Issuu on Google+

Mining

Life& Living magazine

Issue 10 FREE

Have a Happy Marriage DEALING WITH CHALLENGES TOGETHER

A Survival Guide for Families TOP 10 TIPS FOR WORKING AWAY FROM HOME

How to Train Your Dragon The Arena Spectacular TOURING IN MARCH 2012


NORFOLK ISLAND Discover a World where you can be as busy or as laid back as you want to be... Marine

History & Culture

Health & Wellbeing

Natural Beauty

EXPLORcEe Experien

ENJOY

...Welcome to Our World.

Where the only fast food is pulled fresh from soil or sea. Where there are no traffic lights. Ours is an island of unspoiled natural beauty, where we tread lightly upon the earth. We are a unique people, descendants of the famous Bounty mutineers. We speak our own language, and will welcome you in our own unique way. Welcome to the World of Norfolk!

To learn more about The World of Norfolk please visit:

NORFOLK AIR

The Friendliest Way To Fly!

www.theworldofnorfolk.com.au

www.norfolkair.com


contents ISSUE 10

5 on the cover 5

Have a Happy Marriage Dealing with challenges together

8

A Survival Guide for Families Top 10 tips for working away from home

10

How to Train Your Dragon The Arena Spectacular Touring in March 2012

10

14

features 14

Talkin’ Technology We look at the latest in gadgets and gizmos

15

Newcastle Art Gallery Presenting Australian Modern Masterpieces

17

The Future of Boarding Schools Delving into the traditional

18

NSW Business Buzz What’s happening in and around town Mining

15

17

Life& Living magazine

regulars 4 Welcome

19 Puzzles

20 Great for Mining Life & Living 23 Talk Back

Issue 10 FREE

Have a Happy Marriage DEALING WITH CHALLENGES TOGETHER

A Survival Guide for Families TOP 10 TIPS FOR WORKING AWAY FROM HOME

How to Train Your Dragon The Arena Spectacular TOURING IN MARCH 2012

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

3


Mining

Life& Living magazine

PUBLISHER Patrick McElligott patrick@inflightmagazine.com.au

EDITOR Bettina Maniatis

Welcome to Mining Life & Living Magazine

bettina@inflightmagazine.com.au

ART DIRECTOR Lawrence Borchers lawrence@inflightmagazine.com.au

ADVERTISING & ENQUIRIES WESTERN EDITION [WA] Daniela Raos daniela@inflightmagazine.com.au NORTHERN EDITION [QLD] Robyn Crouch robyn@inflightmagazine.com.au SOUTHERN EDITION [NSW] Brittany Cavill brittany@inflightmagazine.com.au

H

ello, and welcome to Mining Life & Living Magazine, a free publication catering to employees of the mining and resource industry. With a clear direction toward health and lifestyle, Mining Life & Living Magazine aims to provide interesting stories to assist in the improvement of reader’s work-life balance as well as to simply entertain with interviews, profiles and regular columns from experts in their field. Hasn’t the year just flown past? I have to admit, as the weeks passed and Christmas was inching closer and closer, panic started to set in as I realised I haven’t even done a smidgen of shopping. For all those just as busy, I urge you to give online shopping a go – it has certainly given me a much needed helping hand! Also in celebration of the Christmas period, our team headed to the beautiful Queenstown in New Zealand. If you’re heading over, be sure to try all of the awesome adventures including skydiving with NZONE, enjoying a drink at Below Zero Ice Bar and for dinner, nothing beats Gantleys Restaurant – a MUST try. Below, I’ve included a few of photos from the trip – enjoy! Until next time, I hope you enjoy reading this issue and keep safe and healthy in your mining life!

BOATING INDUSTRY Patrick McElligott patrick@inflightmagazine.com.au XP TRAVELLER Anita Hennessey anita@inflightmagazine.com.au Bettina Maniatis

PRINTING www.dynamicprint.net.au Mining Life & Living Magazine is published bi-monthly by Inflight Publishing Pty. Ltd. Views expressed in Airport magazine are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher. No responsibility is accepted by the publisher or the printer for the accuracy of information contained in the text or advertisements. Advertisements must comply with the relevant Trade Practices Act 1979. Responsibility for compliance with the act rests with the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisement. Neither the publisher nor the editor accepts responsibility for advertisements.

Editor, Mining Life & Living Magazine Inflight Publishing P.S. We’d love to hear your feedback on any past issues, or this one. Email us at info@inflightmagazine.com.au and we might even publish your letter in the next edition!

Some photos from our team’s visit to the beautiful Queenstown, New Zealand!

