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SOUTH Indy’s southside magazine

Spring 2012

Jon Zwitt

A good sport for the southside

Also Inside:

Craft beer craze | Romantic getaways | We love pets | The benefits of yoga


Total orthopedic care helped Carol get back on track. Running was Carol’s lifelong passion, but then came the tendinitis, stress fractures and Achilles pain. Fortunately, she had a dedicated team on her side: the nationally recognized orthopedic specialists at Franciscan St. Francis Health. They provided expert treatment to help her return to the running she loves so much. Our wide range of orthopedic services includes: • Sports Medicine • Physical Therapy • Fracture Care • Rehabilitation • Joint Replacement • Spine Care

Embracing the future.

Visit StFrancisHospitals.org/ortho for Mini-Marathon training tips.

INDIANAPOLIS • MOORESVILLE • PLAINFIELD • CARMEL


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contents Barx Boutique for Pets

on the cover

Feature Stories

72 Pampered pets

72 trip with 92 Apurpose

Unique southside businesses with a flair for fur

days 84 The of May Center Grove's athletic director, Jon Zwitt. Read more about him on page 62.

Pastor Dean Bouzeos shares his story of a life-changing mission

100 Romantic getaways The Hoosier state has many places to woo your loved one.

Trio looks back at their long careers at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Photo by Joe Saba

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contents Day lilies bloom at Soules Garden.

Departments

15 This & That 21 In Style

Southside news and views

Candy colors

25 Taste

Local brews

36 Worth the Trip 42 Health Eagle's Nest downtown

Where to practice yoga and Pilates

48 Home Trends

A guide to organizing your home

54 62 Profile

Community

Meet the gardening families

Center Grove's Jon Zwitt

In Every Issue

8 Editor’s note 108 Our side of town 114 South weddings 119 Calendar of events 130 A look back 6

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welcome

H

Hello. My name is Sherri, and I shouldn’t be writing this editor’s note. It wasn’t in the plans. Sure, as the editor of NORTH magazine, the northside’s sister publication to SOUTH, I knew there might be a chance I’d have to take over for Kelsey DeClue should her firstborn decide to arrive early. But it wasn’t supposed to happen that way. SOUTH magazine had a mid-February due date to the printer. Kelsey’s baby had a midFebruary due date as well. She’d send the magazine off, I reasoned, and then she’d sit back, relax and give precious life to her first child. It was to be perfect timing in a perfect world. But my newest nemesis, little Nolan Luke DeClue, had other plans. At 5 pounds, 13 ounces and 19 inches long, Nolan decided he was ready to take on this imperfect world a little early (on Feb. 1, to be exact)—magazine deadlines be damned. And so you have me, while Kelsey is home with a heart that has doubled in size and a new, healthy baby boy. (Congratulations, Kels. We can’t wait to meet him in person!) The good news here—besides the announcement of Nolan’s arrival (Really, that nemesis thing was a joke.)—is that this issue of SOUTH was made for me. You might say it’s a perfect fit in an imperfect world. Within these pages you’ll find stories on where to take yoga and Pilates classes (p. 42; I recently started taking yoga and love it.), where to groom your pets (p. 72; I have two dogs and two cats—I am a shining example of the clinginess of pet hair.) and where to get your gardening supplies (p. 54; Anyone who knows me is well-acquainted with my passion for playing in dirt.). That’s not to mention the story about one group’s mission trip to Kenya (p. 92). This past year, I took

SOUTH magazine welcomes Nolan DeClue.

my first mission trip to Cartagena, Colombia. It is often said that these types of trips are as much for the people in need as they are for the people helping those in need, and I—along with Pastor Dean Bouzeos who went to Kenya recently—can attest to this truth. Seeing small children running barefooted through broken glass and trash (and still smiling) taught me a lesson I will never forget. Too often we find ourselves complaining about life’s little inconveniences (like having to write unexpected editor’s notes) rather than seeing life’s enormous blessings. I was born into a world filled with opportunities. I had food set before me, water within my reach, a college education awaiting me, love to get to know and grow, and a career that would introduce me to the many interesting and enlightening stories that Indianapolis—and the southside in particular in this instance—offers. So, thank you, Nolan Luke DeClue, for coming into this world a little early. Your arrival was anxiously awaited by your mom and dad, and—maybe I’m feeling a little sentimental today—it makes me a little teary to think about how happy they must be with you finally here. Welcome to this unexpected, imperfect world. I hope it’s everything you’ll ever want it to be … and so much more.

Keep up with SOUTH happenings on Facebook.

scullison@indynorthmag.com

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transformations salo n + s pa


SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

SPRING 2012 | Vol. 7 | No. 4

Publisher Home News Enterprises Chuck Wells Editorial Editor

Kelsey DeClue Copy Editor

Katharine Smith Contributing Writers

facebook.com/TonySaccosGreenwood

Alisa Advani Melissa Fears Jen Huber Caroline Mosey Amy Norman Ashley Petry Julie Cope Saetre Greg Seiter

@saccosgreenwood

Art Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger contributing advertising Designer

Amanda Waltz Contributing Photographers

Jennifer Cecil Dario Impini Andrew Laker Josh Marshall Jamie Owens Joe Saba

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Christina Cosner ACCOUNT Executive

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2/8/12 8:37 AM

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Back issues

To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone. Š2012 by Home News Enterprises All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.

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this & that

Compiled by Ashley Petry

Total Recall Tom Peters’ paintings offer a fresh look at historic Johnson County. Peters recycles his memories of earlier eras to create vibrant, colorful images of local landmarks. “He has such a great eye for the old buildings,” said Jeff Atwood, his promotional assistant. One best-seller, “Main Street Memories,” depicts downtown Franklin in the early 1960s. Another features the beloved Nick’s Candy Kitchen. “People have cried about the memories it’s brought back,” Atwood said. “People want to talk all about, I remember this and I remember that.” Prints, which start at $25, are available on the website year-round and seasonally at local farmers markets.

Contact: (317) 445-3725, www.tompetersart.com

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this & that a weekly shopping trip to CVS and Walgreens that shows you how to spend $5 or less to get up to $50 worth of merchandise. How realistic are the 90 or 100 percent savings we see on “Extreme Couponing”? At first I thought, “Oh, my gosh, I’m going to get so many things for really cheap or free,” but the show is skewed, and it doesn’t happen that way. I was crushed when I learned the truth.

Q&A

Sarah Christiansen, extreme couponer She hasn’t yet appeared on TLC’s “Extreme Couponing,” but Franklin resident Sarah Christiansen is an expert at discounts. Combining coupons and store sales, she typically saves 50 percent on her grocery bill, and her personal record is 89 percent. She shares her tips and tricks in Couponing 101 and the new Couponing 102, offered this spring through Franklin Parks and Recreation. When did you start couponing? We kind of hit a rough patch in life. We were stuck with me being a full-time student, my husband being unemployed (he is now a full-time student, too) and us having two children. You can see why I was searching for money-saving ideas. I caught an episode of “Extreme Couponing,” and I thought I could learn how to do that. How did you get started? I found a great resource, a website called OurCouponHome.com, which is a forumbased community. They gave me all the support I needed to get started. … I know a lot of people like Krazy Coupon Lady (www.thekrazycouponlady.com). She does 16

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How long does it take you to prepare for a shopping trip? I’m not your conventional shopper. I don’t keep a list and stick to it. … I take my time. If I’m kid-free, you’ll usually find me in the store for two to three hours. I like to just take my binder, start at one end of the store and go up and down the aisles matching what I have on my coupon to the products on the shelf, and if it’s a good deal, I’ll grab it. The only way you can do that on a budget is to keep a calculator handy. What are the easiest deals to find? It’s easier to get health and beauty items for free. I never pay for toothpaste, I never pay for deodorant, and I rarely pay for body wash. Kroger and Marsh are really good at having 10-for-10 or fivefor-five sales. If you pair that with a 50cent coupon, that doubles and becomes a dollar off, and you get that item for free. (Just be careful, she says, because coupon policies vary by location.)

Sarah Christiansen displays her coupon binder.


this & that

Michael Baun. Left, his four-year chimney sweep diploma written in both Danish and German.

A Film Festival for the Birds

The first-ever film festival at the Historic Artcraft Theatre, March 23 and 24, will highlight the work of legendary director Alfred Hitchcock. The schedule includes six classic Hitchcock films, “Vertigo,” “North by Northwest,” “Notorious,” “Strangers on a Train,” “Rear Window” and “The Birds.” “We’ve been wanting to do a film festival for a while,” said Angie Longtin, administrative assistant. “Anything that we do here, we hope (customers) come and have a good time and get to see the older movies, still played on 35 millimeter, in a classic theater.” Tickets are $5 per film or $25 for the package. 57 N. Main St., Franklin; (317) 736-6823; www.historicartcrafttheatre.org

Chim Chim Cheree

“A sweep is as lucky, as lucky, can be,” according to the old tune, so you might want to call Michael Baun, owner of the new Baun’s Chimney Sweeping. Baun hails from Denmark, where becoming a chimney sweep means earning a four-year degree that covers subjects ranging from flammable chemicals to ideal chimney heights. In Denmark, Baun cleaned 25 to 30 chimneys a day for eight years, and he brings that expertise to the southside. Sadly, the traditional European chimney sweep outfit (think top hat and gold buttons) is a bit much for Indiana, Baun admits. “I’ve been told it would be too fairy tale,” he said. (317) 627-3606

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Earth Day is April 22, but these southside residents have found year-round ways to make something new out of something old Who:

Bonnie Ochsner

owner, Furniture by Bonjo

After

What: A refinishing service for old wooden furniture and tired kitchen cabinets. Ochsner started the business a year ago, and now she scours garage sales, Goodwill stores and even curbsides for pieces that deserve a second life. “I either repurpose the piece if it’s really outdated and needs a lot of work, or I just refinish it and give it a classic Pottery Barn look,” she said. Ochsner has a retail space at Spectrum Flooring Services, but she mainly focuses on commissioned work from clients with pieces they want to salvage—and not always for sentimental reasons. “Older furniture is just so much better. It’s well-made,” she said. “I have an old buffet that is beautiful, with curvy legs, and you wouldn’t find that brand new anywhere.” Prices start at $150 for furniture and $500 for kitchen cabinets. Contact: 500 N. Meridian St., Greenwood; (317) 716-9829; www.furniturebybonjo.com

Who:

owner, Bird on a Wire What: A new boutique offering recycled, refurbished and repurposed items—from clothes to architectural salvage. “I just really felt that there was a need or a niche in this area for something like that, and it’s really been a passion of mine for a long time,” said Grimmer, former director of the Johnson County recycling district. She offers booth space to local artisans and also highlights many of their pieces in the boutique. “I feel consumers are really looking for different and unique, so that was my goal,” she said. Contact: 462 E. Jefferson St., Franklin; (317) 738-4237; www.birdonawireboutique.com

Before

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Amy Grimmer

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this & that

Book Nook Reading recommendations with southside ties. History

Inspiring

“Images of America: Franklin” by Jim Hillman and John Murphy Founded by Kentucky natives Garret Bergen, Simon Couvert and George King, and arising from flood-prone and harsh wilderness to become the seat of Johnson County government, Franklin’s growth yielded a nationally renowned college, large Methodist and Masonic communities, a state-of-the-art hospital and so many other amenities. The city’s unique history and character are captured in nearly 200 archival photographs in Franklin, a detailed pictorial history volume in Arcadia Publishing’s popular Images of America series. Expanding from a foreword written by former Mayor Fred Paris and concluding with a chapter introduction by Franklin Heritage Executive Director Rob Shilts, authors Jim Hillman—a longtime Johnson County resident—and John Murphy collaborate with the Johnson County Museum of History to capture the places and people who define the vibrancy of modern Franklin.

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“Dear Me: Advice to Our Younger Selves” published by Savvy Dames, LLC, with submitted excerpts from notable southside women. “Dear Me” is a series of letters written by women to their younger selves about what they’ve learned over the years and what advice they’d offer if given the chance to speak to that younger version. The letters span subjects from love life to professional life and in between. Contributors include Indianapolis singer and songwriter Jennie DeVoe and Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman, as well as numerous southside residents of all ages. Savvy Dames is a group of Indianapolis-area businesswomen who discovered their shared passion for supporting other women in the communities in which they live. The group founded the Women’s Leadership Fund in 2009.


St. Francis Hospital South, 8141 S. Emerson Ave., Suite A Greenwood Corners, 8711 US Highway 31 South Center Grove, 1675 W. Smith Valley Rd


in style

Photography by Andrew Laker

Sweet like candy Brighten your wardrobe and your mood with this season’s popular color schemes. Candy tones, sherbet shades, neon nuances … call them what you may, these oranges, yellows, greens and blues are the perfect way to spring out of winter’s grasp.

Pick a tone Mix and match pops of color with your accessories, such as this Fiesta Orange patent leather tote from Macy’s, yellow patent leather skinny belt from Old Navy, ballerina slipper-style flat from Express or neon rhinestone cuff from Charlotte Russe. All items are available at Greenwood Park Mall.

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in style

1

2

3 4

1

2

Taste the rainbow Bracelets and bangles continue to be popular accessories and can even be layered on the wrist to mix and match tones and designs. These styles are available from Charlotte Russe, Express, LOFT and Macy’s in Greenwood Park Mall.

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Pump in some sunshine These Klarissa pumps from Charlotte Russe make a great addition to a neutral-based wardrobe. Available at Greenwood Park Mall.

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3 Summer shades Add a pop of color to your eyewear with these tangerine aviator-style sunglasses from Charlotte Russe. Available at Greenwood Park Mall.

4 Hard candy Charms accented by beads are one way to bring flair and personality to your accessories. These Novo brand beads are available at Brianne’s Boutique, 49 N. Indiana 135 in Greenwood.


in style

6 5

7

8

5 Or-ange you curious? Handbags and purses provide versatile options for displaying spring’s wild colors. Michael Kors offers a tangerine handbag and matching wallet. Available at Macy’s in Greenwood Park Mall.

Styling by Danielle Smith of Fresh Fettle

6 Red hot This oversized crystal bead necklace makes a statement when paired with a dressy evening-out outfit or casual weekend wear. Available at Brianne’s Boutique, 49 N. Indiana 135 in Greenwood.

7

8

Citrus sensation The clutch continues to be a popular option, and Express offers these grapefruit shades in plush leather with gold and silver accents. Available at Greenwood Park Mall.

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Ride the reef This soft leather braided belt in coral won’t do much for securely holding up your trousers, but it does make a cute waist accent when paired with a blouse or wrap cardigan. Available from Express in Greenwood Park Mall.

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EXPERTS AT SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS. AND OUR COMMUNITY.

