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INDUSTRY WATCH - Chemical World

January 2012


EDITORIAL

Ready for the next ‘leap’?

L

et me begin with wishing you a Great New Year! Time has come to ‘leap’ and help lead the nation become the fastest-growing economy on earth. This undoubtedly promises unparallelled opportunities to raise the present portfolio of products and services to the next level, and in the process, not only transform a multitude of cities and states but also millions of lives.

In retrospect, the year 2011 was a milestone by being the International Year of Chemistry for the Indian chemical sector as well as the overseas peers. Amid sweeping mega global trends – from the Jasmine Revolution to the unprecedented stress on the Euro Zone and their rising ricochets across the globe – India stood tall as one of the few key growth markets, albeit with a placid pace of economic growth. Since product innovation and sustainability increasingly emerge as the core of crucial success quotient for the chemical and chemistry-using industries, the future will belong to those who can smartly transform their products & processes in the quest to gain a competitive edge. Besides, as some analysts reckon that a ‘Super cycle’ is underway for the global chemical sector, perhaps the time is ripe to focus on new business models, high-value add for the user/consumer and sustainable product concepts, among others. This should lead to a much better and future-ready connect of this sector with science at one end and the societal eco-system at the other. Given this fast developing scenario, it is high time for the chemical sector to adopt the approach to leapfrog rather than merely catching up in the race to short-term glory. This will hopefully offer greater productivity, energy efficiency, sustainability, etc by virtue of next-gen products and processes. That said, it is imperative to put into action adequate safeguards and regulatory practices to ensure that the Indian growth momentum is carried forward in an increasingly uncertain global market.

Editorial Advisory Board Pothen Paul Former Chairman, Aker Powergas Pvt Ltd

This edition of ‘Chemical World’ reflects all these and much more, with a focussed mix of the past, present and future. These changes should lead to smarter technology, precise products, superior service and proficient performance for the chemical sector. We will continue reviewing the trends regularly and present analysis thereof for you in the times ahead. Let the journey begin!

D P Misra Director, TCE Consulting Engineers Ltd and Former Director General, ICC

P D Samudra Executive Director (Sales) & Member of the Board, Uhde India Pvt Ltd

Manas R Bastia manas@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Chemical World

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48

46 36 Cover visual: Mahendra Varpe

Special Focus: Engineering, Procurement and Construction EPC industry outlook......................................................... 32

Insight & Outlook: Industrial Gases Industrial gas market .......................................................... 46 Rising input costs ............................................................... 48 Case study - Praxair India ................................................. 50 Threat management ............................................................ 52

Safety-oriented plant design ............................................... 34

Automation Trends

EPC procurement strategies ............................................... 36

Laboratory automation: The need of the hour to be future-ready ............................................................... 54

EPC vs EPCM ................................................................... 38 Roundtable .......................................................................... 40

In Conversation With

Energy Management Energy audit: A focussed approach to attain savings ........ 56

Policies & Regulations

Diane Kelly, India President, Dow Corning ................... 28

National Manufacturing Policy: A booster pill for all ills? ..................................................................... 61

Strategy Indian chemical exports: Emerging markets take the lead ........................................................................ 63

Tips & Tricks

Facility Visit: Kiri Industries Ltd Enhancing life with chemistry of colours .......................... 42

Chromatography analysis: Solvent selection made easy ............................................................................ 64

Event Report Q Engineering Expo Chennai 2011: Capturing

Regular Sections Editorial ........................................................................ 5 Newsmakers of 2011 .................................................... 10 News, Views & Analysis .............................................. 16 Technology & Innovation............................................ 22

the southern stronghold................................................ 68 Q IGCW 2011: Spreading green chemistry culture .......................................................... 70 Q Hannover India 2011: Showing prowess

of novel industrial technologies .................................... 71

Technology Transfer .................................................... 24 Projects ........................................................................ 65 Event List .................................................................... 66

Details on page no. 44, 66

Book Review ................................................................ 72 Products ...................................................................... 73 List of Products .......................................................... 85 List of Advertisers ...................................................... 86

Highlights of Next Edition Special Focus: Oil & Gas Insight & Outlook: Energy Management

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and ÂŁ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise January 2012 | Chemical World

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Business Insights Technologies Opportunities

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January 2012 | Chemical World

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NEWSMAKERS OF 2011

Agri-inputs Insecticides India acquires Monocil from Nocil Ltd

Tata Chemicals to invest in fertiliser complex in Gabon

(March) Insecticides India Ltd (IIL) acquires insecticide brand Monocil from Nocil Ltd. Monocil is a systemic insecticide cum acaricide, which controls broad spectrum of pests in a wide range of crops. Rajesh Aggarwal, Managing Director, IIL, expects revenue worth ` 40 crore from the acquisition in the year-ending March 2012. Monocil will be IIL’s fourth key brand. The other three key brands are Victor, Lethal and Thimet. The firm owns 95 brands and is mulling introduction of additional 7 molecules in the first phase.

(April) Tata Chemicals Ltd (TCL) announced an investment of $ 290 million to acquire a 25.1 per cent stake as a strategic investor in the stream 1 of a greenfield port-based ammoniaurea fertiliser manufacturing complex in the Republic of Gabon (RoG). The balance shareholding will be held between Olam International Ltd (Olam) and RoG. This ammoniaurea venture in Gabon will ultimately result in setting up of two streams, each of 1.3 million TPA of urea with matching ammonia capacity for which feedstock agreement at competitive fixed prices has already been entered into with the RoG.

Coromandel International acquires stake in Sabero Organics

United Phosphorus acquires stake in DVA Agro Brazil

( June) Coromandel International Ltd (CIL) has acquired 42.2 per cent stake in Sabero Organics, which is expected to help CIL to enhance its offerings in pesticides. This complements its strategy of evolving as a focussed agri-input player with less dependence on subsidies from the government, rather than just a fertiliser company. Coromandel International plans to expand its fertiliser manufacturing capacity in Andhra Pradesh at an investment of ` 350 crore. The company has earmarked ` 500 crore for its capital expansion plans. Secunderabad-based Coromandel is a leading producer of phosphatic fertilisers.

( July) The Mumbai-based agro-chemicals major United Phosphorus Ltd (UPL) has acquired 51 per cent stake in Brazilian firm DVA Agro Do Brasil (DVA Agro Brazil) for $ 150 million (about ` 663 crore). The balance 49 per cent would continue to be held by the existing shareholders, the company said in a statement. DVA Agro Brazil, with a net revenue of $ 130 million in 2010, is engaged in the production and marketing of crop protection products. It has a formulation plant in Brazil and is undergoing expansion.

Automation Rockwell Automation to acquire Hiprom

Emerson acquires Fisher Sanmar joint venture

( January) Rockwell Automation Inc is all set to acquire Hiprom, a leading process control and automation systems integrator, headquartered in Johannesburg, South Africa. Hiprom customers include the top global mining firms. “This acquisition accelerates the growth of Rockwell Automation’s business in the Sub-Saharan region and further expands our customer presence in the global mining and mineral processing market,” said Hedwig Maes, President - Europe, Middle East & Africa Regions, Rockwell Automation.

(April) Emerson Process Management announced that it has acquired full ownership of its Fisher Sanmar Ltd joint venture from Sanmar Engineering Corporation, expanding its capabilities in India. This acquisition adds to Emerson Process Management’s offering of control valves, industrial regulators and other process technologies & services through the Fisher brand. The purchase price was $ 135 million for the business and additional land. The company, expected to be renamed Emerson Process Chennai Pvt Ltd, will expand sales, service and industry coverage of Emerson Process Management in India.

Biocides Lonza to acquire Arch Chemicals

LANXESS acquires US biocide specialist Verichem

( July) Swiss pharmaceutical supplier Lonza Group Ltd will purchase biocides company Arch Chemicals Inc for $ 1.25 billion in an effort to strengthen its microbial control business. The combined businesses will create a bacterialkilling products division with sales valued at $ 1.6 billion. “The acquisition of Arch Chemicals is the next logical step in Lonza’s life-science-focussed strategy,” said Stefan Borgas, CEO, Lonza. The global microbial control market is currently valued at approximately $ 10 billion and is growing at 4-6 per cent per year.

(November) LANXESS is strengthening its portfolio of biocides with the acquisition of Verichem Inc based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. As a result, the German specialty chemicals company will significantly bolster its position in the US material protection market and broaden its global biocide manufacturing network. LANXESS will gain access to a complementary portfolio of biocides, as well as active ingredients registered with the US Environmental Protection Agency. They are used to protect coatings, adhesives, construction materials, as well as pulp & paper.

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Chemical World | January 2012


NEWSMAKERS OF 2011

Commodity Chemicals Cytec sells basics unit to private equity firm

AB Group buys Columbian Chemicals for $ 875 million

( January) Cytec Industries has reached an agreement to sell its building block chemicals business to an affiliate of H I G. Capital (leading global private investment firm) for $ 180 million. The purchase is the third chemical acquisition in the recent years for the Miami-based private equity firm. The main asset of the building block chemicals business is a plant in Fortier, LA, that manufactures melamine, acrylonitrile and sulfuric acid. The sale will allow Cytec to pay more attention and resources on its core growth platforms of engineered materials.

(February) The Aditya Birla (AB) Group has acquired the US carbon black maker Columbian Chemicals Company (CCC) for $ 875 million, thus becoming the world’s biggest producer of the commodity that is utilised to improve the durability of tyres, paints and plastics. The transaction will yield an estimated gain of $ 50 million a year by exploiting the sourcing and economies of scale made possible by the combined capacity, said Kumar Mangalam Birla, Chairman, AB Group. The $ 8.5 billion diversified Birla Group’s carbon black firms in Thailand & Egypt, and an investment arm in Singapore will execute the deal.

Evonik and GACL initiate multi-million dollar project

Uhde India commissions Jayshree Chemicals’ caustic soda project

(February) Evonik Industries and Gujarat Alkalies and Chemicals Ltd (GACL) are driving forward plans for a new multimillion dollar project. At its heart is the construction of a new hydrogen peroxide production plant by Evonik and a propylene oxide facility by GACL. The aim is to produce propylene oxide using the environment-friendly HPPO (hydrogen peroxide to propylene oxide) process. Representatives of Evonik and GACL have now signed a Memorandum of Understanding on the proposed project in Dahej, Gujarat.

(March) Uhde India has successfully commissioned Jayshree Chemicals’ 152 Tonne Per Day (TPD) membrane cell caustic soda conversion project at Ganjam, Odisha. The scope of the contract covered know-how, basic & detailed engineering, project management services, supply of membrane cell elements, procurement & site supervision services for cell assembly, startup, commissioning & performance test run. The plant uses the latest 5th generation membrane cells involving Uhde’s proven energy-efficient membrane cell technology.

Aditya Birla Group buys Kanoria Chemicals unit

GACL plans expansion in South Gujarat

(April) The Aditya Birla Group has acquired the chloro-chemicals unit of Kanoria Chemicals & Industries for ` 830 crore. The deal will make Aditya Birla Group India’s largest producer of chlor-alkali, a critical input in the aluminium sector, said Kumar Mangalam Birla, Group Chairman, in a press release. The deal will help boost the supply of feedstock caustic soda, used to make alumina that is refined to produce aluminium, to flagship Hindalco’s aluminium producing unit at Renukoot in Uttar Pradesh.

( June) Gujarat Alkalies & Chemicals Ltd (GACL) has commissioned its third phase 14,000 tonne per annum hydrogen peroxide expansion project at Dahej in South Guajrat. With this expansion, the total hydrogen peroxide production capacity of the company has increased to 39,080 tonne per annum. Meanwhile, the company is also in the process of setting up a project to manufacture 20,000 tonne per annum of sodium chlorate crystals for which it has awarded ` 1,435 crore towards engineering services, procurement assistance and supply of proprietary items for the project to UHDE India.

EPC Mitsubishi and Suhail Bahwan Group form engineering company in India (September) Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd (MHI) and Suhail Bahwan Group (SBG) of Oman have established a Joint Venture ( JV) engineering company, namely MHI Engineering and Industrial Projects India Pvt Ltd (MEIP), in India. MEIP will undertake business development, design, engineering, procurement, construction management, aftersales services and other functions for various industrial and infrastructure projects handled by MHI’s Machinery & Steel Infrastructure Systems division, which is also responsible for the construction of fertiliser, methanol, petrochemical plants.

GACL appoints Uhde India for sodium chlorate plant (September) Uhde India has been appointed by Gujarat Alkalies and Chemicals Ltd (GACL), one of India’s leading manufacturers of caustic soda – chlorine, to render Engineering, Procurement, Construction Management (EPCM) services for its upcoming 20,000 TPA sodium chlorate plant at its chemical complex at Dahej, Gujarat. The scope of the agreement covers project management, basic & detailed engineering, procurement services, proprietary supplies and supervision services for erection and commissioning of the plant. The sodium chlorate plant will use the ThyssenKrupp Uhde Electrolysis process.

January 2012 | Chemical World

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NEWSMAKERS OF 2011

Green Projects Shell inks pact for carbon dioxide storage project in Canada

IOC and Department of Biotechnology to set up bioenergy research centre

( July) Shell has signed agreement with the Governments of Alberta and Canada to secure $ 865 million in funding for its Quest Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project in Canada. The Quest Project will capture and permanently store more than one million tonne of CO2 deep underground per year from Shell’s Scotford Upgrader near Edmonton, Alberta, which processes heavy oil from the Athabasca oil sands. Quest would be the first application of CCS technology for an oil sands upgrading operation.

(August) Indian Oil Corporation (IOC) has inked a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) with the Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Government of India, to set up a DBT-IOC Centre for Advanced Research on Bioenergy. “Second generation biofuels will fill the gap in energy space in the future,” stated Dr M K Bhan, Secretary, DBT. However, he emphasised on the need to pool the talents not only within the country but also across the globe to tap and converge the strengths of all disciplines of biological sciences to make the venture a great success.

Polymers Kemrock Industries forms JV with DSM

Huntsman acquires Laffans Petrochemicals

(March) Kemrock Industries & Exports Ltd, one of the leading manufacturers of reinforced polymer composites, has formed a joint venture with the Netherlands-based Euro 9-billion DSM Composite Resins AG for the production of specialty composite resins in India. DSM and Kemrock together will invest $ 25 million in the JV. Both partners will utilise each other’s strengths, whereby DSM will focus on the supply of innovative specialised composite resin solutions to the fastgrowing Indian market, while Kemrock will concentrate on the production of high-end composite parts.

(April) The American chemicals major Huntsman Corporation announced its takeover of Gujarat-based chemicals producer Laffans Petrochemicals, and has also taken the ownership of the company’s 60 kilo tonne ethylene oxide derivatives facility at Ankleshwar. The $ 9-billion Texas-based Huntsman is a global manufacturer and marketer of differentiated chemicals to industries such as chemicals, plastics, automotive and aviation, among others. Huntsman India has its facilities at Navi Mumbai and has been having a technical collaboration with Laffans for the past two years.

Solvay makes $ 4.8 billion offer to buy Rhodia

Eastman to acquire Sterling Chemicals

(April) Belgian firm Solvay SA has agreed to buy Rhodia SA of France for Euro 3.4 billion ($ 4.8 billion) in cash to add specialty chemicals spanning ingredients for moisturisers and car-part polymers. Including debt, the deal has an enterprise value of Euro 6.6 billion. The deal ends Solvay’s year-long search for a takeover after it sold its drugs unit to its US partner, Abbott Laboratories, in September 2009 for Euro 4.5 billion. The deal will significantly lift Solvay’s exposure to emerging markets, increasing its percentage of sales from fast-growing economies to 40 per cent.

( July) Eastman Chemical Company has acquired Sterling Chemicals Inc, a single site North American petrochemical producer, for $ 100 million in cash. The transaction includes Sterling’s plasticiser and acetic acid manufacturing assets in Texas City. Eastman plans to modify and restart Sterling’s currently idled plasticiser manufacturing facility to produce non-phthalate plasticisers, including Eastman 168 non-phthalate plasticisers. This additional capacity will enable the company’s Performance Chemicals and Intermediates (PCI) segment to serve the growing market demand for non-phthalate alternatives.

Rubber Chemicals LANXESS makes first acquisition in Argentina ( January) LANXESS’ wholly-owned subsidiary Rhein Chemie has acquired Argentina-based Darmex SA – a leading manufacturer of release agents and curing bladders for the tyre industry. As a result of the acquisition, Rhein Chemie will become one of the world’s leading providers of release agents for rubber products in a highly fragmented market. It will also acquire Darmex’s bladder technology in Latin America, which is a key production hub for leading tyre manufacturers. Darmex’s production sites are located near to Brazil, in which LANXESS has significantly expanded its presence in the last few years.

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Chemical World | January 2012

WACKER commissions silicone rubber compounding plant near Kolkata ( June) The Munich-based chemical group WACKER has commissioned a compounding plant at its joint venture site Wacker Metroark Chemicals Pvt Ltd (WMC) near Kolkata for the manufacture of ready-to-use silicone elastomers. The plant is designed for an annual production volume of several thousand metric tonne and can be expanded in stages as demand requires. It is intended to supply high-quality silicone compounds faster and more flexibly to India’s strongly growing economy.


NEWSMAKERS OF 2011

Specialty Chemicals PI Industries partners with Sony for R&D

DRT acquires Crown Chemicals

( January) PI Industries Ltd (PI), one of the leading Indian agri-input & custom synthesis company, inaugurated the PI-Sony Research Centre at Udaipur. Salil Singhal, Chairman, PI Industries Ltd, said, “It is a matter of pride for PI to be associated with a global technology leader like Sony Corporation. PI and Sony will jointly carry out research in the area of synthetic organic chemicals for applications in the electronics industry.” This laboratory is part of PI’s R&D facilities at Udaipur and the first-of-its-kind where Sony Corporation will jointly conduct research in partnership with PI.

(April) One of the global leaders in the development of rosin and turpentine extracted from pine resin, DRT has announced the purchase of shares in Crown Chemicals, specialising in the manufacture of synthetic piperonal. As per estimates, around 5 million trees are cut down each year to meet the worldwide demand for piperonal, and the equivalent of one football field of forest area is destroyed to yield 100 kg of this substance. These alarming figures drove Crown Chemicals to focus its efforts on developing a synthetic route to manufacture piperonal.

Granules India and Ajinomoto OmniChem form strategic JV

AkzoNobel to acquire China’s leading specialty surfactant producer

( July) Granules India Ltd, a vertically integrated pharmaceutical manufacturer, and Ajinomoto OmniChem, a leading producer of fine chemicals for the pharmaceutical industry, announced a joint venture ( JV) to offer high-value active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and intermediates to pharmaceutical companies. The new company, Granules OmniChem Pvt Ltd, will provide value through a unique contract manufacturing platform that will benefit through Granules’ technological capabilities. Granules OmniChem will operate its facility in the Pharmacity SEZ zone in Vishakhapatnam (Vizag).

( July) AkzoNobel plans to further enhance its manufacturing footprint in Asia by acquiring Boxing Oleochemicals, which is one of the leading suppliers of nitrile amines and derivatives in Asia. “This is an excellent opportunity, which couples our strategic ambition to accelerate growth in Asia with our commitment to locate production closer to our customers. Boxing’s leading market position in amines will complement our growing specialty surfactant business in Asia,” said Rob Frohn, Executive Committee Member, Specialty Chemicals, AkzoNobel.

Miscellaneous DuPont to acquire Danisco for $ 6.3 billion

Berkshire Hathaway to acquire Lubrizol for $ 9.7 billion

( January) DuPont has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Danisco, for $ 5.8 billion in cash and assumption of $ 500 million of Danisco net debt. On closing, this transaction will establish DuPont as a leader in industrial biotechnology with science-intensive innovations that address global challenges in food production and reduced fossil fuel consumption. “Danisco is a premier company, a long-time successful partner of DuPont and a proven innovator committed to sustainable growth. It has attractive, market-driven science businesses that offer clear synergies with DuPont nutrition & health and applied biosciences,” said Ellen Kullman, Chairman & CEO, DuPont.

(March) Berkshire Hathaway Inc and The Lubrizol Corporation have announced a definitive agreement for Berkshire Hathaway to acquire 100 per cent of outstanding Lubrizol shares for $ 135 per share in an all-cash transaction. The transaction, which was unanimously approved by the Board of Directors of each company, is valued at approximately $ 9.7 billion, making it one of the largest acquisitions in Berkshire Hathaway history. Warren Buffett, Chief Executive Officer, Berkshire Hathaway, said, “Lubrizol is exactly the sort of company with which we would like to partner – the global leader in several market applications.”

Ecolab to buy Nalco for $ 5.4 billion

PolyOne to buy ColorMatrix for $ 486 million

( July) Ecolab Inc (ECL), one of the largest makers of cleaning chemicals for hotels & restaurants, agreed to acquire Nalco Holding Co for $ 5.4 billion to add industrial water-treatment services. “We expect stronger growth than either company can achieve individually,” said Douglas M Baker, CEO, ECL. He added, “It positions us well to meet the increasing demand for water and resolve water-scarcity challenges that the world is going to face.” Erik Fyrwald, CEO, Nalco, who will continue to run Nalco units after the merger, said the decision to merge evolved from discussions with Baker about potential collaborations.

(October) The US-based chemicals company, PolyOne Corp, will buy ColorMatrix Group, a maker of colourants and other additives for plastics, for $ 486 million. Based in Berea, Ohio, ColorMatrix is a leading specialty provider of liquid colourants and additives for diverse segments, including rigid beverage & food packaging, industrial extrusion, performance moulding, wire, cable, fibre and silicone rubber markets. ‘’With the addition of ColorMatrix, more than 50 per cent of PolyOne’s operating income will now be derived from our specialty businesses, compared to only 2 per cent in 2005,” said Stephen Newlin, Chairman, President and CEO, PolyOne.

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Chemical World | January 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

INDUSTRIAL GASES

COLLABORATION

Air Products receives $ 50 million contract in India

BPCL to form joint venture with LP Chemicals

Air Products & Chemicals Inc announced that its JV in India – INOX Air Products Ltd has signed a $ 50 million long-term contract with Posco Maharashtra Steel Pvt Ltd (PMSPL) to supply on-site nitrogen and hydrogen gases to its new facility located in Vile Bhagad, Maharashtra. The site will be Posco’s second steel galvanising project outside Korea. The automobile industry is the primary target market for PMSPL in India. INOX Air Products will build and operate a high purity nitrogen plant and a steam methane reformer (SMR) hydrogen plant designed to meet the specific requirements of PMSPL’s facility in Maharashtra. Both the nitrogen plant and the SMR are product offerings from

Air Products’ PRISM gas generation portfolio. The plants are all scheduled to come on stream between late 2012 and early 2013. In December 2010, the company announced four new merchant gases facilities and a long-term on-site supply agreement for nitrogen and hydrogen with Saint Gobain Glass in Rajasthan. These projects included three ASUs and an SMR from PRISM portfolio. Global markets currently served by Air Products’ entire PRISM line of gas generation systems include glass, steel, electronics and semiconductors, non-ferrous metals, metals processing, chemicals, food processing and packaging, and energy production & processing.

NEW FACILIT Y

SCG-DOW Group starts HPPO plant in Thailand SCG-Dow Group, a joint venture between The Dow Chemical Company and Siam Cement Group, has finalised the start-up of its new propylene oxide (PO) facility in Thailand by successfully completing its full capacity performance test. The world-scale plant, located within the Asia Industrial Estates (AIE) site near Map Ta Phut, Thailand, has a name plate capacity of 390 kilotonne per annum (KTA) of PO via the innovative hydrogen peroxide to propylene oxide (HPPO) technology. “The successful start-up of this environmentally advanced and complex technology shows the innovation power, project execution and operational strength of Dow,” said Holger Baer, Global Manufacturing and Technology Director, Dow Propylene Oxide/Propylene Glycol. Cholanat Yanaranop, President, SCG Chemicals Company Ltd, said, “This HPPO plant will add value to propylene from the joint venture cracker in Thailand.”

Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd (BPCL) is planning a deal with the UK’s LP Chemicals for a maiden foray into petrochemicals. A senior BPCL official said the state-run company would form a joint venture with LP Chemicals, based in Winsford off Cheshire, to set up a petrochemical plant at its Kochi refinery in Kerala. LP Chemicals manufacture and distribute laboratory chemicals & veterinary chemicals to customer specification. The investment by BPCL is expected to be in the tune of ` 13,000 crore and the partner will bring in ` 6,000 crore. The company is looking at 2015 as the deadline. BPCL is engaged in discussions with the Kerala Government for concession on the investment in the planned petrochemical unit. R K Singh, Chairman and Managing Director, BPCL, had announced the company’s plans to spend ` 40,000 crore in the next five years to set up a petrochemical plant at the Kochi refinery to produce niche products, expand the capacity of existing refineries, and boost gas marketing, exploration & production. The company is also working on a pre-feasibility report to set up a liquefied natural gas terminal, with an investment of around $ 1 billion. The terminal will have a capacity of five to six million tonne and it is working on two locations, one on the east coast and the other on the west. Besides, BPCL is planning to expand its Kochi and Mumbai refineries.

SIMULATION CONTRACT

KBR bags contract from Matix Fertilizers KBR has been awarded a contract by Matix Fertilizers and Chemicals Ltd to perform a dynamic simulation study for the complete steam system at its grassroots Panagarh fertiliser complex in West Bengal. KBR will also deliver an Operator Training Simulator (OTS) for the ammonia plant system to validate the plant’s controls and safety logic design, besides providing initial and on-going training to operators. For the dynamic simulation study, KBR will develop a detailed model of the Panagarh fertiliser complex steam

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system, perform agreed cases and scenarios, and provide a final study report inclusive of all results and recommendations. This simulation will enable Matix to validate the design of critical plant systems such as auxiliary boilers, letdown valves, and controls, and validate operating procedures such as start ups, turn downs, & the handling of process upsets. KBR will also deliver an OTS system for one of the largest capacity ammonia units at Matix to ensure a safe, fast, efficient start up. The OTS system will ensure best energy consumption in the ammonia process unit and support continued profitable & sustained ammonia plant operations.


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

CONSTRUCTION CHEMICALS

RECOGNITION

Dow Corning launches Quality Bond initiative in India

Dow Corning officials at the launch of Quality Bond™ initiative

Dow Corning, a global leader in silicones, silicon-based technology and innovation, has launched its Quality Bond programme for the rapidly growing Indian structural glazing and insulating glass market. This initiative takes silicone bonding and sealing to a new level through the introduction of a set of services & commitments, along with technical training. It brings together all members in the construction project value chain, such as façade consultants and design engineers, fabricators & processors, developers & architects. The Quality Bond programme provides in-house and onsite training to fabricators & insulating

glass processors. Arturo Cuellar, Global Market Leader for Construction, Dow Corning, commented, “Our Indian customers demand creative and worldclass design solutions that help fulfil their requirements for energy-efficiency and long-term sustainability. The programme will further enable the Indian market to benefit from enhanced performance, safety and durability in buildings, thanks to Dow Corning’s world-class products and enhanced services.” Certified Quality Bond members will benefit from Dow Corning’s active support in implementing strict quality control and assurance regimes, along with testing and regular audits. The initiative will also enhance knowledge transfer to partners in the value chain, with early-phase material selection and project support. In addition, Dow Corning will provide certified members with industry referrals, thus helping enhance their business-to-business marketing and networking efforts.

Inaugural edition of BCTA gets thunderous response To celebrate the International Year of Chemistry 2011 in India, Tata Chemicals instituted the Best Chemistry Teacher Award (BCTA). This award appreciated the efforts of exemplary individuals across the country, involved in teaching chemistry and its allied components at various educational levels. Speaking on the initiative, Murali Sastry, Chief Scientific Officer, Tata Chemicals, said, “As a chemistry professional, I am glad to be associated with the BCTA initiative that addresses the critical need to recognise the role our teachers played in shaping minds.” Besides taking into account the experience and expertise of the teachers, this award also focussed on innovative methods in teaching chemistry. It took into cognisance contributions made by individuals towards making chemistry enjoyable and promoting overall scientific literacy. Mahua Roy

GREEN TECHNOLOGY

ULTRAFILTRATION

BASF funds biomass technology

Koch Membrane Systems to install new wastewater recycling system in China

BASF has invested $ 30 million in biomassto-sugar start-up Renmatix. BASF’s investment was part of a $ 50 million round of funding that included existing investors Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. BASF said the technology, dubbed Plantrose, makes it possible to produce industrial sugar in large quantities and at competitive cost from non-edible plant mass. Industrial sugars can be used to produce basic chemical products and intermediates. Renmatix has found an innovative way to cheaply and quickly produce cellulosic sugar, a building block for biofuels & chemicals, without using expensive enzymes, which are traditionally used to break down biomass. To date, Renmatix has only demonstrated its technology on a small scale in a pilot facility capable of converting three dry tonne of cellulosic biomass to sugar per day. But the company has commercialscale aspirations.

Koch Membrane Systems, Inc (KMS) has been selected to supply membranes for a large-scale wastewater recycling system for Yingkou Medium Plate Co Ltd, in Yingkou City, China. The project will recycle the plant’s wastewater to meet strict government discharge regulations and to conserve the region’s fresh water supply. KMS will supply 832 TARGA® 10-inch cartridges as well as the necessary engineering support for the Yingkou project, working in cooperation with Capital Engineering & Research Incorporation Ltd (CERI), the engineering firm responsible for designing and building the system. The system is designed to handle an annual average flow of 80,000 cubic metre per day. Start-up is scheduled for early 2012. “This will be our second

time using KMS TARGA utrafiltration membranes for a wastewater recovery project. I am confident of the success of this project based on our past experience,” said Yang Gaofeng, Vice General Manager, CERI, and Project Manager for the Yingkou system. KMS TARGA membranes have been widely used in China’s heavy industries such as power, steel, and petrochemicals because they offer a cost-effective, safe, high-quality water solution for a variety of ultrafiltration applications ranging from surface water treatment to wastewater recovery. Yingkou Medium Plate Co Ltd processes 1.5 million tonne of steel plates annually, and maintains operations in iron-casting, continuous casting, milling, oxygen abstracting and power generation.

January 2012 | Chemical World

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

SPECIALT Y CHEMICALS

OM Group acquires Rahu Catalytics OM Group Inc has purchased Rahu Catalytics Ltd, the developer of a unique iron-ligand based chemistry for use in environment-friendly coatings, composites and inks, from Unilever Ventures and Management. The transaction includes all related intellectual property rights and master patents, as well as manufacturing and supply agreements. Since its inception in 2006, Rahu Catalytics has focussed on the need for solutions that incorporate more renewable materials and deliver performance at lower energy, water and waste costs in the coatings industry. Since early 2009, the company has operated under an exclusive commercial agreement with OM Group with regard to its Borchi® OXY-Coat product line, which is being utilised by the market leaders in the global coatings industry. “We are excited to formally incorporate this innovative product into our portfolio of sustainable solutions for the coatings industry. It will allow us to further solidify our leadership position in the growing coatings industry,” said Joseph Scaminace, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, OM Group.

INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS

Clariant offers cost-optimisation products at Paperex

(L-R) Andy Walti, U S Shashikeerthy and Adrian Fox, Business Development Manager, UK, Clariant Chemicals, at the Paperex 2011 Exhibition

Clariant showcased the cost optimisation benefits of its colourants, optical brightening agents and chemicals to the user industry at the recently held Paperex event in New Delhi. Its specialty chemicals experts presented latest cost-effective solutions that are designed to enhance papermakers’ products and processes. The important products like new optical brightening agent (OBA) Leucophor XL, Cartaspers PSM, Cartaspers SCH etc were wellreceived by the people. Speaking on the benefits, Andy Walti, Head, Regional Sales, AsiaPacific, Clariant, said, “Higher cost pressures do not have to lead to quality

limitations for paper and cardboard. Our cost-efficient solutions add real value to papermakers’ products and processes, & with our latest innovations, we are looking forward to supporting the Indian paper industry in optimising performance, quality and efficiency.” The paper industry is one of the important segments for Clariant, and from time to time, it comes out with new products. “Clariant’s innovative approach brings life to paper through its various offerings in the colouring, whitening, strengthening, and deposit controlling segments. All these valueaddition and cost-efficient applications follow the path of long-term sustainability, which Clariant believes in sharing with all its customers,” explained U S Shashikeerthy, Head - BU Paper Specialties, Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd. All the products offer a range of benefits to the user industries. For example, Cartaspers PSM minimises stickies, and pitch on sieves and felts by passivation, and thereby increases machine running time.

AU TOMATION

APPOINTMENT

Rockwell Automation introduces tool for easy RoI calculation

Thirumalai Chemicals appoints R Parthasarathy as MD

Rockwell Automation recently developed a free Safety Return on Investment (RoI) Tool in partnership with J B Titus, a machine safety consultant. The new webbased addresses manufacturers’ need for a tool to help quantify potential savings and productivity gains from new investments in safety. “An upfront investment in safety programmes and safeguarding systems can help significantly reduce the financial and employee impact of incidents in a manufacturing facility,” said Mark Eitzman, Safety Market Development Manager, Rockwell Automation. “Still, engineers, plant managers and EH&S professionals have struggled to accurately cost-justify investments in safety. With the new Safety RoI Tool, they can calculate the costs of an incident and see the financial benefits of implementing a proactive safety programme.” Rockwell Automation aims to continuously update the tool to keep it relevant for users, and plans to add a category for quality improvement. “Machine safety is fast becoming a core function of an automation system that delivers significant business and economic value while boosting productivity and the bottom line. The RoI Tool is easy to use and quickly delivers credible proof that safety investments can help protect workers and yield financial benefits,” said J B Titus, machine safety consultant. Nuris Ismail, Senior Research Associate, Aberdeen Group, noted, “The Safety RoI Tool is unique because few tools are available for a manufacturer to calculate the best course of action to protect their workers and also their bottom line.” 18

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R Parthasarathy has been appointed the Managing Director by the Board of Directors of Thirumalai Chemicals. He will work closely with D R Dhariwal, CEO,Thirumalai Chemicals to grow the businesses of the company and to improve performance. While explaining the growth plan of the company, Parthasarathy said, “The company is working towards significant growth both in its bulk chemicals, and in its specialty businesses, which serve the food and cosmetic segments in India and abroad.” Parthasarathy has been with Thirumalai Chemicals since 1974. He is currently the President of the Indian Chemical Council.


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

GREEN CHEMICALS

RESEARCH INITIATIVE

Bio-based chemicals industry to undergo consolidation phase

Praxair India inaugurates R&D facility in Bengaluru

The global bio-based chemicals and materials industry is likely to witness consolidation by 2016, according to a report by Lux Research titled ‘Global bio-based chemical capacity springs to scale’. Desire by major and up-and-coming majors to possess strategic technology will drive this trend, said Kalib Kersh, Analyst, Lux Research, and lead author of the report. The bio-based chemicals and materials industry, carefully nurtured from labs to factories, has reached a tipping point, & capacity will double in market potential to $ 19.7 billion in 2016, as its global manufacturing capacity zooms 140 per cent, stated the report. This consolidation is like to result in big chemical firms buying out small-tomedium manufacturers (& technology developers) of bio-based chemicals. The process of mergers & acquisitions in this space has already begun and some of the recent examples include: PTT PLC acquiring a controlling interest in NatureWorks; Eastman Chemical buying TerraVitae (a biobutanol technology company); Arkema acquiring Suzhou Hipro Polymers and Casda Biomaterials (renewable nylon companies); Amyris buying Draths (a company with several platforms for production of bio-based chemicals, including paraxylene); etc.

Kersh said, “Technologies that are not easily replicated in-house and serve strategic purposes for growth would entice the prospective buyers. We see acquisition of companies with some commercial production in most cases, of monomers for both bioplastics and bio-based drop-in replacements of petrochemicals (PTT PLC’s purchase of NatureWorks and Arkema’s bionylon acquisitions, respectively). Also, in a couple of cases (Draths & TerraVitae) acquisitions are more likely motivated by access to IP and assets.” According to the Lux Research report, the global capacity for 17 major bio-based materials doubled to 3.8 million tonne this year, but over the next five years it will climb to 9.2 million tonne, bringing critical scale to an industry poised to revolutionise the chemicals market. Rakesh Rao

Praxair India has set up a new state-ofthe-art research and technology centre at Hoskote, Bengaluru. The facility will provide a full range of R&D capabilities for various industries such as metal fabrication, pharmaceutical, steel and water treatment. “We supply more than gases to our customers; we provide them advanced applications technologies that enhance productivity, improve quality, reduce costs and implement environmentf riendly options,” said Raymond P Roberge, Senior Vice President & Chief Technology Officer, Praxair Inc. He further added, “In India, we have a growing team of engineers and scientists with expertise in meeting the requirements of our customers’ processes. This centre will significantly boost our capabilities in India, and also be a key part of our global technology organisation.” Speaking on the occasion, Asit Gangopadhyay, Managing Director, Praxair India, said, “Praxair India is witnessing strong growth, thanks to our customer base across various industries. The new R&D centre will strengthen our customer focus and develop indigenous technology specific to meet the challenges and needs of our customers in India.”

INNOVATIVE SOLU TIONS

RESINS

WACKER develops new adhesive for wood

Ion Exchange introduces IONREF range of process chemicals for refinery sector

WACKER has launched an unique product called VINNAPAS® DPX 271. With the new WACKER binder, the next generation of adhesives is already in the starting blocks, ready to enable the processing of the world’s oldest, most natural and versatile medium to this day – wood – in an even more environment-friendly and sustainable manner. According to Dr Massimo Venier, Head, R&D, Durante & Vivan (the Italian adhesives manufacturer), new WACKER dispersions are free of formaldehyde that provides an additional reason for replacing conventional binders. VINNAPAS® DPX 271 also helps to prevent unsightly discolourations.

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Ion Exchange (India) Ltd, in a bid to assist oil refineries to boost their process efficiency, has launched IONREF range of process chemicals and fuel additives.The products will also be instrumental for ensuring overall profitability of refinery operations. Together with the company’s total water management prerogative, the products will help refineries meet the challenges of processing crude and provide a total solution for the entire refinery process network. The process chemicals such as demulsifiers, dewpoint neutralisers, corrosion inhibitors/filmers, etc, apply for specific function in oil refineries. For instance, demulsifiers aids desalter operation and also reduces water in crudes. Similarly, dewpoint neutralisers are meant for application in crude distillation and vacuum distillation overhead units for pH and corrosion control. The function of corrosion inhibitors/filmers is to protect the overhead system from corrosion.


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

Dual bulk bag filling system allows high-capacity filling of bags The dual bulk bag filling system from Flexicon integrates two SwingDown® bulk bag fillers with a Flexicon pallet dispenser and powered roller conveyors, allowing safe, high-capacity filling of bulk bags of all popular sizes. Programmable controls allow the fillers to operate separately or simultaneously, filling bags of the same size or two different sizes. When a filling cycle is initiated by push button or contact closure, pallet dispenser forks lower the stack of pallets onto the roller conveyor, withdraw from the bottom pallet, and raise the remaining pallets, allowing the roller conveyor – equipped with photoelectric eyes – to move the dispensed pallet into a position below the filling station. The bag connection frame of the Swing-Down fill heads lower, and then pivot to a vertical position, allowing an operator at floor level to safely and quickly attach bag straps to automated latches, slide the bag spout over an inflatable spout seal, and press a spout seal inflation button. The system then automatically pivots the bag connection frame back to horizontal, raises the entire fill head, inflates the bag to remove creases, fills the bag at a high rate, finishes filling accurately at dribble feed rate, deflates the spout seal, releases the bag loops, raises the fill head to disengage the spout, rolls the bag out of the filling area, and rolls a new pallet into place to begin another cycle. An annular gap inside the fill head spout directs displaced air and dust during the filling operation to a single point connection. All system components are available, constructed to industrial, food, dairy and pharmaceutical standards. The system is offered with the company’s own mechanical or pneumatic material delivery system integrated with the user’s upstream process equipment or other material source.

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Liqui-Cel capacity increase provides further advantages for industrial degassing Recently, Liqui-Cel product line of Membrana got a fillip with the increase of its capacity from 400 gpm to 550 gpm (125m3). The increase in capacity has many advantages; it allows degassing systems to be built using fewer contactors and connections, resulting in a smaller footprint and reduced capital expense. By piping multiple contactors together in parallel, the contactors also can handle larger flow rates. The 14x40 Liqui-Cel Membrane Contactor utilises a polypropylene hollow fibre and PVC housing, which contains 4,015 sq ft (373 sq m) of membrane area. With a pressure rating of 4.1 bar (60 psig), the units are suitable for industrial degassing applications with stringent capacity requirements, including digital printing, analytical/ biotechnology, semiconductor, power, pharmaceutical, food and beverage, & other industries. Liqui-Cel Membrane Contactors offer a modular degassing option and utilise thousands of Celgard microporous, hollow fibres that are knitted into an array and wound around a distribution tube with a central baffle. During operation, the liquid flows over the shellside (outside) of the hollow fibres. Besides, a patented Extra-Flow design incorporates a baffle in the middle of the contactor, which directs liquid radially across the array.

Grinding, sizing get easier with centrifugal impact mills from Munson The versatile Munson Centrifugal Impact Mill provides a simple, inexpensive means of grinding, sizing, de-agglomerating and homogenising material, and can be employed as an effective infestation destroyer. It yields particle sizes down to 325 mesh and is primarily used for friable materials. Available in #304 stainless steel, abrasive-resistant and standard carbon steel design, the centrifugal impact mill operates without screens, hammers, knives or rolls. Metered material is gravity fed through the centrally located inlet of the ‘stator disc’. Centrifugal forces accelerate the material and launch it into the impact zone. The action created by the stationary and rotating pins creates a ‘treacherous path’ for the material to pass through. Achieving the desired tight particle size distribution is obtained by controlling the rotor speed. Varying the rotor speed between a few hundred rpm up to 5400 rpm provides the flexibility to use the machine as a coarse grinding or de-agglomerating unit as well as a fine grinding mill. Whether the machine is used for cracking wheat, grinding iron oxide powder, creating powdered sugar or as a cellulose fibre conditioner, large production throughput rates can be attained in an inexpensive, compact machine. It also fits in neatly after most flaking operations.


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

LEWA ecosmart metering pump with PVC suits for use in aggressive chemicals Developing the diaphragm metering pump was itself an achievement by LEWA. This resulted in solution for medium-sized requirements on a ‘smaller’ investment budget. To cover a wide range of applications, in parallel with the high-quality components – the stainless steel pump head (316L, alloy 20), the PTFE sandwich diaphragm, diaphragm monitoring and the diaphragm protection system (DPS) – four sizes up to 300 l/hr were developed. Typical applications range from refineries to plastics industry. Now, the company has come out with a new option with a PVC pump head added to the line – the ecosmart. It can even be used in applications that require good resistance against highly aggressive chemicals – including industrial water treatment systems, for example when sodium hypochloride is in use. The PVC pump head can be used at pressures up to 12 bar (stainless steel: up to 80 bar) and at temperatures of up to 60° C (stainless steel: up to 120° C). Regardless of the implementation of the pump head, the metering quantity in all ecosmart metering pumps can either be adjusted manually using handwheel on the gear box (manual stroke adjustment, changing the stroke length of the piston), electrically with an electric stroke actuator or by speed control of the drive motor using a variable frequency drive (VFD). “Every user, who wants to integrate an ecosmart into a process using integration in automated control systems (DCS), can either use the electric stroke adjustment with the servo drive or use a frequency-controlled motor. The result is the same either way. The ecosmart is adjusted precisely to the metering quantity currently needed – the linear relation between the stroke length and the motor speed to the flow rate makes the pump control particularly easy. Using these control types, it also meets the highest requirements with respect to energy-efficient machine selection,” explains Thomas Bökenbrink, Product Manager, Lewa. Stroke actuators and VFDs have the I/O interfaces needed for connection to a DCS. ATEX designs for installation in hazardous areas are available as option.

ACC develops user-friendly Particle-Sizer fine grinding mill The Particle-Sizer from Atlantic Coast Crushers (ACC) Inc is designed for simple disassembly so that maintenance, cleaning, or replacing sizing cage can be accomplished quickly and easily. For the majority of its size reduction applications, a ‘free-flowing’ output size is acceptable. However, a significant number of applications require the process material to be reduced to a fine powder. ACC offers the Particle-Sizer to meet this need. The product finds application in chemical, pharmaceutical, food processing, pulp & paper, pharmaceutical, plastics industries, etc. The Particle-Sizer is a compact, high output device that can be used with moderately oversized materials or in combination with its other equipment to reduce large chunks or lumps to a fine powder. The Particle-Sizer uses two highspeed rotary knives to sweep and cut against a series of stationary bars mounted in a sizing cage. This cutting action can reduce materials to 30 mesh or less, depending on material characteristics and the sizing cage spacing. Sizing cages are available in several different slot combinations to provide different output particle size distributions.

BICHLOR Technology enables increased operability and good pack sealing With BICHLOR, INEOS Technologies has effectively re-engineered familiar bipolar principles; the unique construction has resulted in a new generation of state-of-the-art technology with low power consumption and long component lifetimes. BICHLOR is a modular electrolyser – a series of discrete modules consisting of anode, membrane and cathode. These sealed individual modules can be removed from the electrolyser without affecting the other modules. The modular design provides increased operability and good pack sealing that is essential for reliable operation. The design also allows for maintenance work on the individual

modules in workshop controlled conditions, rather than in the main cell room, as required in the filter press design of electrolyser. This has a major influence in reducing the resultant plant downtime. Between 20-90 modules can be connected to form a pack; two packs connected in series make up an electrolyser. BICHLOR has an effective membrane area of 2.895 m2 and is designed for operation at current densities up to 8 kA/m 2 . This allows for continuous operation at 6 kA/m2 and if necessary at higher current densities in the future. The technology provides benefits like long component lifetimes, easy operation by design, and low voltage high current efficiency by design.

