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SECTION T ✭ SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

3RD


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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR • INDYSTAR.COM

3RD

In the

LOOP

Top employers invite workers to help shape company’s future By Michael L. Jackson

C

The Indianapolis Star

onnection and direction. When it comes to workplace satisfaction in Central Indiana, they are the two most important factors when determining the region’s top employers. Of the 20 questions that WorkplaceDynamics asked nearly 23,000 area workers this year, the six that deal with connection (employees feeling they are appreciated and doing something meaningful) and direction (employees being emotionally bought into what the organization is striving to achieve) had the highest level of importance.

The survey statement “I believe this company is going in the right direction” had the highest “importance value” for area employees. “I do believe that people in senior positions have responsibility to set the overall direction,” said Monarch Beverage Co. Inc. CEO Phil Terry, the leadership award winner among supervisors at large companies. “But then you find great people, you put them in the right job, and then you figure out how to help. “You have to make people understand that they’re appreciated,” he said. “To the extent you can, you want to give them as much purpose as possible. Make them feel that this is more than just a paycheck.” This year 119 companies participated in the annual Top Workplaces survey, up 21 from last year. Ten businesses, including No. 1 large company

Barnes & Thornburg, were named a top workplace for a fifth consecutive time. Twenty-five companies that participated for the first time were selected as a top workplace, and three of those first-time participants made it into the top five in their respective category. “We are delighted to see the number of companies participating in our Top Workplaces program continue to grow,” said WorkplaceDynamics CEO Doug Claffey. “We expect that in years to come many more companies will participate in this important survey that provides a deep internal look at what drives employee engagement and company productivity.” In polling more than 5.4 million people since the company was founded in 2006, WorkplaceDynamics has learned that pay, benefits and training are less important than the factors related to connection, direction and execution (the company having a high performance culture). Being “bought in” to what the organization is doing results in high levels of employee engagement and satisfaction. In 2008, WorkplaceDynamics created a virtual fund of these “organizationally healthy” companies, and since that time the fund has outperformed the S&P 500 index by 48 percent, the company said. Based on results from Central Indiana’s workforce this year, WorkplaceDynamics created a local index of the top five employers with the highest

level of overall employee engagement. Small companies Covenant Christian High School and product developer Indesign LLC led the list, followed by human-service provider Opportunities for Positive Growth, Hilton Indianapolis Hotel & Suites, and law firm Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman. Both Covenant Christian and Indesign ranked in the top five in each of the three categories of connection, direction and execution. “The thing that defines Covenant is that we believe that we are writing our story,” said Kyle Hopkins, who teaches senior English at the school. “Our story has been written partially, but each person that is a part of this place is part of a story that’s being written. “We don’t know where it’s going. We don’t see the end of it. And I think that’s what gives us our direction and purpose because we each feel like we are a part of it. I’ve never heard of a workplace having that sort of philosophy, especially a school.” At Indesign, an engineering design firm on the city’s northeast side, workers have a strong sense of connection, not only with the company but also with its clients. Workers will tell you that they are not just in the business of creating new products; they are also helping dreams come true for others. One particular story stands out. In 2008, Drew Ann Long began a journey to create a shopping cart for special needs children. The Alabama woman’s daughter, Caroline, suffers from multiple disabilities. As Caroline grew older, grocery shopping became a frustrating task for Long, who had to maneuver both a traditional shopping cart and a wheelchair. Long hired the engineers at Indesign, and with their help “Caroline’s Cart” has become a reality. “Our team just jumped at the opportunity to help this woman,” said Ron Kern, Indesign’s director of technical marketing. “The cart enabled her to bring her daughter, who wouldn’t fit into a standard grocery cart, with her along on a shopping trip. How cool is that to be helping out someone like that?”

DETERMINING THE TOP WORKPLACES Of the 755 Central Indiana employers invited by WorkplaceDynamics of Exton, Pa., to participate in the Top Workplaces survey, 119 took part. The sole requirement was that the organization employ at least 50 people. Companies could be public, private, nonprofit or governmental. Of the 40,768 employees of the participating companies, 36,273 received surveys and 22,981 responded to 20 statements covering areas such as company values, leadership, management, benefits, pay, growth opportunities, appreciation, retention and work/life balance. Large workplaces of 400 or more employees had 16 participants. Midsize companies of 150 to 399 employees had 27 participants. Small companies with 149 or fewer employees had 55 participants.

WHO MADE THE LIST? The No. 1 large company, Barnes & Thornburg, repeats taking top honors in its category this year. The No. 1 midsize company, Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman, is the first company to maintain a No. 1 ranking for three consecutive years. The No. 1 small company, Harry & Izzy’s, moved up from 13th in 2011 and sixth last year. Profiles of the top five companies in each category begin on Page T3. The complete list is on Page T11.

CREDITS This publication is a product of The Indianapolis Star, a Gannett company. Additional content also is available online at www.indystar.com/topworkplaces. President and publisher Karen Crotchfelt

Content Writer: Michael L. Jackson Editors: Eric Dick, Leigh Hedger (317) 444-6077

Advertising Bill Platt, Advertising sales manager (317) 444-7424 bill.platt@indystar.com


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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR • INDYSTAR.COM

3RD

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 •

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NO. 1 | LARGE COMPANIES

Barnes & Thornburg LLP By Michael L. Jackson The Indianapolis Star

Ask employees at Barnes & Thornburg LLP why they love their job, and the answer is very likely to be “because of the people I work with.” Sure, the benefits, good pay and perks of the job would make any worker at the law firm happy. But it’s the genuine care and concern for employees and one another that gets talked about most. “This is one of the most welcoming, accommodating, accepting environments I’ve ever been in, both from a work (and personal) perspective,” said Brian Weir-Harden, a fifth-year associate. “There are a lot of great people here. It runs the spectrum as far as the type of people you encounter.” That environment is just one of the many reasons Barnes & Thornburg held onto its spot as the No.1large company to work for in Central Indiana. Barnes & Thornburg is just one of two large companies to be recognized in each of the five years that WorkplaceDynamics has been conducting its survey locally. Community Health Network is the other. Of the 75 companies that have been named a top place to work since 2009, Barnes & Thornburg is the only company to place in the top five each year. And it’s the third time the company has been ranked first. “At Barnes, there is a focus on associates taking the opportunity to craft their own careers,” said Weir-Harden, who started his career at Barnes & Thornburg in finance, insolvency and restructuring and now practices white-collar crime litigation. “The firm and all those involved have been very supportive of that transition.” Legal secretary Marcia Meyer has been with Barnes & Thornburg for the past nine years. She, too, has seen the firm’s commitment to making sure employees are happy in the area where they are working. “They care about what your work relationship is with your attorneys or paralegals, and if it’s not going well, they will try to make a better fit,” said Meyer, who has worked for two other law firms during her nearly 30-year career. “To me that’s unheard of compared to what I experienced before. “They want you to want to come to work. So they really do go above and