Paul Ross

Shirley Best

Tricia Rake

Mike Combs

West Smith Valley Road and SR 135

882-8200 Š2011 The National Bank of Indianapolis

www.nbofi.com

Member FDIC


taste

By Ashley Petry and Melissa Fears // Photography by Jennifer Cecil

Breweries hopping up Popularity of craft beers on the rise in Indiana

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taste

The story of Indiana breweries

their beer recipes with them. By

begins, predictably, with a group of

then, though, other German settle-

German immigrants who settled

ments in Indiana were developing

New Harmony in 1814. They were

their own breweries, and Indianapo-

pioneers on the new frontier, with

lis soon began to dominate the local

plenty of farming and construction

industry.

to do, but they soon had their brewery up and running. “They sold beer up and down the

By the early 20th century, many Indiana towns had their own largescale industrial breweries, which

Ohio River and had a pretty good-

often occupied several city blocks

sized operation for that era,” said

and were major employers. But

Douglas Wissing, author of “Indi-

Prohibition, which came to Indiana

ana: One Pint at a Time: A Traveler’s

in 1918, put 31 breweries and more

Guide to Indiana Breweries.”

than 3,500 saloons out of business.

Ten years later, when the Harmon-

A few managed to scrape through

ists returned to Pennsylvania, they

the dry years selling ice, industrial

took their brewery equipment and

yeast or non-alcoholic “near beer.” After Prohibition ended, Indiana’s brewing industry limped along for decades. Finally, in the late 1980s, the Indianapolis Brewing Co. kicked off a brewery renaissance. Although it eventually went out of business, it helped to establish the model by which other local craft breweries would operate. The industry gained steam in the early 1990s, when a change in state law allowed craft brewers to own restaurants and sell beer at retail outlets. Pioneers of that era included Broad Ripple Brewpub and Upland Brewing Co. The new law came at just the right time, when nationwide sales of craft beer were on the rise. Bill Jackson, Indiana sales man-

Thousands sip craft beer during WinterFest 2012 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds on Jan. 28.

ager for World Class Beer, a division of Monarch Beverage Co., said the real explosion in local craft

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Photo provided by Brewers of Indiana Guild


taste

breweries has happened in the last

beers,” Wissing said. “People just

three years.

wanted more flavor and wanted

“When Sun King opened in In-

99 Bottles of

to get away from bland tastes into

dianapolis, that kind of opened the

something with greater diversity.”

floodgates,” he said. “They’ve edu-

Indiana now has about 45 craft

cated consumers on different styles

breweries, but the state still ranks

of beer.”

low in terms of per capita consump-

In general, what’s behind the

tion of craft beers, which account

recent resurgence? For one thing,

for only about 2 percent of Hoosier

Wissing said, it is part of the larger

beer sales. But Jackson said the in-

national movement toward support-

dustry will continue to grow, steal-

ing local businesses and eating fresh

ing market share from national

foods. The rise of social media has

breweries. Craft brewers such as

also made it easier for small brew-

Three Floyds Brewing, Flat12 Bier-

eries to connect with consumers.

werks, Oaken Barrel Brewing Co.

Meanwhile, Hoosiers are developing

and Upland Brewing Co. all saw

a more refined palate for everything

double-digit sales growth in 2011.

from French cheeses to beers. “There was an increasing popularity of fuller-flavored imported

“I think we’re just seeing the tip of the iceberg,” Jackson said. “This is part of the culture as a whole.”

Beer on the Wall If the array of locally produced beers seems bewildering, take comfort. Ted Miller, president of the Brewers of Indiana Guild, said craft beers can be divided into two basic categories: lagers and ales. “The difference is the yeast,” he said. “Lagers are bottom-fermenting yeasts, and ales are top-fermenting yeasts, so ales ferment at higher temperatures.” Lagers, which include pilsners, tend to have a rounder and more sulfurlike flavor. Ales, which include porters and stouts, tend to taste more fruity.

Brewing 101 Every brewery uses the same basic process to create beer (depicted here). So why do beers from different breweries taste so different? “Processes do change a little bit, the temperatures and times, the ingredients and the brewmaster’s creativity,” Miller said. “Brewing is sort of a blend of art and science.”

»

Sean Lewis, cellarman, left, and Rob Caputo, head brewer and co-founder at Flat12 Bierwerks, empty malted barley during the brewing process.

» Barley or another grain is put through a mill,

cracking open the kernels, which contain starch and enzymes. The kernels are mixed with warm water in a piece of equipment called a mash tun, which activates the enzymes, which then convert the starch into sugar. The process is called malting, and the resulting mixture is called wort. » The wort is transferred to a boil kettle, where the hops and other spices and seasonings are added. (The more hops, the more bitter the beer.) » The mixture is cooled down rapidly in a heat exchanger. » The mixture is transferred to a fermenter, where yeast is added. The yeast eats the sugar and creates alcohol and carbon dioxide (which is why beer is carbonated). » The beer rests in a process called conditioning. It is sometimes filtered, sometimes not, before being packaged for sale.

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taste

Oaken Barrel

50 Airport Pkwy., Greenwood

An oasis in an area dominated by chain and fast-food restaurants, the locally owned Oaken Barrel on Greenwood’s Main Street was born out of a good idea approximately 15 years ago. It has since come into its teen years enjoying high marks and honorable mentions in all areas of brewpub discussion. A fish tank greets guests and regulars and leads the way into where the fun—and good taste—begins. The brewpub offers a variety of booths for semi-private dining, as well as open tables and chairs. With a family section, two bars, an outside dining area and a small banquet room, guests can enjoy large parties or intimate dates. The nouveau-American menu, which includes Mediterranean pasta, Cajun jambalaya, porter filets and mesquitesmoked ribs, is notable, but it’s the beer that keeps loyal customers and hops heads coming back for more. Mark Havens, head brewer, and his assistant, Andrew Castner, accommodate ale drinkers of all tastes with a wellbalanced collection of beers. The ale is brewed on-site in small batches. Oaken Barrel’s 15-barrel system brews six standard house ales, as well as a number of specialty and seasonal beers. Choose from the light Alabaster Belgian Wit or, for more hop, go for the Superfly IP. For special treatment with your suds, sign up for Oaken Barrel’s Schmoozer Club, a free frequent diner service that offers customers VIP benefits, such as meal and drink coupons, as well as discounts on merchandise sold on-site. And for customers who would like Oaken Barrel’s brews served in the comfort of their homes, Oaken Barrel offers half-gallon growlers for carryout, as well as any one of the available six-packs. Bottled choices include the Razz-Wheat, a Belgian-inspired fruit beer, Indiana Amber, a favorite among mid-palate drinkers, Gnaw Bone Pale Ale, the restaurant’s newest rising star, or Alabaster White, a Belgian-inspired wheat beer.

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Big Woods Brewing Co. 60 Molly Lane, Nashville

Located in Brown County, this Nashville microbrewery is one of the newest brewhouses in the Midwest. Founded in 2009 by Tim O’Bryan, Ed Ryan and Jeff McCabe, Big Woods Brewing Co. features two restaurants with five house beers on tap and weekly food specials. On a mission to make great unique beer with styles and flavors that appeal to everyone, Big Woods believes that being part of a tight-knit beer community is important. “Obviously everyone is out to do the best things for their business, but the community is really helpful,” O’Bryan said. Being small is not necessarily a bad thing. Starting out brewing half-barrel batches, this small brewery is climbing the ranks quickly. Now brewing 14 to 20 barrels a week, Big Woods can still run small, unique batches. “Having small batches really lets us have the opportunity to be creative,” he said. “We can run a small batch of something and see what


taste Big Woods Brewing Co. is a microbrewery featuring a full service restaurant and bar, with several beer styles on tap.

people think. It definitely has some limitations, but what it does allow is creativity and lets us try new things pretty easily.” The creativity must be working as its beer just keeps on selling. Busted Knuckle Ale is its number one seller, a light, deep-red porter containing hints of roasted barley and crystal malts. “It’s a beer people take to pretty well,” said O’Bryan. “In warmer months, our wheat beer or blonde ale is really popular. The IPA also always stands out as a good seller. My per-

sonal favorites are our stouts.” Having the restaurant definitely adds another element of complexity, O’Bryan says. Flavor Profiles

Beer and food go hand in hand. The chef incorporates beer into several recipes, including a best-selling stout chili. “It really adds an interesting richness and complexity to the recipe,” he said. “Hops has always been a big thing for people, but I’d like to think that

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the malty characteristics of beer can kind of have its time in the spotlight as well,” said O’Bryan. “There are more than a couple of factors in the flavor. Hops don’t necessarily have to be the main flavor people taste.” The more diversity in the ingredients makes for a more creative and flavorful beer. “Honing in on what particular brewers’ flavor profiles are is the fun part of it all,” he says. “For us, I like to rely on the malt and really make the beer unique.”

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taste

Rob Caputo, head brewer and co-founder at Flat12. ABOVE: Brandon Russell and Sally Reasoner enjoy the tasting room.

Flat12 Bierwerks

414 N. Dorman St., Indianapolis

South central Indiana has a wealth of independent breweries and brewpubs whose varying concoctions cater to everyone from the extreme craft beer novice to the most refined brew connoisseur. Here are just a few:

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Mysterious Name

Some people may not have heard of Flat12 Bierwerks. It is as mysterious as the name. Flat12 is known for frequently venturing out of the box and delivering unique, great-tasting beer. It celebrated its one-year anniversary Dec. 30. Truthfully, Flat12 is not far off the beaten path. You have likely driven past this historic downtown neighborhood dozens of times and never realized it. The innovative brewery pays homage to the flathead 12 cylinder engine popularized in the early 1900s. Around that same time Indianapolis became known in not only the motor

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sports and automotive industries, but the brewing world as well. “You could walk a few miles in any direction and see 15 or 20 breweries,” said Bob Weaver, the community manager of Flat12 Bierwerks. “It was a big culture with immigrants from Germany and Ireland each bringing their own brewing styles.” The “Bierwerks” Germanic spelling offers a nod to the strong German cultural influence felt in and around the historic Holy Cross neighborhood Flat12 calls home. Flat12 puts an emphasis on clean and balanced flavors with a subtle twist. Rob Caputo, co-founder and head


taste

SUN KING BREWing Co.

135 N. College Ave., Indianapolis Sean Lewis, cellarman at Flat12.

brewer with over 15 years of experience, is known for giving a kick to classic tried-and-true recipes. Some of its most popular beers, such as the Half Cycle IPA and F12 Amber Ale, have their own twists. The light-colored Half Cycle IPA is named due to a marriage of single and double IPA characteristics. It has an overtly over-the-top hop taste with a spicy, citrus and pine character that surprises you at the end. The F12 Amber Ale has a high malt flavor with a spicy hop finish. These beers are as unique as their names. Some of the beer lists include classics, such as the Upside Down Blonde, Mustache Ride Red, Grandma’s Glazed Ham, Cow Tipper Bourbon-Barrel Milk Stout and Poop Deck Porter. Always one to experiment with seasonals, this spring is no different. Its Tangerine Porter, a black and white beer, has coriander, tangerine and orange peel. It is a mix of chocolate and citrus at their finest. Also on the menu for spring is Karousel Kolsch, a deep gold-colored German ale with smooth drinkability. The mission at Flat12 is simple: We believe in ourselves and we believe in you. They call this notion “Hopstar Karma.”

Sun King Brewing Co. is one of Indiana’s most successful microbreweries and is listed among the top breweries in the Midwest.  How did this happen? Well, for starters, it has Sunlight Cream Ale, one of the most approachable beers on tap, with a smooth malt profile and a crisp, clean finish. “It has less of a hop profile so it tastes more mellow,” Omar Robinson, president and one of the five co-owners, said. “It’s got more body and a little more flavor than your national brands, but not so much that Charlie, who has been drinking it for 15 years, is going to spit it out.” Sun King embraces the beer culture and so does the entire city of Indianapolis.  Its $5 growler sale on Friday has become a phenomenon in its own right. Offering four house beers on tap, plus seasonal beers, Sun King has taken Indy by storm since first opening two and a half years ago. “We were first, so that helps,” said Robinson. “We selfdistribute … and we service the hell out of our customers. If you run out of beer at 5 on a Friday afternoon, we don’t want you to lose our beer sales over the weekend, so we service you.” Welcoming the competition is easy he said. Having more competition is great as it causes more people to be aware of craft beer and become accustomed to ordering higher quality beers. Its most popular house beers, such as Wee Mac and Osiris Pale Ale, can be found on tap throughout the city, and it is a favorite among locals and tourists. Sun King’s flagship pale ale is just one of many in a well-known lineup of craft beer.  It also brews an Americanized ESB, the Bitter Druid, and is well known for seasonal offerings, such as the Landmarks Wit, made from the Indiana tulip poplar tree, and a Popcorn Pilsner, made with local popcorn. Not one to shy away from new beers, Sun King will soon be offering sours, a fermented sour beer, along with bourbon barrel-aged beer. With business in about a 60-mile circle around Indianapolis, and hopes of opening a distillery, it is taking things one step at a time. “We are growing organically, and we are having fun,” said Robinson.

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taste

From left are head brewer Skip DuVall, assistant brewer Dan Krzywicki, co-owner Justin Brown, and Tasting Room manager Sam Harding.

A barrel measurement tool, used to measure wort in the brew kettle. Right: Skip DuVall uses a hydrometer to measure alcohol content.

Dan Krzywicki

Fountain Square Brewing Co. 1301 Barth Ave., Indianapolis

Located in the historic Fountain Square neighborhood on the southeast side of downtown Indianapolis, Fountain Square Brewing provides a critical community service: It gives Indy’s beer lovers a place to congregate and enjoy some of the best new beer in the area. The brewery and industrial looking taproom opened in full force in late 2011 with its grand opening in January.