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TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY OFFERED As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration. Activated carbon An Iranian firm is willing to offer activated carbon from coconut shells. Areas of application Food processing, pharmaceuticals, etc Forms of transfer Technology licensing

industries is offering precipitated calcium carbonate and turnkey projects for the same. Areas of application Plastics, paper, paints, rubber, inks Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services

Cresyl phosphate/tri phenyl

Phosphate esters

An Indian firm is offering consultancy for manufacturing plasticisers. Areas of application Photo films, chemicals, plastic industry, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy

An Indian firm is offering technology for manufacturing phosphate esters like tributyl phosphate. Area of application Specialty chemicals Forms of transfer Joint venture

Ethanol An Iranian company is offering ethanol from molasses using the fermentation of sacharomyces cerevisiae. Ethyl alcohol is widely used for making many organic chemicals. Areas of application Chemical and energy industries Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Furfuryl alcohol technology An Indian firm offers technology for producing furfuryl alcohol from furfural by liquid hydrogenation as well as vapour hydrogenation, with a capacity of 6,000 tpa to 24,000 tpa. Areas of application Furan polymers, sealants & cements, urea-formaldehyde, & phenolic resins and foundry cores Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, technology licensing

Precipitated calcium carbonate An Indian consulting company for the chemicals, minerals & food processing 24

Chemical World | January 2012

Sodium hydrosulfite An Iranian company is willing to manufacture sodium hydrosulfite using chemical compounds. It is widely used as a stripping agent in dyes and in chemical industry. Area of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Sodium silicate from rice husk ash An Indian company is offering support for a complete project for production sodium silicate from rice husk ash (RHA). The technology is versatile to produce sodium silicate of different SiO2/Na2O ratio. Areas of application Soaps & detergents, adhesive, pulp & paper, water proofing, construction chemicals, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, equipment supply, turnkey, etc

Sodium sulfide An Iranian firm is willing to offer sodium sulfide, which is used mainly in textile industry, paper mill, artificial silk and curriery. Areas of application Leather industry, textiles, curriery industries, paper mills, etc Forms of transfer Turnkey

Synthesis routes for organic chemicals An Indian firm is offering consultancy in design of synthesis routes for organic chemicals. Areas of application Pharma industry, specialty chemicals, plant protection chemicals, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy

Transformer oil unit An Indian company is willing to offer consultancy for making a transformer oil unit with domestic coal from its wastes. Area of application Transformers Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services

Wasteless processing techniques An Indian company is willing to offer consultancy for wasteless processing techniques for the chemical & packaging industries. Areas of application Packaging industry, transformer oil manufacturing industry, chlor alkali projects Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY REQUESTED Calcium carbonate A Saudi Arabian company needs the technical know-how for producing calcium carbonate from limestone. Areas of application Industries like chemical, textile, etc Forms of transfer Others

Glyoxal An Indian company is looking to switch the production technique for manufacturing 40 per cent glyoxal from its existing acetaldehyde-based method to the MEG-based glyoxal production. Areas of application Pharma & textile Forms of transfer Others

Inorganic chemicals An Indian company is interested in seeking the technology & process knowhow for production of potassium nitrate, chromium acetate, and magnesium hydroxide suspension. The company already produces inorganic chemicals and wants to add several other items. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Others

Lime An Indian company seeks to adopt new cost-effective technologies, which can

reduce carbon emissions and earn carbon credits, for manufacturing lime. Areas of application Quick lime and hydrated lime Forms of transfer Others

Lime plant A group of businessmen in Zambia is interested in setting up an 800 t/d of quick lime and 200 t/d of hydrated lime plant. Area of application Mining Forms of transfer Others

Manufacture of sodium hydrosulfite A company based in Pakistan is interested in establishing a joint venture for the manufacture of sodium hydrosulfite in Pakistan with either a Chinese or European manufacturer, who has the technological know-how and expertise in the field. Areas of application Industries like textile, paper and food Forms of transfer Others

Quaternary ammonium chloride An Indonesia-based company is planning to diversify into manufacturing of quaternary ammonium chloride. It is seeking technology along with the

supply of critical plant and machinery for the manufacture of the chemical 3-chloro-2hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride that is produced from epichhlorohydrin. Area of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Technical knowhow, consultancy

Solvent dyes An Indian company has recently installed a manufacturing capacity of 2,400 mtpa and is looking to diversify its product range by including various solvent dyes in its product portfolio. The company is seeking process consultancy for this project. Areas of application Plastics, petroleum, solvents, etc Forms of transfer Others

Treatment of pollutants discharged during PTA production A Chinese organisation is looking for a recycling and pollution-free treatment technology to tackle the wastewater, exhaust gas, waste slag and noises generated in PTA production, thereby shifting from reduction of pollutant discharge to zero-discharge. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, etc

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016, Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org

For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer/seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

Share and Solicit Technology The mission of Chemical World is to spread the technology culture. Here is an opportunity to be a part of this endeavour by sending your technology on offer or technology requirements. If you belong to any of these two categories, you are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details for publication. The write-up needs to be as per the format of this section with information about the particular technology offered or requested, its areas of application and forms of transfer. Contact us: Chemical World, Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028 Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672, Fax: 022-3003 4499, Email: chemedit@infomedia18.in

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IN CONVERSATION WITH Diane Kelly

Photo: Joshua Navalkar

“We would like to leverage knowledge and capabilities in India for our global business” …says Diane Kelly, India President, Dow Corning. Since she joined Dow Corning in 1979, her career has spanned positions in both technical and commercial areas, managing a range of industries & regions. In this freewheeling interaction with Rakesh Rao, Kelly explores the business potential of Dow Corning and silicone chemistry in India.

What are your priorities in India? Dow Corning has been serving the Indian region for more than three decades with innovative and proven silicone-based solutions. Market for standard silicone products, which are used for some of the regular applications, is facing increased competition as there are many manufacturers. We would like to concentrate on offering customised solutions for specialised applications where we can add value. One of my priorities is to bring in global technologies that can be used to offer new solutions to Indian customers from sectors such as construction, textile, energy, electronics, personal care, etc. We are in the preliminary stage of identifying these technologies, and are looking at differentiated opportunities in India. Currently, penetration of silicone products in India is low compared to developed countries. Hence, to succeed in India, there is a need to educate customers about how silicone can help them differentiate their products and give a competitive edge in the marketplace.

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Instead of focussing on price, it is important to discuss about the benefits of silicone and how it can make the overall process & product more cost-effective. And to do that, we need to have insight into customers’ requirements and market knowledge.

How do you plan to develop silicone-based chemistry market in India? The usage of silicone-based chemistry in India is low due to lack of knowledge about modern applications of silicone chemistry (such as personal care, renewable energy, etc). To develop the market, one of the most challenging parts is to explain the advantage of silicone-based products in new application areas because silicone chemistry is different from traditionally used chemicals. To increase the awareness about silicone chemistry, we are looking at tie-ups with universities to organise education programmes for silicone chemistry so that students know about the advantage of silicone early in their career. We also want to educate our channel

partners about the different application possibilities with silicone.

Have you identified institutes for collaboration? We are in the process of short-listing institutes for a joint collaborative programme. We have worked with leading institutes like IIT-Bombay, National Chemical Laboratory, etc for some silicone applications. Now, our aim is to adopt a structured approach to these collaborations to make them more fruitful and derive long-term benefits. We would


Diane Kelly

like to leverage knowledge and capabilities in India for not just local customers, but also for our global business.

The Government of India has ambitious plans for renewable energy. Have you drawn any plans to tap this opportunity?

and communicate specific & clear goals for each individual.

How do you manage to get along with people from different cultures?

Setting up of big solar projects is slightly complicated as there are several players involved who need to collaborate with each other for effective implementation. As far as opportunities are concerned, we see many potential areas since our products find applications in most of the subsegments in the solar energy industry. But, we need to understand the requirements and then design our business plan for this sector. At present, many of the products, such as solar modules, panels, etc that are used in the solar energy plant, are not manufactured in India. Once these products are manufactured on a mass scale in India, then more opportunities would come our way.

Being open-minded and having curiosity to know about different cultures & behaviours of people help a lot when I interact with people. Also, when it comes to basic value systems, I fundamentally believe every human being is the same. When you realise this, it becomes much easier to manage customers.

In India, more energy is generated by way of wind than solar. We would like to participate more actively in wind energy sector in India as we see a huge potential.

electronics industry it could be 3-5 years, automotive may be 5-10 years, etc. We have advantage of two-brand strategy. While Dow Corning brands comprise specialty grades, Xiameter offers standardised products at market-driven prices. This strategy has worked for us, as Xiameter business has grown significantly since its launch in 2001.

How should companies handle commodity products without diluting the essence of the specialties business? In general, it has been observed that life cycle of specialty grades is getting shorter. But, the conversion rate of specialty-tocommodity depends on the applications and end-user industries. For example, in

How do you react when your employees do not achieve their assigned goals? First and foremost, I try to understand the reasons for not achieving the targets. The reasons could be: they have not understood the goal or they did not have the skills to achieve it or the goal was not realistic. Then we try to find a solution to it. We value our employees and ensure that they are well-equipped to achieve their assigned tasks.

How do you prioritise goals for your new role?

What is your success mantra?

First, understand the mandate given to you clearly. Then interact with the team and customers to understand the current status & future requirements; put in place a strong leadership team;

First, know your strong points, and second understand what you are passionate about. If you can use your strengths in a job that interests you, then success is bound to follow.

Will the current economic turmoil impact the market? In developed geographies, consumers are not spending much because of the recent

economic developments in these regions. Hence, it might have an impact on the silicone industry. However, we will continue to invest in developing technologies that can offer solutions for the next-generation products such as energy-efficient buildings, renewable energy, etc. Also, we will be focussing on the emerging markets like India, China, Latin America, etc, which are still showing strong growth, for expanding our business. India will be a key market for us in future. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Chemical World

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An invite that rewards as well...

Dear Reader, ‘Chemical World’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the chemical process industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 3000 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 200 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Chemical World’. Authors whose articles are published will receive a complimentary copy of that particular issue and an honorarium cheque. Published by Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘Chemical World’ is the leading monthly magazine exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the chemical process industry (CPI). Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian CPI. Moreover, it offers a broader platform facilitating effective interaction among several fraternities of these industries by enabling them in reaching out to their prospective buyers & sellers through better trade contacts and more business opportunities. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

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T +91 22 3024 5000 D +91 22 3003 4669 F +91 22 3003 4499 E manas@infomedia18.in W www.infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS

EPC INDUSTRY OUTLOOK Poised for a rise, albeit slow .........................................................................32 SAFETYORIENTED PLANT DESIGN Prevention is better than ‘control’.................................................................34 EPC PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES How to select the right vendor? ..................................................................36 EPC VS EPCM What’s in an ‘M’? .........................................................................................38 ROUNDTABLE Are Indian engineering institutes meeting the talent need of EPC industry? ................................................................40

January 2012 | Chemical World

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SPECIAL FOCUS EPC industry outlook

POISED FOR A RISE, ALBEIT SLOW Uncertain global economy, rising interest rates, regulatory bottlenecks, etc are major challenges facing the engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) sector in India. In an interaction with Rakesh Rao, the two industry veterans offer insights into some of these issues and their probable solutions.

Pothen Paul Former Chairman and India Country Manager, Aker Powergas Pvt Ltd

Is the current uncertainty in Europe and other developed countries affecting the EPC industry? P D Samudra (PDS): It will certainly affect the EPC industry globally, as well as in India. In fact, the signs are visible; and several projects that were scheduled to take off are slowly getting delayed. Pothen Paul (PP): Uncertainties always make everyone apprehensive about the future, and cautious about spending 32

Chemical World | January 2012

P D Samudra Executive Director - Sales & Member of the Board, Uhde India Pvt Ltd

money, especially on discretionary purchases. This in turn affects demand and the need for creating additional production capacities. Unfortunately, what is unknown today is how long it will take for the European muddle to resolve and also the direction it might take. Had it been known, for instance, that in two years everything might be back to normal, it would have been a good time for cash-rich organisations to invest and take advantage of competitive prices of capital goods & contract services available now, and be

ready for entering the market as demand picks up again. But, uncertainty about the duration of current downturn, compounded by tight liquidity situation and high cost of funds, makes such decisions difficult. Fortunately, India is rather uniquely placed, because its low export trade dependency insulates it f rom the vagaries of demand shrinkages elsewhere. Moreover, the huge unmet demand for power & all kinds of infrastructure remains intact, whether there is a downturn or not. So, if


EPC industry outlook

governance issues are dealt with, a sense of well-being will improve, and inflation, interest rates & ` valuation will stabilise at workable levels. This will lead to improvement in the investment climate.

Compared to 2007-08 slowdown, how is the situation now? PP: I believe it is worse, especially for India, because the country is a lot less equipped to deal with it, both politically and financially. This is typically the kind of time, when in the national interest, the political class should keep aside differences and work together to get the nation back on track. Unfortunately, the maturity and wisdom needed for it seems to be missing. PDS: Actually, it is not prudent to compare the recession of 2007/2008 with the anticipated slowdown in 2012/2013. This is due to the fact that most of the EPC companies have a better order backlog now, which can ensure operation of the organisations comfortably. The last recession was due to the gross errors in the financial management, whereas the expected recession in 2012 is arising, in my opinion, due to the continuously maintained high level of oil prices resulting in high energy costs; the European crisis leading to a global affect, prolonged recession in the US; political upheaval in the Af rican continent; as well as political disturbances in emerging markets like India.

How has been the impact of the rising interest rates on EPC projects in India? PDS: The hike in the interest rates is a further blow to the EPC companies. With the reducing number of projects, such negative actions will result in high project costs; and investors will lose interest in setting up new units, for the time being.

PP: It is a fact that few projects are fully funded by internal accruals. As a result, a vast majority of them are domestic interest rate sensitive, especially since a near 20 per cent devaluation of the ` and associated uncertainties make overseas borrowings not an option in many instances. Due to this, quite a few projects in the planning phase have already been put on hold and it is likely that more will follow. For the time being, oil/gas exploration and production companies seem to be sustaining their investment programme, which is good for those EPC companies that have oil & gas business in their portfolio. The Middle East too seems to be unaffected. But this alone is not good enough, and so EPC companies will have no option but to tighten their belts & wait for the situation to improve. Unfortunately, this is the kind of time when those having poor risk evaluation and management systems underbid and land up in serious difficulties.

Is depreciating rupee against the dollar a cause of concern? PDS: Obviously, the imported equipment cost will increase. Also, a large number of items manufactured in India will have to incur a higher cost for the imported raw materials. Thus, the overall project cost is certainly going to increase. It will, therefore, add to the woes of investors interested in setting up chemical projects. The silver lining is that the export of ‘engineering services’ will witness some improvement due to the higher income in rupees, from the dollar. PP: EPC industry is affected not only by the impact of ` devaluation on direct imports of capital goods and bulk installation materials, but also by the way its domestic capital goods supplier base, which depends on imports of raw materials and components, is affected. Unfortunately, relative stability of the ` till August encouraged many to unwisely dispense with currency hedging.

How can companies limit the impact of rising commodity/ raw material prices? PP: Commodity prices have been volatile for quite some time due to which the EPC industry is fairly used to it. What it is not used to, however, is the added impact of ` devaluation. In order to minimise the impact, EPC companies tend to opt for back-to-back agreements with all major suppliers and bring in price revision clauses in their contracts with clients. PDS: In my opinion, the strategy for EPC companies is to find ways and means to become competitive, which involves optimum utilisation of engineering hours, sourcing of equipment/components f rom less expensive countries, good financial engineering in implementation; and employing multiple small size construction subcontractors.

Outlook for the EPC industry in 2012 PDS: As explained above, the outlook is not so good, mainly because only few projects will be realised in the process industry. PP: From a global perspective, it does not look good. However, India has the potential to perform slightly better, if the Central Government succeeds in getting back on the saddle and the opposition parties behave a lot more responsibly than at present. A unique weapon at the disposal of the government is its ownership of many cash-rich public sector companies, which can be persuaded to invest. If implemented, it can go a long way in softening the blow of global slowdown on the Indian economy. My advice to EPC companies at this time of economic uncertainty is to remain watchful and not get tempted to short circuit prudent risk evaluation & management practices. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Chemical World

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SPECIAL FOCUS Safety-oriented plant design

Mahua Roy

T

he philosophy of ‘inherent safety’ proposes that an inherently safer design is one that avoids hazards instead of controlling them. This can be achieved either by reducing the amount of hazardous material or the number of hazardous operations in the plant. Emphasis on the safety aspect acquires much importance because of the nature of chemical and petrochemical industry, which is one of the sectors exposed to maximum hazards. The EPC industry is investing greatly in this principle and educating the chemical & petrochemical industry towards making ‘safety’ the most important criterion at the design stage.

Ground zero: Design stage

The essence of safety lies in the elimination of causes of accidents, and not the control of accidents. With the aid of technology and experience, plant design needs to focus more on safety.

In the initial phases of plant design when all major decisions on the chemical processes are made, inherent safety as a principle needs to be incorporated. The basic aim of process design is to formulate a process, which is profitable, economical, safe, environmentally benign and user-friendly. However, most companies usually achieve this through the optimisation of process alternatives according to economic and functional criteria. It is also required that the safety

How to ensure plant safety at design stage

Tips for safety design

Potential methods

Hazard elimination: Eliminate hazards as a first R priority R R R

Reduce inventories Substitution of hazardous substances by less hazardous alternatives Attenuation to reduce hazardous process conditions, ie temperature, pressure Fail-safe design, eg valve position on failure

Consequence reduction: If hazards cannot be completely eliminated, start focussing on the consequences

R Arranging separation distances such that damage to adjacent plants will not occur even in the worst case R Provision of barriers, eg blast walls R Directing explosion relief vents away from vulnerable areas, eg other plants or buildings, roadways R Fitting remote-actuated isolation valves where high inventories of hazardous materials may be released into vulnerable areas R Provision of ditches, dykes, embankments, sloping terrain to contain and control releases & limit the safety and environmental effects

Likelihood reduction: Where hazards cannot be completely eliminated and after consideration of consequence reduction, consider ways to reduce the likelihood of events occurring

R R R R

Reduce the potential for human error through simplicity of design Control ignition sources Provide redundant alarms Frequent training and educational orientations to workforce Source: AcuTech Consulting

34

Chemical World | January 2012


Safety-oriented plant design

The chemical and petrochemical industry, big or small companies, need to seriously implement Health Safety Environment concepts right from the design stage and maintain the best practices throughout the operations stage. The best way to achieve this is to prepare one’s own technical standards for compliance. Raj Narkhede

Senior General Manager, Aker Powergas

aspect is fulfilled. “The chemical and petrochemical industry, big or small companies, need to seriously implement Health Safety Environment concepts right from the design stage and maintain the best practices throughout the operations stage. The best way to achieve this is to prepare one’s own technical standards for compliance,” says Raj Narkhede, Senior General Manager, Aker Powergas. Statistics, experience and theory can help make an informed decision.

Safe and smart is the key Often, the benefits of risk cutbacks and improved operations may be greatly outweighed by the costs of design or operating changes, giving due consideration to the safety aspect at the conceptualisation stage. Inherent safety is best accomplished by spreading awareness and educating the design engineering team. Through a detailed comprehension of the essential principles, engineers will be acquainted deeply with the priorities and options available to them and are more apt to apply. The Indian industry still considers safety precautions as ‘added cost’. The intent is to find a smarter solution to resolve this conventional conflict. The key lies not in finding solutions that balance costs, risks and advantages, but in finding solutions that lower the risk at a competitive cost and also result in increased benefits. As Narkhede summarises, “Provide/upgrade the fire & gas system at regular intervals; include safety analysis like Safety Integrity Levels (SIL), Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA); ensure safety analysis after modifications; and impart safety training to all personnel including contractors to boost plant safety.” Most manufacturing facilities in India including AkzoNobel Coatings, Bengaluru, and research/custommanufacturing laboratory of Sigma Aldrich, Bengaluru, have integrated advanced features of safety in their plant design. Also, in spite of the advantage of availability of lowcost labour, India is opening up to the idea of sophisticated technology incorporation. Remote monitoring of plants is being employed extensively in the petrochemical industry. “Depending on requirement and weighing benefits of remote monitoring of plants vis-à-vis others, the same is being practised in India, especially in case of offshore installations, being monitored from onshore,” adds Narkhede. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Chemical World

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SPECIAL FOCUS EPC procurement strategies

Mahua Roy

S

hould one aim to be a one-stopshop or best-in-breed supplier? Does being ‘green’ qualify as a serious criterion for EPC companies to choose their vendors? How much of importance is being given to the location and past record? Vendors are usually faced with a slew of questions and doubts when it comes to the EPC sphere of business. Procurement experts however, have simple and straightforward ideologies towards choosing suppliers.

The top six criteria EPC contractors are clear about the deliverables they are looking at. It is common knowledge about the criteria they take into account while selecting a vendor. However, what is more important is the weightage given to these criteria. Following are the top six preferred parameters adopted by EPC companies to select their vendors: Quality compliance: Quite evidently, procurement experts look at quality as the most important parameter. As a vendor, one must be extremely serious about the quality committed as the contractor is in

turn responsible to the company, which has assigned the project. Compliance towards this parameter becomes the deciding factor to forge a long-lasting relationship with the EPC company. Cost-competitiveness: Not just Indian companies, but most firms even overseas consider cost as an important factor. Interestingly, however, it is not given priority over quality compliance. So as a vendor, if you strategise to compromise quality over an ‘attractive’ cost, the procurement manager will not be impressed. Past record: In the EPC arena, time overruns translate into a huge cost, which is borne by the contractor. Maintaining an exemplary track record of on-time delivery and carving an illustrious name in the industry will guarantee the inclusion of a vendor in the preferred list of the contractor. Green practices: India is opening up to the idea of sustainability, as this criterion finds its place among the top six parameters considered for vendor selection. Though gradual, the change in outlook is imminent. It will, however, take some time, experts agree, for this parameter to feature above ‘cost-competitiveness’.

Chemical World | January 2012

Becoming a partner in cost-saving techniques Tactical methods of cost-savings are appreciated by EPC contractors. When a vendor gets actively involved in discussing and suggesting cost-saving opportunities, the contractors see this trait in a positive light. As a vendor, one should be aware of the typical cost-saving parameters considered by the contractors, and thus become a knowledgeable partner to help the contractor achieve his delivery goals. As Abraham J Moses, Procurement Head, SNC Lavalin Engineering India, elaborates, “Strategies for cost savings in procurement depend on many factors, such as adherence to time management while carrying out procurement activities including receiving detailed information as requested in the request for quotation (RFQ), post-order monitoring and support to the supplier for timely completion of the work by resolving any challenges as and when they arise during manufacturing stages.”

Ever wondered what goes on in the minds of experienced professionals dealing with procurement? Read on for tips and strategies to become a preferred supplier and forge lifelong professional relationships with the leaders in the business.

Location: This factor is not extremely important when it comes to choosing a vendor, as location of the vendor does not carry high weightage. Variety of products offered: Often vendors are confused whether to be labelled as a one36

stop-shop solution or a best-in-breed. Since quality is the most important parameter, it is immaterial whether the vendor fulfils either of the two nomenclatures.

It is to be realised that relatively small cost reductions gained in the procurement stage can have a huge impact on profits. Suppliers thus have a large and direct impact on the cost, quality, technology, and time-to-market of new products.

Two-way interactions “Over a period of time, there is a fair amount of alignment of values and goals between our organisation and suppliers, which enables smooth execution. We also keep our suppliers updated on the forthcoming trends and technologies, so that they could upgrade


EPC procurement strategies

& update themselves to stay competitive even with the changing times,” opines C M Venkateshwaran, Chief Operating Officer, Aker Powergas Subsea. EPC contractors welcome the idea of an up-to-date, knowledgeable supplier. On one hand, many contractors are actively involved in the grooming and orientation of suppliers, while on the other hand, many vendors apprise the contractors on what is new and upcoming in the field of best practices and technology. Moses affirms, “From time to time, we have technical sessions with suppliers where we learn about their products in detail. This way, our engineers are kept informed about the latest products and their technical as well as commercial effectiveness. Regular feedback and interaction with suppliers is what grooms them and, in turn, the products proposed for our projects are of good quality.” A contractor’s ability to deliver a quality project at a reasonable cost and in a timely manner is heavily influenced by its suppliers’ capabilities. As a policy, most companies pay regular visits to the facilities of the vendors. Siddharth Wazir, Director, Libra Techcon Ltd, says, “As a contractor, we are involved in regular, timely inspections at the project site. We are thus able to monitor the progress and expertise of our vendor more closely. Educating vendors effectively about what specifically is our requirement is the most critical task ahead of us.”