Below Zero Ice

Bar

P U B L I S H I N G

Ph (07) 3891 7793 • Fax (07) 3891 7702 PO Box 6133, Buranda, Qld 4102 www.inflightmagazine.com.au Gantleys

Skyline Gondola

4

Issue 10

www.inflightmagazine.com.au


Relationships: Working as a Team

BY JASON URBANOWICZ, ENTREPRENEUR & AUTHOR

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RELATIONSHIPS THAT WORK AND THOSE THAT DON’T IS HOW WELL WE DEAL WITH THE CHALLENGES WE FACE TOGETHER

I

f you’re having trouble in your relationship, you’re not alone. The battle for marriage is on as half of American marriages, 40 per cent of Australian unions and a third of Canadian and New Zealand nuptials end in divorce. It’s scary that Australia has one of the highest divorce rates in the world. Each year, around 50,000 people get divorced – and just under half of those divorces involve children. Marriage breakdowns cost the nation up to $6 billion each year. In Japan, the divorce rate has risen by 26.5 per cent in 10 years. In China, the number of divorces has been steadily rising since 1980 when the figure was just 341,000; in 2007 that figure was about 1.4 million.

Modern relationships just aren’t working. Why? What was good enough for our parents doesn’t seem to be good enough for us. We are no longer willing to make the enormous personal sacrifices that our parents and grandparents made. We demand (and deserve) lasting happiness, intimacy and passion with a single partner and if we don’t get it, we are prepared to sacrifice the relationship – personal fulfilment is now more important than the family unit.

So what’s the solution? It’s not divorce, separation or self-sacrifice. The answer lies in learning to create relationships that support our personal fulfilment. There is nothing wrong with wanting more than our parents did.

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

5


“The bottom line is that we care for each other and often have high expectations of how we want to be treated by one another. Being human, we occasionally let each other down.”

the result of the evolution of our society. Our changing values have served us well, but they do pose some new problems. When both partners are unhappy, the relationship they have cannot be fulfilling. The statistics say it all: one in five marriages end in divorce within five years, and more than one in three end within 20 years. More often than not, divorce (or break up) is the result of one or both partners panicking. When we do not have the skills, the support, or sometimes the maturity to push through a layer of difficulty (which could lead to considerable growth), we abandon ship. This decision is often encouraged by the belief that “if I could just find the right partner, everything would be wonderful”. While this concept is certainly good to pursue as an ideal, it’s often flawed because it’s the same “us” that we take wherever we go. The “panic and abandon” mentality often does more damage than sticking it out. If we are in a difficult relationship, it can seem like the “cut and run” approach will save us pain, but this is often not the case.

6

Issue 10

www.inflightmagazine.com.au


There are some common early warning signs that we can all look for. If you identify any of the signs below in your relationship, it’s time to put some serious effort into nurturing your partner and your union. Below are just a couple of early warning signs of a troubled relationship:

Bickering and nitpicking are the norm Have you noticed that either you or your partner seem overly critical of the other, focusing on one another’s flaws or faults or perceiving faults where there really aren’t any? Are you constantly quarrelling about inane issues? Are there times when you can’t even remember what you’re fighting about? Little quarrels can lead to big problems. When bickering replaces conversation, nothing gets addressed or resolved. Instead, tension builds and a power struggle ensues. Anger, blame and resentment can become your bedfellows.

Avoidance is an everyday affair Do you seem to avoid deep and meaningful conversations? Are either or both of you

absorbed in TV, books or other distractions? Is the table quiet during meals, and the mornings spent with noses stuck in newspapers? Does one or both of you seem to be distant, distracted, or miles away in your thoughts? Are you daydreaming more than usual? Like it or not, straight talk is healthy. Without it, you will lose your boundaries and values. Avoiding difficult conversations simply delays the inevitable. Real differences in a partnership don’t have to cause problems, especially when they are explored with respect. When you remain silent and stoic, repressed feelings become part of a toxic cocktail that kills relationships.

So what do we do? The first step towards a lasting, rewarding relationship is accepting that conflict is inevitable. Marriage (or living together) involves two people being with one another in a relationship for up to seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day, year in, year out. This creates a great deal of physical closeness as we eat, drink, sleep and

relax in the same house. And of course on the other hand, for those in the mining industry for example, you can be away from your relationship for long periods at a time. The bottom line is that we care for each other and often have high expectations of how we want to be treated by one another. Being human, we occasionally let each other down. We all experience problems in one-way or another – its part of sharing our lives with another human being. The difference between relationships that work and those that don’t is how well we deal with the challenges we face together. n This article is based on the relationship section of my book, Monkey See Monkey Don’t! If you would like a copy, I’m giving away FREE COPIES to the first 10 readers to contact me at Jason@createptwealth.com.au.

