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EPIC

ADVENTURE


Fun Fact Zebras in a herd will take turns sleeping for everyone’s protection. Now that’s teamwork!

INSIDE: Something for everyone.................................. 3-4 Why orangutans?................................................ 5 Zookeeper notes...............................................6-7

Plan ahead, save money money............................. 14-15 14 15

Meet the orangutans ...................................... 8-9

Make your trip an adventure ..................... 18-19

Green initiatives .......................................... 12-13

Zoo education, conservation......................22-23

CREDITS All content and photography provided by The Indianapolis Zoo.

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Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014


Zoo offers something for every adventurer

Zoo features plants and animals from around the globe

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lants and animals of the land, birds of the sky, fish of the sea — each year, when more than 1 million guests pass through the gates, they experience a world-class zoo, aquarium and botanical garden all in one location. The Indianapolis Zoo offers something for everyone, all with an emphasis on personal interaction. The 64 acres of animal exhibits and 3 acres of gardens are designed to immerse guests in the wonderful world of wildlife. The Zoo’s more than 2,000 animals and 16,000 plant specimens are grouped in biomes, or livi living habitats, that closely resemble the animals’ native regions of the globe. globe Each biome offers visitors countl countless close encounters with the anim animals. Z Zoo adventurers can pet a The Indianapolis Zoo, sh shark in the nation’s largest originally called the sh shark touch pool in Oceans, Washington Park fe feed a lorikeet or a budgie in En Encounters, race a cheetah Children’s Zoo and located in Plains and watch cognitive on East 30th Street, in interactive research being opened its gates to the con conducted with an orangutan public for the first time on in th the Tim M. Solso Learning April 18, 1964. Studio in the amazing new Simon Skjodt IInternational Orangutan Center in Fo Forests. Plus guests can come just inches away from Amur tigers, go 17 feet underwater in the natio nation’s only underwater dolphin viewing dome and surround themselves with the beautyy of freeflying butterflies. The Zoo brings together exotic species from every corner of the globe — walrus from the U.S. Pacificc Northwest, penguins from the Humans and giraffes Antarctic, elephants from the have the same African Savannah, snakes from the arid North America Southwest, number of vertebrae, primates from Indonesian tropical seven, but a giraffe’s rainforests and many more. And vertebrae can be up to all these incredible creatures can be 10 inches long! n found just minutes from downtown Indianapolis. (continued Page 4)

Anne Shumaker

Fun Fact

Kerrie Best

Fun Fact

Hannah Hilliard

Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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C it C ti Commitment to Conservation The Indianapolis Zoo’s mission is to empower people and communities, both locally and globally, to advance animal conservation. We do this through many avenues, including a commitment to global outreach, our Polly H. Hix Institute for Research and Conservation and the Indianapolis Prize.

Global Reach Conservation is at the core of what we do att the nd our Indianapolis Zoo. The ability to stretch beyond nimal borders is essential in making an impact on animal rily conservation. The Indianapolis Zoo monetarily es supports conservation organizations in places all over the world, including Russia, Borneo, Namibia and Zimbabwe. Thanks to our generous supporters, we are helping save elephants, cheetahs, rhinos and orangutans — just to name a few species.

Strategy for Sustainability

Fun Fact Since humans came to Madagascar approximately 1,000 years ago, at least 16 lemur species have gone extinct. 2014 Indianapolis Prize winner Dr. Patricia Wright strives to stop the destruction of lemur habitats in this area.

Reaching a new generation is important in achieving our conservation sustainability goals. That’s where the Polly H. Hix Institute for Research and Conservation comes in. Hixx mps, programs include field trips, workshops, camps, ventures. special animal experiences and overnight adventures. Conservation & Go to IndianapolisZoo.com and click on “Conservation Education” to learn how you can get involved in one of these fun and educational programs.