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Employee Linda Stevens enjoys the firm’s benefit for the Wheeler Center for Women & Children. FRANK ESPICH / THE STAR

BOTTOM LINE Founded: 1982. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Description: One of the 100 largest law firms in the nation, with more than 50 dedicated practice areas. Locations: 12. Employees: 1,049, including 490 in Indianapolis. Website: www.btlaw.com.

beyond there.” Barnes & Thornburg is committed to the growth and development of its workers, providing multiple avenues for associates and employees to learn. In fact, when compared to last year, the state-

ment “I get the formal training I want for my career” saw the most improvement in the survey. Associates are given an allowance to pursue educational opportunities outside of the company. Seminars and attorney presentations are commonplace. And this year Barnes & Thornburg invested in firmwide membership in the Practising Law Institute for all legal personnel. PLI holds seminars and webcasts in many legal areas, as well as provides on-demand learning through audio and video downloads, CDs and DVDs. “A lot is offered here,” Weir-Harden said of the educational opportunities. “I don’t think I’ve ever exhausted my education fund, and I feel like I’ve done some pretty neat things.”

The caring atmosphere that employees talk about within the company extends beyond the walls of Barnes & Thornburg, too. A Care Center Committee puts together year-round fundraisers to support the Wheeler Mission Center for Women & Children. During the past 14 years the committee has raised $175,000 for the shelter and given hours and hours of volunteer service. “One of the things that I really like about working here is the generosity of people, both the staff and the attorneys,” said Linda Stevens, a 21-year company veteran. “It seems like so many people are involved. Barnes & Thornburg is very supportive of us. They’re helping us to make a difference for people.”


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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR • INDYSTAR.COM

3RD

NO. 2 | LARGE COMPANIES

ERMCO Inc. By Michael L. Jackson The Indianapolis Star

In announcing ERMCO Inc.’s back-toback recognition as one of Central Indiana’s top workplaces last year, company Vice President Greg Gossett boldly stated: “We will take all of this input seriously and will use it to make ourselves an even better company.” Call Gossett a man of his word. After finishing seventh and third in the midsize category in 2011 and 2012, respectively, the electrical contractor not only jumped into the large company category this year but also moved up a spot to No. 2. “Everywhere we can get feedback on our company, if there’s a way that we can make ourselves better, we take that very seriously,” ERMCO President Darrell Gossett said. It’s that type of attitude that also garnered ERMCO this year’s special award for training.

Whether it’s through mentoring programs, off-site classes or programs provided through its ERMCO Institute, the focus of the company is on educating employees. If such efforts can help them become better workers, or just better people, ERMCO goes out of the way to make it happen. “It’s ingrained in our culture that people don’t want to just continue doing what they’re doing today,” Darrell Gossett said. “With technology our jobs are changing constantly, and we need to stay ahead of the competition, stay ahead of the industry. “If there’s something out there that’s going to make us better, we need to know about it first. We need to be trained earlier and better than anybody else out there because that’s what our customers expect.” Employees who are going to become supervisors must go through a leadership awareness class in which they are taught not just how to do things but also

BOTTOM LINE Founded: 1962. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Description: Electrical and low voltage systems contractor. Locations: Two. Employees: 431. Special award: Training. Website: www.ermco.com.

Apprentices Tyler Roberts, John Hostetter and Rick Rowekamp work on a project. KELLY WILKINSON / THE STAR

why ERMCO does them. “We want to help them become leaders,” Greg Gossett said. “And we want them to understand the philosophy behind what we do and why.” In an attempt to keep ideas fresh while sharing industry best practices, ERMCO has partnered with10 other noncompeting, privately owned electrical contractors from across the country to form the Electric Roundtable. The group

holds discussions throughout the year on every facet of the business, from health and safety to accounting and purchasing. But ERMCO is not just a company focused on growth and well-trained employees. Senior management makes a concerted effort to make sure the company retains the family feel that permeated the atmosphere when Edward Gossett founded it in 1962. “They make it a point to make sure each employee knows that family comes first,” project manager Luke Jackson said. “It’s a family-oriented company, so it stems from that aspect and goes downhill. So family always comes first. And because it’s an enjoyable place to work, there’s not a lot of stress.”

NO. 3 | LARGE COMPANIES

Monarch Beverage Co. Inc. By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

No one would call Kristen Lampkin’s job undemanding. But as a recruiter for Monarch Beverage Co. Inc., that role is certainly made easier by the fact that she gets to sell potential employees on one of the area’s consistently ranked top places to work. After consecutive years in the No. 4 position among large companies, the wholesale alcoholic beverage distributor moved up one spot this year, and CEO Phil Terry took home the leadership award. “You can make a list of the benefits and see how those things can affect morale and satisfaction with work,” said Terry, who has been CEO of the company for 22 years. “But I think all the data on management tells you there are other things that are much more important than all that. You want all that. But the more important thing is culture. “What does it feel like to work here? Is

Founded: 1947. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Description: Wholesale alcoholic beverage distributor. Locations: One. Employees: 650, including 550 in Central Indiana. Special award: Leadership. Website: www.monarchbeverage.com.

Monarch Beverage CEO Phil Terry says workplace culture matters most. FRANK ESPICH / THE STAR

it frustrating to work here, or do people generally have a level of satisfaction with their life and their career? We do focus on those less measurable aspects of what makes a good workplace.” At Monarch, it’s a culture focused on personal and professional growth where managers are tasked with ensuring employees can answer yes to each of six

critical questions: » Do I know what is expected of me? » Have I been given the resources, training and knowledge needed for my job? » Am I given the chance to do what I do best? » In the last seven days have I received recognition? » Does my manager care about me as a person?