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

7


Top 10 Tips for Working Away: A Survival Guide for Families Don’t assume your life is tougher than the person who’s away/at home. It’s natural to feel this way but getting into a competition about it all won’t help your relationship.

2.

Show a little enthusiasm when you’re reunited. Yes, this takes an effort sometimes, especially when you’ve had a bad day or been flying for hours to get back home – but the rewards can be big.

3. 4.

To help your children cope, never talk about Mum/Dad ‘going away’ or ‘leaving’. It should always be Mum/Dad is ‘going to work’. They’re just words, but children take things very literally. When you are home with the kids, work together to make a special bracelet, card, book or other object to act as a reminder of your bond. Something pocket-sized is great because it can be carried around and treasured every day.

5.

Start out with a team plan. What do you want to achieve personally and professionally? If you’re part of a united team with very clear goals, this can be your focus when times get tough.

6.

Agree on a realistic list of jobs that need doing around the house on the days you’re together – and then write them down. This cuts out the need for nagging and arguments about being nagged.

7.

Don’t organise a massive amount of social activities for the time you’re together. Some couples have a rule of just one catch-up with friends or family over the break at home.

8.

Talk about any problems that arise as a symptom of the lifestyle, rather than as a relationship problem. This will help you tackle issues together as a team, rather

.au www.miningfmpr.cacoticm al tips

ce and Free professional advi in mining and resources. for families

than thinking there is ‘something wrong’ with your relationship or either one of you.

9.

Differing libidos challenge most longterm relationships. For couples who often live and work apart, there’s the added pressure of separation. It’s important to talk openly and honestly about your satisfaction with your sex life.

10. If phone contact isn’t possible, get clever about staying connected: hide little love notes in the suitcase/around the house; read the same book or watch the same DVD as your partner; write a special note to each other for every day you’re apart – to be opened at the same time each day. n Further information is available at www.miningfm.com.au

THE

INKS I’M MY DAD TH

ORE-SOME

SURV GUIDEIVAL Mining Familie s FOR

1.

Practical ways to keep you r rel ati onship healthy and you r family happy.

A

ROC

MY MUM’S

F

I FA

FO R

M 8

Issue 10

www.inflightmagazine.com.au


special events | teamwear | uniforms International style, home grown quality - from contemporary business wear, polos, T shirts, caps and so much more. And it’s just one click away... www.corporate.com.au

Call us for a catalogue

Cooma - Capital of the Snowy Mountains The perfect base to discover the many delights of the Monaro and take in the fresh air and natural beauty of the NSW Snowy Mountains The Cooma Visitors Centre’s friendly staff can help with accommodation bookings, information about activities, attractions and events. We also have souvenirs, maps, annual parks passes and fishing licences.

WE ARE OPEN EVERY DAY 9am-5pm

Call us on 1800 636 525 for your free information pack Or visit www.visitcooma.com.au www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

9


10

Issue 10

www.inflightmagazine.com.au


How to Train

Your Dragon ctacular Arena Spe

Touring in March 2012 I

f you missed out on the hugely popular Walking with Dinosaurs The Arena Spectacular, now’s your chance to make up for it as a live entertainment event for a worldwide audience makes its way to our shores. How to Train Your Dragon Arena Spectacular is an epic arena adventure inspired by the Academy Award nominated DreamWorks Animation film, How To Train Your Dragon and will bring high-flying, fire-breathing dragons to life in an unprecedented live entertainment event for a worldwide audience. In How To Train Your Dragon Arena Spectacular, audiences across the globe will have the unique opportunity to experience the world of How to Train Your Dragon in a one-of-a-kind, live theatrical event that promises to break every rule of traditional arena entertainment. Fire-breathing dragons will soar overhead, immersing audiences in a magical and mythical world of Vikings and dragons. The astonishing cast of characters features 24 dragons, some with wingspans of up to 14 metres, Viking warriors and world-class circus and

t-see This mus ectacle arena sp s world in it will beg ustralia tour in A 2012 in March are ets and tick ow le on sa n k. te via Ticke www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

11


acrobatic performers. The arena spectacular will feature unrivalled production values, projections, flying, stunts, fire and pyrotechnics. In one of the largest theatrical arena productions ever to go on tour, How To Train Your Dragon Arena Spectacular will require an unprecedented 40 semi-trailers to transport the production around Australia. How To Train Your Dragon Arena Spectacular centres on Hiccup, a Viking teenager who doesn’t fit in with his tribe’s longstanding tradition of heroic dragon slayers. Hiccup’s world is turned upside down when he encounters a dragon that challenges him and his fellow Vikings to see the world from an entirely different point of view. n

How to Train your Dragon Arena Spectacular

Fun Facts Number of Dragons:

7 kilowatts of power from 16 truck batteries 1 kilometre of cabling in each body 24 microprocessors control movement along with 15 hydraulic rams and 6 hydraulic motors each

24 Dragons 10 Different Species Represented

2 x Gronckle – 3m long with 2m wing span 1 x Nightmare – 4m long x 6m wingspan 1 x Skrill - 4m long x 6m wingspan

5 Large Dragons

Suits and Puppets

Nadder – Height at shoulder 4m x 12m long & wingspan of 9m

2 Skrills – 2.5m tall x 4.3m long+ 4 Wrestling Dragons Suits - 2m long 2 Stinger suit puppets – 2m at hips tall x 4.5m long 1 Kite dragon – 2m wingspan Multiple nesting dragons (Zipplebacks) 1 Egg Biter Multiple shadow puppets 2 wrestling puppets

Each large dragon:

Each large dragon contains:

40 x 53 foot semis trailers (truck is 22.3m long with cabin) for the Australian Tour

Gronckle – Height at shoulder 3m x 7.5m long & wingspan of 5m Nightmare - Height at shoulder 3.5m x 15.5m long & wingspan of 14m Night Fury (Toothless) – Height at shoulder 2.5m X 8.5m long & wingspan of 10m Red Death – Head and neck total length 12m+, head 5m wide and 6m long, tail is 20m long

7 Flying Dragons 3 x additional Nightfurys (Toothless) – at various scales

12

Issue 10

132 metres of hydraulic hose 90 square metres of fabric 12.2 cubic metres of foam 200 litres of paint

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Weighs 1.6 tons (standard family car) Takes 3 people to operate: 1 Driver and 2 Voodoo Puppeteers, one operates head and tail gross motion, one in charge of minor movements: mouth, blinking & roars

Trucks:

The touring company is made up of: 80 touring cast and crew


Tickets to HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON ARENA SPECTACULAR are on sale now from Ticketek.com.au or 132 849. Ticket prices range from $49.90 to $99.90. MELBOURNE 2 to 11 March - Hisense Arena SYDNEY 15 to 25 March - All Phones Arena BRISBANE 28 March to 1 April - Brisbane Entertainment Centre Inflight Publishing has tickets to give away to the Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne shows. For your chance to win, email us at info@ inflightmagazine.com.au with your name and mailing address as well as the answer to the following question: how many dragons appear in the show? Competition closes at midnight on Monday 6th February 2012.

Open all year round! For fun, friendly & affordable self contained accommodation in the heart of Falls Creek North East Victoria during summer and winter.

Cedarwood Apartments - 11 Schuss Street Falls Creek - North East Victoria P 03 5783 3393 E cedarwo@bigpond.net.au W www.cedarwoodfallscreek.com

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

13


talkin’ technology KEEPING UP WITH THE LATEST GADGETS AND GIZMOS t iDRY The revolutionary iDry is perfect for travelling as iPhone addicts can take their prized possession underwater without the risk of water damage. This innovative case lets you take underwater photos and videos of up to 5 metres, as well as enabling texts and calls while in the water. Music can also be played over the loudspeaker, in or under water. RRP>> $50.00 but online only $11.95 saving 76% Available at oo.com.au

u USB FRIDGE COOLER This mini fridge is the coolest way to keep your drinks chilled while at your pc - perfectly sized for your standard can of soft drink and powered by usb, this will easily be the best addition to your desk this summer. RRP>> $19.95 Stocked at Officeworks: www.officeworks.com.au

t FUJIFILM INSTAX MINI 7 CAMERA Printing excellent credit card-size colour photos instantly, this lightweight and compact camera is great for any holiday maker. RRP>> $85.00 Stocked at Officeworks: www.officeworks.com.au

p KAISER BAAS BT-130 BLUETOOTH PROMINI KEYBOARD This pocket sized keyboard connects wirelessly to Bluetooth enabled devices including desktop or notebook computers, Playstation 3, iPads, iPhones and smart phones. RRP>> $74.96 Stocked at Officeworks: www.officeworks.com.au

14

Issue 10

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

q EDIFIER AUDIO CANDY A compact, lightweight (less than 200 grams), portable audio speaker system with up to 5 hours of audio playback, the Edifier Audio Candy features SD card input and is compatible with MP3 and WMA audio formats. It also has an FM Radio tuner with 24 preset channels and 3.5mm auxiliary input for audio connectivity to multiple audio hosts. RRP>> $49.95 Stocked at Harvey Norman or call (02) 9527 0042 for further stockists.


