gas industry; October 16-18, 2012; at Pavilion 58, Tripoli International Fair, Tripoli For details contact: WAHAexpo Company Ben Ashour Road PO Box 83433 Tripoli, Libya Tel: (00) (218)-(21) 7269417 Fax: (00) (218)- (21) 362 2360 Email: hanan@wahaexpo.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Chemical World

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EVENT REPORT Engineering Expo Aurangabad 2012

AURANGABAD February 17-20, 2012 Ayodhya Nagari Ground

Creating success story

yet another

The maiden edition of Engineering Expo held at Aurangabad was a runaway hit among the growing manufacturing and general engineering sector, as well as SMEs based in and around the historical city. The Expo had a positive impact on the developing manufacturing industry in Aurangabad and is poised to come back with more offerings and opportunities for the exhibitors and visitors in the next edition.

to the entire Indian manufacturing fraternity of an emerging manufacturing hub – Aurangabad. One of India’s largest multi-location SME gatherings, Engineering Expo has become a definitive place for Indian as well as foreign companies to exhibit their products & services and interact with buyers & sellers. According to the industry, the Expo is an ideal platform for companies to foster growth through reach and awareness to their right target audience. And Engineering Expo Aurangabad provided a perfect platform for SMEs and manufacturing & engineering companies to exchange ideas.

Expo takes off on a high note

Dignitaries unveiling the Exhibitors’ Directory during the inauguration ceremony of Engineering Expo Aurangabad

Nishi Rath

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n this era of ‘glocalisation’ where every leading company is trying to establish its footprint in regional markets and create a stronghold, sensing the pulse of customers is one of the old and most powerful adages. In order to explore the tremendous opportunities to get established in regional markets, trade shows play a critical role. Known for organising multilocation trade shows, Engineering Expo 70

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is a brand to reckon with. Keeping up with its rich tradition and a fresh vigour & enthusiasm, the maiden edition of Engineering Expo Aurangabad portrayed the poised locational advantages to the manufacturing community. The latest edition of Engineering Expo, an established trade show from the stable of Network 18, with support from Aurangabad Industrial Suppliers Association (AISA), held from February 17-20, 2012, turned out to be a huge success in terms of its quest towards bringing out the message

Dignitaries including Mukund Kulkarni, President, Chamber of Marathawada Industries and Agriculture (CMIA), and MD, Expert Group Solutions; Millind Kelkar, Owner, Grind Master; Jayant Soni, President, AISA; Ravindra Naidu, Joint President, Birla Precision Technologies and Sunil Daga, Sr VP – Business Banking, Kotak Mahindra Bank along with Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President, Infomedia 18, were present at the Expo’s inauguration function. Elaborating on how Engineering Expo is all set to offer a fillip to the trade prospects of Aurangabad, Naidu said, “This is one of the largest SME gatherings in Aurangabad. As we all know the potential this place has, this Expo comes across as a catalyst that will further boost its growth. It is a matter of pride for Aurangabad. Earlier, it was only known as a historic city; but now, it is also known as an automobile hub.” Complementing Naidu’s views, co-organiser, Soni added, “We were looking for a platform in Aurangabad and now, with Engineering Expo, we found the best and one of the most preferred platforms. This Expo has brought a show of international standard to the doorstep of users. The small and medium business units will reap a lot of benefits from the Expo.”


Engineering Expo Aurangabad 2012

Offering a financial perspective, Virat Diwanji, Executive Vice President & Head – Branch Banking, Kotak Mahindra Bank, said, “We are delighted to be associated with Engineering Expo. SMEs are the backbone of India’s economy. The sector has played a critical role in achieving wide measures of industrial growth, and is instrumental in generating large-scale employment across the country. We, at Kotak Mahindra Bank, believe that with the right mix of capital, technology and innovative ideas, SMEs have the potential to push India’s growth to the next level. Our customised business solutions, backed with customer-friendly service, are designed to meet the challenges and growing requirements of this sector.”

Opening a new account at Aurangabad The latest edition of Engineering Expo highlighted the potential that a new and developing place like Aurangabad has to offer. The fast-paced industrial growth in Aurangabad will not only improve the employment avenues, but will also raise the standard of living in this city, opined Kulkarni. He added, “A trade show like Engineering Expo is vital for the competitiveness of industry, especially for SMEs.”

Offering an organiser’s perspective on the choice of a new location for organising Engineering Expo, Jategaonkar said, “Engineering Expo has come a long way by becoming one of India’s largest multi-location trade shows (other places include Ahmedabad, Chennai, Indore, Pune, Rudrapur and now, Aurangabad). Over the years, it has successfully delivered its goal of becoming a preferred destination for SMEs, manufacturing and engineering companies to connect, transact & leverage ideas to foster the growth of organisations as well as that of the industry at large.”

QUICK STATS: ENGINEERING EXPO AURANGABAD 250+ Exhibitors 18,013+ Visitors 1,00,000 sq ft Exhibition area covered 17,000+ Business leads generated 6,250+ Products displayed 1,10,000 kg Machinery moved ` 70 crore Business transaction DELEGATIONS WHO VISITED THE EXPO…

Exhibitors attract audience Engineering Expo Aurangabad boasted of huge industry participation from various manufacturing areas, including machine tools & accessories, material handling equipment, hydraulics and pneumatics, automation & instrumentation, light and medium engineering, safety & security and packaging machinery, among others. Elaborating on the excellent response generated at Engineering Expo Aurangabad, S J Gijare, GM – Equipment Division, CTR Mfg India, articulated, “Engineering Expo has helped the SME sector, which is

PRELUDE TO ENGINEERING EXPO AURANGABAD Panel discussion on shifting status from ‘Why Aurangabad’ to ‘Why not Aurangabad’ The panel discussion was organised by Infomedia 18 in association with Aurangabad Industrial Suppliers Association prior to the Expo. The endeavour was a part of its value-additions intended to bring the manufacturing and dealer community of Aurangabad to discuss the critical issues related to the growth of the region with an aim to position Aurangabad and the surroundinig areas as the most sought-after manufacturing hub.