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Raising Eyebrows

It is quickly earning a reputation for creative, interesting and innovative beers. The young brewery and its brewing experts create their specialties like no one else can. How so? Well, to start, the creators are an Eli Lilly microbiologist, an electrical engineer, a physicist and a chemist. Being able to create and monitor their own yeast lab allows them the unique opportunity to watch their beer at a microscopic level, perfecting every ounce of the beer you drink. At the brewery you will find a lineup that includes four regulars:

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Blonde Ale, Pale Ale, Amber Ale and a Porter. Along with the mainstays, you will also find several seasonal or specialty brews, such as its most recent Oatmeal Stout, Unfiltered IPA and Winter Warmer, a brown ale with hints of nutmeg and raspberry. From deep rich porters with a hint of coffee and chocolate to pale ales finishing with a crisp aftertaste, there is a beer for everyone. At only $5 a pop for a 64-ounce growler, it is no wonder the taproom is already so popular every Sunday. Bottling is in the works, but currently it only offers keg, growler and pint sales Thursday through Sunday.


taste

Behind the Brews

For the seriously beer-obsessed, the actual brewhouse on Barth Avenue is a 15-barrel brewhouse using Alcatraz Brewing Co.’s old brewing equipment. Now state-of-the-art monitoring systems watch and control every step in the beer-making process. From fermenters to serving tanks, behind it all is great-tasting beer. The men behind the beer are old friends united by a passion for craft brews. Tasting the beer, you know they have the recipes down pat. “We are really trying to get scientific about the brewing process,” said Justin Brown, one of the three co-owners. Using as many local ingredients as possible and controlling the automation of the brewing process, they are able to improve not only the consistency of the beer, but the quality as well. Local is something that is important to not only them, but the community as well. “We wanted to attach ourselves to a place,” said Brown. “That’s one thing that sets us apart a little bit. We are surrounded by artists, which is great because we love good food, wine, art, music.” With lots of room to grow in their office warehouse building turned brewery, they plan on hosting events, parties, even weddings. “We want to get involved with the art festivals and art community here in Fountain Square as well as doing our part sprucing up the area,” said Brown. The brewery and taproom came together slowly as the team at Fountain Square Brewing carefully crafted each recipe and the brewery’s growth.

UPLAND BREWING CO.

350 W. 11th St., Bloomington

Growing Demand Wide varieties and unique classics make Upland the second largest brewery in Indiana. The craft beer market in Indiana is not showing any signs of slowing down. A phenomenon pushing for a new market in Indiana is sour beer, which is making normal beer flavored with fruit and fermentation. The best ingredients and good recipes are critical to making good beer, but sanitation is just as important, said Charles Stanley, strategic projects manager. “Microorganisms that can ruin the flavor of beer are all around us, so making sure that the beer only comes into contact with the particular strains of yeast is imperative. This part of the job is not glamorous, and it requires a strict attention to detail.”

Classics Upland brews a wide variety of beers, including its most popular, Wheat Ale, a light, crisp and citrusy beer, to the Teddy Bear Kisses Imperial Stout, which is dark, robust, chocolaty and hoppy. It also brews nationally acclaimed sour ales, which have strong sour acidic qualities that are typically not associated with beer. Along with its most popular seasonal beers, Oktoberfest, Komodo Dragonfly Black IPA and Nut Hugger Brown Ale, Upland will also feature several new brews in the spring with the Schwarz Black Lager, Ard Ri Imperial Red Ale and the Maibock and Infinite Wisdom Tripel. The Bloomington Brew Pub and Indy Tasting Room have relaxed atmospheres that allow people to just enjoy good beer. “We try to convey the eccentricity and spirit of fun that characterize the people that make up our company,” Stanley said. “Local beer drinkers want to feel connected to the people brewing their beer, and we try to provide plenty of opportunities for interaction.”

Beer with Food “The great variety of craft beer allows for nearly unlimited food pairings, allowing for a very wide range of dining experiences,” Stanley said. “The nature of craft beer also goes hand in hand with the slow food and local food movements.”

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taste RECIPES

Good beer isn’t just for drinking. Exercise your culinary skills with these recipes using craft beer.

From Power House Brewing Co. Columbus Bar in Columbus, best known for its Diesel Oil Stout. It also offers a brown ale, pale ale and IPA.

Beer Cheese

24 ounces cream cheese 1½ cups shredded cheddar 1 tablespoon minced garlic 10 ounce Dave’s IPA (or any other hoppy beer) Worcestershire sauce to taste Warm cream cheese in microwave until soft. Stir in other ingredients. Put back in microwave and warm until cheddar cheese is thoroughly melted.

Mac and Beer Cheese

1½ pounds macaroni 16 pieces bacon 1 red onion 2 cups shredded cheddar 2 cups shredded mozzarella ½ cup blue cheese crumbles 3 cups half and half 1 batch of beer cheese Cook macaroni. Dice bacon and red onion and sauté together. Combine bacon-onion mixture with macaroni and add all cheeses, including beer cheese, half and half, and a dash of salt and pepper. Put mixture into casserole dish and bake at 300 degrees until everything melts together, about 25 minutes.

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From Upland Brewing Co.

From Upland Brewing Co.

Buffalo Chili

Stout Cake

Yields about 12 servings. 1 pound carrots, finely diced ¾ pound celery, finely diced 1 pound white onion, finely diced 1 seeded jalapeno pepper, finely diced 2 tablespoons fresh garlic, chopped 3 pounds ground buffalo 16 ounces crushed tomatoes ½ quart tomato juice ½ can chipotle peppers, pureed 16 ounces canned black beans 1 quart beef stock ¼ cup chili powder 2 tablespoons Cajun spice ¾ cup tomato paste ½ pint smoked tomatoes, pureed (can substitute grilled tomatoes) ½ quart porter beer 1 tablespoon salt Brown buffalo meat in an oiled pan over medium heat. Break apart with spoon or spatula into small pieces. Once cooked through, drain fat away using colander. Sweat carrots, celery, onion, garlic and jalapeno in large stockpot with a small amount of canola oil. When soft, add tomato paste and pureed chipotles. Add cooked buffalo and stir well until mixture is even. Add chili powder, Cajun spice, beef stock, tomato juice and crushed tomatoes. Bring to a simmer over medium-low heat. Add drained black beans, smoked tomato puree and porter beer. Keep at a low simmer for 45 minutes, stirring every three to four minutes so bottom does not scorch. Turn off heat and allow the chili to “marry together” for at least an hour on the stove top. Add salt and pepper as needed.

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2 cups Teddy Bear Kisses imperial stout or Bad Elmer’s porter 1 pound unsalted butter 1½ cups unsweetened cocoa powder 4 cups all-purpose flour 4 cups sugar 1 tablespoon baking soda 1½ teaspoons salt 4 eggs 1 1/3 cups sour cream Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter three 8-inch cake rounds. Line each pan with parchment paper and butter the parchment and pan sides. Bring the stout and butter to a simmer in a sauce pan over medium heat. Add the cocoa powder and whisk until smooth. Turn off heat. Whisk flour, sugar, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Using a mixer, beat together the eggs and sour cream. Combine the chocolate mixture with the egg mixture and mix well. Add the flour mixture and fold to incorporate. Divide the batter among the prepared pans and smooth out the mixture, making sure not to deflate it. Bake the cakes, rotating them throughout the baking cycle, for about 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the cake comes out clean. Serve with a side of beer pudding and top with whipped cream.

Submitted photos


worth the trip

By Caroline Mosey Photography by Jamie Owens

Eagle’s Nest reaches new heights in menu and décor

A different spin 36

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For over three decades, the Eagle’s Nest restaurant has been making slow turns high atop the Hyatt Regency hotel in downtown Indianapolis. Change—not just by way of its 360-degree rotations—has been a part of the restaurant’s fabric since its inception. Shifts have regularly taken place within the circular walls to ensure its reputation remains as high as its elevation. The popularity of revolving restaurants took off during the 1960s and 1970s, and the Eagle’s Nest, a part of the Hyatt’s original design, was built in 1977, says Jeff Stewart, food and beverage director. It was— and still is—the only revolving rooftop restaurant in the state. Now recently remodeled, the Eagle’s Nest proves it’s growing up right alongside Indianapolis’ fast-expanding culinary scene. The restaurant’s interior has been completely transformed by incorporating con-


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temporary design and custom furnishings, Stewart says. Leather-upholstered seating, gold satin walls and throw pillows give the space a sophisticated, modern feel, and muted lighting creates dazzling evening views of the city’s skyline, the restaurant’s most prized asset. The menu has also experienced a facelift, with creative new dishes that showcase ingredients supplied by local businesses Capriole and Fischer Farms. Changes were largely ushered in by kitchen addition John Pivar, who recently took over executive chef duties. The author of two cookbooks, Pivar has more than 20 years of culinary experience, as well as numerous honors and awards. With a focus on traditional American cuisine, the menu captures peak flavors through the use of seasonal ingredients. Crab-crusted cod is matched with fennel risotto and smoked tomato broth, while rack of elk is served with a root vegetable mash. Pivar also pulls off refreshing twists on classic dinner favorites. Consider the twin lobster tails, gently poached in vanilla bean butter, or the fettuccini tossed with cilantro and

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The new interior of the Eagle's Nest. Opposite, grilled shrimp cocktail features jumbo shrimp and spicy cocktail sauce.

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worth the trip

Bronzed sea scallops with corn emulsion and tomato, bacon and basil relish.

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lime. A thick slice of ricotta cheesecake drenched in passion fruit syrup adds a fine finish to any meal. As for libations, the Eagle’s Nest offers plenty of signature cocktails, like the “Sky’s the Limit,” which features strawberry vodka, lemonade and cherry juice, or the “Eagle Eye,” which offers coffee lovers a rich combination of coffee, Bailey’s Irish Cream, Kahlua liqueur, whipped cream and chocolate. Despite the many menu changes, however, it’s still the slowly spinning venue that captivates guests the most. Awarded a spot in the Top 50 “Most Scenic Restaurants” by Open Table in 2011, the Eagle’s Nest makes a complete rotation in roughly an hour’s time. And with its 360-degree views, there’s never a bad seat in the house.

Eagle’s Nest 1 S. Capitol Ave.,  Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis (317) 616-6170

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health

Ross Corson, co-owner of Evolutions, works on a yoga pose.

That’s a stretch Local studios help clients improve balance, strength and flexibility in their bodies and their lives

A

A cookie here, a drumstick there — the mental log of the winter’s caloric transgressions plays in the mind. With spring’s arrival, the possibility of showing a little of that extra skin becomes reality. The Southside offers its residents numerous ways to shape up following the winter indulgence, but instead of relying solely

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By Alisa Advani on the weight racks and elliptical gliders, consider the possibility of a Pilates or yoga class. Both techniques strengthen the body, increase flexibility, sharpen the mind-body connection and relieve stress. Several studios call the southside home, and each offers new students a plethora of benefits. Getting fit just happens to be one of the many.

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health

Rachel Williams of Indy House of Pilates

Evolutions Yoga

Jenni Keith and Ross Corson, co-owners and instructors 2801 Fairview Place, Indianapolis

“When I was little, I used to look at pictures of yogis. They seemed to beam love, and they clearly knew something I wanted to know,” said Jenni Keith, co-owner and instructor at Evolutions Yoga in Greenwood. From the time she was 8 years old, Keith knew that she wanted to be a yoga instructor. She spent her childhood poring over yogic texts, practicing breath work and meditation. In her 20s, she honed her physical practice for about five years. During this time, she also completed her degree in religious studies and philosophy at IUPUI and met Ross Corson. Corson, a fellow philosophy and religious studies graduate of IUPUI, had been pushing Keith to open a studio after realizing her innate gift. Coincidentally, one seemed to fall out of the sky into their lives. In 2008, Keith was managing the yoga side of a studio when the owner decided

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to close. “I did not want to let the students down,” she said. “We had brought them so far. Ross said, ‘You have to buy it.’” “I saw the potential in Jenni, and I thought that she should own a studio. I initially wanted to be a silent partner, but I eventually came into my postures kicking and screaming,” Corson said. With Keith’s help, he rehabbed his body and ended bouts of severe pain. Now, he teaches. The pair offers classes for all fitness levels and teaches them in a gentle, affirmative and humble way. The goal is to “meet people where they are,” and students tell them that Evolutions Yoga is “their refuge and their second home.” Corson and Keith find their deepest rewards from seeing others obtain their physical goals, many of which seemed nearly impossible at one time. “I watch people struggle and then get it. I have learned to step back and not take credit for the milestones. I was just showing them what to do. The students do the work themselves,” said Keith. “People

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come in and cry once they touch their toes. They thought they could never reach, but they can.” One of the most important goals of the studio is making yoga approachable for everyone. Keith and Corson believe that yoga is not a religion but a study of human potential at its fullest degree. It can be anything to anyone. “We don’t speak about weight loss,” said Keith. “Our people just want to feel better. They want and need to be healthy. We take them through the breath work and the physical postures and let them dance with the emotional benefits.”

Indy House of Pilates Rachel Williams, owner and master instructor

6960 Gray Road, Suite G, Indianapolis

At age 25, Rachel Williams was diagnosed with myriad spinal disorders and a degenerative disk disease. An athlete for


health

most of her life, she experienced early indications of the condition, including acute pain and a radiating dullness in the lower back, hips and legs that would come and go with no apparent pattern. She pushed herself and struggled with the condition through college. After months of strenuous training for the Indianapolis Mini Marathon, she suffered a crack in her spine — her L5 vertebra completely separated from her spine. “Nothing alleviated the pain. Barely able to walk, I was fortunate one day to fall into the hands of an on-call chiropractor. He immediately took an X-ray,” Williams said. The chiropractor determined that the degree of her spondylolisthesis was too great for any further nonsurgical treatment, and she underwent surgery to secure the lumbar region, stabilize the spine and prevent further damage. “Even after months of therapy, I could barely function, and I was dependent on

Rachel Williams of Indy House of Pilates instructs a client on the Pilates Reformer.

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health

“I watch people struggle and then get it. I have learned to step back and not take credit for the milestones. I was just showing them what to do. The students do the work themselves.” —Jenni Keith

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St. Rd. 135

Smith Valley Rd.

pain medication. My range of motion in all planes and axes was minimal. For well over a year, I was bed-ridden or confined to a wheelchair for 80 percent of my waking hours,” she said. “It wasn’t until I committed to private sessions with a certified Pilates instructor that I finally started returning to life. The results I experienced in my own body were so amazing that I felt a sense of duty to learn how to teach and share this lifechanging exercise technique.” After regaining her mobility and strength, Williams pursued comprehensive Pilates training with the BASI company and opened her own studio. She teaches with passion and firmly believes that without Pilates, she would still be bound to her bed and wheelchair. She pushes her students lovingly to overcome their real and preconceived physical limitations. “The challenges I face in my own personal Pilates practice have also helped me deal with other challenges in my life. My spinal condition also makes me acutely

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aware of what others with similar back injuries are currently experiencing,” said Williams. “Because my injuries were exaggerated by imbalances brought on by traditional exercises, it is imperative for me to pass along exercises that bring balance, strength and flexibility to the entire body. In my approach, I work to get the client to not only move through the Pilates exercises, but to understand what is actually working in their own body.” Williams says one of her favorite moments as an instructor happens when the body and mind make their first connection and the client feels what she’s teaching. “The bonds that I share with each individual and watching the progression of each client is really rewarding. Our studio environment allows me to know each person who comes into the studio by name. I love when a student does a movement that they told me they would never be able to do,” she said.


Becca Sanchez leads a Pilates class at the Gathering Place.