» Does my manager care about my development? “We have a philosophy that the frontline manager is the most important person in determining whether employees are satisfied or frustrated,” Terry said. “If a manager can get his or her employees to say yes to those questions, we know we’ve got a good manager. And we’ve got a good working environment for our employees.” Terry describes his management style as “servant leadership,” and it was on display in December following a dayafter-Christmas blizzard that essentially shut down the city. With one less day to get merchandise out in time for the busy New Year’s holiday, Terry was among many who ditched their traditional roles to ensure merchants would have stocked shelves. “Just that complete giving of himself gives comfort to the employees that we’re in great hands with our leadership team,” said Terry Williamson, the director of logistics.

IN SOME WORKPLACES YOU TAKE ORDERS. IN THIS ONE, WE WRITE HISTORY.

Thanks to our dedicated staff of clinicians, technologists, researchers, informatics innovators, and solution sales and service experts for making FDB one of Indianapolis’s Top Workplaces. Every day our talented and impressive employees turn drug data into drug knowledge used by millions of healthcare decision makers throughout the world.

Turning a Job into a Mission The best technologies and facilities, the most advanced processes and evidence-based practices—yes, they play an important role in putting exceptional health care within reach for everyone. But the most important element is people, a team of professionals with a passion for enhancing the health and well-being of patients and communities. For a team this extraordinary, this isn’t just a workplace—it’s a place to follow life’s calling.

Visit our website at fdbhealth.com for the latest information on job opportunities, or email Human Resources at hr@fdbhealth.com.

eCommunity.com

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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR • INDYSTAR.COM

3RD

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 •

T5

NO. 4 | LARGE COMPANIES

Tendercare Home Health Services By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

Leslie Deitchman still fondly remembers the summer that a Schwan’s delivery driver thought she was running a children’s day-care center. It was the mid-1990s, and Deitchman and her husband, Jim, had recently started Tendercare Home Health Services. Deitchman and her small staff were working from her home with all of their children running around (17 total) when the driver approached her. “The Schwan’s van pulled up, and the driver said, ‘I can get you a free freezer. … You’re running a day care, aren’t you?’ ” Deitchman recalled. “I told him, ‘We’re not running a day care, but I’ll still take that freezer.’ ” From those humble beginnings Tendercare has grown into one of the largest private home-health agencies in Indiana, employing 430 people. For Deitchman, who began her career as a registered nurse, the growth still shocks her.

Founded: 1994. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Description: Private home health-care agency. Locations: One. Employees: 430. Special award: Direction. Website: www.tchhs.net.

CEO Leslie Deitchman, nurse Ann Humphrey and frequent visitor Kyrillos “Karl” Rezk, 3. MICHELLE PEMBERTON / THE STAR

“We still look at each other and say, ‘What? We’ve got a real company here,’ ” she said. Tendercare is one of three first-time participants in the annual survey of Central Indiana workplaces to crack the top five in its respective category. It’s also

the winner of this year’s special award for direction. “I think Tendercare has been on the right direction for years and years,” said information technology specialist Beth Gorman, whose mother worked with Deitchman during those yearly years. “It’s not about the bottom line. It’s not about the money. It’s about the patients and the employees.” Because Tendercare takes care of clients in their homes, it allows for a flexible work schedule, an area in which employees had high praise for the company.

Whether they work three 12-hour days, a traditional 40-hour week or just the weekends, the schedule at Tendercare allows employees to find the right balance between their professional and personal lives. “There’s balance between family and work,” said Denise Rusler, who started at Tendercare as a field nurse and is now its director of nursing. “You have to put (your kids) in day care. We work to meet their family’s needs. They send us a schedule when they can work, and we schedule them. The philosophy has always been family first.” Every Christmas, Tendercare holds a huge party for staff and patients. Last year, more than 900 people attended the gathering at the Ritz Charles in Carmel. “We just always wanted to be the best and have a good reputation and take good care of everyone,” Deitchman said. “We have the reputation of being very service oriented and doing whatever it takes to meet the patients’ needs. Because of that we keep growing.”

NO. 5 | LARGE COMPANIES

Westfield Washington Schools By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

When Dr. Mark Keen took over as superintendent of Westfield Washington Schools in 1997, it was a four-school system serving a couple of thousand students. Today there are nine schools, 6,200 students and 832 employees — the largest employer in Westfield. And for the first time, it has been voted one of Central Indiana’s top places to work. “The key to what we have here is a structured interview process that identifies staff members who are highly focused on students and not themselves,” Keen said. “I think when you identify people who will basically move heaven and earth to help kids, they have a common interest, and they’re also predisposed to working together. “I think the key to any healthy organization is the fact that everyone works

Founded: 1964. Headquarters: Westfield. Description: K-12 public school system. Locations: One (Nine schools: six elementary, one intermediate, one middle school, one high school). Employees: 832. Website: www.wws.k12.in.us.

Biology teacher Eric Rauch credits the administration for allowing academic freedom. KELLY WILKINSON / THE STAR

together and gets along and has the same outlook. We’ve never varied from that.” Keen’s viewpoint is simple: Teachers shouldn’t be told how to run their classrooms.

His goal as superintendent, he says, is to select good people and support what they do. Teachers are allowed to be process-oriented, not program-oriented. They’re given an expected outcome and allowed to work with others to achieve it. “We do our best to find talented and skilled top-notch employees, and then we let them do their jobs,” said Chris Baldwin, executive director of human resources and a former Westfield

elementary school principal. Eric Rauch certainly feels that trust and freedom. Rauch has taught biology at Westfield High School for the past four years. “The amount of support that we get from all of our administration is paramount and always present in our schools at WWS,” Rauch said. “I know as a teacher if it is what is best for the profound learning of our students, then it is supported and encouraged by the administrative team.” Two years ago Westfield opened a health and wellness clinic at the middle school. Employees who visit the clinic do not pay a copay or deductible and can have some of their prescriptions filled for free. And in 2005, the school system opened a fee-based child-care program to retain young staff members. “People want to come here,” Keen said. “Our people in the schools here are our best recruiters.”

The sky is the limit!