SME Meet: An informal discussion on the pain and gain areas of SMEs A large gathering of SMEs shared their pain and gain areas of working in and around Aurangabad. Some of the major issues discussed during the meet included banking & government policies, availability & procurement of land, which deters expansion, and most importantly, the shortage of skilled labour in & around the region. The major solutions that were arrived at include amendments in regulatory laws and a clear exit policy to change the product line.

Endurance Technologies Varroc Engineering Forbes & Company Larsen & Toubro NRB Bearings Videocon Wipro Crompton Greaves Bajaj Auto fast growing in Aurangabad, in finding potential customers. We showcased some of our best products here and even received good response. CTR already has a strong presence in the segment and by participating in this Expo, we want to retain that position in the years to come.” Discussing the scope Aurangabad offers, Aniket Nanajkar, Profit Centre Manager – Mechanical Division, Phoenix Mecano, explained, “Engineering Expo has provided us a good platform to understand the market demands here. We were delighted to find potential customers visiting our stall at the Expo.”

Visitors in awe The responses from visitors were encouraging as well. Most visitors emphasised that more such events should be organised in future. “Engineering Expo provided companies an excellent

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Engineering Expo Aurangabad 2012

Guests of honour taking a round of the exhibition

platform to know more about new technologies. It helped local manufacturers meet global standards. The Expo was wellorganised and garnered huge success among visitors. Trade shows of this stature will help this growing manufacturing hub,” said Satish Adsul, AGM – Corporate Purchase, Endurance Technologies (Casting Division). Rajesh Baheti, DGM – Corp Materials & VEPL – Head, Varroc Engineering, who was also present at the Expo, visited stalls and interacted with various exhibitors. “In its first edition itself, the Expo has become a huge success. We saw various companies showcasing their best products and solutions here. This will definitely help the SMEs located in and around Aurangabad. Considering the fact that Aurangabad is developing, organising such events will definitely boost the growth prospects of this region,” Baheti added. Engineering Expo Aurangabad also attracted overseas visitors. Russell Small, Sales Manager, Asia-Pacific, Precision Polymer Engineering, England, was in Aurangabad mainly to attend the Expo. “I saw some of the best automation products displayed here by quality exhibitors. Such trade shows can be helpful for a developing place like Aurangabad,” he exclaimed.

Promising times ahead With various other companies looking forward to investing in Aurangabad, the region is set to witness further growth over the coming years. The huge turnout at the Expo is proof enough of the increasing awareness among local businessmen about new technologies and their value-added benefits. With an optimistic outlook, Jategaonkar asserted, “As we look forward to making further value-additions for an even better experience and reach to the target audience, we welcome large, medium and small industries in the manufacturing and servicing sectors to be a part of the Expo in its exciting journey.” With this huge success, Engineering Expo is slated to make it even bigger in the next edition, with more promising opportunities to be tapped and more areas to be covered. Email: nisi.rath@infomedia18.in

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The Fifth Annual India Chemical Industry Outlook Conference EVENT REPORT

Catalysing progress of

chemical industry

The economic recession is behind us, but the chemical industry worldwide is a bit skeptical about the immediate future. Eminent experts from across the globe deliberated about the outlook of the chemical industry at this recently held two-day mega event in Mumbai. A report… Inaugural session in progress

Mahua Roy

C

onsidered to be one of the most revered annual conferences for the Indian chemical industry, the fifth edition of the India Chemical Industry Outlook Conference was held on February 23-24, 2012, in Mumbai. This event was jointly organised by IHS Chemical Week, the Indian Chemical Council (ICC) and the Chemicals and Petrochemicals Manufacturers Association (CPMA). Eminent speakers and distinguished attendees represented the entire spectrum of the chemical industry. The two-day event discussed the prominence of the Indian chemical industry, which is currently at a turning point. It is witnessing shifts in demographics, society, environment, macroeconomics and technology that are leading to a new set of challenges and opportunities. Business leaders will need to identify these megatrends that will impact the sector’s long-term growth and each company’s growth strategies.

Eyeing India The underlying message across all talks at the conference echoed the same sentiment. The entire world has its sights set on India and the opportunities this land can provide. The leading global multinationals setting up manufacturing bases or technology centres in India are concentrating deeply on innovating products that are customised for India. Tony Hankins, CEO - AsiaPacific, Huntsman Corp, said, “India is a huge opportunity. Demographics, energy

management, food, water and infrastructure are some of the major opportunities facing India. By 2020, a 100 million more people will join the workforce, and per capita GDP will almost double to $ 5,700 from $ 3,000 in 2010. And this is going to generate a huge increase in demand for housing, energy, food and clean water, and improved infrastructure.” Basic chemicals and plastics also have opportunities in India, as per Gary Adams, Chief Advisor - Chemicals, IHS. He said, “The demand for basic chemicals and plastics in India will continue to expand at a high rate. The large population and rise of purchasing power makes India an attractive market. External sourcing plays an important role in supporting local development. Import volumes will expand, especially for vinyls, but India remains self-sufficient.”

Garnering growth Jose Cyriac, Secretary (Chemicals & Petrochemicals), Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilisers, Government of India (GoI), presented an optimistic view of the future of the chemical industry in India, while actively answering questions addressed to him by the audience. He summarised, “The Indian government is taking several initiatives to promote innovation and sustainable growth in the chemical industry. The government has approved the setting up of a National Innovation Council to develop a national strategy on innovation. This council includes a sectoral council for the chemical industry, which will try to promote innovation in

the chemical industry through existing and new schemes.” Post the economic downturn, there is imminent skepticism regarding the future of the chemical industry worldwide. R Parthasarathy, President, ICC, said, “At least 60-70 per cent of the companies, I have interacted with over the past year, do not feel positive about 2012. Yet, the overall Indian chemical industry is expected to grow about 8-9 per cent this year and certain sectors will grow at about 10-12 per cent.” Highlighting opportunities for the chemical industry, special sessions were held on how to be a partner for the service industry growth (opportunities in chemical EPC), agro-chemicals industry, supply chain and infrastructure. An interesting feature was the session on the opportunities China can provide to India. This session addressed by Paul Pang, Managing Director, CMAI (Shanghai) Ltd, and N Subramanian, ExManaging Director, Arkema Peroxides India Ltd, holistically gave an overview on how to succeed in Chinese markets. Other eminent speakers included Harsh Mariwala, Chairman and Managing Director, Marico Ltd; Wim Roels, CEO, Borouge Pte; Ajay Shah, Senior Executive Vice President – Chemicals, Reliance Industries Ltd; Godefroy Motte, Senior Vice President, Chief Regional and Sustainability Officer, Eastman Chemical; Zarir Langrana, Chief Operating Officer (India), Tata Chemicals Ltd; and S Ganesan, VP-Corporate, Excel Crop Care Ltd; among others. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