The Indianapolis Prize The Indianapolis Prize is the world’s leading award for animal conservation. Every other year, we honor an individual who has made significant strides in animal conservation. The Zoo just awarded Dr. Patricia Wright with the 2014 Indianapolis Prize. Wright is considered an unstoppable force in conservation for her efforts in saving the most endangered mammal in the world — the lemur. The Prize team just returned from a media tour through Washington, D.C., and New York City. Wright was featured on multiple worldwide media outlets, including NBC Nightly News, Reuters TV, New York One, National Geographic magazine and HuffPost Live. With a lemur sitting on her shoulder, she even closed the New York Stock Exchange with our sponsors from Eli Lilly and Company. Wright was also honored by the Malagasy embassies in New York and Washington, D.C. ,for her success in working with the villagers and the Madagascar government to save the lemurs. The Prize models how a Midwest community can change the future of endangered species across the globe. Go to IndianapolisPrize.org to learn more.

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Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

Fun Fact Did you hear something? Male orangutans use a “long call,” which can be heard more than a mile away!

Jackie Curts


Fun Fact

Why Orangutans?

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ild orangutans only live in two places on Earth: Borneo and Sumatra. These two islands were once full of lush forests that provided habitat for the orangutans. Today the trees are being cut down at an alarming rate for palm oil plantations, leaving fewer places for the great apes to live. If humans don’t make significant changes now, orangutans are on pace to go extinct within a decade. The Indianapolis Zoo is committed to making sure orangutans dren will be part of the future for our children, our grandchildren nd and beyond. Eight years ago, we saw the crisis growing and now the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center serves as an education and outreach hub to make sure these great apes survive and thrive.

Orangutan mothers go eight to nine years between pregnancies, the slowest rate of reproduction for any land mammal.

Exhibit Details The Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center is a revolutionary exhibit designed specifically to meet the physical, social and intellectual needs of orangutans. It is a unique home for one of the largest populations of orangutans in any American zoo with an overall land area larger than two football fields. The center sional was designed from the apes’ point of view. Three-dimensional spaces function as a forest, allowing them to extend theirr bodies completely and naturally and were created indoors and out so they can move around on all levels. It also serves as a vital education, research and conservation center, where dedicated staff and community members can work together to create a positive future for endangered orangutans in the wild.

Nina Mason Pulliam Beacon of Hope The stunning centerpiece of the Center is the Nina Mason Pulliam Beacon of Hope, a towering 150-foot structure that will be illuminated each night by lights. The beacon serves as a visual reminder of the hope we have for a brighter future for orangutans in the wild.

Community Plaza The story of the orangutans’ Indonesian home begins in the Community Plaza, an open-air viewing and gathering place in front of the Atrium.

Efroymson Family Exploration Hub Inside the Efroymson Family Exploration Hub, guests can experience the amazing intelligence of these great apes.

R.B. Annis Atrium The R.B. Annis Atrium, a four-season living space with an internal height of 50 feet, allows orangutans and humans to interact regardless of weather conditions.

Mike Crowther

Tim M. Solso Learning Studio Led by researchers conducting cognitive research, orangutans will use interactive technology in groundbreaking ways on the computers.

Oases Located around the perimeter of the exhibit are three Oases, where the orangutans can go if they wish to be apart from the others. The Oases provide up-close orangutan viewing as they learn, play and rest.

Myrta Pulliam Hutan Trail The Myrta Pulliam Hutan Trail is a network of cables, platforms and bridges 45 to 80 feet high that allow orangutans to travel across the exhibit and over the heads of guests.

The Skyline The Skyline is an aerial cable ride — with 1,200 feet of track — rising 50 feet above the Zoo and taking visitors close to the Myrta Pulliam Hutan Trail for a unique perspective on the orangutans. Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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Fun Fact Azy, an adult male orangutan at the Indianapolis Zoo, has an arm span of 9 feet from fingertip to fingertip — that’s 18 inches wider than the average NFL linebacker!