Synergy Movements Pilates Studio at The Gathering Place

Becca Sanchez, owner and instructor 1495 W. Main St., Greenwood

As a music and dance major at Baldwin Wallace, Becca Sanchez used to spend hours researching and preparing for her roles. When she began a family, she decided to earn her certification to teach Pilates from Balanced Body University. During training, her instructor placed great emphasis on anatomy and rehabilitation. She channeled that same passion for research into understanding movement and the human body. “I do a lot of reading. The education never stops. My mom is a pharmacist, and I always laugh because when I was younger, I thought I was just an artist. Now I am like her, and I love the science. Even in medicine there is creativity. If you just look at something in a book and apply it across the board, you are not really working for your clients. You have to think on the spot and listen,” said Sanchez. “You have to take each individual and observe while applying the book stuff.” Sanchez says that giving people the tools they need to live pain free and return to their activities provides her with daily inspiration. “I love teaching Pilates because it surprises and amazes me on a daily basis in

its ability to heal people physically and spiritually,” she said. For instance, a talented ballerina who suffered from scoliosis began doing mat and reformer (a piece of Pilates equipment) work. Both she and her parents were panicked because the child’s physician suggested placing her in a back brace. “When she returned to her doctor’s office, he told her that her spine had corrected 8 percent. He had never seen that before,” Sanchez said. Another woman came to her suffering from chronic back pain. After lying her on the reformer and helping her control her abdominals with gentle breath work, the woman stood and began weeping. “I said, ‘Are you OK? What is wrong?’ She said that she felt no pain for the first time in years,” Sanchez said. “If you stick to the work and what Joseph (Pilates) had in mind, there will be some correcting that takes place. My biggest goal, besides seeing people make progress, is to make sure that I am giving a session worth more than the money paid for it.” In the future, Sanchez hopes to form a partnership with another instructor who would like to utilize her space. She has four young children and a husband at home who keep her entertained when she is not working with students.

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home trends

I

In today’s hectic world, it becomes increasingly more difficult to keep everyday tasks and events in order. Adding some organization and structure can help make your home a more inviting, relaxing place for everyone. Oftentimes, people don’t realize just how much stress they are adding to their everyday lives by not taking the time to keep things organized. A professional canroom help get A homeorganizer entertainment your life and home organized now, and for done by Galaxy Home Theater. the future. Choosing to hire a professional may ultimately save a great deal of money, time and frustration. “The biggest thing is to try and do things in the moment, not to keep putting it off,” says Jeri Duncan, professional organizer and owner of Household 6. “The importance of organization is a very vast subject, but the biggest reason is to save money and time.”

Call to order Professional organizers help overwhelmed homeowners contain the mess By Melissa Fears

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Enlisting a Professional

Misplacing important documents such as gift receipts, bills and immunization records can be annoying, but late fees and missed appointments can add up quickly. Taking the first step on your own isn’t a bad thing, says Carrie Bell, a Greenwoodbased professional organizer for Extreme Organizer LLC. Just be prepared to sort through the clutter first and prioritize before you go out and purchase more. “Time after time I visit homes that have lots of organizing gadgets and containers,


home trends

After A pantry organization project by Carrie Bell.

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Before

yet the family is still frustrated with their space,” she says. “Buying containers before evaluating the area for needs is like trying to answer a question before it is asked.” What you read in a book or magazine isn’t a one-size fits all approach. Finding the underlying causes is an essential part of a professional organizer’s training. “Is it that they are so busy that they have no time or is it that they have never been taught time management skills or organizational skills?” asks Leslie Howard, certified professional organizer and owner of Streamline by Design. “Clients come to me when they have exhausted all their resources on their own.”

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Helping people learn organizational skill sets is a priority, she says. Everyone has different learning styles and spatial arrangement ideas already in place. “Having a different set of eyes or someone to bring new ideas and concepts is good,” she says. Setting Small Goals

Changing a behavior doesn’t happen overnight, and the same goes for becoming organized. “We are creatures of habit, and for example, I set my purse in the same place every day when I come home, and if somebody tried to change that it probably wouldn’t work,” says Bell. “For a week or two I would probably put it somewhere different if someone asked me to, but a month down the road it’s probably going to get dropped in the same place. I am just trying to initiate a different behavior.” Small changes and goals are a great first


home trends

10 ways to step. Setting a timer for 20 minutes one day to tackle the infamous junk drawer is a good start, Bell says. Use that time to tackle only that spot and nothing else. “Procrastination and oftentimes, for lack of a better word, laziness are what keeps us from staying organized,” says Duncan. “If you are absolutely not using something or not displaying something, put serious thought into why you’re keeping it. If it is something truly sentimental, first decide if it can be beautifully displayed to enjoy. If not, create memory boxes that can be stored in the garage or attic.” Getting started on small projects can be daunting, but once complete, you can breathe a sigh of relief. Completing a task to the end can be extremely rewarding. “Decide one area to organize and do it to completion,” says Duncan. “As a military family we move every three years. We know exactly what we have, because we have to pack and unpack it all every three

Start Organizing 1 Gather three containers, a trash bin and appropriate cleaning supplies to wash out the space.

5 Clean area. 6 Replace “keep” items into the space.

2 Mark the containers as keep, donate and other area.

7 Place “donate” items immediately in your car so they can be dropped off next time you are out.

3 Set the timer for 20 minutes. 4 Evaluate each item and place it into the appropriate marked box/container: Keep The item will be placed back in the area when finished.

Other area The item is being kept, but does not belong in the current space.

Donate The item will be given to an organization of your choice.

Trash The item has outlived its usefulness.

8 Take items for “other area” to the space they belong. 9 Discard trash. 10 You have a clean and organized space. Reward yourself for a job well done. — Carrie Bell, Extreme Organizer

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Date SAVE THE

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years. Developing habits that keep your spaces organized is key. The most important habit of staying organized is simply doing things in the moment.” Household Clutter

Conquer the chaos once and for all. Search high and low for multipurpose pieces you may already own, Duncan suggests. “Think outside the box for organizational tools,” she says. “A shoe organizer hung inside a front hall closet makes a great place for hats and gloves. A store going out of business might sell a grid wall you can use to create a wrapping station.” Keeping playrooms and children’s bedrooms tidy not only makes the rooms look better, but it can be beneficial to them as well. It is a great way to teach them to put things in their proper space while also allowing more room to play. Between the books, toys and clothes, children’s rooms can often be the most cluttered room in the home. Packed closets and shelves can frequently turn into a nightmare. While keeping a room organized can be challenging, it is not impossible. With the right tools and a little motivation, your child’s room can be under control and neat all year long. Labels are a great tool to get rid of clutter. “Label bins with the word and a picture,” says Duncan. “This will help with reading skills as well as help younger children to know where things go. Never just lump everything together in a toy box as that is certainly how pieces get lost and things are strewn about when looking for that one Barbie shoe.”

Small Spaces

Organizing for cramped quarters can be a challenge. Small areas for many people turn into mounds of clutter. However, tiny spaces can be big on functionality and charm with just a little creativity and time invested. “The difficult thing people have is that when they evaluate their space they automatically throw their hands up and say it’s too small,” says Bell. “Sometimes you have to get creative. The Container Store sells a really great shelving system called Elfa.” Turning an unused closet into an office or craft area can be a space-saver. A stan-

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dard size closet can be turned into several options. From scrapbook or craft stations to mini-offices, it’s all about thinking outside the box. “Sometimes it takes going back into the space and looking at it with a different eye and maybe not using it for what it was originally intended for,” she says. Budget, Repurposing and Trends

Getting organized for many people is synonymous with buying more. Smart retailers know that the organization itch breaks out in predictable intervals, such as during spring cleaning, and they capitalize on the desire to create a systemized home. There are several great products on the market to help achieve a better, clutter-free environment. Start by shopping at yard sales. Chances are there will be some organizing products up for grabs. File cabinets, bathroom storage and office supplies will all be on sale for a fraction of their retail price. “Most times people have what they need to get and stay organized already in their home,” says Duncan.  “Decorative items can even be used as organization tools, from baskets to bowls, anything you can put something in.” Using items already in the home is a costfriendly option and saves space. “Trends for 2012 are downsizing and keeping only what you need,” says Duncan. “Repurposing things such as furniture pieces can make a beautiful but outdated china cabinet into a place to store board games and toys.” “The most wanted solutions will be hidden storage, efficiency and convenience,” says Bell. “Quality of the organizing product is also becoming very important. Organizing solutions are being seen as longterm investments that can be stylish as well as functional.” The moral is that no one ever gets organized by buying more; instead they end up having a yard sale. Organization is a process, not a product. It takes time and thought, motivation and effort, none of which can be bought at any store. No tangible item, no matter how valuable, can lead to the road of organizational success all by itself.

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The Dammann family, from left, Jim Jr., Matthew amd Jim Sr.

Growing ventures

Garden centers help nurture Hoosiers’ green thumbs

W

While floral gardening is mostly a seasonal activity in central Indiana for obvious reasons, growing and maintaining annuals and perennials is a year-round job for local nursery owners. Dammann’s Lawn, Garden and Landscaping Center at 5129 S. Emerson Ave. is perhaps best known to southside residents as a place to find a variety of plants and plant-care accessories, but Helen Dammann, who co-owns the facility with her husband, Jim, says the store’s south, east and west locations have much more to offer than just greenery. “I think education is a big issue,” she said. “An educated customer will do better at decisionmaking on all of their landscaping endeavors. We

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By Greg Seiter

want customers to understand what they’re taking home so they can take better care of whatever it is they’ve purchased. “If we can educate them to make better decisions, they won’t have to spend as much money, and there will be fewer returns, too.” Recognized today for the many unique hanging baskets it offers, Dammann’s was originally opened on the eastside of Indianapolis in the early 1980s. “We started our own business in 1983 in what had been formerly a gas station,” said Helen, whose father owned a garden shop in the Castleton area. “My husband was a salesman for a chemical company, and he gained industry knowledge photo by Dario Impini


The Dammann production facility.

photo by Dammann's

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The Dammann production facility.

“An educated customer will do better at decision-making on all of their landscaping endeavors. We want customers to understand what they’re taking home so they can take better care of whatever it is they’ve purchased.” — Helen Dammann

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by selling to box stores and garden centers. Because of our experiences, we both had a love for the industry.” Twenty-nine years later, Helen and Jim continue to expand on their interests. “Over time, we learned that we simply couldn’t feed the needs of all three stores by continuing to bring in all of the products we wanted to sell, especially with the challenges associated with trucking,” she said. “So now, we have our own 10-acre production facility. “We grow bigger and better over what we could have brought in, and we’re able to keep it at a better cost point. Trees and shrubs are certainly a biggie for us, but of course, we still have some perennials and annuals brought in beyond what our own production can provide.” Operating solely as a retailer, Dammann’s is also known to many as a place where a variety of seeds can be found. In fact, Helen says bird seed is always popular.

photo by Dario Impini


“People who come into our stores are generally nature lovers, and during the winter months, many of them want to help take care of birds,” she said. “It’s important for the birds to have fresh water, and bird feeders must be kept clean. “It’s also important to keep ornamental grasses high until March.” When it comes to incorporating grass seed or sod in a given landscaping project, she says there are many things to consider. “Sod and seed can both be good, but it really depends on how much time you have,” she said. “Sod is very time-consuming. It takes a good month for it to root in, and it also requires a lot of regular watering. The key to grass seed early on is also a lot of water because it takes water to break down the seed coat.” Speaking of landscaping, Dammann’s has professional services that are available for hire but also offers educational classes for the public. “A couple of times each year, we’ll offer a landscaping session for $20, and that fee will be returned in the form of a gift certificate after the class is completed,” Helen said. “Basically, a consultant will sit down with people who take a session for about 45 minutes and will help them with decision-making so they can be successful in whatever they’re going to do.” Jim and Helen Dammann, whose sons, Jim and Matt, also work for the family business, take a great deal of pride in the fact that their lawn, garden and landscaping centers are locally owned and operated. They also collectively credit many longtime employees with the success and positive reputation Dammann’s earned over the years. “This industry is not a high-paying profession,” Helen said. “Our employees love what they do because they love plant material, and that’s a key to what helps make us successful. We have a lot of the same people come back year-after-year.” SOULES GARDEN

While Dammann’s has an extensive collection of greenery commonly seen throughout central Indiana, Soules Garden, at 5809 Rahke Road, specializes in plants that are unique and hard to find in this area.

Soules GArden photos by Chris Wilhoite

“With us, the whole idea is rare and unusual,” said Cynthia Miller, who owns the facility along with her husband, Chris Wilhoite. “We bring in plants from all over the world. There are probably only three or four places like us in the entire United States.” According to Miller, Soules opened in 1957 with a somewhat limited area of specialty that focused primarily on daylilies and hostas. A little more than 10 years ago, when the business was put up for sale, she decided to leap into a second career opportunity.

Cynthia Miller of Soules Garden.

“I was working as a sales manager for an Indianapolis company and had been traveling the nation for many years. I was tired,” she said. “We always knew we wanted to do something together when we retired. We had been customers here since the 1980s.” But it was only two years ago that Wilhoite made a full-time commitment to the business himself. “He had been a magazine art director for 31 years, and I finally told him that we were going to have to hire a real person if he didn’t retire. “Now, he travels all over the U.S., giving lectures on plants that most people haven’t even heard of.”

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A unique nursery Mark Fields’ talent for the art of bonsai was inevitable. As a boy, the southside resident would accompany his father, John, a well-known landscaper, on trips to a local nursery when he dug trees for jobs. On one such trip Fields came across some peculiar-looking contorted pine trees growing in one section of the nursery. After asking the owner about the trees, Fields left that day with two books that sparked his education and love of bonsai, the art of growing dwarf ornamental varieties of trees or shrubs in shallow pots by selective pruning. Taught the landscaping business by his father and trained in the art of bonsai by his mentor, Line’s Nursery owner, Walt Line, Fields started a landscaping business, Fields Landscape Concepts, in the early 1980s and operated it for more

than 20 years. He closed the business in 2006, after his father died. In 2007 he opened Bonsai by Fields and now has hundreds of bonsai creations in his nursery at the Greenwood home he shares with his wife, Allison, and twins, Lincoln and Addison. His works have been exhibited at the Indiana State Fair, Mid-America Bonsai Alliance and the U.S. National Exhibition. Last year Fields decided to open another branch of his bonsai business to impart his wisdom to others. The Mark Fields School of Bonsai offers an intense bonsai training course and monthly workshops from March through October. For more information on the nursery or classes, contact Mark Fields at (317) 439-0678 or visit bonsaibyfields.com.