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BOOK REVIEW

Design of process equipment Author: Kanti K Mahajan Price: ` 6, 200

Considered as a boon for design engineers, this book addresses key topics in the field of chemical engineering. Shell and tube heat exchangers, pressure vessels and storage tanks, and other such relevant subjects are elaborated in detail. The third edition comprises a new topic dealing with air-cooled heat exchangers, which explains the design method of this equipment. Besides, seven elaborate appendices have been included to ease the understanding of formulae and derivations. This book effectively consolidates scattered literature available for these topics and presents the material in simplified form. Typical examples have been included to illustrate the application of the procedures presented in the text. This book contains around 80 illustrations and tables. Chemical engineering students and academia would find this book to be a convenient and useful reference.

Pressure vessel handbook

This book covers design and construction processes of pressure vessels made of carbon steel. This updated 14th edition proves to be a definitive manual for the maker and user of pressure vessels as well as designers, drafters, inspectors and estimators. It is almost an entire library of material presented in a clean and concise manner. Organised for quick reference and complete with step-by-step examples and around 460 illustrations, multiple tables, chart, formulae and graphs, the text is lucid and easy to understand. This book contains special sections on geometry and layout of pressure vessels, measures & weights and design of steel structures. Besides, there is elaborate information provided about codes, standards, specifications to aid proper designing of equipment. This book will be useful for chemical engineers in the process industry for all kinds of practical information.

Author: Eugene F Megyesy Price: ` 7, 800

Reviewer: Tejas Padte, Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai

Available at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958, Telefax: 022-2203 4058, Email: thadam@vsnl.com

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PRODUCTS This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

Lapping paste

Fasteners and steel metal components

The lapping paste suits a variety of lapping operations in order to achieve consistent surface finishing qualities. It consists of base materials such as boron carbide, silicon carbide or aluminium oxide particles. The abrasive particles selected are based on the material, hardness and type of finish required post lapping. Distribution of the particles selected is very close, which in turn exhibits high stock removal and better finishing quality. Particle shape selected is blocky and allows more number of cutting edges to act on the components for rapid stock removal and consistent surface finish.

These fasteners and sheet metal components are used in plastic injection moulding machines and rubber industries. The components include full thread spindle, HTS hex head bolt, nuts, washers, spiral pin, plugs etc. These are offered as per ISO, DIN, IS, BS, JIS and ASTM standards. Materials of constructions are made from MS, carbon steel, alloy steel, stainless steel, brass, copper, PVC, nylon, fibre and spring steel. The components are used in plastic injection moulding machines, rubber industries, hydraulic-pneumatic pumps & valves, electrical, electronics, machine tools, material handling equipment, home appliances, washing machines, refrigeration and air-conditioning plants, etc.

Speedfam India Pvt Ltd Navi Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-27692621, Mob: 09833581051 Email: indiainquiry@speedfam.co.in Website: www.speedfam.co.in

Zenith Industrial Products Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2847 0806 Email: zenith@zip-india.com Website: www.zip-india.com

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PRODUCTS

External shunt The MECO-V external shunt is used for DC ammeters. End blocks are made from electrolytic copper extruded sections ensuring high electrical conductivity and perfect contacts. The resistance element is made from manganin, which has low PPM, thus ensuring highly reliable and stable readings. A unique soldering system ensures that the shunt does not get over heated. The external shunt has current rating from few mA to 6,000 A and a voltage drop of 50/60/75 mV. It conforms to IS:1248, DIN:43703 and BS:89 standards. Goliya Electricals Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2414 9657 Email: geplmumbai@mtnl.net.in Website: www.goliya.com

Energy saver Sensor-based energy saver (model ACES) automatically switches the air-conditioners On and Off when the temperature in the room is achieved. There is a 3minute compressor protection time interlock between each OnOff operation. The existing airconditioner has a crude non-sensitive thermostatic control, which senses the grill temperature to switch the air-conditioner On/Off, whereas ACES has a precision sensor, which can be placed, in any part of the room to switch the air-conditioner On and Off. This helps in maintaining the comfort temperature in most used part of the room. Gautam Enterprises Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2875 0421 Email: gautament@vsnl.net Website: www.gautament.com

Magnetic separator The magnetic separator uses super power NdFeB magnet (rare earth magnets). This magnet ensures separation of ferromagnetic and feeble magnetic particles for high levels of purity. The magnetic separator is five times more powerful than normal ferrite magnet. Also offered is a wide range of super power magnetic separators, such as magnetic rods and grills, magnetic 76

Chemical World | March 2012

plate, magnetic drum, magnetic coolant filters and funnels, specialised magnetic system to suit individual requirement. The magnetic separator finds wide applications in food processing, pharmaceutical, glass, plastic, chemicals, metal recovery and mineral purification plants. Saideep Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2685 5799 Email: saideep1@bom5.vsnl.net.in Website: www.saideeponline.com

Facemask respirator The facemask respirator is used for dust filtration. It is convenient to carry in the pocket. The facemask respirator has a durable elastic band, which is soft and safe when it comes in contact with the skin. This mask is easy to wear, comfortable while talking and has breathing resistance. The product finds applications in various industries, like cable, battery, PVC processing, heavy electrical, power & cement plants, ceramic, silica and glass. It is also used while laying cables, spraying paints, grinding, dusting, soldering and electroplating. Empire Trades Coimbatore - Tamil Nadu Tel: 0422-5377228, Mob: 09894232828 Email: ynajmi@indiatimes.com