Experience

a Modern Summer

Sensation at Newcastle Art Gallery S

ome of the most iconic modern Australian paintings will travel north this December when Australian Modern Masterpieces from the Art Gallery of New South Wales goes on display at the Newcastle Art Gallery. Bringing more than 30 of the State Gallery’s most important Australian modern masterpieces in conversation with key works of art from the Newcastle Art Gallery collection, this exhibition will present a fresh look at this vital period in Australian art history. On display will be significant Australian artists including Arthur Boyd, William Dobell, Margaret Olley, Russell Drysdale, Grace Cossington Smith, Donald Friend, James Gleeson, Roy de Maistre, Sidney Nolan, John Olsen, Margaret Preston, Lloyd Rees, Jeffrey Smart, Roland Wakelin, Brett Whiteley and Fred Williams. The Newcastle Art Gallery was selected as the only New South Wales venue for this exhibition in recognition of its significant collection. The quality and breadth of the Newcastle collection means there are many works of art from Australia’s ‘second’ city, Newcastle, ready to hang side by side to complement the paintings making the journey from Australia’s ‘first’ city, Sydney. Each of the modern masterpieces from the Art Gallery of New South Wales will be paired with a work of art by the same artist from the Newcastle collection. Of particular interest to local audiences will be Sir William Dobell’s 1948 Archibald Prize winning portrait of Margaret Olley, which gives a nod to the ongoing artistic legacy of this town. Newcastle’s vibrant arts and cultural scene was one of the main reasons the Lonely Planet guide picked it as one of the hottest destinations for 2011, and the Gallery’s contribution to this continues through bringing the highest quality exhibitions to the region. The exhibition will be supported with a wide ranging events program for all ages. Summer is always great in Newcastle, but with this exciting exhibition taking centre stage at the Gallery, the 2011/2012 season will be even hotter than normal. n

AUSTRALIAN MODERN MASTERPIECES from the Art Gallery of New South Wales will run from 10 December 2011 to 4 March 2012. An admission fee applies; $8 general public, $5 members/ concession and children under 12 years are free. For details regarding all exhibitions and events programming, visit www.nag.org.au (Above) Brett Whiteley The green mountain (Fiji) 1969 oil, collage on cardboard Art Gallery of New South Wales Gift of Patrick White 1979 © Wendy Whiteley

(Right) Grace Crowley Portrait of Lucie Beynis 1929 oil on canvas on hardboard Art Gallery of New South Wales Purchased 1965 © Reproduced with permission of Grace Crowley Estate

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

15


CALROSSY ANGLICAN SCHOOL

You’re invited to join us at our Experience Day, 24 February, 2012!

Contact the Registrar, Mrs Miriam Knight, for further details on 6766 2965.

Secondary Girls Day and Boarding

Secondary Boys Day and Boarding

ACER Scholarship exam 25 February, 2012 for entry into Years 7, 9 and 11, 2013. Register via our website by 6 February, 2012. www.calrossy.nsw.edu.au Secondary Girls Day & Boarding Brisbane Street Campus 140 Brisbane Street Tamworth, NSW 2340 (02) 6766 2965

Secondary Boys Day & Boarding William Cowper Campus 242 Moore Creek Road Tamworth, NSW 2340 (02) 6761 0000

Chrisitian - Personal - Caring


The Future of Boarding Schools BY RICHARD STOKES, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AUSTRALIAN BOARDING SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION (WWW.BOARDING.ORG.AU)

S

o many of the population involved in education today, especially those working in private schools, are wondering whether the traditional boarding school will survive. But what is a traditional boarding school? In Australian terms this is difficult to answer, as there are many different types of schools which offer boarding. Some aim mainly at the country market, providing education for ‘kids from the bush’. Others aim at the overseas market, looking to provide an education for those students from non-English speaking countries, particularly those from Asia. Yet others aim at the short distance market – those from within 100km of the school but who need a boarding school for some reason or another. Schools are recognising the changing expectations of the market, and adapting, refocusing and reconfiguring their services to respond to these market forces. Boarding schools are looking at a range of options, such as extended day, weekly boarding and short term stays. Many families are keen to have time together every weekend, so a weekly boarding option has become common in most schools in Australia. Such an option, coupled with the support and supervision provided whilst boarders undertake their homework, assignments and study, helps many families who have struggled to provide a suitable environment for academic excellence. The structure provided by a boarding school is one in which adolescents can really excel, and the freedom offered by being able to be at home on weekends provides an excellent choice for many families. Casual boarding, where students stay for two or three nights a week, is becoming increasingly common in many schools. Such an offering helps those students who are actively involved in the co-curricular programme of schools and helps save wasted travel time which can be transferred into study and social time together. Schools often offer this at a reduced rate, providing families with a real alternative to long hours on buses or trains or in cars. Short stay boarding, where students stay for a week, two weeks or up to a term, is also an option many boarding schools have begun to offer. Many parents have particularly busy times in their work schedule, or must travel interstate or overseas for short periods, and schools which allow students to stay in the boarding house during such periods have often picked up full time or weekly boarders as the children have enjoyed the time in boarding, and often have achieved excellent results with their studies. Long day boarding is another of the new breed of offerings. Some schools have branched into offering their students the opportunity to stay at school longer, do homework, have dinner, participate in clubs and sports training, all before their parents pick them up on their way home from a long day at work. For those families living reasonably close to the school where the parents still want daily contact with their child, the long day option is very attractive. Next issue, I’ll discuss why parents might consider sending their children to boarding school in the first place. n