Dr. Shumaker and Azy doing cognitive research in the Tim M. Solso Learning Studio.

Dr. Rob Shumaker

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ith his passion for great apes beginning at an early age, Dr. Rob Shumaker is now recognized as one of the world’s foremost experts in primate behavior, including the cognitive abilities of orangutans. Shumaker is also the Vice President of Conservation and Life Sciences at the Zoo — leading the curatorial team in all aspects and care of the animal and plant collections. His knowledge helped bring to reality the vision for the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center and he continues to impact the research conducted with the eight apes that call the Center home. His expertise helped ensure that every element in the exhibit was crafted to meet the physical, social and intellectual needs of the apes. Shumaker “The vertical and complex nature of the th Center frees the orangut orangutans to move their bodie bodies in a full range of n natural, athletic an and graceful ways,” If you’ve been looking Sh Shumaker said. for a personal trainer, “O “Orangutans have look no further! so sophisticated mental Orangutans have ab abilities and at the enough strength in Ce Center, the apes will

Fun Fact

their upper bodies to do one-finger pull-ups!

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IIndianapolis di li Zoo Z • Summer S 2014

have the opportunity to engage in computer-based tasks on a daily basis that allow them to learn, solve problems and exercise their minds.” A vast majority of Shumaker’s credentials include working with great apes. Along with the 20 years’ experience at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Zoo, where he first encountered orangutans, he also worked as Director of Orangutan Research at the Great Ape Trust in Des Moines, Iowa. “Look into the eyes of an orangutan and a sentient being looks back,” he said. Shumaker has written multiple scientific articles and scholarly books on primate behavior and cognition, as well as appearing in documentaries and programs airing on National Geographic Channel, Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, BBC and PBS. Shumaker currently is on faculty at Indiana University and is an affiliate of the Krasnow Institute at George Mason University, where he received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees.

Look into the eyes of an orangutan and a sentient being looks back.


Fun Fact Similar to humans, orangutans have nails instead of claws. These help them grip and manipulate things, making it a breeze for them to speed across the Myrta Pulliam Hutan Trail.

Fun Fact Jackie Curts

Dr. Chris Martin

The word “orangutan” comes from Malaysia and means “person of the forest,” which is fitting since humans and orangutans share 97 percent of the same DNA.

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r. Chris Martin joined the Indianapolis Zoo as a Postdoctorall Research Associate in March 2014 due to his interest in greatt ape social cognition, communication, imitation and strategic reasoning. He conducts research with the orangutans at the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center, which is equipped with a shared touchpanel system that follows a method he developed. This system will enable Zoo guests to interact with orangutans via shared software, creating an immersive educational opportunity for the public, while advancing the Center’s goal of conservation. Martin began his career in animal cognition at the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology in 2006. He continued his education in Japan, enrolling in graduate school at Kyoto University Primate Research Institute, earning his master of science degree and Ph.D. in biology over a seven-year span. For his doctoral dissertation, Martin studied the way in which chimpanzees strategize during competitive interactions. Also for his Ph.D. studies, Martin created a novel method of shared touch-panel tasks, which involved two apes completing social tasks over a single shared touch-panel screen. Using this method, he found that chimpanzees played competitive games in a manner that is different from humans but in accordance with game theoretic principles. After completing his Ph.D., Martin spent two years as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Kyoto University Center for International Collaboration and Advanced Studies in Primatology, where he continued to research chimpanzee comparative cognition and examined how chimpanzees understand and utilize social cues. Martin has traveled to Guinea, West Africa, to pursue his interest in wild chimpanzee behavior and cognition and has spent time in Borneo observing wild orangutans. Look for him working with the orangutans in the Tim M. Solso Learning Studio.

Mike Crowther

Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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apes Get to know the

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o one knows the Indianapolis Zoo’s eight orangutans better than the keepers who care for them on a daily basis. Find out what the Keepers have to say about these amazing apes.