Furnace curtain The high-temperature silica fabric withstands temperature as high as 1,000째C. Because of its capacity to withstand high temperature, it offers better performance than silica glass fabric, which can withstand much lower temperature (around 400-500째C). The fabric is also coated with aluminium foil and silicon rubber. It can also be used as a furnace curtain for covering open/exposed area of the furnace. During the manufacturing process, the loom is provided at top of the curtain and a steel wire is passed through the loom. This curtain is also made in the form of a hanging strip. Urja Products Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2287 2277 Mob: 09825688244 Email: info@urjafabrics.com Website: www.urjafabrics.com


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PRODUCTS

PVC cable tray The rigid PVC perforated cable tray is an ideal replacement to MS tray. This PVC tray is not affected by any corrosive chemicals and is waterproof. It is used outside for prolonged periods as it is UV stabilised to resist ultraviolet rays of sun. It is available in width ranging from 50 mm to 300 mm, flange heights of 25 m and 50 mm and with a standard length of 2.9 m. The cable tray is lightweight and maintenance-free. It is joined by socketed jointing system, which means no coupler plate is required. Supreme Electroplast Industries Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2887 3428, Mob: 09820306252 Email: supshitl@vsnl.com Website: www.supshitl.com

Chemical formulation Ferphos is a unique chemical formulation, which acts as a zinc phosphatiser-cum-rust converter. As a dipping solution it does not form phosphate sludge even after prolonged use resulting in zero effluents. Ferphos does not require frequent addition of chemicals. It produces a strong dense uniform zinc phosphate film, which helps to bond paint/powder pigments strongly. Ferphos is specially formulated to help zinc phosphating /powder coating industries. The solution acts as rust converter when brushed on degreased rusted products and instantly converts rust into iron phosphate tannate coating of black/grey colour and zinc phosphates on the base metal. R J International Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-2481 0804, Mob: 09094378870 Email: rjinternattional@yahoo.com

Cable management system Aeron FRP corrosion-free cable tray management system is developed for long-lasting performance in challenging environments where corrosion and chemical resistance and lasting mechanical performance are key requirements. Ladder type as well as perforated cable trays with wide range of sizes to select from is also offered. Also available is 100 per cent replacement of hot-dipped GI cable tray. Aeron Composite Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 5731, Mob: 09909988266 Email: info@aeroncomposite.com Website: www.aeroncomposite.com

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PRODUCTS

Permanent magnet lifter

Level switch

This lifter is used for convenience of lifting and shifting of steel plates, pipes and steel products. In loading and unloading, it lifts iron/steel blocks, cylinders onto magnetic materials for linkage or connection. It is convenient for application in loading/unloading and moving. The permanent magnetic lifter is ideal lifting facility for factories, docks, warehouses and transportation. It is used for transportation of steel products, machinery and hardware. It is also used for lifting and moving parts and goods during installation operations.

This level switch features fast and easy installation with no calibration and no effect of electrical properties of the service material. It is suitable for high dusty environment, field selectable operation logic and provides economical solutions. The housing is done with aluminium and is powder coated. Integral area is with the probe suitable for back panel mounting. The field selected switch over for minimum or maximum switching points.

Protherm Engineering Pvt Ltd Faridabad - Haryana Tel: 0129-4058801, Mob: 09810146299 Email: marketing@prothermindia.com Website: www.prothermindia.com

Silicone-braided tubing Silicone-braided reinforced transparent tubing incorporates strong polyester braiding between extrusions of silicone (hardness-65 shore A). This tubing is ideally suited for increase pressure and/or high temperature applications. Depending upon the size, the tubing can withstand pressure of 6 to 20 kg/cm² at temperature of 100°F. The tubing withstands repeated sterilisation by autoclave ethylene oxide or gamma radiation. Sizes offered are as per customers’ requirements & order and can also be provided as per specifications. Dataseal India Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2864 1532, Mob: 09820070877 Email: response@datasealindia.com Website: www.datasealindia.com

MTS Engineers Pvt.Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-26400063, Mob: 9879495924 Email: sales@mtsengrs.com Website: www.mtsengrs.com

Air separator This air separator is ideal for separation of two light materials having different densities. The machine comprises classifying chamber, blower and cyclone collector. It is easy to operate and has good separation efficiency. The material fed into the equipment is allowed to pass through a chamber subjected to fluidisation. The zig-zag-classifying chamber effectively lifts the lighter material and conveys them to the drum collected below the classifying chamber. The airflow can be controlled for required efficiency. Premium Vijimech Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-4008 3450, Mob: 09712987467 Email: sales@vijimech.com Website: www.vijimech.com

Screen for centrifuge machine Chemical dehumidifier The chemical dehumidifier is used for effective humidity control of the air. It also maintains the required RH with temperature. The dehumidifier works on liquid desiccant as absorption media. It is a highly efficient system with low power consumption and maintenance costs. The conditioned air is free from bacteria, dust and odour. It is indigenously designed, fabricated and commissioned on turnkey basis. It is available in sizes ranging from 500 cfm to 50,000 cfm or above. Rago & Rane Techno Engineers Pvt Ltd Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2819 5473, Mob: 09870600337 Email: machinemech@hotmail.com 80

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The sieve segment and screen for centrifuge machine is available in flat panel, cylindrical and conical type for precise aperture. The product range starts from 0.075 micron onwards. The screen is manufactured using SS-316, SS-316L (mainly for corrosive chemicals and salt industries). Also offered is chemical transfer metering/dosing pump in plunger and diaphragm type, pressure relief valve that ranges from ¼” to 2” and pressure from 2 kg/cm² to 300 kg/cm². Jagdish Engineering Works Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2685 3584 Email: jew@jewpump.com Website: www.jewpump.com


PRODUCTS

Basket centrifuge These are products for handling highly corrosive and foodgrade chemical for full vacuum to 25 kg/cm² press and up to 250°C temperature. Halarcoated basket centrifuge is suitable for bulk drugs, fine chemicals and pesticides. An industrial advantage of the halar coating is its smooth surface. FDA approved, non-sticky and chemical resistant, it is available from 14” laboratory machines to 24”, 35” and 48”, three pendulums or up to inertia plate construction. Elasto Polymer Processors (Gujarat) Pvt Ltd Rajkot - Gujarat Tel: 0281-2361623, Mob: 09898344774 Email: epp@sify.com Website: www.atikagroup.com