BALANCE Great boys growing into great men of integrity, faith, wisdom and compassion

Life at Knox Grammar School balances the academic and the co-curricular, the personal and the social, through its ‘whole of life’ programs, its high level of academic support, and individual care, all within superb facilities and accommodation. 2013 and 2014 boarding enrolments are currently being confirmed. To discuss boarding at Knox, please contact Martin Gooding on 02 9473 9768 or goodingm@knox.nsw.edu.au Knox Grammar School | Pacific Highway, Wahroonga | 02 9487 0122 www.knox.nsw.edu.au | A Uniting Church school for day boys K-12 with boarding for up to 150 boys from Years 7-12

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

17


Business Buzz

Protect your property Cedarwood Apartments Open all year round

Y

ou’d think somewhere like the Australian Alps would be dead over the summer season… but you’d be very mistaken with the Falls Creek region offering a number of enticing options in the warmer months Unlike other Australian Alps properties, Cedarwood Apartments, located in beautiful Falls Creek - North East Victoria, has accommodation to rent all year round – and you’ll find holidaying there in the summer months certainly has its benefits. “One of the benefits of coming here in summer is that our prices are much lower,” said manager Narelle Clark. “In fact, you’re looking at paying less than half of the peak rates so it’s extremely good value.” But it’s not just value for money that makes a summer holiday at Falls Creek worth your while with activities abound. “Believe it or not, there’s actually a lot more to do in the summer than winter,” Narelle said. “In winter, if you’re not a skier there aren’t a lot of options, but in summer you can go mountain biking, hiking, bird watching, kayaking, do photography – you name it!” Additionally, Cedarwood Apartments is actually the highest building in the area meaning the views are second to none and the silence is almost deafening. “Another benefit to summer is that it’s very quiet,” Narelle added. “There are also a number of festivals and events over the season including the Falls Creek Singles Festival over the New Years weekend, the 2XU triathlon, Billy Cart Derby, 3Peaks Cycling challenge and Easter Festival to mention a few. “You can’t get a resort where there’s so much to do and Cedarwood’s big roomy apartments are a big advantage over other properties.” To book or find out more about Fall Creek, visit the Cedarwood Apartments website at www.cedarwoodfallscreek.com n

18

Issue 10

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

from fire season with IB International

Increase protection with irrigation

T

hey are part of our country’s heritage but when bush fires strike, there’s little we can do. There are ways to protect our homes offering peace of mind for when the season does arrive. Watering your gardens and homes beforehand is important and the trick is to get as much water as possible in the places it is needed. This is a good idea before any threat to our home, not during. Using a sprinkler or pump is the best option as a garden hose hand held can be extremely dangerous if the threat of a bush fire is looming. The most important thing to do if this is the case is leave your home. In mining for dust control and fire prevention, water cannons are used to ensure that the coverage is correct. Pressure, positioning, angle and flow are paramount to making this work. Vari-angle water cannons with the right sized nozzles and configuration protect mines, ports and everyone on site. Where your home is concerned, small embers can land and start their own fires. They can ignite fires long before the fire reaches your boundaries, and can cause damaging spot fires. So when it comes to watering, getting pressure ratings, angles and flow right will mean greater coverage and less risk. Canons with the right pressure ratings can ensure that flow covers all areas, taking into account wind pressure and other variables. Irrigation specialists deal with this every day. The same challenges on the mine site apply wherever water application takes place. When it comes to configurations that will make a difference to your own risk reduction for your home and around your property you need to consider the following: Portability/flexibility - being able to move canons and sprinklers around, perhaps some fixed and others on portable stands. When there is no risk of fire, this level of flexibility will allow the cannons and sprinklers to be used for crops, turf and flora. Properly configured pumps and hose - Depending upon the goal of your risk reduction, you can configure what you need to suit your access to water and the position of your home. For further information on how to increase protection around your home against bush fires, visit ibinternational.com.au n


Puzzles Crossword

ACROSS 1 3 9 10 11 13 15 17 20 21 22 23

- - - - in the woods (4) Material formerly used for making incombustable articles (8) Folding paper decoratively (7) Small live piece of coal (5) Haiti's seaport (4-2-6) To pay before service (6) Take no notice of (6) Employing somebody to park your car (5,7) To restrain (5) Esteem (7) An end-blown flute (8) Shock (4)

Sudoku Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row, column and 3x3 square must contain one of each digit.