L Lucy

“Lucy likes to push the straw back and fo forth from side to side, looking for the b best possible spot. She likes to sit up on tthe window ledges that are at the front o of the Center. There she can really watch aall the people. She also likes the sun that ccomes into the Atrium. She likes to take h her naps on the lower level.” — Lisa Goodwin, Senior Ape Keeper

Azy A zy y

Ian Nichols

“Azy can be seen usually on second level, where he is able to keep a close eye on everyone. It’s easier for him to see everything at that level. He also likes to sleep there at night. He likes to watch little children in the public area. I have seen him studying them intently while they dance around in front of him, just talking away.” — Lisa Goodwin, Senior Ape Keeper

Katy

Ian Nichols

“Katy usually sits in front of the keeper windows, where she can see what we are doing throughout the day. She prefers to hang out with people rather than the other orangutans. Katy will come up and sit on the platforms to give you an eye-to-eye staring contest (don’t blink). Her hair will always be looking its best; you can count on that. She also loves the heated floors. She will lay down on her back with her feet up in the air just relaxing and enjoying the heat. She will also curl up and take a little ‘cat nap’ holding her feet together in front of the keepers’ staff lounge during our lunch break. Katy will also play with Rocky when no one else wants to.” — Lisa Goodwin, Senior Ape Keeper

N Nicky

“Nicky loves to climb at the very top of the exhibit and she’s always se searching for any food items that may be hiding somewhere. She also ca can be seen pushing straw across the floor from one side to the other si side several times throughout the day trying to find the perfect spot to relax and take a nap (if Rocky lets her). Nicky loves to look right in into your eyes when she is peeking at you through the windows on th the visitors’ level.” — Lisa Goodwin, Senior Ape Keeper Ian Nichols

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Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

Mike Crowther


Rocky

“Rocky will continually track and watch as many people as he can when they are present in the public space. He is so curious about what you are wearing, your facial expressions and what you are doing. He can also be seen playing with all of the females orangutans. He really likes Nicky. Rocky also makes use of the fire hoses by swinging all over the place; he is still adding new maneuvers and different combinations every day.” — Lisa Goodwin, Senior Ape Keeper

Knobi K

“Knobi loves to people-watch fro the visitors’ level by lying on from he stomach while she relaxes on her on of the platforms. She plays one w with Rocky a lot throughout th the day. She usually can be se bossing the other female seen or orangutans around, making sure th are doing whatever it is they th Knobi feels they should be that do doing.” — Lisa Goodwin, Senior Ap Keeper Ape

Mike Crowther

Mike Crowther

Jackie Curts

Charly

Basan

“Basan is very charming and playful and often hangs upside down by his toes. He is extremely bright and is very curious about his surroundings. He enjoys a variety of enrichment items, like barrels, cups, blankets and rubber tubs, but he seems to really enjoy shredded paper. Basan often fills up his barrels and rubber tubs with water; he will even soak his biscuits in the water before consuming them.” — Austin Paul, Ape Keeper

Carla Knapp

“Charly is extremely observant and will choose to spend his time outside. Charly is shy at first but is very interested in whoever is nearby. Charly tends to prefer blankets over other offered bedding materials (straw, hay, etc.) and will wrap himself up entirely when he sleeps at night. Charly has also been showing interest in Dr. Chris Martin’s touch-panel device. Although he has only limited exposure thus far, he shows strong potential for participating in the computer/touchpanel research.” — Austin Paul, Ape Keeper

Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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Open 5-9pm Wednesday-Sunday Nov 28 - Jan 4, Plus Dec 22, 23, 29 & 30 Closed Christmas, New Year’s Eve & New Year’s Day

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Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014


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Green roof sets new standards for conscious ecological design Innovative plant-covered roof will extend, protect and benefit exhibit’s conservation efforts