Eccentric helical rotor pump The EU series eccentric helical rotor pumps is a selfpriming, rotary, valveless positive displacement pump having two pumping elements rubber stator and metallic rotor. The stator has helical profile with pitch double to rotor pitch resulting in cavities, which carry the liquid vertically mounted. This pump is specifically designed for emptying barrels, containers or wells having low or highly viscous media with or without solid or fibrous components. Drive unit is directly mounted on the pump body and the whole unit is suspended and lowered into the container or well. UT Pumps & Systems Pvt Ltd Faridabad - Haryana Tel: 0129-2258588, Mob: 09313784055 Email: info@utpsl.in Website: www.utpsl.in

Acid fume extraction system The Anticor acid fume extraction system is specially developed for extraction and neutralisation of hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid fume. This system is highly successful in the plants using acids of higher concentration up to 30 per cent. The system mainly consists of polypropylene scrubbing tower with heavy-duty centrifugal fan. Completely made from anti-corrosive materials, the system ensures compilation of stringent environmental conditions stipulated by pollution control authorities and a long working life. Arvind Anticor Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-3291 8016, Mob: 07878883400 Email: arvindanticor@hotmail.com Website: www.picklingplant.com

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PRODUCTS

Precision balance Shimadzu UniBloc is a one-piece force cell technology for precision balance. It is created by highprecision electric discharge wire processing applied to a block of aluminium alloy, and replaces the conventional electro-magnetic balance sensor assembly. Its compact, uniform structure ensures stable temperature characteristics, excellent response time and stable corner-load performance. The design permits a consistency of production that assures reliability and a long operational life. Also offered are balances ranging from semi-micro with a minimum display of 0.01 mg to precision platform balances with capacity up to 52 kg. Amkette Analytics Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2416 1544, Mob: 09022367107 Email: info@amketteonline.com Website: www.amketteonline.com

Fume extraction and scrubbing system The Anticor Zing Performer is a zinc white fume extraction and scrubbing system, which is a proven solution for purification of white-fumed air generated in hot-dip galvanising process. This system is designed on special software developed for typical requirements of hot-dip galvanising process and consists of zinc kettle & scrubbing unit with heavy-duty centrifugal fan. The zinc (white) fumes generated while dipping process is efficiently sucked through lip ducting and diverted to scrubbing unit where the fumes are neutralised and zinc-fume-free air is released in the atmosphere through chimney. The system delivers excellent results to meet emission control requirement stipulated by pollution control authorities. Arvind Anticor Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-3291 8016 Mob: 07878883400 Email: arvindanticor@hotmail.com Website: www.picklingplant.com

Bulk bag unloader No matter what users’ space requirements are, the bulk bag unloader is tailor-made to meet their exact limitations. A complete range of options is available to ensure that users’ materials flow properly. The optional reverse pulse system puts the materials 82

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back into the process where it belongs and eliminates the need for expensive standalong dust control systems. The bulk bag unloader is designed with modular components that are easily adaptable to a variety of applications, ensuring that the unloader fully meets users’ needs. Hapman Systems Pvt Ltd Vadodara - Gujarat Tel: +91-0265-2517505 Mob: 09825094662 Email: info@hapman.in Website: www.hapman.in

Multi-titration system The FACTS Ce2010 automated multi-titration system is equipped with a comprehensive Windows-based titration operating system, and is capable of multiplexing. With a PC and user-friendly software, the system controls every aspect of titration analysis, from real-time runs to calculated results. The system performs a variety of specific titrations, such as pH, thermo titration, optical, conductometric and on-line titrations. It also includes four titration endpoint-sensing methods available with rapid multiplexing between thermometric, potentiometric, conductometric and chemiluminescence. Multiflo Instruments Pvt Ltd Navi Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2778 0880 Email: sales@multifloinstruments.com Website: www.multifloinstruments.com

Bulk bag filler The bulk bag filler has cantilevered, heavy-gauge steel tubing frame that provides structural integrity and unrestricted bad access from three sides. Adjustable or fixed frame height allows users the flexibility to handle various bag sizes. The bulk bag filler is designed and engineered specifically for users’ system requirements. Processing enhancements, such as remote bag release, densification, deaeration, batch weighing and transport conveyors are available to ensure stable, easy-tohandle FIBCs. Hapman Systems Pvt Ltd Vadodara - Gujarat Tel: 0265-2517505, Mob: 09825094662 Email: info@hapman.in Website: www.hapman.in


PRODUCTS

FRP storage tanks

Mechanical seal

The FRP and FRVE tanks have excellent life in comparison to conventional metal tank when used to store acids, chemicals, alkalies, DM water, dyes, wastewater, caustic and other liquids. Further, the FRP and GRP tanks have several features like chemical resistance, easy to maintain, smooth inner surface, lower sludge formation, less cleaning cost, easy installation, lightweight, 100 per cent corrosion-free, etc.

The UE-RO series mechanical seal is available in multi-spring design. This seal is used for clear, lubricating and non-corrosive liquids. The multi-spring design ensures uniform force all over the face for better duty and longer life. This seal is ideal for use in chemicals, pharma, petrochem, solvent, fertiliser, textiles, power and paper industries. The seal suits a wide variety of processed fluids under various duties of temperature and pressure.

Aeron Composite Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 5731, Mob: 09909988266 Email: info@aeroncomposite.com Website: www.aeroncomposite.com

Unicorn Engineers Delhi Tel: 011-2242 1640 Email: info@mechseal.com Website: www.mechseal.com

Steam boiler

Booster system The non-IBR smoke tube vertical package steam boiler is a custom-built unit for high temperature and heat output rating, fitted with fully automatic oil/gas burners. This boiler comes in the range of 100 to 300 kg/hr smoke tube construction, seamless asthma 106 GR-B pipes, Thermal efficiency is 86.2 per cent on NCV. The unit is easy and economical in operation.