Top Workplaces • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012

Great People Yield Great Results www.meyer-najem.com


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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR • INDYSTAR.COM

3RD

NO. 1 | MIDSIZE COMPANIES

Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman P.C. By Michael L. Jackson The Indianapolis Star

The folks at Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman P.C. will have to be careful how they celebrate this year’s No. 1 ranking among midsize companies. After all, former NBA coach Pat Riley does hold the trademark on “Three-peat.” In the brief history of measuring workplace satisfaction in Central Indiana and choosing the area’s top workplaces, Hall Render is the first company to maintain a No. 1 ranking for three consecutive years. John Ryan, the law firm’s president and managing partner, says its core values — excellence in the whole person, caring relationships, loyalty, quality service, integrity and respect — explain not only the foundation for Hall Render’s business success but also the reason for the firm being consistently voted among the best places to work. When senior litigation paralegal John Myers joined the ranks in May of 2001, he had an opportunity to meet the man responsible for laying the foundation of those principles: founder William S. Hall. “He called me in to have lunch with him one day, at the time he was probably 91, and he just kind of went through his history and how blessed and fortunate he was to have incredible people around him that allowed this firm to be built,” Myers said. “The key he focused on was the relationships he had built along the way and how those relationships forged the work we’d do. As I continued to work for Hall Render I could see it was true, that people bought into that philosophy. “It didn’t matter if you were the person answering the phones, a paralegal, a lawyer, a secretary,” he said. “Whoever you were, we were all part of a team forging that relationship with the clients that we served. When you see that authenticity in a large group of people, it makes you want to stay.” Ryan, who earned the leadership award among midsize businesses last year, echoes Myers’ sentiment. He says

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Michelle Bodem takes a photo of Stacy Hanefeld, Terra Madsen and Angela Fox at Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman as they all wear T-shirts to support a co-worker dealing with cancer. KELLY WILKINSON / THE STAR

that no matter the job title, every employee is valued and their contributions are highly appreciated. Employees feel the gratitude. In addition to its No. 1 ranking, Hall Render also received this year’s special award for appreciation. “I do feel genuinely appreciated working at Hall Render,” said Tracey Johns, an IT procurement and deployment specialist. “My manager and director do a great job at expressing their appreciation for the dedication and hard work I put in each and every day. “Hall Render makes you feel like you are part of a family, not just an employee at a large company. Hall Render has been a true blessing to me and my

family.” The family feel was on display in March as some employees wore “Pink for Pam” T-shirts in honor of a legal assistant who was recently diagnosed with cancer. And true to its mission statement, which calls for balance in respects to work and family, staff members are able to adjust their daily start times to meet their personal needs outside of the office. “I think the philosophy that holds true, and I think this came from Mr. Hall, too, if you’re a good husband, if you’re a good father, if you serve your community, that’s going to spill over to your work life,” Myers said. “Hall Render has allowed me to be the dad that I want to be,

BOTTOM LINE Founded: 1967. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Company description: A full-service law firm specializing in health law. Locations: Detroit area, Milwaukee, Louisville, Ky., and Indianapolis. Employees: 348, including 229 in Central Indiana. Special award: Appreciation. Website: www.hallrender.com.

the husband that I want to be. It’s been a great environment and a great arrangement.”


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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR • INDYSTAR.COM

3RD

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 •

T7

NO. 2 | MIDSIZE COMPANIES

Opportunities for Positive Growth By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

After four consecutive years as being recognized as one of the top small companies in Central Indiana, Opportunities for Positive Growth landed with a bang in the midsize category this year. The growth wasn’t necessarily planned by co-founder and CEO Gail Kahl. It turns out she just had a hard time saying no. As service providers for individuals with developmental disabilities, companies such as Opportunities for Positive Growth have seen an influx in clients since mid-2007. When the Fort Wayne State Developmental Center closed in April of that year, Indiana no longer had any large public institutions to serve those with disabilities. With the focus now on providing

Founded: 2001. Headquarters: Fishers. Description: Provides services for individuals with developmental disabilities. Locations: Three. Employees: 180. Special award: Leadership. Website: www.opgrowth.com.

Andy Panayides (left) works with Cameron Held of Fishers during a music therapy session. CHARLIE NYE / THE STAR

services in home or in small communitybased settings, Opportunities for Positive Growth has been able to

positively impact the lives of more individuals each year. It remains a top workplace because of the continued flexibility it gives its workers and the appreciation it shows for them. Both come from Kahl, who also was honored with the leadership award in the midsize company category. Most schedules are driven by the

needs and goals of the individual an employee is working with, which means no two days are alike, and employees have the freedom to juggle both their personal and professional lives. “They’re not going to be having us punch a clock or put our thumb on some kind of pad or just check in or anything,” said Gina Schenk, executive director of behavior support. “They want us to be happy in our personal and family life, and they know we’ll be happy in our work life.” Although employees could point out numerous ways they feel appreciated on a daily basis, there is perhaps no greater show of gratitude than the implementation of an employee stock ownership plan in 2010. “That to me shows they appreciate the work we do,” said Laura Collins, a direct support professional.

NO. 3 | MIDSIZE COMPANIES

Hilton Indianapolis Hotel & Suites By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

In the ultra-competitive Downtown Indianapolis hotel industry, Jeff Sweet understands how important it is to provide a guest experience that will likely result in repeat business. As the general manager of the 332-room Hilton Indianapolis Hotel & Suites, Sweet has worked tirelessly to develop a culture in which employees are highly trained and motivated and exude positive attitudes with co-workers and customers. When he arrived as the general manager of the hotel in May of 2004, Sweet knew that creating an environment in which associates were not always looking for the next pay raise from a competitor would be key to maintaining a consistent level of service that would earn customer loyalty. “You can sell all day and bring customers into your hotel, but if you don’t have the right employees to service those guests, you’re in the constant cycle

Founded: 2004. Headquarters: Boston. Description: Full-service, 332-room hotel in Downtown Indianapolis. Locations: One. Employees: 160 in Central Indiana. Special award: Clued-in Senior Management. Website: www.indianapolishilton .com.

Kisha Stone says training on the job has helped her advance in her career. KELLY WILKINSON / THE STAR

of replacing business versus keeping business and servicing the same guests over and over,” said Sweet, who said he interviews every employee. “Nothing is better in our business than having the same associates service the same guests month in and month out because they begin to foster their own relationships.”