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Display gardens at Soules have more than 1,200 varieties of daylilies and 800 types of hostas. The facility also offers many rare and unique arisaema, ferns, hellebores and other perennials. “We have five polyhouses and one greenhouse about the size of a football field,” Miller said. “We spend practically every moment of time we have caring for the plants we grow. That’s what we do.” Unlike many other nurseries, however, Soules Garden does not sell annuals. “That’s another thing that makes us different, so really, we aren’t in competition at all with anyone else around here,” Miller said. “This is a tight community. I know what other nurseries have, and they know what I have, so if somebody comes in here looking for an annual or for a particular tree, I know where to send them, and I don’t mind doing that at all. “We cater mostly to very serious collector-type gardeners who are willing to drive 50 to 500 miles,” she said. However, Miller says approximately 40 percent of the orders Soules receives come through the Internet. “Most of our customers are repeat, and in the month of May, when we do shipping on Mondays, we probably have 25 to 30 boxes going out at a time,” she said. Even though it’s not unusual for bus loads of plant enthusiasts from other states to show up at Soules Garden, Miller and Wilhoite would like to see an increase in on-site visits, especially from southside residents. “First of all, we have thousands of items we don’t put online, so there’s a lot to see here,” she said. “And I know that if I can get somebody in here once, they’ll be a repeat customer.” While working alongside half-a-dozen part-time employees and several volunteers, Miller and Wilhoite are constantly striving to increase their inventory and introduce new plant varieties to their gardens, but the couple also works hard to ensure their plants will thrive in Indiana conditions before offering them to the public. “I don’t sell anything that isn’t hardy in Indiana, so I try everything out first, and

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The hosta garden at Soules Garden.

Martagon lilies bloom at Soules Garden.

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photo by Dario Impini


if it’s too hard for me to grow, I won’t sell it,” Miller said. “People don’t want to invest money in something they’re unsure of. “If a certain type of plant we have requires special knowledge, we offer cultural sheets, and we walk people through the caring process. If someone can see a plant actually growing here in our gardens, no matter how unusual it is, they’re going to be more apt to try it themselves.” Dammann’s Lawn, Garden & Landscaping Center, (317) 786-0799, www.dammanns.com. Soules Garden, (317) 786-7839, www.soulesgarden.com.

According to information found on the website for Dammann’s Lawn, Garden & Landscaping Centers, numerous studies have confirmed there are both physiological and psychological benefits to having plants in a given office area.

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profile

Still in the

game Center Grove’s Jon Zwitt excels at bringing organization to the complexity of high school athletics By Greg Seiter | Photography by Joe Saba

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Center Grove's Jon Zwitt.

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» Long after the final buzzer has sounded, the

fans have departed and the student-athletes have gone home, Jon Zwitt can oftentimes be found patrolling the stands and bleachers at Center

Grove High School, locking up the facility’s press box or contacting the media from his office. Those are just some of the many responsibilities associated with being the Trojans’ director of athletics. Zwitt has spent countless evening and weekend hours at the school while supporting Center Grove teams during his 16 years there. The 57-year-old’s contributions are probably overlooked by most who instead focus on the Trojans’ numerous sectional, regional and even state championships that have been earned during his tenure.

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Zwitt was born and raised on the south side of Chicago in what he believes were interesting times, to say the least. “It was very much like the late Jim Croce sang about,” he said. “You definitely didn’t spit into the wind, you didn’t pull on Superman’s cape, you didn’t pull the mask off the ol’ Lone Ranger and you didn’t mess around with Jim … or anyone else for that matter. “There were tough individuals and tougher situations, but it was a time and a place that helped form character and resilience.” Zwitt was a young fan of a handful of well-known professional athletes. “I grew up idolizing Dick Butkus, Gale Sayers, Ernie Banks and Glenn Beckert,” he said. “It was an era when players were paid peanuts, and they remained on teams long enough to keep their trading


YOUR OWN

BEFORE

cards and jersey numbers current from year-to-year.” Football helped provide an avenue for Zwitt to obtain a college education at Purdue University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial education (1978), a bachelor’s degree in construction engineering technology (1979) and a master’s degree in education (1980). He was also persuaded to minor in guidance and counseling while at Purdue. But his achievements were just as impressive while playing defensive tackle for the Boilermakers. During a collegiate career that lasted from 1973 through 1976, Zwitt was voted to the Academic All-Big 10 team in 1975 and went on to win Purdue’s Noble Kizer Award for Athletic and Scholastic Performance in 1976. “It afforded me the opportunity to extend my playing days and to obtain an excellent career springboard,” he said. “At the time, I wasn’t sure why my master’s adviser encouraged the guidance and counseling minor, but in the long run, it was one of the best pieces of advice I have ever received.” Zwitt met his future wife, Kristen, while at Purdue, and after finishing work on his master’s degree, they moved to Carmel. He was then hired to teach, coach and counsel at Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School. “I was hired as their defensive coordinator and became the head coach prior to the season of 1983,” he said. “I also coached boys golf for all but two years during the 16 years I was there.” However, after 11 years at the school, a new opportunity presented itself. “I was ‘persuaded’ into accepting the position of athletic director at a time when life in that department was anything but rosy,” Zwitt said. “My perspectives and goals had to be refocused quickly. It was definitely a swim upstream, but I learned to manage the currents.” Previously, a new athletic director, one without experience in education or athletic administration, had been hired at the school prior to the 1990-91 academic year. “He quickly floundered, and coaches were running their own individual programs,” he said. “In essence, there were approximately 20 athletic directors.

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There was disorder and numerous problems, including probation for the boys basketball program. I adjusted, overcame and adapted on the run and helped guide the staff back onto the tracks.” Transitioning away from coaching was difficult for Zwitt, but the move ultimately helped him grow professionally. “Although I missed coaching and the thrill of competition from the sidelines, I enjoyed the intricacies of the big picture rather than being a single snapshot,” he added. “Those accomplishments led me to the next challenge, a shot in the Iditarod of Indiana high schools.” With two children at home and five years into his run as Brebeuf’s athletic director, Zwitt received a career-changing offer. “Center Grove was a growing school that was going through the typical pains of trying to break away from the ‘sleepy little town’ mentality,” he said. “The administration there had made the decision

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“I grew up idolizing Dick Butkus, Gale Sayers, Ernie Banks and Glenn Beckert. It was an era when players were paid peanuts, and they remained on teams long enough to keep their trading cards and jersey numbers current from year-to-year.” — Jon Zwitt

indysouthm ag.com

to join a newly formed conference called the MIC and wanted someone to lead them into the unknowns and the rapids of the ride. I accepted the task and have never looked back. “Sixteen years later, I continue to be proud of the community, the staff and the student-athletes who took and continue to take those steps together, steps that put Center Grove in the top echelon of academic and athletic successes.” Zwitt’s job at Center Grove is everchanging. “One of the best aspects of this job is the flexibility and a constant change of scenery,” he said. “Every day is different and has its own unique challenges. Primarily, the job consists of setting schedules for all of the teams, hiring officials and workers for all those events, writing checks to pay for the officials and workers as well as for the bills that come in from head coaches.”


profile

Zwitt is on hand during sporting events.


profile

With grandson, Corbin. Right: Zwitt on Media Day freshman year at Purdue, 1973.

Now Accepting Care Credit

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His responsibilities also involve standard office functions. “I answer the phone, reply to emails and voicemails, respond to regular mail and address questions and concerns about the program or an individual sport or coach.” Zwitt must also set departmental budgets, order equipment and supplies, coordinate the school’s hosting of athletic tournaments, plan for fundraising activities, evaluate the coaching staff on a yearly basis, attend a variety of administrative meetings and file accurate records for the department. “Jon is a strong leader who always looks out for the best interests of the CG Athletic Department. He is innovative and always brings new, fresh items to the department,” said secretary Joanny Tolle. “As a boss and friend, he is great to work for and pushes us to be the best we can be, as people and as an athletic department. We can always count on his valuable instruction being given based on his years of experience.” In addition to supervising at home athletic events and road games for the boys basketball and football teams, he also helps oversee the cafeteria during one lunch period. Zwitt believes that advancements in technology have been both a curse and a blessing for him at Center Grove. “The biggest change for me since taking this job would easily be the electronic and technology explosion,” he said. “Paper has been replaced by e-files. Phone calls and faxes have been replaced by emails and texts, and direct, personal communication has now been reduced to attachments or inserts of icons, characters and clip art that represent smiling or frowning faces. “The Internet and the email system have become the central components of communication, document transferal and research from everything simple to everything complex,” he continued. “Unfortunately, the phone is quickly becoming a secondary mode of contact. Face-to-face and person-to-person interactions seem to be fading rapidly. “On the plus side, answers are quicker and simpler, and individuals in groups, small or very large, can all be given the same information at the same time, in-

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stantaneously, with the push of one button. There is also the general population who might have been hesitant to pick up a phone and call an unknown, but with the world knowing everyone’s access via email, few seem to lack the courage to keystroke their views, opinions or advice.” As one who considers his strengths to be dependability, integrity and organization, Zwitt also admits his limitations. For example, he hopes that one day he’ll learn to appreciate things as they are in the present before looking ahead and beginning to plan for the next task at hand. Additionally, as a stickler for details and perfection, Zwitt believes there’s room to “ease up a bit” in that regard. Many variables have contributed to Zwitt’s professional development, personal achievements and career longevity at Center Grove, but in his mind the greatest of them all has been the people who have been around him.

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At home with wife, Kristen.

“The bottom line, like in any business, is surrounding yourself with good people, people who have similar goals, a similar focus and a similar drive,” he said. “After that, it’s a constant battle to be progressive, without losing sight of the present.” Zwitt says it’s important to be a quality leader while remembering to be a friend and also emphasizes the significance of having high expectations while keeping a realistic perspective. “I don’t have all the answers and will never pretend to, but I do know I enjoy the profession and working with the coaches and the young men and women at Center Grove High School who play the games.”  Tolle says one of Zwitt’s endearing qualities is his motivation and passion for his Center Grove family, as well as his own family. “He takes care of us all,” she said. “Center Grove and the Center Grove community have been a significant part of


my life for almost 16 years,” he said. “I love the area and the people. Although I would not rule out another branch on the career tree, it would have to be something in the Indy-Cincy 200-mile circle. “My family is very important to me, and I would not stray from them under any circumstances. I have grown too accustomed to seeing children and grandchildren at a moment’s notice.” Zwitt’s oldest child, Lindsay, is married to Chad Buck. The Indianapolis residents have an 18-month-old son named Corbin. Zwitt’s son, Jonny, and his wife, Danielle, have a 22-month-old daughter named Aubry. The three of them live on the north side of Cincinnati. Both of his children attended Center Grove High School; Lindsay graduated from Purdue University, while Jonny graduated from the University of Cincinnati. Someday, Zwitt would like to become more involved in community affairs, but his current hectic schedule simply doesn’t allow for much more than family and Center Grove these days. “I truly wish there were enough hours in the day to do community service and volunteer work, but working 60 to 70 hours each week and getting seven to eight hours of sleep per day doesn’t leave much time for anything else. I’m hoping to explore those possibilities when the time comes to hand the baton to someone else at Center Grove.”

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Getting to know him

Jon Zwitt, Center Grove High School director of athletics, said he doesn’t play favorites with anything in his life, but here are a few general preferences: Food: “Anything hot off the grill in the middle of the summer.” Movies: “Something entertaining; a plot or ‘meaningfulness’ is optional.” Music: “James Taylor, Phil Collins, Sting; they’re clean and intelligible.��� TV Shows: “60 Minutes,” a variety of sitcoms, “SportsCenter” Leisure: Biking, weight training, golfing, crossword puzzles Dream: “To shoot my age in a complete round of golf, not just after nine holes.”

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comforts Lucky pets want to sit and stay at these southside businesses

By Jen Huber | Photography by Dario Impini

Funny Farm in Franklin.

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I comforts

In 2011, Americans spent more than $55 billion on their pets. That’s $55 billion of organic foods, bakery-made treats, rain jackets, bejeweled collars, embroidered leashes, antidepressants, toothpastes, lotions and even prosthetic testicles. Yes, Americans love their pets, sometimes more than themselves. Pet pampering is an industry that seems to be recession-proof. Even in the midst of tough economic times, people still splurge on their pets, buing them the bestquality food and taking care of them with massages, acupuncture and physical therapy. According to a 2011 New York Times article, about 62 percent of American households have a pet, with 40 percent of those being dogs, and cats coming in second at 34 percent. And if you are among those happy owners, you’ll be pleased to note that the southside of Indianapolis isn’t short on ways to pamper your furry friend. From fancy bakeries to boarding facilities with webcams to grooming with glitter, this city has everything to make your pet howl or purr in delight.

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comforts

Barkefellers

Rick and Christi Coffey, owners 8808 S. Madison Ave., Indianapolis (317) 881-1888 www.barkefellers.com Curious to know what dogs think about Barkefellers? Just stand at the entrance and watch. Dogs don’t just walk into Barkefellers — they pull and run and jump, barking to get inside. Owned by Rick and Christi Coffey, Barkefellers began as a dream almost three years ago when Rick decided that he wanted to raise the standard of pet care available on the southside of Indianapolis. “I wanted to provide the best possible pet care experience for our customers — the pets — and their parents,” says Rick. “My love of cats and dogs was a driving force, and I’ve had pets since the time I was 6 years old.” Fast forward to today when dozens of dogs (and even some cats) can stay in the “hotel” at Barkefellers. Guests stay in suites ranging in size from 4-by-4-feet to 4-by-14-feet and receive walks, a raised dog bed and time outside. If you spring for the luxury suite with patio, your dog not only has access to a private outdoor patio but also has a fan, a sliding glass door to keep things quieter, a webcam and a television—set to Animal Planet, of course. Extra amenities can include a canine massage, a heated mat spa treatment or even a bedtime story. “We have about 21,000 square feet inside and about an acre outside,” says

Pet Files

Doggone Purr-fect Pet Sitting Service

assistant office manager Jessica James. “There are outdoor suites for the dogs to enjoy,” she explains, “and the outside surface is covered in turf, making it easy to clean and disinfect. We also have a live nature park and offer services such as dips in the pool, a treadmill workout or playing fetch.” In addition to the overnight guests, Barkefellers runs a day care service, has four groomers on staff and teaches obedience classes. More than 40 employees work around the clock to keep pets and owners happy. “I love watching large groups of dogs at play and how they interact with each other,” says Rick, “as well as the anticipation of the day care dogs when they arrive. It’s one of the best parts of the job.” The day care dogs are separated into playrooms by size and are always with an attendant or two. The staff keeps track of food, medicine and belongings and makes sure that dog owners get report cards about behavior or other issues. The growing business recently added an upstairs loft with more suites that comes in handy during holidays when the need for boarding is high. Barkefellers also has a separate area for cats with duplexes for single or multiple cats that include housekeeping three times per day and interaction time with staff members. A large saltwater tank brimming with fish holds the cats’ attention otherwise. “Watching the reunions of pets and their owners after a stay with us is just great,” says Rick. “The smiles on the customers’ faces tell it all.”