Aero Therm Systems Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2589 0158, Mob: 09825008720 Email: contact@aerothermsystem.com Website: www.aerothermsystem.com

The hydro-pneumatic pressure booster system consists of an automatic pressure controlled pump and a pressure tank, along with an air-filled Poly-EtherUrethane (PEU) bladder. Water pumped into this tank is compressed and generates pressure on the bladder. This in turn maintains a desired pressure within the whole water system. The automatic system requires no manual intervention and is built for flow maintenance. Jay Water Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2685 0026 Email: info@jaywater.com Website: www.jaywater.com

Transdermal diffusion cell The Logan System 902 is designed to perform fully automated transdermal diffusion cell HPLC system. Up to 12 bobble-free Franz cells (six per console) are linked by the peristaltic pumps to corresponding flow through vials. The flow-through vials are installed in the auto sampler. Samples are transferred from the transdermal cells to flow through vials and then collected into the sample vials for on-line HPLC injection. The replacement media is then replaced into the flow cells. This helps to keep the cell volume constant throughout the test. The report of the test results and data are performed automatically. Moreover, the entire test is controlled by Logan ATLC software package. Logan Instruments (I) Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2416 1544 Email: info@anmonline.com Website: www.anmalliance.com

Ribbon mixer This ribbon mixer is fabricated with engineering precision and has double ribbons that provide to and fro, and also has up and down movement to the powder. Two chopper blades moving at cutting speeds are provided at diagonally opposite ends to break lumps of the mixture. It accurately and rapidly blends small proportions into large stocks. The equipment is used to mix a small quantity of liquid to powder stocks. Besides, it is compact and offers dust-free operation. Ultra Febtech Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2584 2345 Email: info@ultrafebtech.com Website: www.ultrafebtech.com

March 2012 | Chemical World

83


PRODUCTS

FORM IV Statement about ownership and other particulars about Chemical World, as required to be published in the first issue every year after the last day of February. 1. Place of Publication: Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 2. Periodicity of Publication: Monthly 3. Printer’s Name: Mr Mohan Gajria Nationality: Indian Address: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 4. Publisher’s Name: Mr Lakshmi Narasimhan Nationality: Indian Address: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 5. Editor’s Name: Mr Manas Bastia Nationality: Indian Address: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 6. Names and addresses of Individuals who own Chemical World & partners or shareholder holding more than 1% of total capital: Infomedia 18 Limited (formerly known as Infomedia India Limited), Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 is the owner of Chemical World. Details of the shareholders of Infomedia 18 Limited who are holding more than 1% of the paid up equity share capital of the company as on 20-02-2012: 1. Network18 Media & Investments Limited, 503,504 & 507, 5th Floor, Mercantile House, 15 Kasturba Gandhi Marg, New Delhi - 110001 2. Acacia Conservation Fund LP, Citibank N A, Custody Services 3rd Flr, Trent House, G Block, Plot No. 60, BKC, Bandra (East), Mumbai - 400051 3. Pramod Premchand Shah, Kalpana Pramod Shah, Agra Building, 1st Floor, 121/4 M.G.Road, Mumbai - 400023 4. Acacia Institutional Partners, LP, Citibank N A, Custody Services 3rd Flr, Trent House, G Block, Plot No. 60, BKC, Bandra (East), Mumbai - 400051 5. SPS Capital & Money Management Services Pvt Ltd, 66,Tamarind Lane, 4/5,Haji Kasam Bldg, 1st Floor, Fort, Mumbai - 400023 6. Sanjiv Dhireshbhai Shah, 201-203, Sapphire Complex, Nr. Cargo Motors, C.G. Road, Ahmedabad - 380006 7. The Oriental Insurance Company Limited, Oriental House, P B 7037, A-25/27, Asaf Ali Road, New Delhi - 110002 8. Accurate Finstock Pvt Ltd, 9th Floor, Shikhar, Adani House, Nr. Mithakhali Six Road, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad - 380009 I, Lakshmi Narasimhan, hereby declare that all particulars given above are true to the best of my knowledge and belief. Dated: 20th February 2012 Lakshmi Narasimhan Signature of the publisher

84

Chemical World | March 2012

Side channel blower The side channel blower works on the following principle. In the chamber set, in the periphery of the impeller, air is accelerated due to centrifugal force created as the impeller turns and is thrown into the next chamber and is again similarly accelerated, thus continuously increasing compression as the impeller turns until it reaches the outlet part. Features include: non-pulsating continuous airflow, compact and lightweight, no metal-to-metal contact, oil-free air, rugged construction, maintenancefree, low noise level, additional filter system (optional), and construction of cast aluminium alloy. Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2291 0771, Mob: 09824036375 Email: info@vacunair.com Website: www.vacunair.com

Breath alcohol analyser The sensor is based on full cell technology, the response time is less than 10 sec. For the preliminary check blow over the sensor for 5 sec and without the mouthpiece.For the quantitative check blow through the mouthpiece for 5-7 sec. It can store up to 3000 data with date, time and test results. The data transfer is done through the serial interface to the printer. Data can be downloaded to the printer or on the computer through RS-232 port. Uniphos Envirotronic Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-4037 1646 Email: cel@uniphos.com Website: www.uniphos-she.com

Multi mill The materials of construction of the multi mill are SS304/316/316L. Motor is of 3 hp and rotor diameter is approximately 250 mm. The beater ranges from 8-12 in number, has knife/impact edge and two scrapper blades, rotor speed is approximately 720 rpm. Bombay Pharma Equipments Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2859 4877, Mob: 09820124804 Email: bombaypharma@vsnl.net The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Chemical World


LIST OF PRODUCTS To know more about the products featured in this magazine, fax us on 022-3003 4499 or tear and post to us the ‘Product Inquiry Card’ by following the 5 easy steps given there. Alternatively, you may also write to us at michael@infomedia18.in or call us on 022-3003 4684, and we will send your inquiries to the advertisers/companies directly to help you source better. Sl. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73

Product

Pg. No.