In addition to back-to-back top-five rankings among midsize companies, the Hilton also took home this year’s Clued-in Senior Management award. For Sweet and his staff, that starts with a daily 9 a.m. meeting that includes all departments of the hotel. Managers discuss challenges from the previous day, potential issues that might be pending for the current day and what areas may still need follow-up. Other issues, such as employee

Brebeuf Jesuit would like to thank its dedicated faculty and staff for voting us a Top Workplace while helping form Men and Women for Others.

2801 W. 86th Street | Indianapolis, IN 46268 317.524.7050 | www.brebeuf.org IS-6050788

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birthdays and anniversaries, what VIPs may be arriving, and what groups are staying at the hotel also are shared. That information then cascades down from senior management to pre-shift meetings with hourly employees. “Everybody is getting that opportunity for an ‘information share’ first thing in their shift,” Sweet said, “and it doesn’t matter what time you report to work, they happen.” Employees of the Hilton also rank the company highly on career training. Kisha Stone started at the hotel two years ago as a server before moving on to become a banquet captain and, later, the catering and sales coordinator. “They were willing to teach me what I needed to know as a server and then push me to advance to the position I’m in,” said Stone, who studied in the tourism, conventions and event management department at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. “And that’s everybody — from the servers that I started with to the banquet captains to everyone in the sales department.”


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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR • INDYSTAR.COM

3RD

NO. 4 | MIDSIZE COMPANIES

Insights Consulting Inc. By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

For the fourth time in five years, Insights Consulting Inc. has been in the top six among Central Indiana midsize companies. Every time it has happened, founder and CEO Kelly Hartman is sure of one thing: It’s not because of the paycheck her employees receive. As a service provider for individuals with developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injuries and autism, Insights is nearly 100 percent funded by state and federal dollars through Medicaid. Hartman’s average employee makes less than $11 an hour. “We have a pretty tough job,” Hartman said. “We work with a sector of the society that a lot of people would choose not to work with. So the fact I have an employee who makes less than poverty level in Marion County and is that thrilled to work here, I think it’s huge as an employer that we have that kind of

Founded: 1996. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Description: Provides support for individuals with developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injury and autism spectrum disorders. Locations: One. Employees: 248. Website: www.insightsonline.net.

Jeff Davies (right) and Kim Rowland (left) help client Mark Masden shoot pool during a day’s outing. CHARLIE NYE / THE STAR

relationship with our employees that they put us in a position of recognition.” Whether it’s hearing an individual speak for the first time or helping people develop skills to hold a job, that thrill for workers at Insights comes from making a difference in people’s lives.

“If someone isn’t doing it for the love of teaching somebody new skills, then this really isn’t the profession for them,” said Mike Massie, a quality outcomes coordinator who has known Hartman since the late 1980s. “That’s where our greatest joy comes from.” Although Insights employees can work in sometimes-stressful situations, they report very little frustration in the workplace. From team-building exercises to Hartman’s quarterly open-door day (a time when employees can come to

her office and talk), Hartman has sought to keep the lines of communication open and stress to a minimum. What she can’t give to her employees in terms of salary, Hartman seeks to make up for in other areas. The company works hard to ensure that some employees can take extended time off to visit family in other countries. She may write a note of gratitude to an employee and enclose a gift card for gas. She recognizes employees at an anniversary breakfast and holds an annual Christmas party. “I love working here,” Ericka Pinkston said. “She makes sure she looks out for her employees.” It’s a culture that has helped foster double-digit growth each of the past seven years. “I have amazing people who work here,” Hartman said. “When you have people who are really committed to the value of focusing on people’s capabilities and really changing lives, that’s a good gig.”

NO. 5 | MIDSIZE COMPANIES

Orchard Software Corp.

By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

When the results were tallied from last year’s annual Top Workplaces survey of Central Indiana employers, Orchard Software Corp. found itself among the honorees for the second time. But after taking a look at the employee feedback, senior management at the Carmel-based software developer knew there was room to improve. The first order of business was to increase opportunities for the management team to update and interact with employees at companywide gatherings and within individual departments. “This helped the company to improve lines of communication throughout the organization,” Executive Vice President Henry Oglesby said. “The company also established a set of focused goals for the year, not solely focusing on profit and loss but also on job satisfaction and creating workplace improvements.”

Founded: 1993. Headquarters: Carmel. Description: Develops, markets, installs and supports software information systems for clinical laboratories. Locations: One. Employees: 151. Website: www.orchardsoft.com.

Workers enjoy pizza during Orchard Software’s quarterly employee service awards. D. KEVIN ELLIOTT / FOR THE STAR

The focus on improved communication, increased training opportunities and the needs of employees helped fuel the biggest jump in the rankings among Central Indiana employers that participated last year. Ranked 23rd among

small companies in 2012, Orchard climbed into the top five among midsize companies for 2013. “If you have a question or want to educate yourself on something, someone is always available and willing to help,” said Brian Kelly, a lead project manager who has been with the company for two years. “This tone is set from upper management and filters down to everyone. Every day, the doors are always open for C-level executives and director staff to

About Us Family-owned and operated since 1994, Tendercare Home Health Services is one of the largest private home healthcare agencies in Indiana. Our commitment to individualized, high-quality home healthcare has made it possible to build trust-based relationships with individuals and families that span years.

Honored to be

a Top Work Place

in Indianapolis. Blessed to have such outstanding employees who feel more like family. Thank you to our dedicated staff for another year of hard work and excellence in home care.

Sincerely...Thank you!

chat. The experience and depth of knowledge from executives and directors is a huge resource.” Workers also praise the company’s laid-back environment and the potential for professional growth and career advancement. “Atmosphere is what sets Orchard Software apart from other companies,” said Ryan Cash, an accounting assistant who was hired into the company’s early talent and development program. The program allows Cash to gain exposure and experience in every department of Orchard. In May, he’ll join the sales department. “In most cases, I would have to find a new company to work for to gain sales experience,” he said. “Instead, Orchard offers the opportunity to move around within the company. It is set up in such a way that you could potentially work in accounting, sales, operations and development and never have to leave the company.”