Nancy Manuputy, owner (317) 531-4775 nancy@indypetsitter.com www.indypetsitter.com If the idea of taking your dog to a kennel has you growling in discontent, Nancy Manuputy might be the person you need. In 2005, she began Doggone Purr-fect Pet Sitting Service after realizing her own need for good pet care on the southside. “Many pets don’t do well in a kennel,” she says, “and it’s easier on them to stay in their own home. I really saw a need in the city for someone to be a pet sitter for folks while they are gone.” Nancy and her staff of four can visit up to 10 homes per day. A typical visit involves feeding, walking and playing with the animal, and can include extras such as watering the plants or picking up the mail when a homeowner is out of town. Daily walks and midday breaks can be scheduled when the pet owner is at work as well. “We spend at least 30 minutes with the pet, loving on them while their owner is gone,” says Nancy. Dogs and cats are the usual requests, but she has occasionally taken care of skunks and other small animals. Nancy says that having a pet sitter come to the home can be great for older animals or multiple pets. “I really enjoy helping the people and the pets,” she says. “I’ve had the pleasure of meeting so many great animals and people, and I love what I do.”

Bella

Age: 12 // Breed: English Bulldog

Benson

Age: 4 // Breed: Yellow Lab

Pets of Loren Snyder, Franklin

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Clients looking sharp for their photo session at Barx. Inset, pre-photo primping with a Barx groomer.

Barx Boutique for Pets Chad and Jennifer Whitaker, owners 101 N. Main St., Franklin (317) 738-0700 | www.barxboutique.com

A building in downtown Franklin that once was part of the Underground Railroad is now the home to Barx Boutique for Pets, a onestop shop for almost all the things your furry friend needs. Not only can you have your dog groomed at Barx, but you can also buy him a new collar or outfit, have his photo taken and reward your good boy with a freshly baked cheddar cheese twist on the way out. Sound like a good experience? Owners Jennifer and Chad Whitaker opened Barx in December 2010 after years of debate. “I was a vet tech for 20 years and worked at a kennel,” she explains, “and I always knew that this is 76

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what I wanted to do. I finally just decided to quit talking about it and just do it.” Barx specializes in toys and outfits that are harder to find, including items for cats. Dog bowls are handmade by an artist in Greenwood, and many of the items in the boutique are made from recycled materials. Boutique items include life jackets for dogs, car seat belts, reusable boots, water bottles, Tuffy brand toys and even pajamas. In the photo studio, Chad is the one who takes over. And the trick to capturing that perfect look on film? “Patience,” says Jennifer. “Lots and lots of patience.” Chad can go on location to take the pho-

tos and is in the process of doing some remodeling in the studio. Barx has three groomers on staff and can fill special requests such as adding bows or even spray-on decals. And once the dog has been groomed, a treat from the bakery is the perfect reward. Iced cookies, whoopie pies, carob bones, peanut butter bones, doughnuts and filled pastries line the glass shelves. “The cheddar cheese twists and the peanut butter bones are our best sellers,” says Jennifer. As Barx goes into its second year, Jennifer and Chad are looking forward to the possibilities. “It’s been a great first year,” she says. “We made it through, and I’m loving what I do.”


photo by JEn Huber

comforts

Bella Dog Bakery & Biscuit Co. Ron and Tracey Held, owners 7220 Madison Ave., Indianapolis (317) 781-1814 www.belladogbakeryllc.com

The first thing you see when you walk through the door is the display case. Perfectly shaped éclairs with a dark glaze, biscotti with white swirls on top, Neapolitan treats piped with frosting, curved cannoli oozing with filling, and brownies that look straight from the oven, all sit on tiered glass platters. But before you reach for one in hungry delight, don’t forget—these treats are going to the dogs. Bella Dog Bakery & Biscuit Co., owned by Tracey and Ron Held, is in its sixth year of cooking up culinary treats for its furry friends. “We specialize in holistic foods that are corn-, wheat- and soy-free,” says Tracey. Ron even took his mom’s meatball recipe and adapted it to be dog-friendly. In addition to the fancy gourmet treats, traditional bones with untraditional flavors are

available, including sweet potato, blueberry, cranberry, calming lavender and, of course, cheese pizza. “Everyone needs a little pizza in their life!” adds Tracey with a laugh. The Helds and their staff bake more than 15,000 treats per week. “We bake different treats for different days,” says Ron, “and everything is licensed by the Indiana state chemist at Purdue University.” On one visit, tiny decorated apple spice cupcakes sat on the counter, ready to be wolfed down. Smells of gingerbread or cinnamon buns waft through the air, often teasing the people more than the pets. Along with the baked goods, Bella sells a wide selection of holistic foods, including a dehydrated raw bar. These dried raw foods, such as chicken and beef, can be helpful to a dog’s digestive system and

can be used as a supplement or a treat, explains Tracey. “We carry the foods and supplies that vets are looking for,” she explains. Bella sells toys made by Cheerful Pet, a company that uses boiled wool with organic dyes. Toys made with rubber, plastic or latex can damage a dog’s digestive tract if ingested. They also sell Lupine leads and collars and pet furnishings made by Crypton, a durable fabric that resists water, stains and bacteria. Though most of the bakery is dedicated to dogs, Bella does carry holistic cat food in addition to health care products and toys for cats. The bakery also partners with three animal rescue organizations, Sheltie Rescue of Central Indiana, Kentuckiana Pug Rescue and Forever Friends Great Dane Rescue.

Feeny Monster

Pet Files

Tank

Age: 1.5 Breed: Greater Swiss Mountain dog

Age: 1.5 // Breed: Pug

At 100 pounds, Feeny Monster's favorite activity is hikes around Ogle Lake—followed by a nap on the couch.

Tank has a habit of burying himself in sleeping bags.He loves watching movies (especially "The Godfather").

Pet of Kristen and Craig Biehl

Pet of Brad Stone, Greenwood

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Kathy Keating shows Peaches some love in the "living room" of Funny Farm Petcare.

Funny Farm Petcare Johnson County Facility 4170 South U.S. 31, Franklin (317) 736-5708

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Kathy Keating used to deal with criminals all day long in her work as a probation officer in Morgan County. Now she deals with four-legged customers who are undoubtedly happier to see her than her former clientele. Kathy and co-owner Sandy Potter opened Funny Farm Petcare, a boarding facility for cats and dogs, in 2005 in Morgan County. Four years later they opened a second facility south of Franklin in Johnson County with room for 40 pets. “We really treat them all like they are our own pets,” says Kathy, who has five dogs of her own. “We dote on them and make sure they have whatever they need while they are here.” The highlight of any dog’s visit is what Kathy calls “couch time.” Each dog gets to spend time in a living room that comes complete with a couch and other

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furniture and looks just like the inside of a house. They also go outside five to six times per day, and all play time activities are included. “We get every kind of dog and cat here that you can imagine,” says Kathy. “It really makes our day.” Cats have a separate area with their own space for “couch time,” including a window perch and a jungle gym. Owners choose a boarding package that suits their pets’ needs. Deb Sachs and her pets have long been fans of Funny Farm. “The great thing about Funny Farm is that they treat my pets like they are part of their own family,” she says. “My dog is just as enthusiastic about going there as she is about coming home. I feel confident that my pets are getting plenty of attention and great care.”


photo by thinkstock.com

comforts

Lynn’s On The Spot Mobile Pet Grooming Lynn Macke, owner (317) 209-5282  

Lynn Macke can almost be thought of as a mobile pet magician. Dirty pets walk into her van. Clean, fresh pets walk out of the van. And it all happens while she is parked in front of your house. As owner of Lynn’s On The Spot Mobile Pet Grooming, she travels around Indianapolis and Greenwood providing convenient, at-home grooming services. “I get paid to spend time with some really amazing dogs,” she says, “And it’s a good service that is needed in the city.” Lynn’s van is outfitted with everything a groomer needs: a hydraulic lift, a stainless steel tub, dryers and clippers. It has a generator, a 50-gallon water tank and even a water heater.

“Size doesn’t matter,” she says. “I can groom a 3-pound dog or a 200-pound mastiff.” Lynn finds that mobile grooming is great for dogs that might get nervous at a traditional grooming facility. “Some dogs really have anxiety issues or don’t do well traveling in a car, so it makes it easier when I can come to them,” she says. “The dogs can see their house from the van, and it can help to keep them calm.” Lynn started her business in 2007 after her cousin started a similar business in Illinois. She is booked anywhere from six to 12 months out, proving that there definitely is demand for the service. “It’s a great business,” she says. “I love my dogs, and they are so good to work with. There isn’t a better job for me.”

Samurai Warrior (Sammy)

Cooper

Age: 17 // Breed: Siamese

Age: 9 // Breed: Black Lab/Chow

Sammy gets pampered with his own nonfat creamer each morning and evening. He especially loves to cuddle up on a warm heating pad .

Cooper is the greeter at Mallow Run Winery, but his favorite activity is running with Laura several times per week on their usual four-mile route in the countryside.

Pet of Gail Richardson

Pet Files

Rescued from Morgan County Humane Society by Bill and Laura Richardson.

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Groomer Gregg Gregg A. Smith Cedar Rowe Kennel, (317) 459-0382 Hollywood Dogs, (317) 215-4165

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For Gregg Smith, retirement doesn’t mean sitting around. After leaving Eli Lilly three years ago, he took on a second career by attending grooming school and learning how to groom dogs. Now he works out of three locations—at his home, at Cedar Rowe Kennel in Franklin and at Hollywood Dogs in Greenwood—keeping southside pets neat and clean. “I have a lot of wonderful clients who visit me quite often,” he says. Gregg has seen it all and can do it all, from coloring hair to adding bows and bandannas and glitter. He also can do hot oil treatments on the dogs

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to help soften their coats. The latest trend has been to add feather extensions to the dog’s fur, much like the trend in humans. “One of my favorite dogs, Simon, has become an artistic expression,” says Gregg. “He has a Mohawk, tribal expressions, and is outfitted with feathers, including a yellow marabou feather.” How long the feathers stay in the fur depends on the dog, of course. Catch Gregg Smith online at Indianapolis-based City360tv for webisodes about grooming and caring for dogs.


comforts

In search of a groom Looking for a good groomer? Don’t settle on the first person you find with a pair of clippers. According to the Humane Society of the United States website (www.humanesociety. org), you need to do your homework. The easiest way to start is by asking questions. Get recommendations from friends, from your veterinarian or from the professionals who run your favorite kennel. Once you have the names of a few good groomers, give each of them a call to ask about services, rates and how they schedule appointments. From there, you can make an informed decision about which groomer to choose, but the Humane Society also recom-

mends you double-check your final choice with the Better Business Bureau before scheduling your appointment. When preparing for your appointment, spend some time training your pet to be groomed by brushing him a little each day. On appointment day, your new groomer will ask for a copy of your pet’s vaccination documentation, so make sure you have the information up-to-date and handy when you show up. When dropping your pet off, make the goodbye short and sweet—save the extra affection for when you pick up your newly fluffed friend!

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Shooting Stars Portrait Studios Dave Yurasko and Sweela Mundy, owners 1001 N. Indiana 135, Suite B5, Greenwood (317) 882-7827 dave.shootingstars@sbcglobal.net

For Dave Yurasko, co-owner of Shooting Stars Portrait Studios in Greenwood, getting dogs to behave for the camera is all in a day’s work. He makes it look easy. The portraits on the walls of his studio show dogs looking alertly at the camera, posed on props or elegantly lying on the floor. What you don’t see is the owner holding up treats or toys, trying to hold the dog’s attention long enough for the shutter to snap. “You’ve got to just take plenty of pictures in order to capture the right one,” explains Dave. “Some dogs don’t know ‘sit’ or ‘stay,’ so it can be a challenge. The right shot can be gone in a split second.” He started taking photos in 2006 and opened the studio in 2009 with his business partner, Sweela Mundy. The studio photo-

graphs people in addition to dogs and has been known to photograph the occasional cat, goose, fox and even tarantula. “People just love their pets!” he says. When a dog arrives at the studio, Dave spends some time with it, getting everyone comfortable and relaxed. Sometimes the owner will bring his pet’s favorite toy or blanket for the session, or Dave will work in various props to add creativity and flair. “I want to capture the best images that reflect the beauty and personality of the breed,” he says. In addition to prints, pet owners can order calendars, greeting cards, business cards and even ornaments. Most photos are printed at the studio and are delivered into the happy owner’s hands within a couple of weeks.

Pet Files

Sassy

Baxter

Sassy's favorite activity is eating ...anything— Sharpies, CDs, knitting needles and a baby gate!

Leo

Age: 5 // Breed: Chihuahua

Pet of Dan and Toni Carr

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Age: 2 // Breed: Golden mix

Age: 10 // Breed: Newfoundland/Black Lab mix

Rescued by David Benner and Jane Jankowski


comforts

Pet Files

U Dirty Dawg Robert and Stephanie Morrison, owners 2435 S. Indiana 135, Greenwood (317) 535-3647 www.udirtydawg.net “If you can do it to your dog, we can do it here!” Nothing seems to surprise the staff at U Dirty Dawg in Greenwood. Want glitter in your dog’s fur? Done. Painted nails? Sure. Hair dye? Not a problem. U Dirty Dawg has been open almost five years and not only cleans up the dirty dogs but can board them, care for them during the day and sell the treats that make tails wag. “We pride ourselves that our business does not look or smell like a kennel,” says manager Carrie Hatcher. “We’ve had customers coming here since we opened who won’t go anywhere else.” Pets staying overnight get fleece blankets and can keep their paws warm in the winter, thanks to the heated floors inside the kennel. Play time is included and can take place outside in the fenced area or inside one of the large day care rooms. Dogs are separated by size, and all play equipment is wiped down multiple times per day. In addition to the professional groomers, a self-service pet wash is also available, as are classes in the licensed and accredited grooming school. Onsite veterinary care comes from Center Grove Animal Clinic, located next to U Dirty Dawg. Owners Robert and Stephanie Morrison opened the vet clinic after opening U Dirty Dawg and the grooming school. Both now work in the clinic and recently started Center Grove Pet Rescue & Orphanage. “It keeps you busy,” says Stephanie. “But we really enjoy it.”