AC motor ..................................................... 19 Accelerated ageing test ...................................... 37 Acid fume extraction system.............................. 81 Acid tank ........................................................... 61 Acoustic hood .................................................... 39 Agitator .............................................................. 11 Air blower .......................................................... 39 Air pollution control equipment........................ 31 Air receiver......................................................... 31 Air separator ...................................................... 80 Air treatment ...................................................FIC Air/VOC stripper .............................................. 55 Air-cooled heat exchanger ................................. 13 Air-cooled steam condenser .............................. 13 Analytical instrumentation................................BC Aqua gas chlorinator .......................................... 65 Automated orbital welding ................................ 53 Automatic and contained discharge .................. 35 Axial flow fan .................................................... 81 Ball check valve ............................................ 63 Ball valve ........................................................ 4, 63 Basket centrifuge................................................ 81 Batch disperser ................................................... 11 Bellow and dip-pipe ............................................ 4 Bio-diesel ........................................................... 37 Biospec-nano................................................... BIC Blower ................................................................ 39 Blowers and fans ................................................ 81 Boiler.................................................................. 33 Booster system .................................................. 83 Brake motors...................................................... 19 Breath alcohol analyser ...................................... 84 Bulk bag filler .................................................... 82 Bulk bag unloader .............................................. 82 Bush ................................................................... 63 Butterfly valve ................................................ 4, 63 Cable management system ............................ 79 Cake pressing ..................................................... 35 Calorifer ............................................................. 33 Calorimeter ........................................................ 11 Centrifugal air blower ........................................ 81 Check valve .......................................................... 4 Chemical dehumidifier ...................................... 80 Chemical formulation ........................................ 79 Chemical process equipment ............................. 61 Chemical pump.................................................. 79 Columns and chemistries..................................BC Compositional and trace metal analysis ............ 37 Compressor ........................................................ 81 Condenser .......................................................... 31 Cone screw mixer .............................................. 31 Continuous or batch filtration ........................... 35 Conveying blower .............................................. 81 Cooling pad ....................................................... 33 Cooling tower ..................................... 13, 33, FIC Dairy equipment........................................... 31 Damper .............................................................. 31 DC motor .......................................................... 19 Diaphragm valve ................................................ 63 Disperser ............................................................ 11 Distillation column ............................................ 81 Drip irrigation.................................................... 33 Dust collector system ......................................... 81 Eccentric helical rotor pump ......................... 81 Empower chromatography data software .........BC Energy saver ....................................................... 76 External shunt.................................................... 76 Facemask respirator ...................................... 76 Failure analysis ................................................... 37 Fasteners and steel metal components .............. 75 FEP/PFA/PVDF materials ............................... 63 Filler compositional analysis .............................. 37 Fittings ............................................................... 63

Sl. No. 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145

Product

Pg. No.

Flameproof motor .............................................. 19 Flange mounting motor ..................................... 19 FRP battery stand .............................................. 15 FRP cable tray ................................................... 15 FRP canopy ....................................................... 15 FRP grating ....................................................... 15 FRP hand rails and fencing ............................... 15 FRP ladder ......................................................... 15 FRP luminaries .................................................. 15 FRP poles and masts ......................................... 15 FRP storage tanks........................................ 15, 83 FRP structural profile ........................................ 15 Fuel burners ....................................................... 81 Fuels - diesel ...................................................... 37 Fume extraction and scrubbing system.............. 82 Furnace curtain .................................................. 76 Gas conditioning and fire protection ............. 21 Gases .................................................................. 37 Gasket ................................................................ 63 Gear box ............................................................ 26 Gear motor ........................................................ 26 Gear oil .............................................................. 37 Geared motor..................................................... 26 Heat exchanger ...............................8, 31, 47, 81 Heating baths..................................................... 11 Helical inline geared motor and reducer ........... 26 High pressure homogeniser ............................... 11 Hot plate ............................................................ 11 HPLC ...............................................................BC Industrial cooler .........................................FIC Informatics ........................................................BC Injection moulding machine .............................. 33 Inline disperser................................................... 11 Inline shaft-mounted helical geared motor and reducer.............................................. 26 Kneading machine ........................................ 11 Laboratory reactor ........................................ 11 Laboratory software ........................................... 11 Lapping paste..................................................... 75 Large diameter welded pipe .............................. 79 Level switch ....................................................... 80 Lined valve and pipe fitting................................. 4 Liquid-ring vacuum pump................................. 81 Lubes engine oil................................................. 37 Magnetic separator ....................................... 76 Magnetic stirrer ................................................. 11 Material identification ....................................... 37 Mechanical seal .................................................. 83 Metallography .................................................... 37 Mill .................................................................... 11 Monoblock pumps ............................................. 79 Motor ................................................................. 19 Motor-driven dosing pump ............................... 65 Multi mill........................................................... 84 Multi-stage cake washing .................................. 35 Multi-stage centrifugal air blower ..................... 81 Multi-titration system ...................................... 82 Non-metallic pump ...................................... 79 Non-return valve .................................................. 4 Oil and gas firing equipment......................... 81 Overhead stirrer ................................................. 11 PBEGL geared motor ................................... 19 Permanent magnet lifter .................................... 80 Petrol and fuel oil .............................................. 37 Pickling tank ...................................................... 61 Pilot plant .......................................................... 11 Pipe .................................................................... 63 Pipe line ............................................................. 33 Piping system from polypropylene ...................... 6 Plug valve ........................................................... 63 Pneumatic conveying system ............................. 81 Polymer characterisation .................................... 37 Polypropylene process pump.............................. 79

Sl. No. 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216

Product

Pg. No.