DOWN

SOLUTIONS

1 2 4 5 6 7 8 12 14 16 18 19

A tube through which a stream of air is forced into a flame (8) Tree heath (5) Lacking in size (6) Formal attire for a woman (7,5) An ingredient of cigarettes (7) Serum's plural (4) Derogatory term or slang for a Queenslander (6,6) To increase (8) Stretchy (7) Thinly scattered (6) Without skill for a particular task (5) A rolled metal bar (1-3)

Find-a-Word

Artichoke Asparagus Bean Beetroot Broccoli Capsicum Carrot Cauliflower Celery

Cucumber Eggplant Eschalot Parsley Parsnip Pea Potato Pumpkin Radish

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Red cabbage Shallot Spinach Sweetcorn Tomato Turnip Zucchini

Issue 10

19


Great for Mining Life & Living

WE BRING YOU PRODUCTS PERFECT FOR YOUR LIFESTYLE...

p UNIDEN’S GPS RANGE Uniden’s new super-slim GPS range provides drivers with the most realistic car navigation experience and exceptionally easy operation at an affordable price. No thicker than an iPhone, each features a bright and intuitive touchscreen to display roads, landmarks and terrain in the vibrant 3D detail for which Uniden car navigation systems have become renowned. Available from leading electronics retailers and department stores. IGO50 5” Flat Panel GPS Car Navigation System>> RRP $249.95 IGO43 4.3” Flat Panel GPS Car Navigation System>> RRP $199.95 IGO35 3.5” Flat Panel GPS Car Navigation System>> RRP $159.95

p PHILIPS PORTABLE DVD PLAYER Now you can enjoy your movies any time and place for longer. With up to five hours battery life and full resume on power loss, Philips’ new PD9000 Portable DVD Player features a 9”/23cm, widescreen LCD display for a great viewing experience and lets you indulge in high-quality DVD/DivX®/MPEG movies, JPEG photos and MP3-CD/CD music while on the go. RRP>> $249.95

20

Issue 10

www.inflightmagazine.com.au


p COLGATE WISP The mini disposable toothbrush for use on-the-go, giving a whole new meaning to fresh breath. Featuring a built-in breath freshening bead, there is no need for water or rinsing so it’s perfect for use during travel, in the office, before meeting friends, on a date or before a job interview to give your whole mouth that just brushed cleaning feeling. Available in all major supermarkets>> RRP $3.49 (4 pack) or $5.99 (8 pack)

p RIVER TO REEF: COOKING THE CATCH From the popular TV series, River to Reef comes the delicious new spinoff DVD, Cooking the Catch. Join host, Theo Rozakis - an everyday Aussie bloke with a passion for fishing and creating mouth watering recipes for his catches. Filmed on location along Australia’s stunning coast, viewers learn how to prepare and cook their catch themselves. Drawing on his Greek heritage and the expertise of his professional fishing buddies, Theo creates simple recipes with ingredients that every family will have in their kitchen – or on the boat, the caravan or RV. Available at all major retailers or online at www.dukevideo.com.au >>RRP $24.95

p UV NATURAL With summer just around the corner, it’s time to start thinking about sun protection! These natural sunscreens not only protect the skin from the harmful effects of the sun but also provide hydration so that your skin glows with health and youthful vitality. The products are carefully formulated using naturally derived ingredients and zinc oxide to protect from the sun’s harmful UVA and UVB rays. For stockist enquiries, visit any Terry White Chemist or selected health stores. Also available online at www.uvnatural.com UV Natural Sunscreen SPF30+ 150g>> RRP$28.95 UV Natural Sunscreen SPF30+ 50g>> RRP$14.95 UV Natural Baby Sunscreen 150g>> RRP $28.95 UV Natural Baby Sunscreen 50g>> RRP $14.95 UV Natural Sport Sunscreen 125g>> RRP$26.95 UV Natural Lip Sunscreen>> RRP$8.95

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

21


Top 5

Family Travel

TIPS

I

t’s that time of the year - families everywhere are looking for a much deserved getaway holiday, whether it be up the coast, interstate or overseas. Family travel can, at times, be stressful and Australia’s leading travel agency group, Travelscene American Express, understands that kids need to be entertained and budgets need to be followed.