Advantage India and what more is needed India is a strategic location for sourcing raw materials. The chemical and

Today, the whole world is looking towards lowcost countries for their project procurement, and India is an important centre. We have huge potential in our country to cater to almost all requirements at competitive pricing. Abraham J Moses

Procurement Head, SNC Lavalin Engineering India

petrochemical sector in India is booming, and heavy investments are planned for these sectors. “Today, the whole world is looking towards low-cost countries for their project procurement, and India is an important centre. We have huge potential in our country to cater to almost all requirements at competitive pricing, thus making local sourcing a much more viable option,” says Moses. Besides, a vendor is also evaluated for post-purchase maintenance track record, responsiveness as well as efficient customer service, and adherence to preventive maintenance.

Centralised purchasing “Quality, as a criterion, outperforms the variety of services/products a vendor supplies. It does not really matter whether he is best-in-breed or one-stop-shop. As long as the quality compliance and delivery status is in place, along with other important criteria, the vendor figures in our preferred list,” explains Wazir. Centralised purchasing allows handling of cost drivers, which determine the total cost of purchasing practices. “Earlier, suppliers were selected for order placement based on costs, and we moved on to a new supplier the next time. This approach has often been too shortsighted to be effective. Our take instead is to pick a number of suppliers who provide a particular quality product at reasonable prices and then forge a longterm relationship with them. This goes a long way to eliminate the extra costs and delays of finding new suppliers all the time,” elaborates Moses.

Understanding the needs of the contractor Most contractors are dissatisfied with the attitude of certain vendors. They look forward to a professional and ethical code of conduct as they are answerable to the contracting company. “The biggest problem faced by EPC contractors is with regards to the inability of certain vendors to comprehend the minimum requirements, and standards to be followed. This is mostly seen when

Over a period of time, there is a fair amount of alignment of values and goals between our organisation and suppliers, which enables smooth execution. We also keep our suppliers updated on the forthcoming trends and technologies. C M Venkateshwaran Chief Operating Officer, Aker Powergas Subsea

customised orders are to be delivered. It is expected of the vendor to be abreast with the needs of the contractor and ensure a quality-compliant, timely delivery,” says Wazir. Apart from the quality issues, which are sometimes below international standards, the most important factor is the supplier’s attitude, right from the enquiry stages to the manufacturing completion stages. “The offers submitted are mostly not in line with the requirements of the RFQ. This attitude reflects a casual approach and it causes inconvenience and several delays before we can ensure receipt of the correct offer with the required documentation. Similarly, during the post-order stages, a lot of follow-up is required to get the drawings/documentation for approval. We find it difficult to change this mentality in some suppliers, but they must learn to work the global way, which will increase the effectiveness of the working process,” notes Moses. A vendor needs to understand that the EPC contractor is responsible for the delivery of a world-class project for reputed companies. These projects will one day become landmarks in the country’s progress. “At Aker Powergas, we and our suppliers are like partners in an enterprise, with a common aligned goal to meet the project requirements of quality, cost, HSE and delivery,” concludes Venkateshwaran. Taking extra efforts to become a preferred vendor with an EPC contractor will in turn make the vendor an integral part of a lauded project. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Chemical World

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SPECIAL FOCUS EPC vs EPCM

Mahua Roy

A

time-bound lump sum turnkey contract, which an owner makes with a company that will be responsible for all aspects of Engineering, Procurement and Construction of a facility, is the EPC contract. EPCM, on the other hand, is Engineering, Procurement and Construction Management. In this case, the contractor will be responsible for managing the other companies that have their contracts with the owner, and overseeing the progress of the project, thereby acting as an expert consultant. One can say that an EPCM contract is a professional services contract. The EPCM contractor is not contractually liable to provide a completed project on time and budget. There are pros and cons of both modes of contracts, and a detailing of three key points might help an owner to decide which one to opt for.

Single point responsibility “An EPC contract makes way for a single point of responsibility, ie the EPC contractor is overly responsible to the owner for the design, engineering, procurement, construction and commissioning of a facility. The EPC contractor is responsible for the time, cost and quality risk for the project,” explains Siddharth Wazir, Director, Libra Techcon Ltd.

Utilising expertise

The cost factor Undoubtedly, the cost factor will stand out as the differentiating parameter. Says Vinayak Pai, Director-Operations, Aker Powergas, “Unlike an EPC model, EPCM does not entail preparing a detailed bid process before start of the job, which saves time. Due to the uncertainty associated with an EPC contract, contractors add contingencies, risks and profits in their pricing. With a good EPCM contractor, this cost can be saved. The selection criteria for equipment and material can be on true costbenefit analysis rather than ‘lowest cost minimum acceptable standard’ criterion. This will result in a sustainable plant performance.” Cost savings is the biggest plus point of the EPCM methodology. 38

Chemical World | January 2012

In the EPCM methodology, the owner is required to have multiple points of responsibility with vendors, suppliers and other miscellaneous agents. The owner independently files contracts with vendors and suppliers, and the EPCM contractor holds no responsibility of quality or other aspects of delivery, delay, and cost. His responsibility is restricted to the management of the vendors and suppliers. “One of the major disadvantages of EPCM is the lack of single point responsibility. Also, there are only a few organised EPCM contractors in India who have adequate people and systems to deliver a good project,” says Pai. The single point of responsibility makes the EPC contracting model an attractive option for owners. In this mode, the owner only needs to overlook any defect or dispute.

Whether you are an owner or a contractor, the critical ‘M’ changes the responsibilities and liabilities. Here’s demystifying the terminologies of EPC and EPCM and what’s applicable when.

An EPC company is renowned for its proficiency in the three fields of engineering, procurement and construction. Braving circumstances like foreign exchange fluctuations, natural disasters, accidents, etc, the EPC contractors possess the expertise towards efficient delivery. Wazir observes, “Most companies opt for an EPCM contract and utilise only the consulting & management services of the contracting company. The owner overlooks the entire process of execution of project. The EPCM model may have its own benefits, but it makes the chemical company divert its attention towards project execution, at the cost of its core competency of manufacturing.” An EPC contract is usually structured to grant the EPC contractor considerable liberty towards the design. If the owner needs a deeper involvement and control, an EPCM contract is more appropriate. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS Roundtable

Are Indian engineering institutes meeting the talent need of EPC industry? World over, Indian talent is lauded for its scientific aptitude and dedication. India is also blessed with renowned chemical engineering colleges. But is the new young talent well-groomed for the EPC industry? Mahua Roy speaks with young engineers, HR managers in EPC industry as well as academicians in chemical engineering to gauge their views.

Shulmit Bapat Project Engineer, SNC Lavalin Engineering India (SLEI)

Shashikant Patange Head - Human Resources, Linde Engineering India

Nita Mehta Associate Professor - Chemical Engineering Department, Thadomal Shahani Engineering College

Being a chemical engineer, I have an edge over the other engineering disciplines. However, understanding the relation between on-site construction and the drawings prepared by the engineering team is something that happens with experience. Selection of technology for a particular chemical plant is an important step where a chemical engineer can use his acquired skills. The fundamental requirement for both engineering colleges and EPC companies is to bridge the gap between what is required and what is available. It seems to be more of a communication gap, because this issue is well-known and yet seldom addressed. This year, SLEI intends to conduct programmes across various engineering colleges in Mumbai to make budding engineers more aware about the EPC sector and how they can fit into it. This would help the engineers to understand the benefits of being a part of this sector.

At times, for a business as specialised as EPC, it is difficult to get well-groomed talent from chemical engineering colleges to suit the requirements. A fresh talent needs to be trained extensively to orient him about the deliverables, expectations and how the industry functions. While recruiting young talents, most importantly, we try to gauge their understanding and comprehension of the basic concepts of engineering and other subject matter expertise. In India, the academic curriculum of many chemical engineering colleges needs to be reviewed and redesigned in such a way that it also caters to the needs of EPC companies. Moreover, it is required that the educational institutes concentrate on personality development and bettering communication skills in students. This is important for attaining success in the corporate world, and not just in the EPC industry.

Despite several constraints, the academia is doing its best to train students to become responsible, talented and knowledgeable chemical engineers. Although we see a change in trend these days, wherein engineers from chemical discipline do not take up IT-related jobs (as was the case earlier), there is a lot more to be done. It is difficult to exactly pinpoint where the problem lies. The EPC industry feels that the students are theoretically excellent, but lack practical expertise. This calls for the need to provide compulsory summer/semester industrial training. However, the industry also should be able to accommodate the large number of chemical engineers in a batch. Besides, at the grassroots level, we see that most students are not interested in chemical engineering. As academia, it is our responsibility to promote this branch of engineering, which has enormous growth prospects in India.

EDITORIAL TAKE Besides theoretical and practical knowledge, the EPC industry looks out for soft skills, which most engineering curriculum does not lay much emphasis upon, among new recruits. On the other hand, colleges feel that the industry should be actively involved in grooming the talent of young engineers. A concerted effort from both academia and industry is needed to make the graduates not only talented engineers, but confident individuals who will prove to be an asset to the company. 40

Chemical World | January 2012


Photo: Vijaykumar Soneji

FACILITY VISIT Kiri Industries Ltd

Company’s new plant right next to the existing plant

Reactor where water and additives are mixed

The packing unit

Research & development laboratory

ENHANCING LIFE WITH CHEMISTRY OF COLOURS India being a major textile manufacturer, there is a huge requirement for dyestuff. Cashing in on this demand is Kiri Industries Ltd, one of the leading manufacturers of dyes in the country. Moreover, the company also exports products to as many as thirty countries in the world. Avani Jain

D

yestuff constitutes one of the core chemical sectors in India. It is also the secondhighest export segment in the chemical industry. Dyes find applications in the areas of textiles, paper, plastics, printing ink, etc. The textile sector consumes around 80 per cent of the total production due to high demand for polyester and cotton, globally. 42

Chemical World | January 2012

Maharashtra and Gujarat account for 90 per cent of dyestuff production in India due to the availability of raw materials and dominance of textile industry in these regions. Contributing to this growth and taking advantage of its strategic location is Kiri Industries Ltd – headquartered in Ahmedabad – which is one of the largest manufacturers and exporters of wide range of dyes, intermediaries and basic chemicals in India. Manish Kiri, Managing Director, Kiri Industries Ltd, notes, “The dyestuff

industry is mainly export-oriented. Around 70 per cent of the products are exported. Further, the industry is mainly dependent on the consumption of dyes in the textile sector. Since the textile industry is rising in India, the demand for dyestuff is increasing as well.”

Manufacturing facility Housed in Vatva Gujarat Industrial Development Corporation (GIDC), the manufacturing facility was established


Kiri Industries Ltd

in 1998. Spread across an area of 12,000 sq m, the infrastructure includes corporate house, production department, spray drying unit, ice manufacturing plant, packing unit, research & development laboratory and process control lab. The company produces a variety of dyes, especially reactive dyes. Kiri says, “Over the last five years, we have changed our product mix drastically. Earlier, we were mainly known as commodity manufacturing company; but today our portfolio includes several specialty dyes. Some initiatives have been taken for strengthening our product mix.”

Production proficiency Elaborating on the production process, Rajendra Shah, Chief Technical Officer, Kiri Industries Ltd, observes, “Water and additives are mixed in the reactor. The strength of the company is its reactors, having the capacity of holding 2,50,000 litre. Different types of raw materials produce different colours like orange, yellow, red, etc, so these are added as per the requirement. After the raw materials are added, various chemical reactions are performed. Through this process, semi-finished products (mostly in a liquid form) are obtained.” After this, the liquid is converted into powder through spray drying process. Sometimes, the wet cake is isolated from the liquid and then it is converted into powder through spray drying. He adds, “In the next step, standardisation of the product is done. Most of the standardisation is done online during spray drying and rest is done in blender where anti-dusting oil is added. Later, the product goes through screening and is packed in different types of packs like cardboard boxes, bags etc as per customers’ requirements.” Shah further says, “The process is repeated for making different coloured dyes. Further, the equipment range of the company has increased over the years. The capacity of spray drying unit has also increased.”

Process control At the plant, each stage of chemical reaction during the manufacturing process

is tested in the process control lab, before it is released for any further reaction. The lab is equipped with an array of efficient testing instruments, which include HighPerformance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), spectrophotometer and Gas Chromatography (GC). Further, the company is ISO 9001:2008 certified. Mukesh Dave, Production Manager, Kiri Industries Ltd, avers, “Every customer has different standards and requirements. So first a customer sends samples to us; then we make the required product in small quantity and send for approval to the customer. After getting the approval, we produce in bulk quantities. Once the product is manufactured, we study all the parameters and give the certificate of analysis to the customer along with the product.”

Emphasis on research The company firmly believes in research and development, and hence houses a R&D laboratory, which is equipped to carry out experiments under variable conditions. Its instrument range includes fuming hoods, pH & temperature controlling units, variable speed stirrers, transfer pumps, vacuum drying ovens, lab spray dryers, lab R/O membrane unit, etc. Broadly put, the company’s main research objectives include achieving continual improvement in product quality through improvements in manufacturing technology and processes; attaining low manufacturing costs through strategic process improvements; and conducting innovative, exploratory research to develop new product lines that are optimally environment-friendly.

Environment-consciousness The company is environment-conscious and conforms voluntarily to environmental norms and practices prevalent in the most advanced parts of the world. All the production processes are conscientiously designed and periodically modified to minimise environmental impact, and to enable optimum worker safety and general health. The company takes pro-active measures for pollution prevention. Periodical

Since the last two to three years, the dyestuff industry is growing at a rate of 12-15 per cent. Migration of industries from the developed nations will further boost the growth of this sector in India. This will surely impact the growth of the company. Manish Kiri

Managing Director, Kiri Industries Ltd

internal evaluations are conducted, backed by third-party monitoring by an environmental auditor recognised by the Gujarat Pollution Control Board (GPCB). Kiri notes, “We have installed effluent treatment plant for treating waste. We believe in zero effluent discharge policy, ie recycling and reusing the products. We are coming out with a sustainability report by the end of the year. Further, by 2012-2013, we plan to reduce solid waste generation by about 80 per cent.”

Envisioning growth opportunities According to Kiri, the demand for dyestuff will definitely increase in India as well as the world over. “Since the last two to three years, the dyestuff industry is growing at a rate of 12-15 per cent. Migration of industries from the developed nations will further boost the growth of this sector in India. This will surely impact the growth of the company.” The company has been performing well for quite some time now as evident from its investments and other ventures. “In 2009, we successfully completed the joint venture with Zhejiang Longsheng Group Co Ltd, China, to develop Lonsen Kiri Chemical Industries Ltd. The acquisition of DyStar Group in 2010 has given us a global status. Further, we have made large investments in the intermediaries division.” He concludes, “Our aim is to focus on improvising quality so as to satisfy the customer. Moreover, we want to consolidate on the previous achievements and ensure that whatever efforts we have taken till now give good results in future.” Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

INDUSTRIAL GASES INDUSTRIAL GAS MARKET Coming out of captivity ............................................................................. 46 RISING INPUT COSTS Gung-ho about industrial gas business amid inflationary pressures.......... 48 CASE STUDY ďšş PRAXAIR INDIA Inculcating best practices in industrial gas logistics .................................. 50 THREAT MANAGEMENT Business leadership in combating terrorism .............................................. 52

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Industrial gas market

Till now, almost 50 per cent of industrial gas market is captive. However, of late, outsourcing of industrial gases has gained momentum, with the user industries realising its importance. This is certainly a significant shift, which augurs well for the industrial gas manufacturers. Outsourcing offers many benefits to the user industries, right from cost to access to sophisticated technology.

Praxair India's Jamshedpur plant Courtesy: Praxair India

Prasenjit Chakraborty

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very market has its own dynamics, so does the industrial gas segment. Interestingl y, almost 50 per cent of the total industrial gas market in India is captive. However, it has just started witnessing few significant shifts. There are some reasons behind it. The industrial gas sector, besides being highly technical and capital-intensive, is also explosive in nature. The operations in industrial gas plants are continuous, and it calls for highly skilled manpower, with specific training to operate them. “Some of the main consumers of industrial gases such as steel, glass, chemical and pharma companies opt for outsourcing 46

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their requirements of industrial gases, by routing through on-site plants installed by gas companies or liquid supplies from the tonnage plants in the merchant market,” observes R P Khator, Advisor, Bombay Oxygen Corporation Ltd.

Benefits of outsourcing It has been observed that several large steel, glass, chemical and pharma companies prefer on-site installations of gas plants by gas manufacturing companies. “These consumer industries not only consider this to be a convenient method to meet their gas requirements satisfactorily, but also they find it to be hassle-free and economical,” points out Khator. World over, there are limited large gas plant manufacturers and they continuously carry out research

activities to inter alia optimise power consumption, which is the main input in the production of industrial gases. They innovate and introduce such improvements not only in new plants, but also existing plants by modifying them suitably. As mentioned earlier, though almost 50 per cent of the market is captive (ie, air separation units or ASUs are owned and operated by consumer themselves), customers have realised that manufacturing industrial gases is not their core strength and it is better to rely on industrial gas manufacturers. This is due to several reasons. For instance, the customer gets the most optimal cost solution; guarantees on cost as well as performance during the contract period; access to the latest and state-of-the-art technology for ASUs,


Industrial gas market

CORE FACTS R 50 per cent market is captive R Time to focus on core areas for user industries R Outsourcing is considered highly reliable by companies like SAIL, IOCL etc R Steel, glass, chemical and pharma sectors are opting for outsourcing to a large extent which are being further upgraded from time to time, etc. “High order of reliability of ASUs minimises customer’s production downtime due to want of industrial gas; eg Praxair’s plants operate at a reliability of over 99 per cent,” says Asit Gangopadhyay, Managing Director, Praxair India Pvt Ltd. Besides, industrial gas players follow high order of safety standards. Take the example of Steel Authority of India Ltd (SAIL), India’s flagship steel manufacturer and a leading global player, which decided to outsource industrial gas requirements rather than operating on its own in 2005 and has been continuing on the same path. “We received its first order from Durgapur unit of SAIL for setting up air separation plant and supplying oxygen, nitrogen & argon gas in 2006. This ASU, commissioned in June 2008, has been operating reliably and safely,” notes Gangopadhyay. In 2010, Praxair India was awarded yet another major contract for supply of gases to the Bhilai facility of SAIL to take care of their gas requirement for the capacity

Some of the main consumers of industrial gases such as steel, glass, chemical and pharma companies opt for outsourcing their requirements of industrial gases, by routing through onsite plants installed by gas companies or liquid supplies from the tonnage plants in the merchant market. R P Khator

Advisor, Bombay Oxygen Corporation Ltd

expansion from 5 million to 7 million tonne per year of crude steel. Praxair India will build, own and operate two state-ofthe-art cryogenic ASUs, each with capacity of 1,250 metric tonne per day, with an investment of over $ 100 million. This plant is scheduled to start up at the end of 2012. “Our contract for setting up a plant on build, own & operate basis to cater to gaseous hydrogen & nitrogen requirements for the upcoming refinery of Indian Oil Corporation Ltd (IOCL) at Paradip, Odisha, is yet another testimony to the afore-mentioned trend,” he asserts. IOCL has always been buying such hydrogen and nitrogen plants, & operating on its own. However, it recognised that buying gas is more beneficial as it allows the company to focus on its core competency areas.

Important leverage points The industrial gas manufacturers focus on the overall efficient operations of the gas plants and the benefits reaped are obviously shared by the consumer industries. This arrangement enables the user industries to focus on their core business areas. “Another great advantage offered by gas companies to the consumer industries is the reliability of supplies in any given situation. As is seen, gases form a critical input in the operations of the steel, glass and chemical industries. Any impediment in the supply system may adversely affect the production schedules of the consumer industry, resulting in avoidable financial losses. Gas companies have more resources to supply gases through liquid tankers from their other locations at short notices to meet such eventualities as compared to the consumer industry,” points out Khator. This gives the consumer industry a sense of reliability and availability of gases in case of any eventuality, which is a big boon to them. The gas manufacturers generally put up plants of a higher capacity than the regular requirement of the consumer. This surplus production is marketed in the merchant market by gas manufacturers, thus giving them an additional marketshare. It can also be used for any future enhanced requirements of the consumer. It is therefore

The shift of customers towards outsourcing of industrial gases is going to fuel the growth of this market not only because of opportunities from upcoming projects, but also because of potential decaptivation of the existing plants currently being operated by customers themselves. Asit Gangopadhyay

Managing Director, Praxair India Pvt Ltd

a win-win situation for both the supplier and the buyer. “The shift of customers towards outsourcing of industrial gases is going to fuel the growth of this market not only because of opportunities from upcoming projects, but also because of potential decaptivation of the existing plants currently being operated by customers themselves,” says Gangopadhyay.

Environment-friendliness The energy segment is witnessing a major transformation in India with focus on development of renewable sources of energy. As per the Government’s National Solar Mission, 20,000 MW of solar power generation has been targeted by 2022. This would boost the requirement of industrial gases in this segment. Apart from this, environmental compliances and increasing awareness & concerns about emissions and its impact will drive customers towards efficient processes, which will involve enhanced usage of industrial gases. “Applications of industrial gases help in reduction of fuel consumption & flue gas, treatment of bio-degradable waste, etc,” points out Gangopadhyay. The tendency of outsourcing industrial gases by the user industries is a significant development. It also means industrial gas manufacturers will play even more important role in the manufacturing arena. With this, the industrial gas manufacturers will have to be more proactive in servicing their customers. One cannot rule out more plants being set up by the gas manufacturers in the near future. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Rising input costs

Gung-ho about industrial gas business amid inflationary

pressures

Environmental issues coupled with inflation has resulted in delays or cancellations of projects in sectors like steel, oil & gas, etc. This phenomenon ultimately retarded the growth of the industrial gas segment. However, industrial gas manufacturers are not perturbed; they continue investing and strongly believe that the future will be bright for the sector. Prasenjit Chakraborty

T

here have been enormous delays in execution of several major projects across various industry segments due to reasons like delay in environmental clearances, higher interest rates and other socio-political issues. “Currently, only few large on-site opportunities are available and there are delays in award of contracts for industrial gas supplies. This will certainly impact the growth of industrial gas market as well,” points out Asit Gangopadhyay, Managing Director, Praxair India Pvt Ltd. In a similar vein, R P Khator, Advisor, Bombay Oxygen Corporation Ltd, strongly feels that the stalling of projects in industries like steel and refinery due to environmental issues did affect the growth of the industrial gas sector. “Since these industries are large consumers of industrial gases, a number of industrial gas plants for the captive consumption in these units was also in the pipeline and a hold up in these projects resulted in delays or cancellations

REALITY CHECK R Environmental issues are hampering the growth of industrial gases segment R Usage of industrial gases is low in India compared to the developed world R Steel segment still rules the roost R Time to look for new areas of applications

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of some of these industrial gas plants,” he laments. Inflation is another factor that is hampering the growth of the industry. Higher inflation is leading to rise in cost for all industrial gas manufacturers, and companies are compelled to pass at least a part of the impact to their customers to be able to sustain the margins. “While we are engaged in doing so, we also look internally and use our best productivity knowledge to reduce our cost in every possible value stream. The deployment of Six Sigma and Lean Management techniques has consistently helped Praxair globally to contain inflationary cost pressures and India is no exception. We are working hard to pass on these cost increases as per the contractual escalations and trying to plug the leakages,” he claims. The biggest threat is the continuous rising cost of power and its lack of uninterrupted supply. “This is not only causing the margins to shrink but is also resulting in extending the gestation periods of the gas plants, as the industry is highly capital-intensive,” points out Khator. The

demand for industrial gases, especially oxygen is primarily driven by the growth of the steel industry, which is at present going through a low phase due to various reasons such as shortage of iron ore, rising costs of inputs, high interest rates, etc.