Services Providing exceptional home healthcare is a 24/7 commitment. Our comprehensive professional services for adults and children include: ! Specialized, in-home nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) ! Physical therapy ! Occupational therapy ! Speech therapy ! Home health aide services ! Select Durable Medical Equipment (DME) and supplies (Tendercare is a licensed DME company)

~ Serving All Generations! ~

(317) 251-0700 | 6308 Rucker Road Suite D, Indianapolis, IN 46220 | For career opportunities, check us out online!

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NO. 1 | SMALL COMPANIES

Harry & Izzy’s By Michael L. Jackson The Indianapolis Star

Treated with respect. Genuine care and concern for the employees. Owners who care about worker happiness. Those may not be phrases that some people associate with the restaurant industry. But they are the hallmarks of a philosophy that has propelled the Downtown location of Harry & Izzy’s to this year’s No. 1 ranking among small businesses. “We run it like family,” said operating partner Jeff Smith, a 28-year restaurant veteran. “We’re tough on results but fair with people.” For Harry & Izzy’s, it’s the third consecutive time it has been recognized as a top place to work. It debuted at 13th in 2011 and moved up to sixth last year. Smith has used the employee feedback to find areas for improvement. Last year, it received the special award for communication. The idea to get involved in the Top Workplaces survey came from hostess Teree Bosso, who admits it took a little persuading that first year. “It’s not that we don’t feel like a restaurant, but we’re very well taken care of,” said Bosso, who has been with the restaurant for 51⁄2 years. “I think the people here think about this more than just a restaurant job, but rather it’s a career.” For managers there’s a wellness program and free health screenings that can result in lower insurance premiums. All employees are entitled to a week of vacation after 1,400 hours of service. There’s an annual Christmas party and bonus, and last year each employee received an additional bonus following Super Bowl XLVI. Employees also know there is opportunity for career advancement. Four of the five managers at the Downtown location started as hourly employees, and four managers at the Northeastside Indianapolis location got their start working Downtown. “We want people who want this as a career,” Smith said. “If you let us know your interests, your aspirations, it’s really our jobs as leaders to get you there. We truly do have some of the best people in

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Operating partner Jeff Smith says the Downtown restaurant is run like a family. MATT DETRICH / THE STAR

Indianapolis working for Harry & Izzy’s. We always have someone who’s ready to be trained for the next opportunity.” As the sister restaurant to the world famous St. Elmo Steak House, Harry & Izzy’s entered the crowded Downtown restaurant market with instant credibility. But it’s the staff and their relationships with the customers that has fueled a yearly 20-percent growth in sales. Employees are empowered to make decisions for guests without management involvement. Smith likes to say that smart management knows when to stay out of the way, and employees agree that they’re not micromanaged. “It’s customers’ needs first,” bartender Barbie Gale said. “If we tell the customer yes, management backs us up. We don’t have very many people who ask to speak to a manager, and if they do, it’s to sing our praises. And that’s a great thing.”

“You’re better served as management to try and understand why an employee did what they did rather than asking, ‘What were you thinking?’ ” Smith said. “You’d be surprised what you learn.” In an industry in which the average annual turnover rate is 75 percent, Harry & Izzy’s can boast that 32 of its 125 employees have been with the company since the doors opened in April 2007. The management team does it by creating a culture in which it’s not just the paycheck that the employees care about. “Somebody will always pay your people more money,” Smith noted. Employees are given annual reviews in which goals are set. Birthdays are celebrated with freshly baked cookies. And on a recent night after closing, roughly 30 staff gathered with guests in the bar to produce its version of the popular “Harlem Shake” video that has become one of the latest crazes on YouTube.

BOTTOM LINE Founded: 2007. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Company description: Upscale American grill. Locations: Three (only the Downtown location participated in this year’s survey). Employees: 125 (Downtown only). Website: www.harryandizzys.com.

“There’s a lot of laughter that goes on here,” Smith said. “I really believe people need to be loose. I love what I do, and I hope it shows to everyone. I come here to have fun. There’s no reason you can’t have fun while you work. You have to be professional about it, but you still can have fun. And we have a lot of fun around here.”


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NO. 2 | SMALL COMPANIES

Meyer Najem By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

The lobby of Fishers construction firm Meyer Najem is filled with industry accolades. In February, for the second time in five years, the Indiana Subcontractors Association named it Contractor of the Year for firms under $100 million in annual revenue. Alongside those awards and others for safety and projects of the year sits a growing collection of Top Workplace honors. The company has been in the top 10 of small companies in Indiana for the past five years, and in four of those years it has finished first or second. “We don’t make a conscious effort to be on the list,” said Andrew Habel, a senior project manager who has been with the company nine years. “It’s just the culture we have.” It’s a culture in which practical jokes are the norm and Fridays after work are

Founded: 1987. Headquarters: Fishers. Description: A construction-management firm specializing in health-care facilities, schools, churches and commercial buildings. Locations: One. Number of employees: 61. Special award: New Ideas. Website: www.meyer-najem.com.

Andrew Habel, Mike Mattingly and Adam Filler are seen with one of Meyer Najem’s awards. ROBERT SCHEER / THE STAR

spent hanging out at a local restaurant having drinks and catching up. A Work Life Balance committee plans employee events throughout the year. From group outings to see the Indiana

Ice and Indianapolis Indians to monthly company barbecues in the parking lot at headquarters to wine and beer tastings, the emphasis is on creating an environment in which employees and their families can gather and bond while leaving behind the stresses of the workplace. “It’s enjoying to come to work to a place where you’re friends with people,”

Habel said. This year Meyer Najem also was given the special award for new ideas. All of the company’s field supervisors, project managers and executives use iPads to streamline project documentation using cloud computing. “Our culture allows for innovative thinking,” said senior project manager Adam Filler. “You’re pushed to excel. The group as a whole is motivated. Motivated for growth. Motivated to be best in class. Ultimately it’s the employees and culture that allow for that creative thinking to occur. It’ not stifled by ‘this is the way we’re going to do it’ attitude.” Added Michael Mattingly, who does pre-construction cost estimates: “There is a strong level of trust within each other. There’s a strong level of responsibility, as well. And I think the company does a real good job of allocating the right people for those roles. And in turn it produces an exciting place to work.”