“Wednesdays are also the cheapest days to fly, while weekends are most expensive”

Their top 5 tips when travelling with the family are: 1.

Look for package deals. Most people book flights and accommodation separately which can end up in spending more than intended! Package deals can offer huge discounts, and travel agents are the most up to date with what’s hot and what’s not.

2.

Use reward points such as airline frequent flyers or, if you’re an American Express card member, you can use your Membership Rewards points to pay for all or part of your travel. Using them for your next family holiday means you save cash, and gain extra money to keep the kids entertained.

22

Issue 10

3.

Choose hotels with free add-ons. Some hotels charge for the extras that can come free at other accommodation sites, such as internet access and breakfast. Taking the time to search around for what is included can be time consuming, but will ensure you have more spending money for activities.

4.

Travel during non-peak periods. From mid-January onwards, many airfares, resorts and hotels move from a high season to a shoulder season pricing, which means less crowded resorts and hotels as well as great savings in the last weeks of school holidays.

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Wednesdays are also the cheapest days to fly, while weekends are most expensive. Ask your Travelscene American Express agent to help plan your family holiday so you get the best value deals on hotel rooms and flights.

5.

Pack carefully! To keep children entertained choose toys that will occupy your kids for long periods of time such as a board game or portable DVD player, while the classic games such as ‘I Spy’ can keep the whole family entertained. Luggage costs should also be kept in mind, so divide belongings in a carry-on or bring a second piece of luggage – which will still cost less than an overweight bag. To help you plan your family holiday, talk to an experienced Travelscene American Express Member agent, who will provide direct access to airlines, hotels and tour operators, as well as exclusive deals only available through an agent. Contact your local Travelscene American Express Member on 13 TRAVEL (13 8728) or visit www.travelscene.net.au n


TALK BACK WITH OCCUPATION: Folks seem to like the cartoons I’ve been in. Oh, and lots of folks know about my club. I bet a lot of little kids know about my clubhouse too. WHAT DO YOU NEVER TRAVEL WITHOUT: If ya ask me, it sure is hard to beat a pair of red shorts, they are a must when we pack to travel! And my music. I like all sorts of music! If it can get me dancin’, great! If it can get a crowd dancing, that’s even better! Of course I never travel without Minnie and my friends Goofy, Donald, Daisy and the rest! FAVOURITE HOLIDAY DESTINATION: We love travelling all over the world, meeting children and making them smile

Mickey Mouse and dance and sing. Australia is one of our favourites. Australian kids sing real loud! WHAT’S THE WILDEST THING THAT HAS HAPPENED TO YOU AND THE DISNEY CREW? Well, between Donald’s practical jokes and Goofy almost blowin’ things up all the time, I’d have to say, “this week.” (ha-ha).

art. Not to mention, it’s a great way to get to know other people. But maybe the most important thing to me is how much fun music can be!

WHAT’S COMING UP FOR YOU NEXT? “Rock and roll!” (ha-ha). We’re touring Australia these summer holidays (from 28th December 2011 to 6th February 2012) with Disney Live! Mickey’s Music Festival. I can hardly wait to see all my friends from down-under, real soon. I heard that kids who are into music are really good at learning all kinds of stuff, like math and science and

www.inflightmagazine.com.au

Issue 10

23


AUSTRALIAN MODERN MASTERPIECES f r o m

1 0

t h e

A r t

G a l l e r y

D e c e m b e r

2 0 1 1

o f

-

N e w

4

S o u t h

W a l e s

M a r c h

2 0 1 2

Selected from the collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, this exhibition presents over eighty icons of Australian modern art, by artists including Grace Cossington Smith, William Dobell, Russell Drysdale, James Gleeson, Sidney Nolan, Margaret Olley, John Olsen, Margaret Preston, Lloyd Rees, Jeffrey Smart, Brett Whiteley and Fred Williams. Newcastle Art Gallery is the only New South Wales venue for this exhibition and will include complementary works by these artists from its collection.

Newcastle Art Gallery LAMAN STREET NEWCASTLE NSW 2300 T 02 4974 5100 www.nag.org.au

Left - Grace Cossington Smith Trees (detail) c1927 oil on plywood 88.5 x 72.0 cm Purchased with assistance from the Art Gallery and Conservatorium Committee 1967 Newcastle Art Gallery collection © Estate of Grace Cossington Smith Right - Grace Cossington Smith The curve of the bridge 1928–29 oil on cardboard 110.5 x 82.5cm Art Gallery of New South Wales Purchased with funds provided by the Art Gallery Society of New South Wales and James Fairfax AO 1991 © Estate of Grace Cossington Smith


Mining Life & Living NSW Issue 10