Sparkey Age: 9 // Breed: Boston Bull Terrier

The year was 2003. My partner, Terry, and I had been enjoying walking around the Johnson County Fair. We returned home at approximately 8 that evening when we received a phone call that would forever change our lives. It was two close friends of ours who proceeded to tell us a story. They shared that they were standing in front of their home in Franklin when a car drove up and stopped in the street. An unknown person opened the back door, threw a helpless little puppy into the street and drove off. The puppy began running behind the car as fast as his little legs would carry him, but the car sped out of sight. My friends ran down their driveway and called for the little dog, and he came running toward them. They took him into their home and called us to ask if we would like to have a dog. I had never had a dog before and was not excited about the idea, but Terry said let’s just go look at this dog. When we got to our friends’ home, the puppy immediately ran to us and started licking our faces and running around like a chicken with his head cut off! Terry said, “We have to have this dog; he is like a spark plug so we will name him Sparkey!” Needless to say, we brought him home. We took him to a local vet to make sure he didn’t have

a microchip and to have him checked out, get his puppy shots, etc. The vet said Sparkey was about 6 months old judging by the growth of his teeth. The doctor said the puppy was in perfect shape, and he could not believe anyone would dump such a handsome and loving purebred animal. Sparkey was already potty trained and smart as a whip. I found out later that Terry’s grandparents and great-grandparents had raised Boston bull terriers. So, for Terry, Sparkey represented a warm memory of his childhood. Later, I saw pictures of his great-grandfather with his Boston bull terrier riding in family automobiles. Back on that day, and every day since, Sparkey has won our hearts and the hearts of everyone who has the good fortune to come to know him. Sparkey has a special way of making folks smile. Today, even though his hair is graying, much like his daddy’s, Sparkey still has the pep in his step and gives all the unconditional love that he has to give like the first day we had the pleasure to meet him. Sparkey has a spark for life that makes us smile every day. We feel blessed that on that hot July night, Sparkey found his way into our life and into our hearts. —Dale Hughes

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At Don & Donna's in Franklin, Jerry Miller, Roy Nicoloff and John Mahoney wax poetic about their days at the track.

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Driven by tradition Three locals remember their days at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

By Julie Cope Saetre Photos by dario impini

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John Mahoney, Jerry Miller and Roy Nicoloff, from left.

The Indianapolis 500 is a well-known May tradition for most Hoosiers. But for three southside Indy residents, it has been more than a tradition. These locals have not only been fans of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing, but valued participants as well. Here, they share their experiences with the quirky personalities, sleek race cars and intricate machinery that make each race special.

On the beat Jerry Miller has been watching the Indianapolis 500 for more than six decades, since his father took his then 6-year-old son to see the spectacle in 1946. The vast majority of those races—from ’46 to 2004—Miller watched in person from the stands, missing only two. All that exposure might burn a person out on the big race. But not Miller. He eventually became a journalist covering the sport. From 1968 to 1995,

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Miller wrote about racing for a variety of publications and news organizations, including the Marion Chronicle Tribune, Gannett News Service, the Johnson County Daily Journal, Indianapolis Star South and a variety of sports and auto racing publications. Now retired, Miller, who lives in Franklin, no longer attends the race in person. “As I got older and my wife got older, it just became such a physical hassle to go fight the crowds, fight the traffic,” he says. “We had great Paddock Penthouse seats, but you had to climb lots of stairs. It just became too much.” These days, he and his wife, Sheron, watch the delayed broadcast every race day evening, going to great lengths to keep all 500 miles of the race a secret until the viewing starts. “On race day, we don’t turn on the radio,” he says. “We


don’t go anyplace where they might have radios going. People think we’re crazy. I tell my son, who sometimes goes to the race, ‘It’s fine if you want to call, but don’t tell us who won. Don’t tell us anything that happened. Because we want to see it live.’ We’re a little crazy that way.” During his time as a journalist, Miller says he was fortunate. “I think I interviewed just about everybody—anybody you’ve ever heard of,” he says. “Foyt and Andretti and the Unsers and so forth.” But it was the not-so-household names whom he found to be the most fascinating—people he calls “the characters” of motorsports. “Jigger” Sirois (born Leon Duray Sirois), who is best known for not making the 500, comes to mind. In 1969, Sirois’ car owner waved off the driver’s qualifying attempt, thinking the speed wasn’t sufficient to earn him a spot

Jerry Miller in the press room at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, May 1972.


Jerry Miller in Gasoline Alley, 1969. With 500 winners Mark Donohue (right) and Bobby Unser (left), Penske garage, IMS, May 1969.

“I think I interviewed just about everybody—anybody you’ve ever heard of.” — Jerry Miller

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in the race. Shortly thereafter, however, rain dampened the track and qualifying was called off. Had Sirois completed his attempt, he would not only have made the race, but claimed the pole. Instead, he would never race at Indy, despite multiyear attempts. “It could have been a crushing kind of thing,” Miller recalled, “and he just handled that with such class and good humor. He and I still see each other every May at the Speedway, and we exchange Christmas cards. (He’s a) nice guy, and it’s been a pleasure to know him all these years.” Of course, there were some decidedly unpleasant memories over the years as well. “Racing, by its nature, has some terrible moments,” Miller says. “We just saw a situation with Dan Wheldon (the 2011 Indy 500 winner who was killed in a horrific 15-car crash at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway last October). “Those are always, always difficult.” He recalls American driver Jim Malloy, who had 61 career starts in the USAC Championship Car series in the late 1960s and early 1970s, including four Indy 500s. One rainy afternoon in 1972, prior to qualifying weekend, Malloy participated in a sit-down interview session with a small group of reporters, including Miller. “He was really a nice guy. Interesting,” Miller says. “He really had high hopes for that year. And then the next day he went out to qualify and crashed and was killed. That’s tough to handle.” So tough, in fact, that Miller learned to keep an emotional distance from the drivers he met, which he says “was good as far as keeping my objectivity. But also, that distance helped in situations like Jim Malloy. I learned early on, if you get too close, you’re going to get hurt. Racing is that kind of a sport. So I purposely kept at least arm’s length as much as I could.”


While Miller no longer serves as a reporter, he returns to Indianapolis Motor Speedway every year during the month of May as a member of the American Auto Racing Writers & Broadcasters Association. For the past eight to nine years, he’s run the group’s annual writing and photography contest. And as much as he enjoys taking in the colorful track activities without having the responsibility of covering them, sports journalism is still in his blood. “If somebody made me an offer” for a job, he says with a laugh, “I’d probably do it.”

Getting the shot Most of us think nothing of grabbing our digital camera to document a vacation or other special occasion with seemingly unlimited shots. But for Greenwoodbased photographer John Mahoney— who’s been taking photos at the Indy 500 since his days as an Indiana University student in the 1960s—it’s nothing short of a revolution. “I switched to digital in 2005, and I absolutely love it,” he says. “There’s nothing bad about it. (Before digital), when you shot the 500, you had 36 frames. ... When you got down to about 20 or 15 frames, you basically just had to change film, because you didn’t want to run it down and have two frames left and then have a big accident happen in front of you and be out of film in two frames. It made the strategy a whole lot different.” Mahoney learned this the hard way. In 1971, he was shooting from his favorite vantage point, the third turn, when a young driver blew his engine and spread oil on the track. A second driver, Mel Kenyon, skidded on the oil and slammed into the wall. As the action unfolded before Mahoney’s camera lens, he realized the unthinkable: He only had two frames of film remaining. And the mayhem wasn’t over. “Out of the corner of my eye, I saw this orange streak flying down the end of the

photo by Rick Lane

turn. I thought, ‘God, this guy’s going to pile right into the whole crash,’” Mahoney recalls. “It was Gordon Johncock. … He flew over a car where the driver (Kenyon) was just starting to get out. And the firemen were already on the track. It could have been a disaster. I managed to get a couple of great shots of Johncock flying over and the firemen jumping back to get out of the way.” Great indeed. The next day, the splitsecond shot by Mahoney, who was a stringer for United Press International at the time, had been picked up by newspapers around the world. “I went down to the newsstand the Monday after the race and bought up all the papers I could find,” he says. Mahoney had plenty of experience to back up his photography coup. A love for short-track racing—sprint, midget and dirt cars—brought him to a track, camera in hand, every weekend from the 1960s on. He got to know many of the drivers personally and followed their

John Mahoney at IMS, 2010.

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Former Indianapolis Motor Speedway drivers, mechanics, journalists and employees can join the Indianapolis 500 Old Timers Club after they have reached their 20th anniversary working at the race. Pictured are Roy Nicoloff's 20- and 40-year commemorative hats.

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careers from short tracks to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. “I’d watch races every weekend, and we’d party together after the races,” he says. “That was so much fun.” In fact, Mahoney became friends with Tony Stewart during the driver’s USAC short track stint. “We still get together for a poker game every so often,” he says of today’s NASCAR star. “It’s fun to renew old acquaintances.” The camaraderie with other shutterbugs has also been a highlight of his career. He and fellow IMS third-turn photogs have formed the Third Turn Society, complete with a Facebook page, T-shirts, even commemorative bricks. And as for Mahoney’s work itself, it has been commemorated in “Full Tilt!” a book of 400 photographs from the Indy 500 as well as sprints, midgets, champ cars and more. In addition, his photos have appeared in publications such as Sprint Car & Midget Magazine and Open Wheel Magazine, among many others. For 15 years, he and a business partner

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published an annual yearbook called Sprint Car Pictorial, and his archive of negatives from the ’60s and ’70s continues to be in demand by people ranging from magazine editors to car enthusiasts restoring vintage racing models. Now that Mahoney has retired from “his other full-time job”—working for a staff training department with the Indiana Department of Workforce Development—he continues to shoot races every weekend during the season. “Sometimes I think, ‘Hey, I’m retired. I should be kicking back and doing other stuff,’” he says. “But I’d probably wither on the vine if I did that.”

Official explanations Roy Nicoloff knows his cars. The Greenwood resident served as a longtime official for USAC races in the early ’60s, working with stock cars driven by racing luminaries with last names such as Foyt, McCluskey and Unser and first names that included Parnelli. “At that time, everybody wanted to get to the 500, but you had to build a reputation,” he recalls. “So the way you got it was by driving midgets and sprints and stock cars.” Likewise for officials. Around 1963, Nicoloff made his Indy 500 debut as an official on the Technical Committee, charged with inspecting cars in the pits to look for mechanical issues that could result in compromised safety on the track. “Our job was to look the car over to make sure that we didn’t see any places where water could be leaking or, especially, oil,” he explains. Nicoloff was the man to catch those dangers, even if the car was outside the pit confines. He recalls one situation with an Offenhauser engine, which required preheated oil to avoid an oil-line blowout. A young driver climbed in his car, buckled on his goggles and pulled out on the track—without, apparently, that preheated oil. “As soon as he started pulling out, I


could see the oil spurting up from underneath the fan,” Nicoloff remembers. He had to warn the driver, but calling out to him would do no good—his voice wouldn’t be heard over the roar of the engine. “You could yell your lungs out, but he’s not going to hear you,” he said. The quick-thinking Nicoloff decided to catch the man’s attention another way. “We wore caps with the USAC emblem and our name on them. I threw the cap into the (car’s) cockpit, and he stopped. I got a blue ribbon for that one.” Nicoloff sometimes even identified problems before they could be seen. During one practice session, he and his fellow officials were munching on ham salad sandwiches in between pit visits. Nicoloff was facing the stands when he asked one of the chief technical advisers which driver had just passed by on the track. “I says, ‘Look for the yellow light to come on—he’s throwing transmission fluid out.’” How did he know? He could smell the fluid, he explains, a scent no one else in the pits picked up on. “I’d no more says, ‘Can you smell that?’ when the yellow light went on and (the technical adviser) says, ‘Well, looky here, smart aleck.’” During his 500 tenure, Nicoloff saw the cars circling Indy’s famous oval switch from roadsters to rear-engine models. The mix of engines on the track made for a good competition, he explains. “You had Tommy Thompson (show) up with a Ford engine, and then Mickey Thompson showed up with a Chevy engine,” he says. “Dan Gurney made his own chassis and brought them in, and he came up with an engine and a chassis called the Eagle. And that was really competitive.” Nicoloff’s love of all things motorsports has been passed down to one of his daughters, who is also an avid fan of the races. It’s an interesting twist considering the changing social norms he saw during his years at IMS. “I was there back in the days when women weren’t allowed in the pits,” he says, “let alone a woman with skirts or open-toed shoes.”

Roy Nicoloff at IMS, left, 1991; below, 1992.

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An Attitude of Gratitude Southside residents take life-changing mission trip to Kenya By Greg Seiter

Pastor Dean Bouzeos of The Gathering Place at Community Church of Greenwood with children in Kenya. Left, members of the soccer Club of Angels in Kariobangi, Nairobi, Kenya.

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Pastor Dean Bouzeos is no stranger to international missionary work. In fact, the executive director of The Gathering Place at Community Church of Greenwood has visited both Brazil and China within the last three years alone. But even extensive exposure to needy people around the world didn’t prepare him for what he witnessed during a recent mission trip to Kenya. “Of all the trips I’ve made, this is the one in which I was exposed to the greatest amount of poverty,” he said, while reflecting on the early December trip in which 12, mostly southside residents participated. “When you go on a sports/missions trip, you don’t usually go into the areas that we did. It was a great experience, and I’m glad we did it, but it was certainly different than anything I’ve ever seen before.” The trip was coordinated at the request of two Kenyan pastors who were visiting the Greenwood area during an annual confer94

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ence for the Association of Church, Sports and Recreation Ministers last spring. “Pastor Kennedy Salano and Pastor Hudson Nyando stayed with my wife and I while they were here, and we got to know them very well,” Bouzeos said. “When they learned about our basketball trips to China and Brazil, they asked if we would be interested in having a similar, church-endorsed trip to Kenya with a focus on fitness training and soccer. They indicated that no one had ever come there for that purpose before. “I felt there was no way I could say no.” With numerous connections accessible through his work at The Gathering Place, an 82,000-square-foot sports outreach complex in Greenwood, Bouzeos enthusiastically be-


Above, Pastor Dean. At left, Chris Osborne. Opposite page, sisters eating in Kariobangi.

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Chris Osborne in Njoro. Right, kids in Kariobangi.

gan the process of recruiting potential team members to accompany him. Greenwood resident Chris Osborne, who coaches the St. Francis Soccer Club Blue Stars, a southside-based U10 girls travel team, was among his initial targets. Ironically, Osborne also serves as director, information technology for Kids Against Hunger-Greenwood. “I’d never been on a missions trip before but had been wanting to go on one, especially because of my work with Kids Against Hunger,” he said. “I’d been on the front end of packing meals, but I wanted to see the people who were receiving our food. “Initially, I had some concerns about going, but I felt God pulling me in that direction. I knew I had to have faith that God would take care of us, even if we had some bumps along the road.” 96

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Actually, unexpected challenges began to present themselves not long after the group arrived in Nairobi, Kenya. “We got there late at night, and the airport was really packed,” Osborne said. “While riding to the conference center we were going to stay at, the van I was in broke down. I think we even got lost once or twice after leaving the airport.” Bouzeos was particularly surprised by the condition of the roads in the area. “They drive on the left side of the road there, it’s very dark in most places, there really aren’t any lane lines and you rarely see a traffic light,” he said. “We were off the main highway a lot, traveling on dirt roads that had massive craters in them.” The morning after their arrival, group members were immediately exposed to the realities of the poverty-stricken area,

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particularly in nearby Kariobangi, a lowincome residential area in northwestern Nairobi where above-ground sewers, crudely built shanties and massive trash heaps are plentiful. “A lot of their waste is burned so the smell there is horrible,” Osborne said. “Being there and seeing it was a very emotional experience. It was a lot to take in.” During their time in Kariobangi, members of the missions’ team often split up in order to assist in as many different areas as possible. While Bouzeos worked in biblical leadership, helped pastors with sermon preparation or led basketball training sessions, women from the group conducted fitness classes. Osborne and the remaining team members played soccer with local children and helped conduct a tournament. However, the


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Above, Chris Osborne with girls team in Njoro. Right, children eating in Njoro. Opposite, goats and children.