Investments still pouring Although the long-term outlook for India remains strong, implementation of new projects has slowed down in the recent past. “To arrest inflation and other factors, we find that large number of projects have either been cancelled or delayed, and there is a decline in investments. It calls for government intervention, and a balancing act between measures of curbing inflation and ensuring growth,” exhorts Gangopadhyay. Despite the prevailing scenario, players in the industrial gas segment are down but not out. There are backlog of orders (that are getting cleared from the environmental department) for industrial gas manufacturers, which will help them grow faster in the next couple of years. “In spite of inclement economic conditions


Rising input costs

in 2011, we are poised to register revenue and operating profit growth of over 20 per cent in 2011, and we expect similar growth to continue for the next couple of years. However, we need to work harder for securing new orders to meet our long-term growth expectations,” says Gangopadhyay. Praxair is currently building several large and small plants for various customers requiring investments of over $ 300 million over the next two years. “We are also coming up with an air separation unit (ASU) near Mumbai, which will pave way for creating a significant presence in western India. This plant will be commissioned in early 2013 and would cater to the growing needs of automobile, pharmaceutical, healthcare, chemical, manufacturing industry in Maharashtra and Gujarat,” reveals Gangopadhyay. Similarly, BOC India, another industrial gas major, has invested ` 1,200 crore for setting up ASUs for different steel companies. Two plants are getting ready for commissioning by late 2012.

An air of optimism Due to the global economic situation, the growth in core industries in India has declined; this will certainly have an impact on the overall industrial gas market. Experts associated with the industry strongly feel that steel and glass industries will contribute the most to the growth of industrial gas sector in the years to come. This is because the growth of these two sectors will be substantial.Since development of infrastructure remains the core focus of the government, the consumption of steel and glass will be obviously more. This factor will ultimately benefit the industrial gas sector. It is imperative to find out new application areas for industrial gases. For example, water is a precious resource, particularly in dry belts of India. Here there are large natural reservoirs that are contaminated with anaerobic bacteria, which may be recovered through gaseous oxygen injection and distribution deep inside the water mass. This is a major

oxygen application for India. The aquaculture fish and shrimp farming ventures can become viable and less risky, if oxygen can be used to maintain the level of harmful bacteria within acceptable limits. Perhaps, the biggest opportunity for calibration gases lies in the well-established chemical and the rapidly growing automotive sectors, where new tighter environmental standards comparable to European norms are being applied to analyse the gaseous effluents. However, gas manufacturers, at present need to take certain important steps that will benefit their customers. “We will continue to work towards growing industrial gas demand by bringing in new application technologies that improves customers’ process efficiencies, thus resulting in a win-win situation for customers and us. The industrial gas usage intensity in India is still much lower than those in the developed countries and that brings in opportunity for growth,” points out Gangopadhyay. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Case study - Praxair India

Prasenjit Chakraborty

T

he distribution of chemical or gas needs efficient logistics system in place, as these are hazardous and inflammable in nature. The task becomes even more arduous against the backdrop of poor infrastructure. There are companies, which have adopted some best practices, and thereby succeed against all odds. The Bengaluru-based Praxair India Pvt Ltd is one such company that falls into this category. Praxair has installed the software called LMS, which enables the company to perform hassle-free distribution operations. The software can carry out a variety of critical jobs such as raising indents, planning and managing active & closed trips, billing, payments etc. LMS comprises sections like trips, Vehicle Tracking System (VTS), reports, Tank Telemetry System (TTS), transaction, and fleet/driver management.

Inculcating best practices in industrial gas logistics

In a bid to ensure smooth logistics functioning, Praxair India Pvt Ltd has initiated several innovative steps like installing the software called Logistics Management System (LMS) and introducing unique programmes like Route Survey, Driver Delight Programme (DDP) etc. These initiatives have helped the company gain a competitive edge through efficient logistics management.

Reward system When it comes to logistics, technology alone is not enough for successful completion of the entire operation, which, to a large extent, depends on the performance of drivers. In its endeavour to provide flawless service to customers, Praxair has initiated certain unique programmes to encourage truck drivers. “In an effort to acknowledge our drivers’ contribution towards safely transporting our products, we launched Driver Delight Programme (DDP). Besides acting as a motivational tool for drivers to perform better, this programme also stresses on overall safety compliances,” says Asit Gangopadhyay, Managing Director, Praxair India Pvt Ltd.

ROUTE TO EFFICIENCY R Route survey is must R Eight hours mandatory sleep for drivers R Drivers undergo refresher training R Provision for winning lucrative prizes for drivers

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Courtesy: Praxair India

Emphasis has been laid on driver training at Praxair. It starts from the point of hiring the drivers. Their training is a highly rigorous programme involving intensive classroom and hands-on training sessions, followed by mentoring sessions. This is followed by a certification programme for drivers who have successfully completed a period of 12 months with Praxair.

Route to safety At Praxair, it is mandatory to conduct a route survey before venturing into any new route. This is carried out primarily for safety reasons. “At Praxair, safety is prime! Our systems and processes ensure that all aspects of distribution management are well-planned so that our operations are carried in a safe and reliable manner. Route survey is just one of the many initiatives that we employ in our operations to make this possible,” asserts Gangopadhyay.

The purpose of route survey is to assess risks associated with the routing of vehicles and the consequences of potential spills or releases that can occur during the transportation of products. The findings establish the minimum requirements that need to be adhered to for a safe transport. “We take pictures of the routes so that it can be used along with route survey report for giving training or for sharing the road conditions and the associated risks with all drivers at the time of releasing them from the plant,” he points out. Even trucks are diverted from one destination to other, depending on the urgent requirement of products by other customers. “We have a centralised system for allotting trucks based on product availability and customer requirements. In case there is an emergency or an unexpected stock-out situation, we direct the closest truck to meet the demand,” says Gangopadhyay. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Threat management

Business

LEADERSHIP

in combating TERRORISM

Global terrorism poses a major threat to businesses the world over. Businesses are out of the governmental realm, and have little protection from terror activities. Any impact on businesses affects the society at large, and hence, it is important to take an active stance in countering terrorism. Suresh Lulla

T

oday, significant social, political and economic interdependences have developed among nations & businesses. In this scenario, terrorist or disaster situations in one country has a profound to moderate impact on several other businesses and economies. Further, globalisation in some cases brings with it deep intercultural and economic tensions, which over a period of time have developed as a means to facilitate terrorism. The deployment of extensive technology in terrorist activities today also provides evidence on how globalisation may sometimes prove self-destructing. Technology use, economic aspirations and cultural evolution are linked to a social maturation process, and bring positive changes to the society. What is important is that, globalisation should be used as a positive means for creating and managing these influences within a society. Businesses have a great role to play in managing this balance. With some business hubs and commercial cities such as Mumbai in India, being large enough to be independent economies in themselves, they are extremely vulnerable to terrorist activities. It is therefore important that businesses provide the necessary leadership in responding to, and maintaining the need for socio-economic balances at a micro-level, and create strategies to fight & protect businesses/economies from terrorism at a macro-level.

Basics in countering terror networks With terrorist groups being well-networked through sophisticated technologies across the globe, it is important for governments and businesses to fight them both tactically & strategically. While governments have access to infrastructure, businesses do not enjoy access to such resources, and need to employ other mechanisms to identify and understand 52

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the source & potential for terrorist impact, and initiate counteractive steps accordingly. Businesses need to first evaluate their exposure across a few critical aspects, and ascertain the extent of vulnerability, before they proceed to create the safeguards and fight terrorist influences. Oil and core infrastructure: Terrorism is centred on threatening critical infrastructure, supply chains, operations and physical/virtual networks. For instance, oil-related infrastructure is significant, as it can immediately bring down commercial activity globally, and also cause high-range economic impact. Terror networks particularly target important oil-flow routes such as the Suez Canal, Strait of Hormuz, and Straits of Malacca, all of which are known to be fairly politically unstable regions. In addition, these routes are surrounded by some of the most socio-economically challenged countries, making their citizens easy targets for recruitment into terror groups (eg, piracy in Somalia coast and rising terrorist groups in oil-rich African countries). Social tensions: While globalisation has lifted millions out of poverty, in some cases, it has widened the rich-poor divide. The growing economic gap and the unprecedented prosperity & rise in standard of living for some will intensify the extent of perceived deprivation, fuelling antagonism and inter-group tensions. Cyber-terrorism: Many countries have a policy on intense cyber-monitoring of businesses. While these may be positioned as defence measures, what this means is that in the long run, these nations can gain access to large amounts of business critical and R&D information that may threaten not just individual corporations, but also potentially


Threat management

jeopardise the security and interests of common citizens. New technologies: Technology offerings have made the game easier for terrorist groups. Today, terrorists can gain access to accurate geographic information on key locations, virtually. This increases the risk for all – individuals, corporates and governmental institutions. It is important that businesses develop protective tactics to fight their exposure to terrorist activities. While these investments may be hard to evaluate or justify from a purely return on investmentbased perspective, they certainly help businesses in adopting a focussed strategy in countering terror influences. It is, therefore, essential that businesses invest heavily in risk management tactics such as information security and audit, disaster recovery & business continuity planning. Besides, corporates can also initiate diversity and culture-focussed learning to enable better appreciation for differences,

and create a more tolerant social system, in the long run.

Towards a terror-free world While globalisation has improved lives, it has in some instances ignored other important aspects for social balances such as creating economic growth that is inclusive and reaches all sections of society. When prosperity is achieved within smaller groups, and economic gaps widen, it sows the seeds for terrorist ideologies. And terrorism at its core being a socio-economic issue preys on commercial activity as a way to create far-reaching social and economic impact. Business and government leadership, therefore, is pivotal in this direction, enabling education and awareness, and encouraging social dialogue. This will make for a more prosperous, vibrant and peaceful global society in the long run. Today, leaders from the business and political arena are working together to

fight terrorism. Their initiatives assert that fighting terrorism is not just about protecting borders from enemy forces or guarding national assets; it is rather a movement that needs to be driven deep into the social fabric. Which is why, some of these initiatives are directed at empowering the average citizen, enabling them to take ownership and be active participants in the cause of fighting terrorism. Suresh Lulla is the Founder & Managing Director of Qimpro Consultants; Founder & Director of BestPrax Club Pvt Ltd, and Chairman of the IMC Quality Awards Committee – IMC RBNQA; IMC Juran Medal. He is Regional Coordinator - Western India, Quality Council of India; and Director - Membership Retention and Engagement, Global Benchmarking Network. He is also a Member, Governing Board, Institute of Health Management Research. Email: info@qimpro.com

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AUTOMATION TRENDS Laboratory automation

Gone are the days when burettes and pipettes were symbolic of a chemical laboratory. Minimal glassware and sophisticated instrumentation is where the laboratory is headed to. Laboratory automation is expected to be the next big thing in the face of research as well as QA/QC. Mahua Roy

of component wear in moving parts. Based on the study of lubricants, they can determine the health of a fleet of equipment,” adds Ziegler. The application automation acquires huge significance when it comes to the handling of repetitious sample preparation or sample introduction for unattended operations. As Ziegler puts it, “Laboratory automation finds several applications today in the high throughput QA/QC sampling labs that do not have complex sample preparation protocols. Labs using precious or scarce samples will definitely resort to automation to integrate complex equipment and software control to automatically transfer results, decreasing user-error prevalence.” But the need

A

s we all witnessed the transition from bulky desktops to trendy laptops and now to handy tablets, the buzzword in technology today is small, and of course smart. In the perspective of chemical laboratories, the sample size is getting smaller. Specialised techniques for handling these smaller amounts have the ability to revolutionise the scale and pace of scientific discovery. As and when science has witnessed breakthroughs, the introduction of automated instrumentation, equipment and even software has had a major impact on a lab’s ability to carry out work, whether in an analytical testing lab, a materials lab, or a lab focussed on primary research. In basic research, scientists benefit hugely as a result of automated assays, which essentially require smaller amounts of sample. A smaller sample size also makes way for higher throughput experiments, which require sophisticated software to keep the work flowing smoothly.

Status of lab automation The chemical laboratory has already started depending heavily on automation. The automation service providers are adept at identifying the problems faced by manual laboratory operators and have come up with smarter solutions to address those. “Automation has historically benefitted the field of pharmaceuticals, but recent 54

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trends show its application needs for QA/QC, both in production as well as inspection,” says Eric M Ziegler, Vice President - Product Planning, Research & Development, Analytical Science & Laboratory Services, PerkinElmer. Currently, in the research lab, many processes call for investments in automation to maintain a level of consistency and brand equity. Oligonucleotide manufacture, separations and organic syntheses have started to rely on automated methods. Also, in order to adjust process control to ensure quality and consistency, most companies are expanding their consumer base. “PerkinElmer has a number of customers studying the long-term characteristics

gap still remains. Experts are still looking towards specialised and customised automated solutions for a number of processes, which will aid the research scenario. Few analytical techniques are in need of automated solutions. Also, same is the case with the syntheses of certain small molecules,” says Dr Pintoo Ganguly, General Manager – Laboratory Operations, Sigma Aldrich India.

The reluctance towards automation in lab In spite of understanding the benefits of automation in the chemical laboratory,


Laboratory automation

many chemical companies and academic institutions in the country shy away from the incorporation of automated technology. Industry experts are of the opinion that the easy availability of talented and low-cost human resources, high capital cost of equipment & lack of expertise in these related areas hinder the acceptance of automation in the laboratory. Agrees Ziegler, “The slow adoption of lab automation in India is driven by the skilled and low cost of human resources, as compared to the capital equipment cost of automation equipment. Given the relatively limited amount of regulations in place, there is little demand for the increased capacity outside the pharmaceutical industry.” But again the picture remains blur, as automation adoption in the country has two extremes. “The large multinational companies often leverage the latest technology for their production lines, while the smaller, local companies that are in the infancy of adoption avoid

sophisticated automation owing to lowlabour costs, high capital equipment and lack of regulations. Ultimately, Indian companies that fall in the former category are more advanced due to their capital advantages,” explains Ziegler.

Preparing for the future There are several ways to address the incorporation of lab automation. One way is the gradual, but steady and measured introduction of automated equipment in the lab, thereby slowly replacing manual tasks, such as liquid handling, with more efficient automated functions. However, the reluctance towards using automation may be evident, but it cannot be denied that the inclusion of automation in the chemical laboratory is where the future is headed. The fresh talent out of educational institutes too will need to be groomed and oriented towards the fulfilling of this criterion. As Dr Ganguly explains, “As laboratory automation reaches an advanced state in the country,

aspiring scientists will need to develop a different set of skills. A multidisciplinary skill set encompassing knowledge of IT, bionformatics, etc, will be required.” Contrary to the popular belief in the industry that terms investment in automation as added cost, automated equipment in fact provides a significant economic benefit to lab operations. “As with most industries, automation clearly can help reduce the overall costs including that of labour, quality assurance, regulatory compliance, and combating capacity constraints as well. Automation also offers tight integration to provide the consistent throughput and quality required for high productivity. In the end, the finances drive the decision,” concludes Ziegler. It should be realised that the real advantages, both economic and operational, will become clearer when the process industry changes its outlook towards planning, choosing and applying the technologies. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Chemical World

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT Energy audit

Keeping a check

Rakesh Rao

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nergy cost is considered to be the second-largest operating expense in a chemical manufacturing plant after raw materials. The changing carbon emission laws around the world are causing anxiety among many chemical companies regarding the competitiveness of the industry. “Chemical industry is polluting by nature. Hence, effective energy management, which can reduce wastage and pollution, is important from energy and environment point of view. Process industries are undertaking energy improvement initiatives since they operate in a competitive market. However, due to the lack of working capital or priorities, they are not taking fresh initiatives towards it when new capital investment is required. They try to mend an inefficient system instead of going for an improved new system,” avers Na Raghu, Managing Director, Technoplus Services, and a BEE-certified Energy Auditor. Experts suggest the following ways to improve energy consumption in the chemical industry: R Metering energy consumption and collecting the data R Finding opportunities to save energy, and estimating how much energy each opportunity could save. One might also investigate the energy savings that could be made by replacing equipment (eg, lighting) R Taking action to target the opportunities to save energy (ie, tackling the routine waste and replacing or upgrading the inefficient equipment) R Tracking one’s progress by analysing meter data to see how well energysaving efforts have worked

energy audit is the first step towards attaining effective energy management. “Yes, it is absolutely right. Without measuring, it is not possible to know where we stand. Once we measure, we can compare it with industry standards to prepare the roadmap for improvement,” observes Raghu. An energy audit is a preliminary activity towards instituting energyefficiency programmes in an establishment. It consists of activities that seek to identify conservation opportunities preliminary to the development of an energysaving programme. “Effective energy management is not an exercise in absolute values, but based on As feedstock and energy an incremental costs continue their ascent, savings improvement in this department can make a big process based on benchmarks. impact on chemical manufacturers’ Energy audit bottom line. Energy audit, which helps process allows in understanding energy consumption the creation of pattern in a facility, can be a stepping benchmarks. stone for savings. It also gives an understanding of the energy consumption with regard to the competitive scenario, and allows a focussed approach towards finding an end-solution,” says Siddharth Wazir, Director, Libra Techcon Ltd – a privatelyheld chemical consultancy and engineering, procurement & construction firm.

Experts feel that energy management should be seen as a continuous process, and strategies should be reviewed annually & revised as necessary. The key activities involved in the process include – having a formal energy management policy statement, specific and well laidout strategic approach, a dedicated energy management team, effective energy monitoring & reporting systems, etc. It is said that

Auditing gains To institute correct energy-efficiency programmes, one has to know which areas in the establishment unnecessarily consume too much energy, eg which is the most cost-effective to improve. Hence, conducting regular energy audit, which identifies where energy is being consumed more and assesses energy-saving opportunities, will ensure maximum gains to the company operating a chemical plant that houses thousands of energy-intensive equipment. Realising this benefit, many


Energy audit

AUDITING TIPS The energy audit action plan lists the steps and sets the preliminary budget for the energy management programme. R Analysis of energy use: Identifying where energy is used is essential because it identifies which areas the audit should focus on and increases awareness on energy use and cost. The results of the analysis can be used in the review of management structures and procedures for controlling energy use. Analysis of energy use can be done by installing submeters in different plant locations to pinpoint actual energy usage per area. This is a good source data for allocating energy use. R Identification of energy projects: Opportunities for energy savings can range from the simplest, such as lighting retrofits, to the most complex such as the installation of a cogeneration plant. The important thing to remember is to focus on major energy users and areas. Always apply the 80/20 rule – focus on opportunities that provide 80 per cent of the savings, but require 20 per cent inputs. After the preliminary identification of opportunities, spend more time on those which have shorter payback periods. R Cost-benefit analysis: The identified energy conservation opportunities should be analysed in terms of the costs of implementing the project versus the benefits that can be gained. For example, if a company wants to install a heat plate exchanger to recover waste heat, it is important to calculate the total cost of installation and compare that with the savings it will derive from recovering waste heat. It makes sense to go on with the project, if there is a net positive benefit from the project. R Action plan to set implementation priority: After passing the cost-benefit test, an action plan should be developed to ensure that the opportunities identified are implemented. Furthermore, there should be a plan for monitoring the results. Source: Ministry of Power, Government of India

chemical manufacturers are conducting energy audit programme. “Energy consumption constitutes about 7-10 per cent of the variable cost for the bulk/industrial chemicals, and can be up to 20-30 per cent for the specialty chemicals. A reduction in the same can give a competitive edge to the business. In the current scenario, with prices of energy moving upwards, there is greater awareness about conducting energy audits,” opines Wazir. Of the many processing equipment used in a chemical plant, reactors, which are extensively used in most of the chemical plants, offer huge scope for energy savings.

Process knowledge and domain expertise are the key requirements for undertaking energy audit. General energy auditors may not be effective in this segment. Na Raghu

Managing Director, Technoplus Services, and a BEE-certified Energy Auditor

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Steam consumption can be optimised by addressing the following areas: R Avoid temperature overshoots through correct temperature control on the reactors R Evacuate condensate from the reactors by installing the correct steam trap R Recover heat from exothermic reactions and its utilisation R Evacuate air from the steam space of the reactor by providing air vents R Proper steam conditioning R Use of agitation or mixing of the reactor contents where possible

How to get started? A well-conducted energy audit would reveal the areas of wastage of energy and it would lead to suggestions for possible energy savings in all sectors. According to Wazir, key requirements for undertaking energy audit for a chemical company are: R Availability of the past data on energy consumption over a fairly long period of operation (3-6 months) R Details of the basic production process and logsheet data

Energy audit process allows the creation of benchmarks. It also gives an understanding of the energy consumption with regard to the competitive scenario, and allows a focussed approach towards finding an end-solution. Siddharth Wazir

Director, Libra Techcon Ltd

R Interaction between the auditors and the operations personnel R Fairly good understanding on part of the audit agency of the alternative processes/fuels/utility sources and an ability on part of the audit agency to carry out a magnitude of calculations, correlate vast amount of data & comment expertly on the validity of the data So which is the best when it comes to conducting energy audit – in-house team or outsourcing? Wazir answers, “In-house exercise deviates the attention of operating personnel from the primary objective of productivity. Often, the technical expertise required is not available inhouse. External expert audit agency brings with it the necessary level of insight and expertise required, if the audit results are to be translated into actual on-the-ground implementation.” Raghu has a different view. He says, “Process knowledge and domain expertise are the key requirements for undertaking energy audit. General energy auditors may not be effective in this segment. If a company has adequate knowledge, expertise, skill, time – in-house team is always better. They will know the process, safety feature, limitations etc to decide the best for the plant. Even if they go for outsourcing, it is better to go in for a team, which has exposure to similar plants.” Regular energy audit and implementation of its recommendations can be a useful tool to reduce feedstock and energy cost leading to economical gains for the chemical manufacturer. So let’s start measuring the gains! Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


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National Manufacturing Policy POLICIES & REGULATIONS

On the face of it, most of the features of the National Manufacturing Policy are timely and well-directed as it addresses essential issues. But will it result in giving a boost to the chemical industry?

Rakesh Rao

W

ith an aim to boost the country’s share of industrial production, the Planning Commission released the draft of India’s first ever National Manufacturing Policy (NMP) in November last year. Industry leaders have welcomed this step as they feel that it will augur well for the future of the manufacturing sector in response to the changing landscape of transforming economy, emerging markets, modern technology and a new generation of workers. Vipul Shah, President, CEO and Chairman, Dow India, observes, “The suggestion for a dedicated policy on manufacturing sector in our country is a welcome step. In a country like ours, the thrust has to be on job creation, and manufacturing plays a key role in this. The target of raising share of manufacturing in GDP from around 16 per cent currently to 25 per cent by 2022 is achievable.” Various financial and development incentives envisaged in the NMP draft are likely to give the required boost to all industries, including chemical.

D R Dogra, Managing Director & CEO, CARE Ratings, opines, “Chemicals and chemical products industry in the SME segment, which accounts for nearly 12 per cent of the 6,000 products manufactured by the segment, would have better access to finance. NMP has listed a number of proposals and fiscal incentives in this regard. In addition, the rationalisation and simplification of regulatory processes and business regulations would go a long way in increasing operating efficiency of firms.” The proposed creation of large National Investment and Manufacturing Zones (NIMZs) can help the chemical industry to achieve economies of scale and global competitiveness. The relaxation in environmental regulation too could offer respite to these industries.Dogra says, “NMP proposal to acquire land for industrial purposes by way of creation of land banks by states would undoubtedly be a welcome respite for the chemical industry, which otherwise faces severe constraints on this front. Moreover, with the various areas in the chemical industry (such as pharmaceuticals) being accorded as special focus sectors in the NMP, the

benefits that the industry could hope to receive from this would be manifold.”