NO. 3 | SMALL COMPANIES

Covenant Christian High School By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

If you could build an organization on a single word, at Covenant Christian High School it would be community. Whether it’s within the confines of the school or in the neighboring area, the small, private high school on Indianapolis’ Westside prides itself on being a relationship-driven institution. “When we say Covenant Christian High School, we make that a verb and say ‘We covenant with parents and families’ in that we want to build a relationship with them,” said Andy Goodwin, the school’s principal and CEO. “We just don’t want to provide a service to them academically.” Teachers at the 325-student school say they are free to be creative and focus on teaching, while Goodwin says the school is focused on hiring teachers who are passionate about a subject and wants

Founded: 1995. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Company profile: Private primary/secondary school providing Christ-centered education. Locations: One. Number of employees: 53. Website: www.covenantchristian.org.

Andy Goodwin, principal of Covenant Christian High School, encourages an independent spirit. JOE VITTI / THE STAR

them to be free and enthusiastic. He also notes that the school encourages new programming, whether it’s untried curriculum or improving what is already in place.

“I call this place a place of becoming,” said Goodwin, who joined Covenant as a Spanish teacher in 1997 and started an immersion program in the subject. “There is an encouragement for an independent spirit. If you can come up with it here and think you can sustain it and have a good plan for it, you can kind of run with it. And I think that’s exciting for a lot of people.” It’s an environment that keeps former

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Our associates are passionately committed to providing outstanding service to our Long Term Care policyholders.

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students coming back as adults looking for jobs. Three former students are members of the 25-person faculty, and Goodwin recently saw four Covenant alumni apply for a single position. A 1999 graduate of the school serves on its board. The school also encourages “ongoing sparks with the surrounding community” with its annual “Gone Servin’ ” day of community service. On the final Friday of each April, the school cancels classes for a day. Students and staff spend it helping others, doing a host of tasks, whether landscaping, painting or babysitting. “We feel like service begins with relationship building and is paramount to service,” Goodwin said. “It’s a lot of fun to watch their eyes open as they consider service in a structured way, but a fun way, and beyond just somebody putting a rake in their hands and saying, ‘Do this for eight hours.’ ”


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NO. 4 | SMALL COMPANIES

Indesign LLC By Michael L. Jackson The Indianapolis Star

Engineering excellence. At Indesign LLC that’s more than just the company motto. It’s how the company is building its work environment, too. In 1996, rather than follow their jobs to New Jersey, 34 engineers at Bell Labs decided to create something new in Indianapolis. Seventeen years later, the 69-person electronic-products developer has more than 100 clients, from startups to Fortune 100 companies. It also has been named a top place to work in Central Indiana for the third consecutive year. “We wanted to make this a good place to work. We wanted to make this a place where we would all be happy to work for the rest of our careers,” said Kathy Rima, an executive vice president and one of the original 34 company founders. “We wanted to make it a place that was

going to be sustaining.” Indesign is employee owned, with no one person owning more than 5 percent of the company. After six months of service, employees can buy up to five units of the company, with a 25-unit maximum. The idea was to create a distributed ownership model that prevented the president of the company from owning significantly more than the newest hire. “A company for all of us,” Rima calls it. That structure also helps foster an atmosphere in which meeting client needs, not jockeying for fancy titles, is the No. 1 priority. “Every engineer has a direct relationship with the client,” software engineer Michael Sorensen said, “so you get to see and hear the excitement that they have when they get the finished product. You get a connection with the client, and that’s what gives you the ownership that what you’re doing has purpose.”

BOTTOM LINE Founded: 1996. Headquarters: Indianapolis. Company profile: Designs and develops electronic products for consumer, medical, computer, communications, military, industrial and transportation markets. Locations: One. Number of employees: 69. Website: www.indesign-llc.com.

Engineers Russell Willmot and Debbie Green work in the radio frequency test lab. CHARLIE NYE / THE STAR

When they’re not working, Indesign employees are highly engaged in community service. The company pays employees for half of their time when they are participating in company-sponsored volunteer activities. Whether it’s mentoring or tutoring students at a nearby elementary school or delivering lunches through Meals on Wheels, employees who give back to the community can count half of their service toward their

workweek. Stop by Indesign in the summer, and you might see an ice cream cart in the halls. It’s just one of the many ways the company’s “Fun Team” engages employees both in and outside the workplace. “In terms of serving your customers, if your employees are happy, that carries over in the work they do for their clients,” said Ron Kern, director of technical marketing. “The more we can keep our employees happy while they’re here, the more time they’re going to spend here and thus everybody benefits, including our customers. You might as well do something you enjoy.”

NO. 5 | SMALL COMPANIES

Vasey Commercial Heating & Air Conditioning By Michael L. Jackson

BOTTOM LINE

The Indianapolis Star

Pay your workers a fair wage. Make sure they are well-trained. Show them respect. Then let them do their jobs. Sometimes that simple formula is all it takes to make a company a great place to work. That seems to be the case at Vasey Commercial Heating & Air Conditioning, a first-time participant in the annual Top Workplaces survey. The Zionsvillebased contractor also was given the Doers special award for being highly rated by its employees for doing things efficiently and well. “We’re a very relaxed company,” said Tom Slagle, Vasey’s vice president and general manager. “(Owner) Bill Vasey has instilled in us to treat your people well and be open to their personal needs.” For Vasey technicians, the efficiency in the field stems from computer-based tracking of a customer’s contract and the

Founded: 1977. Headquarters: Zionsville. Description: Heating, ventilation and air conditioning contractor. Locations: One. Number of employees: 63. Special award: Doers. Website: www.vasey.biz.

Ron Anderson and Brandon Horn inspect a heating and cooling system of a local business. DOUG MCSCHOOLER / FOR THE STAR

types of services required. Equipment on-site is also labeled. The steps relieve job-site uncertainty because the processes followed are clear and consistent. Vasey appoints what it calls a “primary tech” to each contract, meaning

the same technician services the same customer over and over. “Over time that leads to employee satisfaction because they build a rapport and they know what’s expected of them,” Chief Financial Officer David Sheffield said. “It’s also beneficial to the customer because they know that familiar face. The technician becomes the face of Vasey.” In 1997 Vasey became Central Indiana’s only Linc Service contractor. Linc provides Vasey with software programs and training for its managers and tech-

nicians. Sales have grown steadily since becoming a Linc franchisee. “It’s really allowed us to focus and be proactive instead of reactive,” Slagle said. “Once we bought in, the company started becoming a lot more efficient.” In the ultimate show of respect for his employees, owner Bill Vasey began transferring ownership of the company to them in 2004 through an employee stock-ownership plan. That first year he sold 30 percent of the company, then followed up with an additional18 percent in 2007. Employees are fully vested in the plan after five years. It’s a rewarding company benefit. Average employee tenure is more than 14 years. “The better we do as a company the more value your stock is going to be worth,” sales manager Roger Mooney said. “The technician that is the face for Vasey, it’s in his best interest for his back pocket to make that customer smile. He gets a paycheck like everyone else, but now he has extra incentive. And we’re seeing the benefits.”