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orget about the gold standard — the Indianapolis Zoo is setting the green standard with the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center’s innovative roof. While contemplating this world-renowned project, the Zoo focused not only on orangutan conservation but on an environmentally conscious design for the exhibit. After teaming up with the Indianapolis-based architecture firm Browning Day Mullins Dierdorf Architects, the green roof idea came to fruition. Designed by Dan Overbey, director of sustainable design, the green roof will protect and extend the life of the roof system, as well as save energy and prevent storm water damage. Sedums — small, succulent, flowing plants — planted on top of lightweight growing substrate and a waterproof membrane, cover the structure to create an extensive and thin green roof about 4 inches thick. Sedum was selected for its regenerative abilities, low maintenance and tolerance to heat, drought, wind and frost. “The diversity of the plants and their changes throughout the seasons will have an inherent beauty and raise awareness about the life of natural systems, which is at the core of what the Zoo is about,” Overbey said. The green roof will catch approximately 70 percent of an average day’s rainfall, while the remaining runoff will go into 10,000-gallon storage tanks used for ir irrigation at the Zoo as needed. This will protect area waterways, while providing ecologic economic and aesthetic benefits ecological, ye to come. for years At approximately 6,400 square feet, the Center’s green roof will be another fea feature helping to ensure a lifelong As a species, muntjacs ho for the new orangutans. home

Fun Fact

have been around for more than 15 million years and are the oldest deer species on the planet.

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Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

Planting Trees, Saving Orangutans The main threat to wild orangutans is the loss of suitable forest habitat. The Indianapolis Zoo is supporting an Indonesian reforestation initiative that will begin in Borneo’s Kutai National Park. The project grows, plants and cares for trees in areas where forests have been depleted. This will rebuild forest habitat for orangutans, as well as a variety of other species. At the Zoo, visitors can make this project a success by donating money for the purchase of trees through interactive kiosks within the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center.


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Fun Fact

Reservoir, geothermal system contribute to exhibit’s green ideas

If captured, many reptiles can voluntarily shed their tails to escape.

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he Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center was designed with ecological implications in mind. Along with the green roof, the Center includes several green aspects that will also provide continuous aesthetic and economic benefits. The Center’s rainwater reservoir, a 10,000 gallon tank in the ground, offers an irrigation supply. Storm water runoff is diverted to the tank until full and then excess continues into the Zoo’s storm water sewer system. As water is used for irrigation and the tank empties, the reservoir will again take on runoff. With the possibility of dry weather as the summer months arrive, the tank will be kept full by a 125-foot-deep underground well — the same well used as part of the building’s geothermal cooling system. The system allows cool water to be extracted, pulling heat from the building. The warm water is then separated into a different well. These systems and initiatives were implemented to ensure the Center provided a lasting ecologically friendly exhibit for generations to come.

Fun Fact Penguins have approximately 100 feathers on every square inch of their bodies. When they are molting — replacing old feathers with new ones — they cannot swim.

Fun Fact Unfortunately about 17,000 species are on track for extinction in the current generation’s lifetime.

Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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Saving money

starts with planning ahead Zoo offers multiple opportunities for fun, affordable family adventure

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lanning a family adventure that’s both fun and affordable can be a challenge, especially when travel costs continue to rise. According to AAA Travel, the prices of gas, airfare and hotel rooms are all expected to increase during summer 2014. The Indianapolis Zoo al offers adventurers several options for an amazing visit that won’t break the bank and the key to savings starts with planning ahead. Earlier this year, the Zoo began a new Pick Your Day, Pick Your Price, Pick Your Package program. By planning ahead and purchasing advance tickets online, visitors can have an experience that’s more oyable. Guests can affordable and more enjoyable. find the most up-to-datee pricing information by visiting IndianapolisZoo.com and shopping for the days they want to visit. The earlier people purchase their tickets, the more they can save. Families will typically save more on a weekday visit. The prices will never fall below today’s listed prices, but they may increase with demand on busier days. Zoo guests can still purchase tickets at the gate, but admission prices will be cheaper online. So guests are encouraged to lock in the best admission price by purchasing in advance. The Zoo’s Family Fun Adventure Package has also been a popular option for out-of-town guests looking to make the most of a trip to Indianapolis. The package offers four tickets to the Zoo, four tickets to the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis and an overnight stay at a participating hotel — all for an affordable rate. The Zoo partners with dozens of area hotels to offer discounted admission tickets with an overnight stay. (continued)

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Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

Carla Knapp

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Fun Fact Orangutans can show more facial expressions than any other great ape due to the mobility of their lips.