Green manufacturing The special emphasis on encouraging green technology in NMP will propel the chemical industry closer to cleaner and eco-friendly operations. “Sustainable development premises on the coexistence of economic, environmental and societal factors, which is what the government has etched in the NMP. The policy rightly promotes commitment to environment, health and safety through the Technology Acquisition and Development Fund (TADF), a positive move in the direction of making our manufacturing industry an eco-friendly one,” says Shah. The policy also suggests timebound clearances for environment and pollution-related approvals. It also says that there should be a timeline (within three months) for the procedure for grant of emission and discharge consents by the State Pollution Control Boards, else such applications remain pending for more than a year making it a post facto consent. He adds, “Moreover, the move to make public hearing (consultation) valid for the entire lease period including

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National Manufacturing Policy

expansions or change of technology could result in implementation of the project in a time-bound fashion.” NMP also points to an inclusive and pro-active approach to skill development. “The government must be lauded for this. Having said this, it is imperative that they do not underestimate the complexity and the enormity of the effort required in bridging the skill gaps and ensuring best-in-class training,” opines Shah. The issue of land acquisition has been a major bone of contention in India, and the measures proposed in the NMP in this regard are definitely the pre-requisites in solving this issue. “The plans to acquire land for industrial purposes and create land banks have shifted the onus of this onerous task from the industry to the government. In fact, the concept of NIMZ is a step towards addressing this issue,” believes Dogra.

have been identified, which include pharma directly, the focus is more on addressing general issues. Concerns regarding say exports, environment, R&D, consolidation, export promotion, cost-competitiveness, etc have to be addressed separately, depending on the specific sub-sector rather than the NMP, which provides the framework. Hence, we can see the designated Ministry identifying these problems for the sub-sectors and then addressing them appropriately through policy responses.” Besides, there are other unsolved issues. He adds, “Contiguous land required for setting up NIMZ has to be made available, given the size of the requirement, which is a challenge. In fact, this limitation has on its own pushed up the cost of industrial land to prohibitive levels. The proposed special purpose vehicle (SPV ) model for governing the NIMZ should address this aspect.”

Need to synchronise The missing link While outlining the thrust areas and the necessary action that has to be taken, NMP does not spell out specifics in the form of policy measures as it has taken a macro and medium-term view of industry. Dogra says, “The NMP, in general, is fairly broad-based, which looks at providing an enabling environment for industry in terms of special focus on SMEs, NIMZs, training, exit mechanism etc. Therefore, while niche segments

We hope with the NMP’s mandate for green manufacturing, a momentum is created across the chemical industry towards an alignment with the international chemical guidelines such as Responsible Care, Sustainable Technology (SUSTECH), and Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM). Vipul Shah

President, CEO and Chairman, Dow India

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The growth of the chemical sector has played an important role in the economic growth of the country, with an approximately 3 per cent contribution to the GDP. In a major move to boost investment and make the country an important hub for both domestic & international markets in the petrochemical sector, the government had come up with the concept of Petroleum, Chemical and Petrochemical Investment Regions (PCPIRs) in 2007. The states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Gujarat and West Bengal were identified for hosting PCPIRs. However, the PCPIRs have yielded limited and slow results. “For the NMP to be successful and not go the PCPIRs’ way, it will be important that NMP is viewed through a long-term lens and it is implemented in the right spirit from day one,” observes Shah. The Indian chemical industry has come a long way and is fairly wellregulated. However, according to him, there are issues the industry is still grappling with: R Chemical plants in India, with the exception of a few, are not of global capacity. The paucity of global scale

The NMP, in general, is fairly broad-based, which looks at providing an enabling environment for industry in terms of special focus on SMEs, NIMZs, training, exit mechanism etc. Therefore, while niche segments have been identified, which include pharma directly, the focus is more on addressing general issues. D R Dogra

Managing Director & CEO, CARE Ratings

plants and ageing equipment, old processes and obsolete technology make the Indian chemical industry uncompetitive R The per capita consumption of chemicals is much below the world average and there remains a huge demand potential within the country R The chemical industry has already adopted substantial measures towards making the sector green and sustainable, but fall short in the global arena “We hope with the NMP’s mandate for green manufacturing, a momentum is created across the chemical industry towards an alignment with the international chemical guidelines such as Responsible Care, Sustainable Technology (SUSTECH), and Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM). We believe that synchronisation and alignment between PCPIRs and NMP would help boost the chemical industry’s growth in the country in the long run,” says Shah. While the policy is an important step to boost the Indian industry, in isolation the policy may not significantly contribute towards increasing industrial output. “Additionally as the state governments will be primarily responsible for the new NIMZs, the success in each state will vary and will be defined by its administrative effectiveness & industrialisation priorities,” concludes Shah. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


Indian chemical exports STRATEGY

Developing countries are now the largest contributor to the global chemical industry. In this backdrop, Indian chemical exporters are taking steps to increase business from these markets. Avani Jain

T

he chemical industry in India is known for its cost-competitiveness and high-quality products; but until a few years ago, the export from Indian companies was limited and was dominated by the European & Chinese players. The scenario seems to be changing drastically as the chemical exports from the country have increased substantially over the years. Today, the industry is in an advantageous position, as the US and the entire European Union (EU) are increasingly looking at India as a prospective country to buy chemical products. Earlier, China was a preferred destination owing to its huge manufacturing capacity and aggressive promotional activities. But in the long run, countries are slowly realising that Indian products have better quality. At present, export of chemical products from the country has increased at a CAGR of 25 per cent, driven by favourable government policies. The Middle East and Africa are seen as major export destinations for India’s organic and inorganic chemicals. Apart from these nations, Europe, the US, Canada, Brazil etc are the major markets for Indian chemical industry, and India has preferential trade agreements with some of these countries. Vijay Singla, Director (Works), IOL Chemicals & Pharmaceuticals (IOLCP), notes, “Import and export

play a key role in determining the production of chemicals in the country. Chemicals that are exported f rom India are low-volume but high-value chemicals. Low-cost base in the country and increasing demand in export markets have recently increased exports from India.”

Scaling up exports Companies have adopted various strategies to boost their exports. Singla observes, “IOLCP is mainly manufacturing chemical products in two segments, ie chemicals and Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs). In the chemical sector, 25-30 per cent of the business comes from export market. Major export destinations include Europe, West Africa, East Africa, Middle East including Turkey and subcontinents like Bangladesh, China and Pakistan. In the API section, 33-35 per cent of the business comes from export markets, which include Brazil, Indonesia, Ghana, Columbia and Nigeria.” The dyestuff industry too is largely export-dependent. Manish Kiri, Managing Director, Kiri Industries Ltd, states, “The dyestuff industry is mainly driven by exports. We are exporting our products to more than 30 countries. The major export destinations are developing countries, which include Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Bangladesh, and Indonesia, among others. We also export to Middle East. In addition, the US and Europe are also other major export destinations. However, the

demand for chemicals in Europe and the US has decreased over the years.” He adds, “We are mainly targeting the developing markets; the reasons being many. Colours are mainly used to process textiles, leather, etc, and at present, the developing countries are involved in the manufacturing of these products. So the demand for dyes is more in these countries. It can be seen that the textile manufacturing industry has shifted from the US to the developing countries. Now only the finished products are sent to developed markets, so the demand for dyes has reduced in these countries. Thus, as a manufacturer of dyes, it is quite natural for us to go to countries where dyes are used the most.”

A spectrum of opportunities For Indian exports to scale new heights, first the capacities should rise. Thankfully, now there is widespread awareness among manufacturers that exports is the only way out to survive in the long run, and for that they have to increase their production capacity tremendously. Several companies are, therefore, undertaking large-scale capacity expansion. This, coupled with the high quality standards in India, will lead to increased exports. It is expected that India’s chemical exports will rise significantly by 2015. Further, the trend of major exports to developing markets will continue in the near future, thus paving the path to booming trade. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

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TIPS & TRICKS Chromatography analysis

Solvent selection made easy In the chemical industry, chromatography is mainly used for analysis by quantifying or measuring purity and the concentration of impurities present in a sample. Proper solvent selection is perhaps the most important aspect of chromatography, and determining the best solvent for an unknown mixture may require a degree of trial and error.

I

n chromatographies – column chromatography, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) and Gas Chromatography (GC) – a mixture is separated by distributing the components between a stationary phase and a mobile phase. The mixture is first placed on the stationary phase (a solid or a liquid), and then the mobile phase (a gas or a liquid) is

allowed to pass through the system. In chromatography, separation of chemical components of a mixture is achieved due to the selective interaction of chemicals with both the stationary and mobile phases. Column chromatography is used to separate and purify components of a mixture. On the other hand, TLC and GC are usually used only to analyse

mixtures: to determine the number of components and see if a desired component is present. Success of chromatography, to a large extent, depends on the solvent used for analysis. When selecting a solvent in a chromatography for an unknown mixture, one has to undertake several trial runs. Following tips can make the selection process simpler:

TLC elution patterns usually extrapolate to column chromatography elution patterns. Since TLC is a much faster procedure than column chromatography, it can be used to determine the best solvent system for column chromatography.

Normally, solvents are completely miscible, if they are on the same half of the scale (from 0 to 1). There are several ‘universal’ solvents such as tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, which are miscible with almost all others except hexane and pentane. By far the most useful ‘rinsing or cleanout’ solvent is iso-propanol, which is miscible with all others at all concentration levels.

Diethyl ether can be used, but it is flammable and volatile. Alcohols (methanol, ethanol) and acetone (a ketone) can be used. Acetic acid (a carboxylic acid) can be used, usually as a small percentage component of the system, since it is corrosive, non-volatile, very polar, and has irritating vapours.

Because of toxicity, cost and flammability concerns, the common solvents are hexanes (or petroleum ethers, ligroin) and ethyl acetate (an ester). As with plate selection, keep in mind the chemical properties of the analytes. A common starting solvent is 1:1 hexane:ethyl acetate.

If two solvents are equal in performance and toxicity, the more volatile solvent is preferred in column chromatography because it will be easier to remove from the desired compound after isolation from a column chromatography procedure.

Methylene chloride (halogenated hydrocarbon) is a good solvent, but it is toxic and should be avoided whenever possible.

One can mix a non-polar solvent (hexanes, a mixture of 6-carbon alkanes) with a polar solvent (ethyl acetate or acetone) in varying per cent combinations to make solvent systems of greater and lesser polarity.

If one increases the polarity of the solvent system, all the components of the mixture move faster (and vice versa with lowering the polarity).

If you know that one component of a mixture is insoluble in a given solvent, but another component is freely soluble in it, it often results in good separations.

Acids, bases, and strongly polar compounds often produce streaks rather than spots in neutral solvents. Streaks make it difficult to calculate an Rf (the Rf value can be used to identify compounds due to their uniqueness to each compound) and may occlude other spots. Adding a small per cent of acetic or formic acid to the solvent can correct streaking with acids. Similarly for bases, adding a small per cent of triethylamine can improve results. For polar compounds adding a small per cent of methanol can also improve results.

Volatile solvents should only be used once. If the mobile phase is used repeatedly, results will not be consistent or reproducible.

Reference: R University of Colorado, Boulder, Chemistry and Biochemistry Department R UC Davis ChemWiki, University of California 64

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PROJECTS

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the chemical and allied industries. Acetic acid

Rectified spirit

Single super phosphate

Indian Oil Corporation Ltd

Ranjani Sugar & Agri Industries Pvt Ltd

Chambal Fertilisers & Chemicals Ltd

Project type New facility Project news Ranjani Sugar & Agri Industries Pvt Ltd plans to set up a rectified spirit unit with a capacity of 30 klpd at Ranjani, Maharashtra. Project location Ranjani, Maharashtra Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning

Project type New facility Project news Chambal Fertilisers & Chemicals Ltd is setting up a new facility for single super phosphate with a capacity of 2 lakh tpa at Gadepan, Rajasthan. The cost of the project is ` 32.50 crore. Project location Gadepan, Rajasthan Project cost ` 32.50 crore Implementation stage Work is in progress

Project type New facility Project news In a 50:50 joint venture, Indian Oil Corporation with the UK-based BP Plc plans to set up an acetic acid unit based on Cativa XL technology with a capacity of 1 million tpa. This also includes associated gasification facilities for production of synthesis gas, where petroleum coke will be used as feedstock. Project location Gujarat Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Indian Oil Corporation Ltd Indian Oil Bhavan Bandra (East) Mumbai 400 051 Tel: 022-2642 3272/2640 0926 --------------------------------------------Industrial gases

Seva Gases Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news Seva Gases is setting up an industrial gases unit at Sanurapatti, Tamil Nadu, with a capacity of 100 tpd. The work is in progress. Project location Sanurapatti, Tamil Nadu Project cost Not known Implementation stage Work is in progress Contact details: Seva Gases Pvt Ltd G-18, Royal Castle, Raja Colony 4th Cross Cantonment, 1st Main Road Tiruchirapalli 620 001 Tamil Nadu Tel: 0431-4241 423 Email: eco@sevagases.com

Contact details: Ranjani Sugar & Agri Industries Pvt Ltd 3rd floor, ‘B’ wing, Dwaraka House, Rambaug Colony, Paud Road, Kothrud Pune 411 038, Maharashtra Tel: 020-2546 2671 --------------------------------------------Refinery

Contact details: Chambal Fertilisers & Chemicals Ltd PO Gadepan, Kota 325 208 Rajasthan Tel: 0744-2782 915/934/027 --------------------------------------------Sulphuric acid

Amerind Petroleum Pvt Ltd

KPR Chemicals Pvt Ltd

Project type New facility Project news Amerind Petroleum Pvt Ltd proposes to set up a petroleum refinery in Andhra Pradesh in joint technical collaboration with the US-based American Industrial Corporation. The project, with an estimated investment of ` 12,000 crore, is likely to be located in the Petroleum, Chemicals and Petrochemical Investment Regions (PCPIRs) near Visakhapatnam. Project location Visakhapatnam Project cost ` 12,000 crore Implementation stage Planning

Project type New facility Project news KPR Chemicals plans to set up a sulphuric acid unit with a capacity of 99,000 tpa at Balabhadrapuram village, which also includes 450 MW gas-based captive power unit. Work is expected to commence in February 2012. Project location Balabhadrapuram village, Andhra Pradesh Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning

Contact details: Amerind Petroleum Pvt Ltd 8-2-580/B/2, Road No.8 Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034 Email: info@amerindpetroleum.com

Contact details: KPR Chemicals Pvt Ltd Survey No. 24/2, Nallamilli Road Balabhadrapuram, Biccavolu, East Godavari 533 343 Andhra Pradesh Tel: 08857-237367/236344 Email: chemicals@kprgroup.in

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EVENT LIST

NATIONAL

Plast India

technology and instrumentation; April 2022, 2012; at Auto Cluster Development & Research Institute Ltd, Pune

One of the leading exhibitions for the plastics industry featuring equipment and latest technology for processing; February 01-06, 2012; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi AURANGABAD

For details contact: Plastindia Foundation 401-B, Landmark, Suren Road, Off Andheri Kurla Road, Opp Cine Magic Andheri (East), Mumbai 400 069 Tel: 022-2683 2911 Fax: 022-2684 5861 Email: info@plastindia.org

India Oil and Gas Review Summit and International Exhibition International event dedicated to the oil & gas industry with latest technology showcase on display; February 06-07, 2012; at Taj Lands End, Mumbai For details contact: S M Singh Gandhi Oil Asia Publications Pvt Ltd 530, Laxmi Plaza, 5th Floor Laxmi Industrial Estate, New Link Road Andheri (W), Mumbai 400 058 Tel: 022-4050 4900, Fax: 022-2636 7676 Email: iors@oilasia.com

Water Expo 2012 Tradeshow and conference dedicated to water and wastewater management; February 07-09, 2012; Chennai Trade Centre, Chennai For details contact: Water Today 3rd Floor Bhagheeratha Residency 124 Marshallas Road, Egmore, Chennai 600 008 Tel: 044-4291 6900/6901, Fax: 044-4214 7898 Email: info@waterexpo.biz

Oceantex 2012 Event dedicated to the hydrocarbon sector in India; February 08-11, 2012; at NSE Exhibition Complex, Mumbai For details contact: Chemtech Foundation 26, Maker Chambers, VI Nariman Point 66

Chemical World | January 2012

Maharashtra, Feb 17-20, 2012, Garware Stadium India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Infomedia 18 Ltd

Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. • Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in

Mumbai 400 021 Tel: 022-2287 4758, Fax: 022-2287 0502 Email: sales@jasubhai.com

Everything About Water 2012 International conference and trade show for wastewater management and allied industries; February 09-11, 2012; at India Exposition Centre & Mart Ltd, Greater Noida For details contact: EA Water Pvt Ltd A1/152, IGNOU Road Neb Sarai, New Delhi 110 068 Tel: 011-4310 0568/0500 Fax: 011-4310 0599 Email: enquiry@eawater.com

Paintindia International Exhibition and Conference Trade show and conference for the paints and coatings industry; February 23-25, 2012; at NSE Exhibition Complex, Mumbai For details contact: S Mani Colour Publications Pvt Ltd 126-A, Dhuruwadi, AV Nagwekar Marg Prabhadevi, Mumbai 400 052 Tel: 022-2430 6319, Fax: 022-2430 0601 Email: paintindia.2012@gmail.com

Lab Expo & Conferences Pune Industrial fair for lab equipment,

For details contact: Harish Arora Paramount Exhibitors 679, Phase 7, S A S Nagar, Mohali 140 110 Tel: 0172-2274 801, Fax: 0172-2274 803 Email: contact@labexposindia.com

Aquatech India Focussed trade show on advanced technologies for wastewater management; April 25-27, 2012; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Sunil Chhibber Inter Ads-Brooks Exhibitions (India) Plot No 859, Phase-V Udyog Vihar Gurgaon 122 001 Tel: 0124-4524 105; Fax: 0124-438 1162 Email: info@interadsindia.com

ChemProTech India 2012 International exhibition on chemical processing technology and equipment to be held concurrently with Chemspec India 2012; April 26-27, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Krunal Goda Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd #1102, 11th Floor, DLH Park, Near MTNL Office, S V Road, Goregaon (W) Mumbai 400 062 Tel: 022-2871 5207, Fax: 022-2871 5222 Email: k.goda@koelnmesse-india.com

India Chem 2012 Premier tradeshow for the chemical industry in India; October 04-06, 2012; at NSE Exhibition Complex, Mumbai For details contact: Mehul Tyagi, FICCI Federation House, 1 Tansen Marg New Delhi 110 001 Tel: 011-2376 5081/2373 8760 Fax: 011-2335 9734 Email: mehul@ficci.com


INTERNATIONAL Informex USA Trade fair for fine & specialty chemicals, chemical process technology, APIs & excipients, catalysts, contract research, equipment & instrumentation, etc; February 14-17, 2012; at Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, the US For details contact: Jennifer Jessup UBM LIVE 212 Carnegie Center Suite 203, Princeton NJ 08540, The US Tel: +1-609-759-4700, Fax: +1-201-720-2972 Email: jjessup@informex.com

Offshore Asia Trade show dedicated to latest advancements in offshore technology and subsea applications; February 21-23, 2012; at KLCC Convention Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For details contact: 1421 S. Sheridan Road, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74112 Tel: +65 9616 8080, Fax: +65 6734 0655 Email: yfyee@singnet.com.sg

Expo Coating Moscow International trade show and conference on coatings applications across various industries; February 28-March 01, 2012; at Olympiysky Sports Complex, Moscow, Russia For details contact: Evgenia Chaplygina Primexpo Saint Petersburg, 24-A Yakubovicha Street, 3rd Floor Belye Nochi, Russia Tel: +(7)-(812)-3806002/3806000 Fax: +(7)-(812)-3806001 Email: coating@primexpo.ru

Middle East Coatings Show International exhibition and conference on coatings and surface treatment; March 12-14, 2012; at Dubai World Trade Centre (DWTC), UAE

For details contact: Chris Hamilton Quartz Business Media Ltd Westgate House 120/130 Station Road, Surrey Redhill, The UK Tel: +44-1737-85563, Fax: +44-1737-855034 Email: chrishamilton@quartzltd.co.uk

Analytica Event to showcase technologies for analysis, quality control, laboratory technology; April 17-20, 2012; at New Munich Trade Fair Centre, Munich, Germany For details contact: IMAG Annegret Goldhan AM Messesee-2,, Munich, Germany Tel: +(49)-(89)-9492 2121 Fax: +(49)-(89)-9492 2350 Email: info@analytica.de

Coatech Mexico Focussed event showcasing latest technological advancements in the coatings industry; May 02-04, 2012; at Expo Banamex, Mexico For details contact: Mauricio Cadena Giprex Mexico S.A. de C.V., Daniel Zambrano, No. 525 Col., Monterrey, Mexico Tel: +(52)-(81)-8347 8560 Fax: +(52)-(81)-8346 2597 Email: mauricio.cadena@tsfactory.com.mx

American Coatings Show Symposium and technology showcase on coatings; May 08-12, 2012; at Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, the US For details contact: Anna Marie Roberts Nuernberg Messe North America, Inc 400 Interstate North Parkway, Suite 710 Atlanta, The US

EVENT LIST

Tel: +1 (202) 462-6272, Fax: +1 (202) 462-1924 Email: info@american-coatings-show.com

World Gas Conference & Exhibition Event showcasing the latest in exploration, safety, refining, subsea production systems, drilling, transportation, etc; June 04-08, 2012; at Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For details contact: Vicky Thomson The CWC Group Ltd Regent House, Oyster Wharf 16-18 Lombard Road London, The UK Tel:+(44)-(20)-7978 0037 Fax:+(44)-(20)-7978 0099 Email: exhibition@wgc2012.com

Chemspec Europe International event dedicated to the fine and specialty chemicals industry; June 13-14, 2012; at Gran Via Exhibition Centre, Barcelona, Spain For details contact: Quartz Business Media Ltd Westgate House 120/130 Station Road, Redhill, Surrey Redhill, The UK Tel: +44-1737-855000 Fax: +44-1737-855034 Email: michellebaalham@quartzltd.co.uk

ACHEMA One of the leading international events on chemical engineering, environmental protection and biotechnology; June 18-22, 2012; at Messe Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany For details contact: Simone Janik Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH Ludwig-Erhard-Anlage 1, Frankfurt, Germany Tel:+(49)-(69)-7575000, Fax:+(49)-(69)-7575643 Email: rentalinquiries@dechema.de

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Chemical World

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EVENT REPORT Engineering Expo Chennai 2011

Leveraging on the southern potential, the fourth edition of Engineering Expo Chennai lived up to the expectations of exhibitors & visitors in harnessing envious business deals. Having generated over 12,692 business leads, this edition was a huge success in not only offering companies an opportunity to explore the southern market, but also helping them garner successful partnerships. A report…

Chennai

CAPTURING the

southern STRONGHOLD Galaxy of dignitaries at the inauguration (L-R) R V Krishnan, C M Venkateshwaran, V Gokul Das, Sandeep Khosla, R Bhaskar and Asheesh Sharma

S Raj, Regional Director, Indo-German Chamber of Commerce cutting the ribbon with Dominic Savio, Head – Thermal-Business Unit, Valeo. Also present are Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President – B2B Publishing, Infomedia 18; T Murrali, Editor, Auto Monitor & Aftermarket

Bhargav TS

C

hanging business paradigms and uncertain market conditions are pushing companies to deliver better than the best. Keeping up with the tradition, the fourth edition of Engineering Expo Chennai proved to be a true facilitator in terms of fructifying business deals and cashing in on southern opportunities. The Chennai edition, held during December 8-11, 2011, showcased the best in terms of engineering innovations and technologies and served as a platform for the business fraternity to grow and gain a competitive edge. Organised by Infomedia 18, the event provided exhibitors from various sectors an opportunity to spread awareness about their products & services. Held at Chennai Trade Centre, Chennai, the show was inaugurated by S Raj, Regional Director, Indo-German 68

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(L-R) S Raj lighting the lamp with Dominic Savio in the presence of Sudhanva Jategaonkar and T Murrali

Chamber of Commerce, and Dominic Savio, Head-Thermal-Business Unit, Valeo. The event also witnessed the release of the Engineering Expo Chennai exhibitors’ directory. Offering insights into the significance of such trade fairs, Raj, during the inaugural address, highlighted, “Trade fairs offer huge opportunities in terms of introducing new products, technologies and ways & means to access the market. Trade shows also offer a platform for exchanging technologies and help in raising joint ventures & technical collaborations.” Giving the organisers’ perspective, Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President – B2B Publishing, Infomedia 18, said that currently, the Engineering Expo is held in six different cities in India. Rather than doing a show and waiting for customers to come, our ideology is to take the show to the customer’s doorstep.