TOP WORKPLACES 2013 LIST These are the companies recognized by the 2013 Top Workplaces employee survey, which was conducted by WorkplaceDynamics. More about the companies listed here is available online at www.indystar.com/topworkplaces.

TOP LARGE COMPANIES 1. Barnes & Thornburg LLP. 2. ERMCO Inc. 3. Monarch Beverage Co. Inc. 4. Tendercare Home Health Services. 5. Westfield Washington Schools. 6. RCI. 7. Ice Miller LLP. 8. FedEx. 9. Charles Schwab. 10. St. Vincent Anderson Regional Hospital. 11. Fifth Third Bank. 12. Decatur County Memorial Hospital. 13. Celadon Group Inc. 14. Community Health Network. 15. Center Grove Community School Corp.

TOP MIDSIZE COMPANIES 1. Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman P.C. 2. Opportunities for Positive Growth. 3. Hilton Indianapolis Hotel & Suites. 4. Insights Consulting Inc. 5. Orchard Software Corp. 6. Royal United Mortgage. 7. Key Benefit Administrators. 8. Fusion Alliance Inc. 9. Krieg DeVault LLP. 10. Bank of America Merrill Lynch. 11. Stonegate Mortgage Corp. 12. ATI Physical Therapy. 13. Bose McKinney & Evans LLP. 14. Ernst & Young LLP. 15. Crowe Horwath. 16. Indiana Orthopaedic Hospital. 17. Noble of Indiana. 18. Deloitte. 19. OrthoIndy. 20. Williams Comfort Air.

TOP SMALL COMPANIES 1. Harry & Izzy’s. 2. Meyer Najem.

3. Covenant Christian High School. 4. Indesign LLC. 5. Vasey Commercial Heating & Air Conditioning. 6. Comcast Spotlight. 7. FCCI Insurance Group. 8. Dawes Fretzin Dermatology Group. 9. Proportion-Air Inc. 10. Wessler Engineering. 11. RE/MAX Ability Plus. 12. Cannon IV Inc. 13. WestPoint Financial Group. 14. Finance Center Federal Credit. 15. 360 Services. 16. Communications Products Inc. 17 Lewis Wagner LLP. 18. SHIP. 19. Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center. 20. The Container Store. 21. August Mack Environmental Inc. 22. Sogeti. 23. Sun King Brewing Co. 24. Nyhart. 25. Aerotek Inc. 26. Terry Lee Honda. 27. Cohen & Malad. 28. Option Six, Division of GP Strategies. 29. Kronos. 30. Total Quality Logistics. 31. Northview Church. 32. First Databank. 33. enVista. 34. YourEncore Inc. 35. Express Employment Professionals. 36. Unique Home Solutions. 37. Plymate Inc. 38. Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School. 39. LeadJen. 40. Haggard & Stocking Associates Inc.

SPECIAL AWARDS These awards were based on standout scores for specific survey statements. Employees rated criteria — such as “I have confidence in the leader of this company” — on a seven-point scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree. LEADERSHIP Criteria I have confidence in the leader of this company. Winners Large: Phil Terry, Monarch Beverage Co. Inc. Midsize: Gail Kahl, Opportu-

nities for Positive Growth. Small: Michael Crafton, 360 Services. DIRECTION Criteria: I believe this company is going in the right direction. Winner: Tendercare Home Health Services. MANAGERS Criteria: My manager helps me learn and grow. My manager makes it easier to do my job well. My manager cares about my concerns. Winner: Charles Schwab. NEW IDEAS Criteria: New ideas are encouraged at this company. Winner: Meyer Najem. DOERS Criteria: At this company, we do things efficiently and well. Winner: Vasey Commercial Heating & Air Conditioning. MEANINGFULNESS Criteria: My job makes me feel like I am part of something meaningful. Winner: Cohen & Malad. ETHICS Criteria: This company operates by strong values and ethics. Winner: Communications Products Inc. CLUED-IN SENIOR MANAGEMENT Criteria: Senior managers understand what is really happening at this company. Winner: Hilton Indianapolis Hotel & Suites. COMMUNICATION Criteria: I feel well-informed about important decisions at this company. Winner: RCI. APPRECIATION Criteria: I feel genuinely appreciated at this company. Winner: Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman P.C. WORK/LIFE FLEXIBILITY Criteria: I have the flexibility I need to balance my work and personal life. Winner: Key Benefits Administrators. TRAINING Criteria: I get the formal training I want for my career. Winner: ERMCO Inc. BENEFITS Criteria: My benefits package is good compared to others in this industry. Winner: Comcast Spotlight.

Fired up. We are excited to once again be named as one of Central Indiana’s Top Workplaces. Many thanks to our staff and lawyers who made 2012 a great year. Two qualities set us apart: our passion for what we do and the pride we take in helping our clients achieve their business goals.

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AT L A N TA C H I C AG O D E L A W A R E I N D I A N A L O S A N G E L E S M I C H I G A N M I N N E A P O L I S O H I O W A S H I N G TO N, D. C .

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WHAT MAKES OUR EMPLOYEES SO HAPPY TO COME TO WORK? Could it be our commitment to the community causes important to our employees? Is it the mile-high sundaes at our Annual Ice Cream Social? Or maybe it’s the way we start each day together with a cup of coffee and a team huddle? We know that what makes us a Top Workplace is as unique and individual as each of our employees. That’s why we are always trying new things and asking our employees to tell us how we’re doing. Fifth Third Bank is proud to be recognized as a Top Workplace by our employees four years in a row. Rest assured we’re doing all we can to make it five.

Fifth Third Bank. Member FDIC. Equal Opportunity Employer.

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2013 Indiana's Top Workplaces