For guests who will visit the Zoo frequently, the most cost-effective option n is Zoo membership. With multiple packages available, there’s a membership to accommodate everyone, from an individual through a large family. Memberships are valid for 12 months from the time of purchase and are a great option if guests will visit the Zoo more than twice during that time ts during the period. In addition to unlimited Zoo visits year, membership includes other great benefits enefits like d att free parking, discounts throughout the Z Zoo and other Indianapolis-area attractions, savings and early enrollment for Zoo Camps and early admission on weekends through Labor Day as part of the Wake Up With the Orangutans program program. Thi summer, weekend This visito also have the visitors cha chance to save on parking by taking advantage Sea lions live up to their of free parking at the Ve Vermont Street Garage name. They make loud at the IUPUI campus. roars and some males Gu Guests can then climb grow mane-like coats abo aboard the free shuttle on their neck. avai available on weekends only throug Labor Day. Shuttles through will depa depart every 25 minutes and run unt until 8pm. Visitors can also get from the ggarage to the Zoo along the White River Trail and across the pedestrian bridge in White River State Park. Visit IndianapolisZoo.com for more information on any of these money-saving options.

Fun Fact

Carla Knapp

Indianapolis Zoo hours through Labor Day: 9 am–5 pm Monday through Thursday 9 am–7 pm Friday through Sunday and holidays Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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Enjoy Friday nights with great live music, specialty food and drinks, plus the ambience of the Zoo after hours! June 27 July 4 July 11 July 18

Jennie DeVoe 8 Miles High Bahama Llama West Central

Lineup subject to change.

Concerts from 5:30-8:30pm. Animals, rides and Kroger Splash Park until 7pm! Rain location under the Party Pavilion.

Nightly samplings by

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FREE general admission for a full 12 months. FRE FREE FR parking at the Zoo. EXCLUSIVE EX members entry gate. FREE F admission to select special events. SPECIAL S discounts, member-only events and more.

Start your membership today at IndianapolisZoo.com! Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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Make your next trip an

adventure J

ump into an adventure the next time you visit the Zoo by taking advantage of some d unique experience opportunities. Go behind the scenes to get up close and personal with your favorite animals in our Dolphin In-Water Adventures and Animal Art Adventures. Wade into the water and interact with a dolphin orr watch as an animal of your choosing paints you a one-of-a-kind masterpiece that you can take home. Both of these behind the scenes adventures provide a unique experience and memories that will last a lifetime. Watch as your little An elephant’s nose marine mammal lover ventures into the Splash Zone as a Junior can be five times Dolphin Trainer, presented by more sensitive than a Dippin’ Dots, during one of our bloodhound’s! exhilarating Dolphin Adventure Shows. You’ll be amazed as the dolphins perform orm pond tricks and respond to your junior dolphin trainer’s hand cues. Each child takes a badge and a dolphin trading card home after the show as a souvenir. There are also wonderful opportunities for the future zookeepers and trainers in your family. If you just can’t get enough of some of the special features, there is a pass available to gain unlimited access. Feed animals, hop on rides and repeat with the Total d Adventure Package (TAP). TAP includes unlimited rides and unlimited animal feeds. It also introcuces a new program called Zooper Challenge — a virtual game that determines if you have what it takes to be a zookeeper. Find all 14 animal stations around the Zoo, answer the questions correctly and become Head Zookeeper. Any one or a combination of these features will add to your Zoo experience and make it a true adventure.