The Chennai edge Tamil Nadu is a favoured destination for investments in the service and manufacturing sectors due to the availability of abundant talent pool and infrastructure facilities including sea, air, rail and road networks. Since its launch in 2008, the Engineering Expo Chennai has grown from strength to strength and helped Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) gain growth pastures. Over the years, it has become one of the most lucrative platforms for enhancing business opportunities. Also, the Expo serves as an ideal networking platform for companies that want to reach out to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). Tracking the past, the third edition of the Engineering Expo held last March saw over 200 exhibitors and attracted close to 12,000 business visitors generating a business worth ` 34 crore and about 5,500 business leads. Considering


Engineering Expo Chennai 2011

the visitors’ portfolio, exhibitors and the leads that were registered in the 2011 edition, the Expo had broken all its previous records. Moving up the ladder, the fourth edition saw more than 175 participating exhibitors and more than 5,000 products were on display. Spread over more than 42,000 sq ft area, the Expo attracted 11,359 business visitors f rom across India. On this, Sandeep Khosla, CEOPublishing, Infomedia 18, said, “The last three editions of Engineering Expo have contributed immensely to the engineering and service industries from this part of the country. Besides, it has significantly benefitted the SMEs in spreading their wings, as the event provided an ideal platform to connect the buyer and sellers.” Commenting on the event, Raj said, “We need such shows to showcase our strength particularly in Tamil Nadu, which is strong in manufacturing and engineering. This gives us hope that the mandate for the government to have 25 per cent GDP coming from manufacturing is possible.”

Expo as a one-stop resource The event witnessed some of the latest packaging technologies on display and presented the latest material handling technologies, like conveyors and cranes. Few companies also displayed their range of CNC machines used in the field of component manufacturing. Citing the example of Germany, which has emerged as the preferred destination in organising such trade shows, Raj said, “In Germany, the trade fairs are well organised and there are about 24 exhibition centres with 2.7 million sq mt of space for both national and international fairs. Of the 10 top exhibition companies worldwide, six are from Germany. In 2010, the trade fair industry was € 2.9 billion, which is roughly ` 20,000 crore. The trade fairs also have a multiplier effect; about € 12 billion was spent on trade fairs in Germany during 2005-08, and all these have been reported to have contributed to the country’s production of about € 23.5

billion. So, the spending that happens on trade fairs whether it is exhibitors, visitors or exhibition companies improving infrastructure, has helped create 2,26,000 full time jobs.” Satisfied with the response generated during the four power-packed days of the trade event, exhibitors are all geared up for the next edition of Chennai Expo. Sanjay V Pawar – CEO, Narahari Engineering, commented, “Engineering Expo Chennai has provided us good business since it has a wide range of clients. During the exhibition, we received more than 230 enquiries, which is about ` 85 lakh worth of business.” Another exhibitor, Eraimozhi R of Global Water Systems, pointed out, “We are participating in an Expo for the first time. We have made some initial spot sells and have some hot projects in the pipeline. I have generated a business of about ` 1 lakh. Going by the enquiries we have received here, we would like to continue participating in the Expo in the future.” V Janardanan, Manager-Business & Pre-sales, Redington India, whose company specialises in 3-D printing solutions, elaborated, “We would like to meet maximum visitors and educate them about the new concepts of 3-D printing. Educating the market on these new technologies will help us enhance our business and reach in the long run.”

Expo provides us with information about the various products in this segment available in the market.” The Expo enabled visitors to witness some of the innovative offerings from the leading exhibiting companies including Atlas Capco, Bhavya Machine Tools, Black & Decker India, CTR Manufacturing Industries, Dijet Industrial Co, Emtex Machinery, Fein Power Tools, Keyence India, Tussor Machine Tools India, Ramco Systems, Shutter Enterprises and Wendt India.

Delighted visitors

Growing in expanse

Overwhelmed with the vast product spread, visitors were able to get a glimpse of the latest technologies in the offing. A visitor at the Expo, K Shivprasad, Sales Executive, Crompton Greaves, agreed, “My visit to this Expo has given me some good leads, which I hope to convert into business.” Gaurav Toshniwal, Director, BST Press Metal Components, stated, “My experience at the Engineering Expo was amazing as I was looking out for CNC machine manufacturers. I got a chance to meet a company who supplies the equipment. Overall, the ambience at the Expo was good.” Ezhil Arasu, Senior Engineer – Sales, Electronica HiTech, added, “Engineering

Going by the sentiments of exhibitors & visitors, Engineering Expo Chennai marked another year of success in offering companies a perfect platform for profit. While plans are bullish for the next edition, the brand has something more to offer to the engineering community. To this, Jategaonkar added, “We plan to take Engineering Expo outside India. In another few months, we will be announcing our international foray. Currently, we are in a process of shortlisting the locations.” With such ambitious plans in place, there is no stopping the success bandwagon called Engineering Expo!

QUICK FACTS Spread across

11,359

42,000 sq ft

business visitors

Business transactions worth around

` 41.98 crore

Pan-India participation by 175+ exhibitors

5,000+ products displayed from different industries Over 85,000 in for display

kg machinery moved

70 per cent of the exhibitors satisfied with visitor response at the show 36 per cent exhibitors are looking for partnerships & JVs

Email: bhargav.t@infomedia18.in

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EVENT REPORT IGCW 2011

Spreading green chemistry culture A specialised event focussing on green chemistry, Industrial Green Chemistry World 2011 (IGCW 2011) was held from December 04-06, 2011, in Mumbai. It witnessed participation from 350 organisations, with representation from 8 countries.

IGCW symposium in progress

Mahua Roy

I

GCW-2011 proved to be an insightful event, acquainting the industry and distinguished academia about the recent developments and future predictions related to the field of green chemistry. The event also witnessed the presence and enthusiasm of the student community.

A comprehensive coverage IGCW comprised three concurrent events taking place at the venue. The main attraction was the symposium. The whole structure of the symposium was divided into 9 parts spread over three days to discuss ignition, inspiration, initiation, identification, invention, innovation, implementation, industrialisation and impact of green chemistry, thus making it a smooth flow of knowledge exchange. Distinguished speakers from Tata Chemicals, Dr Reddy’s, L’oreal, Pfizer and others turned their presentations into healthy discussions, with active participation f rom the equally distinguished audience. The symposium was graced by the pre-recorded talk by Prof Paul Anastas, Associate Admin, US Environment Protection Agency 70

Chemical World | January 2012

Visitors inspecting products at display

(USEPA), USA, who is also renowned as the Father of Green Chemistry. He said, “The reason green chemistry is being adopted so rapidly around the world is because it is a pathway to ensuring economic and environmental prosperity. Green chemistry is powerful because it starts at the molecular level and ultimately delivers more environmentally benign products and processes.” The other widely attended concurrent event was the IGCW-180 0 Seminar Series, which were held on five distinguished topics. Each seminar was presented by 4 key experts on the subject, attended by over 200 delegates across all 5 seminars, followed by focussed interactions and questions. The delegates gained valuable technical insights from over 30 global speakers and experts whose presence on all the three days allowed in-depth interactions and sharing of knowledge. The IGCW-Awards Evening, attended by over 200 guests from the industry, government bodies, academic institutes, in addition to the symposium delegates and exhibitors, acknowledged the winners of IGCW Green Innovation Awards. Eminent organisations and individuals were felicitated for their contribution in promoting industrial green chemistry and engineering practices.

Participants in rapt attention during the conference

The expo The IGCW-2011 Expo got established as one of the key dimensions of the event, successfully bringing together over 50 organisations, which showcased their green chemistry and engineering focus. There was also a provision of ‘technology showcase’, which greatly benefitted the give and take of collaboration backed by green technologies. The technologies showcased at the IGCW-Expo served as door-step solutions for the industry delegates seeking commercially viable technologies to address their processrelevant environmental challenges as opportunities. Apart from the symposium delegates, the exhibition was visited by senior decision makers from over 100 companies across three days. Nitesh Mehta, Co-founder, Newreka Green Synth Technologies, and convenor of the symposium, said, “The core idea behind this initiative is to activate work towards green chemistry for which involvement of academic, industrial and governmental & non-governmental bodies is needed collectively, which will further help the designing and development of environment-f riend ly chemistr y practices around the world.” Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in


Hannover India 2011 EVENT REPORT

Showing prowess of novel industrial technologies

Dr Veit Steinle at the traditional lamp lighting ceremony, while other dignitaries look on

A galaxy of industry leaders at a high-tech seminar

Hannover India 2011 witnessed many new product launches, which provided fillip to the respective sectors. Besides, several high-tech seminars and presentations added lustre to the event. This year Laser India show was the latest entrant among the concurrent events at Hannover India.

T

he fifth edition of the concurrent industrial trade shows of Hannover Milano Fairs India (HMFI) took place from December 06-09, 2011, in Bengaluru. The event was inaugurated by G V Kongavad, IAS, Secretary, Mines, SSI and Textiles, Commerce and Industries, Government of Karnataka, and Dr Veit Steinle, Director-General, Environmental Policy and Infrastructure, Departmental Policy Issues, Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Development, Berlin, Germany.

drive and automation, hydraulics & pneumatics and electro-mechanical transmission), IA India (for process and production automation & industrial building automation), Surface India (for surface technology) and the newly launched show Laser India (for laser systems and laser technology for manufacturing). “HMFI provides a huge platform for an array of industries to exhibit; we find this stage to be lucrative for us as MDA is present in every sector of the industry,” said Dilprit Sabharwal, Director, Spareage Seals Ltd.

Fairs galore

New launches

The event saw 6,800 high-quality business/technical visitors, with a good number from the senior CXO level professionals and top management. Over 400 exhibiting companies from 25 countries, including Germany, Italy, Spain, China and Taiwan showcased their latest innovations and technologies, at the fair. The concurrently held fairs were CEMAT India (for materials handling and logistics), MDA India (for motion

Hannover India 2011 witnessed several new product launches from various companies like Vinko Auto Industries, Laser Technologies Pvt Ltd, Bystronic Laser India, Maxon Motors, Precision Automation & Robotics India, Freudenberg Simrit and Alkon Plastics among others. Tessa Marheineke, Director, Global Fairs, Hannover Fairs International, the parent company of HMFI, stated, “This fifth edition has met our expectations and am glad with

the response from all the stakeholders to the five concurrently held fairs here in Bengaluru. The visitors had first-hand experience of the synergic effect of seeing the integrated technologies in a single visit, which is a well-proven concept at Hannover Messe worldwide.”

Conference and seminars The highlight of the event was the conference that featured a number of high-tech seminars and presentations addressed by renowned speakers from India and overseas, which was held parallel to the show. The seminars included ‘CEO conclave of fluid power industry’ and ‘International seminar on advancements in mobile hydraulics’, organised by Fluid Power Society of India, which discussed the strategy for making Indian companies think big and become global players. The ‘Seminar on role of lasers in manufacturing’, organised by HMFI, Laser Technologies Pvt Ltd and Indian Laser Association discussed the increasing applications of laser in diverse manufacturing industries.

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BOOK REVIEW

Process understanding: For scale-up and manufacture of active ingredients Edited by: Ian Houson Price: ` 8,165

Process understanding has gained significance during the last few years, particularly due to the recent impetus from food safety and other quality regulating agencies. This book extensively covers the multidisciplinary aspects required for successful process design, safety, modelling, scale-up, pilot plant implementation, plant design as well as the rapidly expanding area of outsourcing. The USP of this book is that it covers real-life practical descriptions of contract manufacture of fine chemicals and active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). There is extensive coverage on many key topics for process chemistry and scale-up: heat transfer, reaction phases (kinetics, solids handling, gas handling etc), material transfer, mixing, switching of rate determining steps (physical or chemical), sensitivity tests (heat, mixing, etc) among others. While providing insights on what process understanding means to different disciplines and sectors throughout a product’s lifecycle, this handbook reveals the factors important to the development and manufacture of chemicals. As a result, readers will become aware that process understanding can deliver a real competitive advantage within the pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals industries. It is applicable to students involved in post-graduate studies of chemistry as well as research scientists and academicians.

Organic syntheses based on name reactions The 3rd edition of this book can be considered as an indispensable reference book for students and researchers in the field of organic synthesis. It is like a practical dictionary of terms for a wide range of name reactions. Each entry is carefully condensed to practical science. This edition includes over 160 new stereoselective and regioselective reagents or reactions (including asymmetric syntheses), bringing the total number of reactions covered to over 700. It summarises various laboratory uses of these reaction types in the synthesis of complex products, including around 3,400 references to other sources and extensive indexing to reflect the complexity of data, along with cross-referencing encompassing a names index, reagent index, reaction index and a functional group transformation index. This book will be useful for students pursuing post-graduate organic chemistry, as well as for professors in the disciplines of biochemistry and organic chemistry.

Authors: Irishi Namboothiri and Alfred Hassner Price: ` 4,500

Reviewer: Tejas Padte, Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai

Available at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958, Telefax: 022-2203 4058, Email: thadam@vsnl.com

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PRODUCTS This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

Screw pumps The KX series industrial and chemical screw pumps is offered in the capacity of 200 m³/hr, pressure at 48 bar, temperature of 200°C and viscosity at 1,00,000 CST. KDX pumps are of cast iron construction with various metallurgy of rotating parts, like alloy steel, tool steel, SS 304 and SS 316, while KHX pumps are available in SS 304 and SS 316 material of construction.

properties and improve the performance & efficiency of customers’ products. Continental Carbon India Ltd Noida - Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0120-2840505 Email: sales@continentalcarbonindia.com

Pultruded cooling towers

Carbon black

The cooling towers are lightweight and take less construction/ installation time. These offer much longevity and resist corrosion. The pultruded FRP cooling towers are suited for seawater application as a replacement for old and large wooden cooling towers or fresh installation of new cooling towers in place of conventional ones.

The super conductive carbon black (CL-08) enables users to obtain a wide range of conductivity levels in their products at lower loadings. Low loading allows easier processing and good dispersion for compounds that are sensitive to filler addition. These help to avoid losses in mechanical and rheological

Paltech Cooling Towers & Equipments Ltd Gurgaon - Haryana Tel: 0124-4222483 Email: paltech@paltech.in

Hydro Prokav Pumps (India) Pvt Ltd Coimbatore - Tamil Nadu Tel: 0422-3242220 Email: hydroprokav@vsnl.net

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PRODUCTS

Twin screw pumps

Basket and pot strainers

These pumps consist of one set of shafts – one driving and one driven with two screws mounted and keyed onto each shaft. Liquid entering the pump is divided into two parts, each part going to the outer end of screws. These hold a given volume of fluid, moving axially as the screws rotate.

These strainers are flexible, reliable, durable and user-friendly. The filters are fabricated as per users’ requirements, like 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mesh. Sizes range from ½” to 10”. MOCs are ASTMA 216 Gr WCB, CI to IS 210 Gr FG 220, AISI 304, AISI-316, AISI 316 L, gun-metal, etc.

UT Pumps & Systems Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-32992488 Email: info@utpsl.in

Acoustic cleaning systems These systems generate sound waves by pneumatically vibrating a diaphragm inside the sound generator. The acoustic horn bell directs the sound waves onto the equipment surfaces where deposition of soot/ash/dust and other particulate materials accumulate. Low frequency and high energy sound waves dislodge the deposits from the equipment surfaces. F Harley & Company Pvt Ltd Kolkata - West Bengal Tel: 033-22897676 Email: cal@harleygrp.com

M Kumar Technocrates Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-27540287 Mob: 09898114242 Email: info@amtechvalves.net

Centrifugal blowers These are robust and welded, available in MS sheets and plates that are reinforced with angle iron frame. Any type of outlet direction of rotation, and discharge specifications are made as per users’ requirements. The clearance between casing and impellers to reduce air slippages and increase volumetric efficiency are maintained. NBE Motors Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22740546 Email: info@newbharat.com

Digital flow meters These paddle wheel insertion-type digital flow meters are unique 2in-1 combination, wherein the rotameter measures flow rate vertically. The water meter counts total horizontally and measures both the aspects. It is economical and used to match up with international standards. No external power supply is required. MTS Engineers Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-26400063 Mob: 09879495924 Email: sales@mtsengrs.com 74

Chemical World | January 2012

Gas detector strips These are paper strips impregnated with specific gas sensing chemicals by a special process. Gas is detected with the change of colour of the strip. The gas detector strips are designed specially after keeping in mind the requirements of diverse industries. These are used for H2S, HCN, PH3, AsH3 and mercaptan. Uniphos Envirotronic Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-40371646 Email: cel@uniphos.com


PRODUCTS

Programmable logic controllers The AC500-eCo is a compact and easy-to-use programmable logic controller, which reduces engineering and commissioning time, keeps maintenance costs under control, and has high performance. Important features include: investment-saving solution due to hardware and software compatibility with the AC500 family; cost-saving; and simple-to-position applications with configurable interrupts.

salts from low salinity water, and desalination systems to remove salinity from high salinity water. Concepts India Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-27758873 Email: conceptsindia@vsnl.com

Gear pumps

Water treatment systems

The V-series gear pumps are used for handling high viscosity media in chemical and industrial applications. These are discharge pumps with special inlet geometry and can be used at temperatures up to 350째C. The inlet geometry ensures even filling of the gears at low pressure to safeguard continuous production flow.

A complete range of water treatment systems and standalone equipment is available as per diverse requirements. These systems are used for clarification and filtration to remove suspended particles, turbidity, organics, iron & manganese; softening to remove hardness; demineralisation to remove

Maag Pump Systems India Navi Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-27893645 Email: satyagarinapally@maag.com

ABB Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-22949554 Email: amit.a.sharma@in.abb.com

January 2012 | Chemical World

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PRODUCTS

Ribbon blenders

Filter presses

These light-duty blenders are useful for easy mixing of powder components and are low-shear mixers, most commonly used for solid/ solid, solid/liquid mixing and when high shearing force is not required. The counter flow helicoids flight mounted on shaft ensure gentle mixing. Blades are designed for triple action mixing to suit end-product characteristics.

These are sparkler-type filter presses (model BPSF–8) that consist of stainless steel shell and top cover, which use bolts to give pressure-tight enclosure. The filter cartridge assembly inside the shell consists of several horizontally arranged disc-type filter plates with perforated supporting screens, filter media and interlocking cups.

Raj Process Equipments & Systems (P) Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-4071001 Mob: 09766441144 Email: sales@rajprocessequipment.com

Bombay Pharma Equipments Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-28594877 Email: bombaypharma@vsnl.net

CFI systems

Screening machines

These are fully prefabricated systems. Each storage tank has one or more independent systems depending on size of the tank. Each storage vessel is provided with a contents level and a pressure switch. These are immune to lightning effects, having no re-ignition due to cooling effect from the released gas.

These high-performance specialised machines (type VTS & Vibrall) are available as per GMP and FDAregulations. The hygienic design includes solutions for WIP-cleaning devices and ATEX certification. Three-dimensional tumbling movement creates exceptional fine cuts for bulk solids. Modular design allows production of additional fractions through additional screening desks in one machine.

CTR Manufacturing India Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-26633402 Email: handlingequipments@ctr.in

Liquid chromatography systems These systems are rugged in design that facilitate high uptime delivering consistent results for low operating and maintenance costs. The systems provide modular design for future-proof, upgrade path to quaternary system and combination with many 1200 Infinity series modules. These systems have wide power range and system pressure up to 600 bar. Agilent Technologies India Pvt Ltd New Delhi Tel: 011-51496664 Email: cag_india@agilent.com 76

Chemical World | January 2012

Allgaier Werke GmbH Uhingen - Germany Tel: +49-7161-301353 Email: siebtechnik@allgaier.de

Lubricant additives and reactive surfactants The ADEKA lube S series is an organo-molybdenum compound developed with original technology by ADEKA Corporation. These additives can reduce friction and help save fuels, minimise metal wear & extend machine life. The additives give good lubricity performance even under severe conditions, prevent degradation of oil, and extend oil life. Adeka India Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-40263301 Email: info@adekaindia.com


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PRODUCTS

Knife gate valves These valves are available in various ranges. The rising gate clean sundries on the seal surface automatically. Stainless steel prevents leaking, which is caused by corrosion. Short face-to-face saves raw materials and installation room & supports intensity of the pipe effectively. Triangular yoke saves raw materials and ensures mechanical performance. Zhejiang Gaochuang Pump Valve Co Ltd Wenzhou - China Tel: +86-577-6798 8958 Email: trade@chinagaochuang.com

Radar transmitter systems These are full-line reliable, solid-state radar transmitter systems to drive Klystrons, TWTs, IOTs and magnetrons operating from UHF to W band. The systems incorporate switching power supplies, solid-state pulse modulators, and controls that provide from 10 to 50 per cent greater power efficiency and higher reliability than vacuum tube-based systems. Diversif ied Technologies Inc Bedford - USA Tel: +781-275-9444, x211 Email: kempkes@divtecs.com

Air handling units These IClean modular units are designed to highest engineering standards for indoor air quality requirements according to ASHRAE standard 62, and meet the requirements of cooling,heating, ventilation, dehumidification and air distribution to a conditioned space. The supporting frame Penta-Post is made of extruded aluminium profiles having excellent mechanical characteristics. Integrated Cleanroom Technologies Ltd Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-3213478 Mob: 09989212162 Email: srinivas@cleantech.com

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PRODUCTS

Automobile care cleaning chemicals

Vibro sifters These vibro sifters are ideal for gradation and separation of dry powder, granules and semi-solids and liquids. The modular design clings easily with fitted clamp and is suitable for a wide range of materials. Less power consumption, variable flow pattern and the dust-free arrangement leads to free sieves. Bombay Pharma Equipments Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-28594877 Email: bombaypharma@vsnl.net

Dust filtration systems The Dustkiller DK 500 captures fine particulates before they settle down on precision equipment. Dust is sucked by the centrifugal blower through the inlets on the top. Capacity is 500 cm³/hr, input voltage is 230 V ±10 per cent, with low noise and wall mounting with fixtures. Powertech Pollution Controls Pvt Ltd Bangalore - Karnataka Tel: 080-2345 2156 Email: powertech@airtelmail.in

These chemicals are gentle and capable of effectively removing spots and stains from the painted vehicle’s body. Furthermore, the chemicals are also utilised for effectively cleaning the floors, wall panels, glasses and paint surfaces. The range of the chemicals is gentle on the car’s paints and does not hamper the shine and look of the vehicle. Altret Performance Chemicals Gujarat Pvt Ltd Surat - Gujarat Tel: 0261-2451807 Email: info@altret.com

Industrial panel PCs The IPPC-8151S 15” XGA TFT LCD Celeron M fanless industrial panel PC is designed with 316L stainless steel, food-safe sealing materials and an anticorrosive and chemical resistant touchscreen. The fanless design and NEMA4X/IP66 waterproof and dustproof protection can ensure reliable operation in most hazardous environments. The IPPC-8151S can provide a fully-enclosed IP66 protection for all sides. Advantech India Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-23374567 Email: info.in@advantech.com

Mass spectrometry systems Industrial plastic components A wide range of industrial plastic components is available in ABS, polycarbonate, EVA, polyacetal, nylon, HDPE, PP, HIPS, PVC and PET. Also offered are rings, closures, spacers, bushings, gears, lids, clamps, housings, handles, brackets, caps, connector brackets, electrical switch boxes, pumps and valve components, etc.