Polypropylene tank ............................................ 61 Portable loader ................................................... 81 Precision balance ................................................ 82 Pressure and vacuum filtration .......................... 35 Pressure vessel .................................................... 81 PTFE ................................................................. 63 PTFE lined valve and pipe fitting ....................... 4 Pump ............................................................ 79, 81 Pumping filtering unit vacuum pump ............... 81 Pumping solution............................................... 49 PVC cable tray ................................................... 79 PVC pipe ........................................................... 33 PVDF pump ...................................................... 79 Reactor ............................................. 31, 72, 75 Ribbon mixer ..................................................... 83 Right angled helical bevel geared motor and reducer ........................................................ 26 Right-angled helical worm geared motor and reducer.............................................. 26 Rod..................................................................... 63 Rotary evaporator ............................................... 11 Rotary gear pump .............................................. 79 Sampling valve ............................................... 4 Screen for centrifuge machine ........................... 80 Seamless pipe ..................................................... 79 Self priming mud pump .................................... 79 Self priming sewage pump................................. 79 Shaker ................................................................ 11 Sheet .................................................................. 63 Side channel blower .......................................... 84 Side-channel blower........................................... 81 Silicone braided tubing ...................................... 80 Slip ring crane duty motor................................. 19 Solenoid driven metering pump ........................ 65 Solid-liquid mixer .............................................. 11 Spray analysis ..................................................... 21 Spray control ...................................................... 21 Spray dryer project ............................................. 31 Spray fabrication ................................................ 21 Spray nozzles and accessories ............................ 21 Sprinkler system ................................................. 33 Stainless steel pipe ............................................. 79 Steam boiler ....................................................... 83 Storage tank ....................................................... 81 Strainer................................................................. 4 Swing check valve .............................................. 63 Tank ............................................................ 61 Teflon-lined ball valve ......................................... 4 Teflon-lined butterfly valve ................................. 4 Teflon-lined check valve ...................................... 4 Teflon-lined sampling valve ................................ 4 Teflon-lined strainer ............................................ 4 Teflon-lined valve and pipe fitting ...................... 4 Tefzel HHS isotactic PP material ....................... 6 Testing machine ................................................ 37 Thermoplastic valve ............................................. 6 Thermostats & vacuum dryer and mixer........... 11 Transdermal diffusion cell ................................. 83 Transmission fluid ............................................. 37 Trim handling system ........................................ 81 Tube ............................................................. 63, 79 Turnkey systems for dust suppression ............... 21 UPLC .........................................................BC U-tube ................................................................ 79 Vacuum control ............................................ 65 Vacuum or hot gas drying ................................. 35 Valve .................................................................. 63 Vane damper ...................................................... 81 Vertical glandless pump ..................................... 79 Water ring vacuum pump ............................. 81 Welded pipe....................................................... 79 Welding gun ...................................................... 33 Zircoat ........................................................... 3

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover March 2012 | Chemical World

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LIST OF ADVERTISERS

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details AB Diachem Systems Pvt Ltd

Pg No 33

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Gem Equipments Ltd

Pg No FIC

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Shanbhag And Associates

T: +91-11-25155456

T: +91-422-3267800

T: +91-22-28346604

E: sales@scalewatcher.in

E: sales@gemindia.com

E: info@shanbhags.com

W: www.gemindia.com

W: www.scalewatcher.in

Ador Welding Ltd

53

HRS Process Systems Ltd 15

8

W: www.shivatec-india.com

T: +91-20-66047894

Spraying Systems (India) Pvt Ltd

T: +91-79-65258500

E: info@hrsasia.co.in

T: +91-80-39853200 / 01

E: info@aeroncomposite.com

W: www.hrsasia.co.in

E: ssipl@sprayindia.com

W: www.aeroncomposite.com

IKA India Private Limited

Aqua Services

T: +91-80-26253900

65

11

Jyoti Ceramics Industries Pvt Ltd

W: www.aquaservicesindia.com

63

T: +91-79-22205282

W: www.ika.in

E: aqua@aquaservices.co.in

21

W: www.spray.com

Supremo Polymer Industries

E: process@ika.in

T: +91-265-2331748

37

E: gupta@shivatec-india.com

W: www.ptfeindia.com

W: www.arcmachines.com

Shiva Analyticals (India) Limited T: +91-80-27971322

E: hitech@ptfeindia.com

E: himadripal@adorians.com

49

W: www.shanbhags.com

4

T: +91-79-25833040

T: +91-20-40706000

Aeron Composite Pvt Ltd

Hi-Tech Applicator

Pg No

E: supremoproduct@gmail.com

3

W: www.supremoproduct.com

T: +91-253-2350120

Aries Engineers

75

T: +91-09930992671

Suraj Limited

E: info@jyoticeramics.com

T: +91-79-27540720

W: www.jyoticeramics.com

E: ariesengineers@gmail.com

Kwality Process Equipments Pvt Ltd

W: www.ariesengineers.com

72

E: suraj@surajgroup.com

T: +91-250-2453438

W: www.surajgroup.com

E: pdmakwana@vsnl.net

The Indian Electric Co

T: +91-79-25894692

W: www.chemicalequipments.com

T: +91-20-24474303

E: info@picklingplant.com

Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd

W: www.picklingplant.com

T: +91-33-24792050

Arvind Anticor Ltd

BHS-Sonthofen (India) Pvt. Ltd.

61

35

T: +91-40-23315341 / 45 E: neelesh@bhs-sonthofen.in

E: icemktg@indianelectric.com

Toshvin Analytical Pvt Ltd

W: www.paharpur.com

26

T: +91-22-23015096 E: info@toshvin.com

UNP Polyvalves India Pvt Ltd

W: www.pbl.co.in

T: +91-79-26403839

Pressure Vessels (India)

E: info@devpumps.com

T: +91-20-27130430

E: mktg@polyvalve.com

W: www.devpumps.com

E: info@pvipune.com

W: www.polyvalve.com

Envirologek India Pvt Ltd

55

T: +91-20-25431008

T: +91-11-45457777

Samarth Engineers T: +91-20-66300305

T: +91-79-22910771

W: www.vacunair.com

W: www.rajprocessequipment.com

39

81

Waters (India) Private Limited

E: sanjayraut21@hotmail.com

E: waters_india@waters.com

W: www.everestblowers.com

W: www.samarthengineers.com

W: www.waters.com

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

Chemical World | March 2012

BC

T: +91-80-28371900

E: info@everestblowers.com

86

81

E: info@vacunair.com

E: sales@rajprocessequipment.com

W: www.envirologek.com

6

T: +91-265-2649248

Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd 31

T: +91-20-40710010

E: gtendulkar@envirologek.com

Everest Blowers

47

W: www.pressurevesselsindia.com

Raj Process Eqpts & Systems(P) Ltd

BIC

W: www.toshvin.com

E: infopbl@elecon.com

79

19

W: www.indianelectric.com

T: +91-2692-231070

W: www.bhs-sonthofen.in

Dev Engineers

13

E: pctccu@paharpur.com

Power Build Ltd

79

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Chemical World - March 2012