Fun Fact

Carla Knapp

Halloween Extended to Four Weekends October 3–5, 10–12, 17–19 and 24–26 • 2-7 pm

oBoo presented by Central Join us for the best that fall has to offer at Halloween ZooBoo Indiana Honda Dealers. ZooBoo has become one of the biggest Zoo events for good reason. It has it all — and now the haunting celebration runs four weekends! Kids are encouraged to come in costume and ready to play. The animals are out on exhibit (most love the cooler weather) and several provide additional shows and chats, such as the elephant pumpkin smash and a Halloween-themed dolphin show. Extra activities can also be found throughout the Zoo. Your goblin can dance to monster music, bowl with pumpkins, feel animal artifacts, take on an obstacle course Gabi Moore

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Shawn Knapp

and look for goodies. The rides get in on the fun as well with the Round-GoMerry presented by Geico, looking an awful lot like the Carousel going backward. The Train is truly a special treat, too, as actors bring a Halloween tale to life. And finally, what would a great day be without food? Fall treats are done right with apple cider, caramel apples and roasted nuts among the favorites. The little kids can even practice trickor-treating by visiting a handful of treat station in Plains. (Please bring a trick-or-treat bag if possible to help minimize extra bags.)

Fun Fact Running at top speed, a cheetah can go the length of a football field in four seconds. That’s as fast as Andrew Luck runs the 40-yard dash!

Holidays Become Merry, Get Bright and Last Longer at the Zoo Beginning November 28 • 5-9 pm Christmas at the Zoo presented by Donatos and Teachers Credit Union has been a magical time to visit the Zoo for more than 45 years. Festive merriment is around every corner and now the holiday cheer is extended until Jan. 4, 2015. It’s hard not to smile when you see the Zoo covered in lights. The brighter LED décor is beautiful up close and from afar. Add to it animals indoors and outdoors featured in extra shows and chats. As you stroll through the Zoo, search for hidden mistletoes, toasty campfires, joyful caroling, tasty treats, hot chocolate, animated light shows and until Christmas, Santa and Mrs. Claus. May the magic of the season capture your heart!

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Indianapolis Zoo â&#x20AC;˘ Summer 2014

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ANIMALS

AND ALL THAT

at the presented by

Our popular Thursday night concert from 5:30-8:30pm with great food, drinks and more!

July 10

Indianapolis Jazz Orchestra

July 17

Cynthia Layne

July 24

Janiece Jaffe and DaVida

July 31

Direct Contact

August 7

Blair Clark

with special guest Mark Buselli

August 14 Red Hot Whiskey Sippers Lineup subject to change.

Nightly sampling by Animals, rides and Kroger Splash Park until 7pm! Rain location under the Party Pavilion.

Discount tickets available at Indiana Members Credit Union or save $2 by bringing a Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s milk jug to recycle! Indianapolis Zoo â&#x20AC;˘ Summer 2014

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What you do supports the Zoo Zoo support continues education, conservation mission

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he Indianapolis Zoo needs you to continue making a real difference for the natural world. The Zoo does not receive any direct public support or tax dollars and relies on revenue from visitors, in-park sales, members, donors and sponsors. Thank you to all of our supporters, volunteers and staff in caring for our more than 2,000 animals and 16,000 plants, including many threatened and endangered species. There are many opportunities for individuals of any age to take part in supporting the Zoo and White River Gardens.

Volunteer: More than 600 volunteers take part in special events, education and animal care here at the Zoo. Programs are available for teens from ages 14 to 18 and adults, as well as internship opportunities for collegiate level students.