The Agilent 5975E GC/MSD is a bundled system, which provides outstanding value for routine analysis. These systems consist of 7820A GC, 5975 series GC/MSD, PC loaded with MSD ChemStation software and printer. An optional 7693A automatic-liquid sampler and 150 vial tray, or Headspace sampler can be added for increased productivity.

A S Engineering Works Mumbai - Maharashtra Mob: 09833617762 Email: moulds.plastic@gmail.com

Agilent Technologies India Pvt Ltd New Delhi Tel: 011-51496664 Email: cag_india@agilent.com

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PRODUCTS

Full body opening centrifuges These machines are used where cleaning process is of prime importance and in places where there is frequent product changeover. Top body of the centrifuge is hinged and body flange provided with square gasket to ensure leak proof ability with LBD. Hydraulic cylinder is provided to open top body of the centrifuge. Lester & Dynamiks (India) Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 0250-2454735 Email: l_n_d@vsnl.com

Investment castings These are ferrous and nonferrous components by investment casting under lost wax process. Components from few grams up to 70 kg in single piece are offered. Materials used are of any metal/alloy, such as stainless steel, alloy steel, carbon steel, nickel-based steels, super alloys, Hastelloy, aluminium alloys, copper-based alloys, bronze alloys, etc. B K Tech Enterprise Inc Rajkot - Gujarat Tel: 0281-2388614; Mob: 09662861959 Email: bktechenterprise@rediffmail.com

Hybrid stepping motors These PJPL series lineartype hybrid stepping motors enable linear motion of motor shaft with a combination of threaded shaft and inner threaded rotor. The motors do not require any outside mechanical parts, such as lead screw, wire or belt for linear motion. These motors are available in two sizes: 28 mm² and 42 mm². Nippon Pulse Motor Co Ltd Tokyo - Japan Tel: +81-3-38138841 Email: s-hagimoto@npm.co.jp

January 2012 | Chemical World

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PRODUCTS

Cage mill flash dryers These have capacity that ranges from 10 kg/hr to 5000 kg/hr. Due to low residence time in the range of 0.5 to 2 seconds in these flash dryers, heatsensitive products can be easily dried without degradation. The cage mill flash dryers are compact, requiring less maintenance and are user-friendly. Raj Process Equipments & Systems (P) Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-4071001 Mob: 09766441144 Email: sales@rajprocessequipment.com

Centrifugal pumps These pumps have all contact parts, including casing and impellers, of corrosion-resistant silica epoxy construction. The pumps are fitted with externallymounted Teflon bellow-ceramic mechanical seals. Impeller shaft is cast integral with shaft and hence there is no chance of joint getting corroded. Heavy bearings are provided on the drive shaft. Resicast Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-26501971 Mob: 09820883985 Email: kfresi@rediffmail.com

Variable inlet vane dampers These vane dampers give accurate modulation and power saving over other styles of dampers at reduced airflow. For every inlet vane position, there is different capacity versus static pressure curve and capacity versus brake horsepower curve generated by the fan. Inlet guide vanes are synchronously adjustable in the same angular positioning by connecting elements. Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22910771; Mob: 09824036375 Email: info@vacunair.com 82

Chemical World | January 2012

In-line colloid mills Supraton from BWS Technologies GmbH, Germany is an energy saving machine that can grind, disperse, mix, dissolve, emulsify, homogenise solids & liquids, liquids & gases or even different liquids. It consists of a set of stator and rotor rings running at a highspeed and with extremely fine & accurate clearances. Machinomatic Engineers Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-22044766 Mob: 09820035943 Email: praveer@symachgroup.com

Air classifiers These are screenless machines for grading offline powder into distinct coarse and fine grades from 60 mesh down to 40 microns. The conventional vibrating screens have choking problems along with low capacity when used for fine powder separation. Also separation efficiency is reduced. The machines can be operated in closed circuit. Premium Vijimech Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: +079-40083450 Mob: 09712987467 Email: sales@vijimech.com

Thermic fluid heaters These have capacities ranging from 30,000 kcal/hr to 20,00,000 kcal/hr. The thermic fluid heaters have maximum operating temperature of 300째C for thermic fluid and 130째C for hot water. Concentric coil is made from MS seamless tube of ASTMA 106 GR-B. The units are equipped with high efficiency oil/gas burners and air pre-heater arrangement. Aero Therm Systems Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2589 0158; Mob: 09825008720 Email: contact@aerothermsystem.com


PRODUCTS

Pallet washing machines

Gas monitors

Type PalWash pallet washing systems are especially made for cleaning of standard plastic pallets. These systems clean up to 100 pallets per hour and contain a separate pre-wash zone and a final rinsezone. Soiled pallets to be washed are manually placed on the machines and conveyed by a chain conveyor into the wash chamber.

These are reliable for onthe-spot measurement of toxic gases at workplaces or for monitoring in different application areas. The instruments can be used with over 20 different gases. These are microprocessor-based and come with alphanumeric LCD. The instruments come with data logger & RTC and have inbuilt pump for remote sampling.

Flow Control Industries Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-32227296 Mob: 09833889965 Email: ludwig_vaz@rediffmail.com

Ultra-filtration systems These ultra-filtration (UF) systems are of robust flat sheet and spiral wound membrane. The UF systems are operated in a crossflow mode, thus reducing the chances of fouling and maintaining the permeability of the membrane for a long time. These systems undergo negative pressure operation, thereby eliminating compaction and higher TMP. Ovivo India Surat - Gujarat Tel: 0261-2465972 Email: info.in@ovivowater.com

Miniaturised sensor systems The CarboSen miniaturised sensor systems are used for detection of flammable gases, such as CO, H2 or CxHy, for example. These systems consist of a sensor unit, sensor housing and sensor electronics. The sensor electronics enable temperature compensation during operation. This design can be used at temperatures up to 450째C. Lamtec GmbH & Co KG Walldorf - Germany Tel: +49-6227-605240 Email: info@lamtec.de

Uniphos Envirotronic Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-40371646 Email: cel@uniphos.com

Sample preparation plates Ostro sample preparation plates represent a novel approach for removal of phospholipids from biological samples. It removes up to 30 times more phospholipids. With its proprietary, patentpending design, it is specifically created to overcome the hurdle by offering a solution that removes multiple families of phospholipids. Waters (India) Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-28371900 Mob: 09342160313 Email: padmini_satish@waters.com

Static mixers These static mixers are used for liquid-liquid mixing wherever it is difficult by conventional operation. Fluid components to be mixed are pumped at the inlet of the mixing unit containing static mixing elements. Due to special construction of the mixing elements, fluids are directed radially outwards and inwards while the forward flow continues. Fenix Process Technologies Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-65008772 Mob: 09860723222 Email: info@fenix.in

January 2012 | Chemical World

83


PRODUCTS

Waterjet cleaning machines

Welding fume extractors

These are compact mobile units with easy manoeuvrability in difficult terrains as well as on smooth surfaces. The systems are versatile in nature and are available in different designs with a number of features. These waterjet cleaning machines are designed on the basis of using water at pressure for cleaning of tough surfaces.

The Fumekiller welding fume extractors are fitted with selfbalanced extractor arms that are ideal for capturing and controlling of all types of welding fumes. Unlike mechanical filters, these work on the electrostatic filtration principle. Filter modules are washable and re-usable. There is no replacement cost of the filters.

UT Pumps & Systems Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-32992488 Email: info@utpsl.in

Level control switches These are RF admittance-type solid & liquid single-point level control switches. The RF admittance absorption measurement principle use sensing probe using driven shield, coat guard circuit and corresponding three–element probe. Three-element coat guard technology ignores material build-up on the probe. These are suitable for high dusty environment. MTS Engineers Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-26400063 Mob: 09879495924 Email: sales@mtsengrs.com

Airless paint spraying pumps These pumps are suitable where better paint finish, gloss of paint and aesthetic results of the machine are prime requirements. The pumps give high output of paint and thus save time, manpower, paint & cost by giving high efficiency. It is also possible to spray high build paints for anti-corrosive painting with airless pump. Synco Industries Ltd Jodhpur - Rajasthan Tel: 0291-2741571 Mob: 09829022258 Email: synco_2000@yahoo.com 84

Chemical World | January 2012

Powertech Pollution Controls Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-23452156 Email: powertech@airtelmail.in

Corrugated tube heat exchangers Ecoflux corrugated tube heat exchangers use corrugated tubes instead of plain tubes. The tubes are corrugated to induce turbulence in both flows at lower velocities. This not only increases thermal efficiency but also eliminates product channeling. Product fluid channel is surrounded on both sides by the service fluid used for high viscous material. HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-25663581 Email: mktcom@hrsasia.co.in

Fly ash dryer systems These systems are used to dry the wet fly ash with 20-25 per cent moisture by weight, by utilising waste heat generated from the clinker production process or by hot air furnaces. The exhaust hot air from the cooler or hot gas generator installed are around 300° to 350°C and made to pass through the dryer, along with wet fly ash. The dryers are designed to have sufficient retention time for the fly ash to get dried by bringing down the moisture to less than 2 per cent. Sabash Engineering (Chennai) Pvt Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-24732900 Email: welcome@sabashengg.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Chemical World


LIST OF PRODUCTS To know more about the products featured in this magazine, fax us on 022-3003 4499 or tear and post to us the ‘Product Inquiry Card’ by following the 5 easy steps given there. Alternatively, you may also write to us at michael@infomedia18.in or call us on 022-3003 4684, and we will send your inquiries to the advertisers/companies directly to help you source better. Sl. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81

Product

Pg. No.

AC motors ................................................... 19 Accelerated ageing tests ....................................... 8 Acid tanks .......................................................... 49 Acoustic cleaning systems .................................. 74 Acoustic hoods ..................................................... 6 Agitators ............................................................ 13 Air blowers........................................................... 6 Air classifiers ...................................................... 82 Air handling units.............................................. 79 Air receivers .................................................... BIC Airless paint spraying pumps ............................. 84 Air-pollution control equipment .................... BIC Analytical instrumentation................................. 25 Aqua gas chlorinators ........................................ 75 Automatic and contained discharge .................. 35 Automobile care cleaning chemicals .................. 80 Axial flow fans ................................................... 79 Bad conductor of electricity .......................... 15 Bag filters ........................................................... 53 Ball valves....................................................... 4, 73 Basket and pot strainers..................................... 74 Batch dispersers ................................................. 13 BBL brake motors ............................................. 19 Bellows and dip-pipes .......................................... 4 Bends ................................................................. 73 Better ergonomics .............................................. 15 Bio-diesel ............................................................. 8 Blowers and fans ................................................ 79 Blowers................................................................. 6 Boilers ................................................................ 27 Bulk bag fillers ................................................... 79 Bulk bag unloaders ............................................ 79 Butterfly valves ............................................... 4, 73 Cage mill flash dryers ................................... 82 Cake pressing machines ..................................... 35 Calorifiers........................................................... 27 Calorimeters ....................................................... 13 Carbon black ...................................................... 73 Centrifugal air blowers ...................................... 79 Centrifugal blowers ............................................ 74 Centrifugal fans ................................................. 41 Centrifugal pumps ............................................. 82 CFI systems ....................................................... 76 Check valves......................................................... 4 Chemical process equipment ............................. 49 Chemical pumps ................................................ 81 Chemical/acidic fumes resistance ...................... 15 Columns and chemistries................................... 25 Compositional and trace metal analysis .............. 8 Compressors....................................................... 79 Condensers...................................................... BIC Cone screw mixers .......................................... BIC Continuous or batch filtration ........................... 35 Conveying blowers ............................................. 79 Conveyors .......................................................... 79 Cooling pads ...................................................... 27 Cooling towers ................................................... 27 Corrosion resistance ........................................... 15 Corrugated tube heat exchangers ................... 84 Dairy equipment ............................................. BIC Dampers .......................................................... BIC DC motors ......................................................... 19 Diaphragm valves............................................... 73 Digital flow meters ............................................ 74 Dispersers ........................................................... 13 Drip irrigation.................................................... 27 Dust collector systems ....................................... 79 Dust collectors ................................................... 53 Dust filtration systems ....................................... 80 Easy installation ........................................... 15 End cap .............................................................. 73 Exhibitions ......................................................... 21 Extended performance columns ........................ 25 Failure analysis ............................................... 8 Filler compositional analysis ................................ 8 Filter cocks ......................................................... 73 Filter presses ................................................ 55, 76 Flameproof motors............................................. 19 Flange mounting motors ................................... 19 Flexible screw conveyors .................................... 79 Flow indicators .................................................. 73

Sl. No. 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162

Product

Pg. No.

Fly ash dryer systems ......................................... 84 Foot valves ......................................................... 73 FRP piping .......................................................... 3 Fuel burners ....................................................... 79 Fuels - diesel ........................................................ 8 Full body opening centrifuges ........................... 81 Gas detector strips ........................................ 74 Gas monitors ..................................................... 83 Gases .................................................................... 8 Gear oils............................................................... 8 Gear pumps ....................................................... 75 Geared motors ................................................... 19 General-purpose grade....................................... 57 Heat exchangers ...........................FIC, 51, BIC Heat transfer equipment .................................... 41 Heating baths..................................................... 13 High-pressure blowers ....................................... 41 High-pressure homogenisers ............................. 13 High-strength to weight ratio (GRP/FRP products) .... 15 Hot plates .......................................................... 13 Hot water generators ......................................... 53 Hot-air generators ............................................. 53 HPLC ................................................................ 25 Hybrid stepping motors ..................................... 81 IBR steam boilers ......................................... 53 Impellers ............................................................ 73 Industrial panel PCs .......................................... 80 Industrial plastic components ............................ 80 Informatics ......................................................... 25 Injection moulding machines............................. 27 Ink quality .......................................................... 57 In-line colloid mills ........................................... 82 Inline dispersers ................................................. 13 Investment castings ............................................ 81 Jet black grade .............................................. 57 Kneading machines ...................................... 13 Knife gate valves ................................................ 79 Laboratory reactors ....................................... 13 Laboratory software ........................................... 13 Large diameter welded pipes ............................. 81 Level control switches........................................ 84 Lined valves and pipe fittings .............................. 4 Liquid chromatography systems ........................ 76 Liquid ring vacuum pumps................................ 79 Logistics services ................................................ 39 Long-lasting valves ............................................ 15 Long-neck pipe ends ......................................... 73 Low maintenance............................................... 15 Lubes - engine oils .............................................. 8 Lubricant additives and reactive agents ............. 76 Magnetic stirrers .......................................... 13 Mass spectrometry systems ................................ 80 Material identification systems ............................ 8 Metallography ...................................................... 8 Mills ................................................................... 13 Miniaturised sensor systems .............................. 83 Monoblock pumps ............................................. 81 Motor-driven dosing pumps .............................. 75 Motors ............................................................... 19 Multi-stage cake washing machines .................. 35 Multi-stage centrifugal air blowers .................... 79 Non-IBR steam boilers ................................. 53 Non-metallic pumps .......................................... 81 Non-return valves .......................................... 4, 73 Oil/gas firing equipment............................... 79 Overhead stirrers ................................................ 13 Pallet washing machines ............................... 83 Petrol and fuel oils ............................................... 8 Pickling tanks..................................................... 49 Pigments quality ................................................ 57 Pilot plants ......................................................... 13 Pipe line ............................................................. 27 Pneumatic conveying system ............................. 79 Pole rings ........................................................... 73 Polymer characterisation ...................................... 8 Polypropylene tanks ........................................... 49 Polypropylene filter plates.................................. 55 Polypropylene process pumps ............................ 81 Polypropylene recess plates ................................ 55 Portable loaders.................................................. 79 Powder & Bulk Solids India-2012 .................... 21

Sl. No. 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242

Product

Pg. No.

PP-recess chamber-type filter presses ................ 55 PP-recess chamber-type fully automatic filter presses........................................................ 55 Pressure and vacuum filtration .......................... 35 Process gas blowers ............................................ 41 Programmable logic controllers ......................... 75 PTFE-lined valves and pipe fittings.................... 4 Pultruded cooling towers ................................... 73 Pumping filtering unit vacuum pump ............... 79 Pumps .......................................................... 79, 81 PVC pipes .......................................................... 27 PVDF pumps..................................................... 81 Radar transmitter systems ............................. 79 Reactors..................................................... 51, BIC Reducers ............................................................. 73 Ribbon blenders ................................................. 76 Rotary dry vacuum pumps ................................. 41 Rotary evaporators ............................................. 13 Rotary gear pumps ............................................. 81 Sack tip stations ........................................... 79 Sample preparation plates .................................. 83 Sampling valves .................................................... 4 Scoops ................................................................ 73 Screening machines............................................ 76 Screw pumps ...................................................... 73 Seamless pipes.................................................... 81 Self-priming mud pumps................................... 81 Self-priming sewage pumps ............................... 81 Shakers ............................................................... 13 Showels .............................................................. 73 Side-channel blowers ......................................... 79 Silence flow packages......................................... 41 Slipon flanges ..................................................... 73 Slipring crane-duty motors ................................ 19 Solenoid driven metering pumps ....................... 75 Solid-liquid mixers............................................. 13 Spade.................................................................. 73 Spray dryer project .......................................... BIC Sprinkler systems ............................................... 27 Stainless steel pipes ............................................ 81 Static mixers....................................................... 83 Storage tanks...................................................... 51 Strainers ............................................................... 4 Tanks ........................................................... 49 Tees .................................................................... 73 Teflon-lined sampling valves ............................... 4 Teflon-lined ball valves ........................................ 4 Teflon-lined butterfly valves ................................ 4 Teflon-lined check valves .................................... 4 Teflon-lined strainers........................................... 4 Teflon-lined valves and pipe fittings ................... 4 Testing equipment ............................................... 8 Thermic fluid heaters................................... 53, 82 Thermostats/vacuum dryers and mixers ............ 13 Totally integrated automation ..........................BC Transmission fluids .............................................. 8 Trim handling systems ...................................... 79 Truck blowers .................................................... 41 Tubes ................................................................. 81 Twin screw pumps ............................................. 74 Ultra-filtration systems ................................. 83 UPLC ................................................................ 25 U-tubes .............................................................. 81 UV stabilised ...................................................... 15 Vacuum and hot gas drying ........................... 35 Vacuum controls ................................................ 75 Valves ................................................................. 73 Vane dampers .................................................... 79 Variable inlet vane dampers ............................... 82 Vertical glandless pumps.................................... 81 Vibro sifters........................................................ 80 Warehousing service providers ...................... 39 Washers.............................................................. 73 Water treatment systems ................................... 75 Waterjet cleaning machines ............................... 84 Water-ring vacuum pumps ................................ 79 Water-soluble grade........................................... 57 Welded pipes ..................................................... 81 Welding fume extractors.................................... 84 Welding guns ..................................................... 27 Y-type strainers ............................................ 73

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover January 2012 | Chemical World

85


LIST OF ADVERTISERS

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details AB Diachem Systems Pvt Ltd

Pg No 27

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Fluidtech Boilers Pvt Ltd

Pg No 53

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Parth Poly Valves Pvt. Ltd

T: +91-11-25155456

T: +91-79-25840105

T: +91-79-22200198

E: sales@scalewatcher.in

E: info@fluidltd.com

E: sales@parthvalves.com

W: www.scalewatcher.in

W: www.fluidltd.com

W: www.parthvalves.com

Aeron Composite Pvt Ltd

15

T: +91-79-65258500 E: info@aeroncomposite.com

Hapman India

79

T: +91-265-2517505

T: +91-20-40710010

E: info@hapman.in

E: sales@rajprocessequipment.com

W: www.aeroncomposite.com

75 Heattrans Equipments Pvt.Ltd.

55

T: +91-265-2331748 E: aqua@aquaservices.co.in

Hi-Tech Applicator

4

Siemens Ltd

BC

W: www.seimens.com/chemicals

E: info@picklingplant.com

T: +91-79-25833040

W: www.picklingplant.com

E: hitech@ptfeindia.com

BHS-Sonthofen (India) Pvt. Ltd.

8

W: www.shivatec-india.com

49

T: +91-79-25894692

Shiva Analyticals (India) Limited

E: bc.aithala@shivatec-india.com

E: info@heattrans.com W: www.heattrans.com

Arvind Anticor Ltd

BIC

T: +91-80-27971322

T: +91-79-25840105 W: www.aquaservicesindia.com

73

W: www.rajprocessequipment.com

W: www.hapman.in

Aqua Services

Raj Process Eqpts & Systems(P) Ltd

Pg No

35

Suraj Limited

81

T: +91-79-27540720

W: www.ptfeindia.com

E: suraj@surajgroup.com T: +91-40-23315341 / 45

HRS Process Systems Ltd

E: neelesh@bhs-sonthofen.in

T: +91-20-66047894

W: www.bhs-sonthofen.in

E: info@hrsasia.co.in

.FIC W: www.surajgroup.com

Swam Pneumatics Pvt Ltd

41

T: +91-120-4696222

Carbon India

57

W: www.hrsasia.co.in E: swamatic@airtelmail.com

T: +91-11-23236666

IKA India Private Limited

E: carbonindia@eth.net

Chemical Process Piping Pvt Ltd.

13

3

The Indian Electric Co

W: www.ika.in

E: icemktg@indianelectric.com

E: salescbg@cppiping.com

Indo German Chamber Of Commerce

21

W: www.cppiping.com W: www.powderbulksolidsindia.com

Kwality Process Equipments Pvt Ltd

E: info@devpumps.com W: www.devpumps.com

6

W: www.indianelectric.com

Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd

81

T: +91-79-26403839

Everest Blower Systems

51

T: +91-22-2453438

E: info@vacunair.com

E: pdmakwana@vsnl.net

W: www.vacunair.com

W: www.chemicalequipments.com

Waters (India) Private Limited 39

New Era Fabrics Ltd

E: info@everestblowers.com

T: +91-22-40829551

E: waters_india@waters.com

W: www.everestblowers.com

E: kagarwal16@hotmail.com

W: www.waters.com

25

T: +91-80-28371900

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

Chemical World | January 2012

79

T: +91-79-22910771

T: +91-11-45457777

86

19

E: process@ika.in T: +91-20-24474303

T: +91-22-67230600

Dev Engineers

W: www.swamatics.com

T: +91-80-26253900

Our consistent advertisers


Chemical World - January 2012  

Chemical World is a monthly magazine for the chemical process industry. Published by Network 18 Ltd., it delivers the latest trends and tech...

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