Giving: Individuals can help sustain the Zoo as a vital conservation, education and cultural resource for our community and the world. Starting with a donation of $50 or more, individuals can take part in the Animal Amigo program, which helps care for all of the animals at the Zoo by funding food, medical treatment, equipment, enrichment toys and habitat re. improvement for the animals in the Zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care. ers To support the new team in town, supporters nd can join in the Campaign for Conservation and Community: Saving the Orangutans. For an even greater impact, gifts of $500 to $9,999 will be increased by 33 percent, thanks to the Margot Lacy Eccles Community Challenge As the longest snake in initiative. the world, reticulated Donors may give any amount, transfer o pythons can grow up to stock to fund gifts, or honor friends and 33 feet long and weigh up family with a memorial gift, as well as an to 350 pounds. array of non-cash goods or services. Opportunities exist at every level and donors impact both the present and future off the Indianapolis Zoo.

Fun Fact

Education: Educational offerings make it fun to learn more about animals and the world around us. The Polly H. Hix Institute for Research and Conservation at the Zoo offers workshops,

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Fred Cate

Fun Fact Bats are great at pest control and they eat several thousand insects each night.

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Mary Welch-Keesey

camps, overnights i h and d a variety i off animal i l adventures. Zoo camps are offered as two-day programs during school breaks and as three- or five-day camps mps in the summer. Participants can choose from a variety iety of opportunities, whether they want to learn what animals eat, snap some photos, or discover what it takes to be a Zookeeper. Camps are offered for agess 5 to 12 and topics are geared specifically for each age group. In the fall and spring, families can even take Tortoises don’t have part in overnights that include crafts, games, teeth. Instead they have animal stories and special after-hours Zoo tours. sharp beaks to bite at Have you ever wanted to get up close and their food. personal with the animals at the Zoo? Why not have an adventure with them? Guests can take partt in Animal Art Adventures, where they’ll go behind d the scenes, meet one of our various animal artists and watch as a masterpiece is created for them to take home. Dolphin In-Water Adventures are also offered, during ing which participants can learn about dolphins, help signal behaviors, reward them with a fish and have a photo taken with a dolphin. The Indianapolis Zoo’s education and conservation programs are designed to get guests active and thinking more about animals and their role within our environment.

Carla Knapp

Fun Fact

Events: Whether it’s a picnic or dining in view of the downtown skyline, events held at the Zoo will be remembered. From the Hulman Riverhouse to the Dolphin Gallery, venues are available for the most casual of events to formal affairs. Each year the Zoo hosts birthday parties, corporate picnics, holiday parties, weddings and more. By having a wedding at the Indianapolis Zoo and White River Gardens, a bride and her groom will experience gorgeous gardens, breathtaking views and a choice of memorable venues for the rehearsal dinner, ceremony and reception.

Unique Gifts: The Indianapolis Zoo’s Gift Shop offers keepsakes for all ages. From plush stuffed animals and games to books and home décor, the store is sure to have many unique pieces that emulate the animals at the Zoo. A portion of every purchase at the Gift Shop supports the Indianapolis Zoo and its conservation programs. Learn more about supporting the Zoo at IndianapolisZoo.com. Fred Cate

Indianapolis Zoo • Summer 2014

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Fun Fact

Fun Fact

Scorpions are a staple in a meerkat’s diet because the meerkat is immune to the venom.

Male seahorses take fathering to a whole new level! The females of this species get a break while the males carry the babies in a pouch until they are born.

Fun Fact A polar bear’s fur is actually hollow, not white. It reflects light and traps the sun’s heat to keep the bear warm.

Fun Fact Many caterpillars eat poisonous plants and eventually transform into poisonous butterflies. Birds learn not to eat these dangerous snacks — no matter how delicious they look.

Fun Fact Porcupines are born with soft spines that harden into quills as they age.

Hours through Labor Day:

Fun Fact Flamingos get their vibrant, pink coloring by eating algae and small crustaceans.

9 am–5 pm Monday through Thursday 9 am– 7 pm Friday through Sunday and holidays h lid Indianapolis Zoo • 1200 West Washington St. • 317.630.2001 • indianapoliszoo.com

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Indianapolis Zoo