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“After driving through the slums and seeing the excitement of the people just because we were there, it was very clear the Lord’s hand was on us.”— Dean Bouzeos

soccer fields were a far cry from what Johnson County residents are used to seeing. “The fields were all dirt and very bumpy,” Osborne said. “There were exposed rocks, broken glass, nails and even disposable razor blades on it … certainly not conditions we would let people play on here, especially kids. We also noticed there were kids out there who were barefoot or playing in flip-flops. “On the field we were on, there was a big puddle, and I’m not sure what was in it, but we saw kids relieving themselves in it,” he said. “It was disgusting. The ball went in there a lot, but it didn’t seem to bother the players at all. There were even kids who would stop by and play in it.” Other obstacles were present as well. “We were refereeing a game, and some goats walked across the field, and one of the sidelines by the church was a barbed wire fence,” Osborne said. The Gathering Place team also did some missionary work in western Kenya, where the soccer fields had actual grass growing on them. “While there, I got to work with a girls

high school team,” Osborne said. “Girls are just now starting to get into playing sports in that area. It was really fun, but the fields are also used by cows so there were cow patties everywhere. Many of those kids were also barefoot.” According to Bouzeos, members of the missionary team were able to fulfill three goals during their trip. “We wanted to share the good news about Jesus Christ with as many people as possible, we wanted to support the work of the two pastors who had invited us to come and we wanted to return from the trip having had a life-changing experience. I know we were successful with all three,” he said. “After driving through the slums and seeing the excitement of the people just because we were there, it was very clear the Lord’s hand was on us.” Group members also brought numerous items to leave behind. “Everybody took one piece of luggage for themselves and then took a second piece of luggage with ministry pieces to share,” Bouzeos said. “We took books, SOUTH

Bibles and things like deflated balls. We went there very well supplied.” As a first-time missionary, Osborne was particularly moved by the experience and believes that all team members came home from Kenya with a strong sense of fulfillment and accomplishment. “A lot of those folks were very vocal in their appreciation of us being there. They said they really appreciated our sacrifice and that we were willing to be away from our families in order to be with them,” he said. “I now realize how fortunate I was to be born here and how blessed we are to have the simple things we do. I can go to the kitchen, turn on the tap water and drink it. My kids don’t have to walk a mile or two to school, and they get to enjoy their childhood. “I have friendships with people over there now via Facebook and email that I’ll have forever. I think the whole team feels that way, too,” he said. “This experience was very meaningful for me. In fact, I feel like I probably got more out of it than our new friends in Kenya did.” |

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Hoosier

hideaways

Treat your special someone to an old-fashioned romantic weekend

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This is a quieter time of year. The holiday decorations are back in their boxes, and the chaos of summer vacations and neighborhood barbecues is still months away. Before the world starts buzzing again in the spring, take advantage of this lull to slip away with your sweetheart. We’ve compiled five of the Hoosier state’s most romantic destinations.

A Hoosier Utopia

Bridge at the New Harmony Inn. Photo courtesy of New Harmony Inn.

New Harmony New Harmony was founded in 1814 and re-conceived in 1824 as a utopian community in the wilderness—the kind of place where money wasn’t necessary and equality was paramount. The Harmonist experiment was short-lived, but its legacy lives on in the architecture and culture of this peaceful town. “What makes New Harmony a romantic place to visit is the sense of seclusion that you have here, the sense of separateness from the pace of everyday life,” says Missy Parkison, community engagement manager for Historic New Harmony. “At the same time, you’re still in a place where you can have a fine dining experience.” Start your romantic getaway on a walking tour with Historic New Harmony (10 a.m. and 2 p.m., weekends, through March 1). Stops on the tour include the roofless church, an early Hoosier log cabin, a labyrinth and several restored Harmonist homes. Afterward, you and your sweetheart can explore the compact downtown, with boutiques and art galleries such as Harmony Pottery (310 Main St.), New Harmony Woodworks (609 Main St.), Firehouse Antiques (608 Main St.) and the Stephen Pace Gallery (500 Church St.). When you need to warm up, head to Sara’s Harmonie Way, which offers growlers of beer brewed with the original Harmonist recipe. For dinner, make a reservation at Red Geranium Restaurant, located within the New Harmony Inn. “The dining room is beautiful, the service is very nice and it’s just an in-

timate dining experience,” Parkison says. “You immediately kick down a notch when you walk into the dining room.” Start your meal with platters of cheese and fruit, shrimp and butternut squash bisque, or Maryland-style crab cakes. For your entrée, try decadent but traditional preparations of fish, steak, pasta and chicken. Back in your room after dinner, you can take in a view of the lake from your balcony or curl up in front of your fireplace, perhaps with a nightcap from Sara’s Harmonie Way. The founders of New Harmony never realized their utopian vision, but perhaps you’ll find your own version here.

Traveler Info: Historic New Harmony, 401 N. Arthur St., (812) 682-4474, www.usi.edu/hnh New Harmony Inn & Red Geranium Restaurant, 504 North St., (800) 782-8605, www.newharmonyinn.com Sara’s Harmonie Way, 610 E. Church St., (812) 682-3611

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A romantic wine tour

Madison Madison is known for its riverfront downtown, a 133-block historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. But if it’s too cold for a casual stroll, you can instead explore the six local wineries included on the Indiana Wine Trail. In downtown Madison, the highlight is Thomas Family Winery (208 E. Second St.), which offers a casual pub setting, cellar tours, complimentary wine tastings and live traditional music most Saturday nights. “It’s not like most wineries where you go and do a tasting and leave,” says Linda Lytle, director of Visit Madison. “People go in and hang out and stay.” Other wineries on the trail include the Lanthier Winery (123 Mill St.) and the Madison Vineyards Estate Winery; three others are located in nearby Vevay, Batesville and Commiskey.

In 2005, Madison Vineyards Estate Winery opened its own bed and breakfast, with guest rooms that look out over the vineyards. Guests at the inn enjoy private wine tastings and tours, as well as multi-course hot breakfasts. Downtown, one option for a gourmet dinner is Bistro One, where the menu is influenced by the cuisines of Greece and France. “It’s fine dining, and people just love the food,” Lytle says. Another popular choice is Key West Shrimp House (117 Ferry St.), in business since 1950 and still serving traditional seafood favorites. Whatever restaurant you choose, be sure to enjoy it with a glass of your newfound favorite local wine.

Traveler Info: Bistro One, 122 E. Main St., (812) 273-9448 Indiana Wine Trail, www.indianawinetrail.com Madison Vineyards Estate Winery, 1456 E. 400 N., (888) 473-6500, ww.madisonvineyards.com

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Downtown Madison. Opposite page: Lanthier Winery and Bistro One. Photos by Bill Pohley SOUTH

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A Cabin retreat

Brown County In warm weather, tourists flock to Brown County for hiking, cycling and some of the state’s best shopping for artisan crafts. In the fall, they come here for scenic views of the changing foliage. But during the winter and spring, the community is quieter, and it’s the perfect time to tuck yourself away—with your sweetheart, of course—into one of the many private cabins in this area. “We have some great, cozy, two-person cabins, and some are closer to town and others are more secluded,” says Jamie Newton, com-

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munications director for the Brown County Convention and Visitors Bureau. (The bureau’s website lists more than 30 cabin rentals.) In town, you’ll find one of the state’s highest concentrations of unique boutiques and artisan studios, including many members of the Indiana Artisan program. Look for Anne Ryan Miller Glass Studio (425 N. Jefferson), the Brown County Craft Gallery (58 E. Main St.), Bathology (58 W. Main St.) and Oak Grove Pottery (942


Oak Grove Road). If you can pull yourself away from your crackling fire in the evening, head to the memorable Story Inn, set on the border between the Hoosier National Forest and Brown County State Park. The menu here focuses on seasonal foods from Hoosier farms, such as pork chops from Gunthorp Farms and salads made from produce grown in the inn’s own backyard. For a truly special evening, check the restaurant’s schedule for live music and wine dinners. Photo courtesy of Story Inn

Traveler Info: Brown County Convention & Visitors Bureau, www.browncounty.com Story Inn, 6404 S. Indiana 135, Nashville; (812) 988-2273; www.storyinn.com

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A historic getaway Traveler Info:

Wabash Paris may be the City of Light, but in 1880, the tiny town of Wabash became the world’s first electrically lighted city. That forward-thinking ambition is still evident today in projects like the Honeywell Center, a small performing arts venue that attracts some of the nation’s top talents. The center is just one of many attractions in downtown Wabash. You’ll also want to explore the restored Eagles Theatre (106 W. Market St.), the Dr. James Ford Historic Home (177 W. Hill St.) and the yearround Charley Creek Gardens (551 N. Miami St.). “It’s manageable for one day to stroll around and see the historic buildings,” says Debby Pyle, manager of the Charley Creek Inn. Located near the downtown attractions, Charley Creek Inn is a restored mansion from the 1920s. “The great thing about Charley Creek Inn is that when you step inside the doors, you feel like you’re somewhere else,” Pyle says. “It has an old-time Chicago feel, so it transports you to a different realm.” With a piano bar and separate boutiques for wine, cheese and chocolate, the inn offers a complete package for romantic getaways. The inn also houses Twenty, a gourmet restaurant. Try pork saltimbocca, slow-roasted prime rib or decadent lobster mac-and-cheese. For dessert, Pyle recommends the indulgent raspberry chocolate cheesecake.

Charley Creek Inn and Twenty restaurant, 111 W. Market St., (260) 563-0111, www.charleycreekinn.com Honeywell Center, 275 W. Market St., (260) 563-1102, www.honeywellcenter.org

Twenty restaurant

Charley Creek Inn. Photos courtesy of Charley Creek Inn

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a his-and-hers adventure

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South Bend

More Romantic Hoosier Getaways

This university town along Indiana’s northern border is the perfect destination for couples who don’t want to compromise. For him, the town offers the College Football Hall of Fame (111 S. Saint Joseph St.) and the Studebaker National Museum (201 S. Chapin St.). For her, there are tours of the South Bend Chocolate Co. factory (3300 W. Sample St.) and of Copshaholm, the restored 1895 home of industrialist J.D. Oliver (808 W. Washington St.). “It’s one of the most historically intact homes in the country,” says Alice Erlandson, owner of the nearby Oliver Inn. After a day of touring, you’ll both enjoy a visit to the Morris Performing Arts Center. The Oliver Inn, built in 1886, was originally the home of Oliver’s sister, Josephine. Now, Erlandson and her husband, Thomas, offer guests a range of romantic amenities, such as Jacuzzis, fireplaces and chocolates. Ask for the James Oliver room, a suite with a king-sized bed, fireplace and two-person jetted bathtub. In the morning, you’ll enjoy your gourmet breakfast to the tunes of live piano music. Next door in the palatial Studebaker mansion is Tippecanoe Place, one of South Bend’s top fine dining experiences. You’ll feel like a Victorian houseguest in the dining room, where the menu includes lobster cakes, pan-roasted scallops and the house specialty, prime rib. With your cozy bedroom waiting just next door, you might as well indulge in that extra glass of pinot noir.

Relaxing in the spa and hitting the blackjack table at West Baden Springs Hotel and French Lick Resort. www.frenchlick.com Shopping and dining at destination restaurant Joseph Decuis, in the tiny town of Roanoke. www.josephdecuis.com Exploring modern architecture and sampling 240Sweet artisan marshmellows in up-and-coming Columbus. www.240sweet.com Splurging on a room at the Indianapolis Conrad and going on a culinary tour of the city’s best new restaurants, such as Libertine, Black Market and Room 4. www.conradhotels. hilton.com/Indiana

Tippecanoe Place. Photos courtesy of Tippecanoe Place

Noshing on a gourmet breakfast at the Sycamore Farm Inn near Terre Haute and exploring the local Clabber Girl Museum and Bakery. www.thesycamorefarm.com

Traveler Info: Morris Performing Arts Center, 211 N. Michigan St., (574) 235-9190, www.morriscenter.org Oliver Inn, 630 W. Washington St., (888) 697-4466, www.oliverinn.com Tippecanoe Place, 620 W. Washington St., (574) 234-9077, www.tippe.com

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our side of town

Mallow Run Winery January 21

1. Ashley Ward, left, and Haley Sweitzer.

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2. The menu for winter warm-up. 3. From left, Debbie Newland, Patty Beam, Tammy Anderson and Deb Sachs. 4. Mindy and Jeff McNeeley. 5. Dena and Ken Hudley. 6. Girls day out. 7. Cindy Bailey performs with Bloodshot Moon.

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8. John Richardson opens a bottle of wine while Hannah Abraham observes. 9. Kerri Faulkner, Nikki Thompson and Lenore Terek, from left. 10. Laura Richardson serves lunch. 11. Billy Joya, Angie Bane, Mary Liggett, Karena Binder and Brandi Joya, from left.

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12. Allison Crowley, left, and Kelly Levengood. 13. Gail Klotz and Al Wray.

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our side of town

The southside celebrates the Super Bowl February 4 & 5

1. Hayley Gross, 9, and Hunter Gross, 12. 2. The registration tent for corn hole outside the Artcraft Theatre. 3. Tom Mazza of the Jukebox Night Club in Franklin participated in the tailgating contest.

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4. Sam Heineman, 5, Greenwood, plays a game at the Baxter YMCA.

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5. Luke Stultz, Franklin, 11, tosses a pillow as Delaney Johnston, 9, Franklin, watches. 6. Hunter Gross, Franklin, 12, tries to throw the football. 7. Bruce Ashworth, Greenwood, cooks brats and hot dogs during the YMCA's Super Celebration.

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8. Lex Logan, 11, Greenwood, and Benji Pesto, 10, Whiteland, put together a craft during the YMCA Super Celebration. 9. Eli Betts coordinates the beginning of the corn hole tournament. 10. Super Bowl XLVI letters in front of The Willard.

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10th Annual Greenwood Valentine's Dance February 10

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5. D  avid Johnston and Makenzye Zollman, 6.

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6. Various snacks were free to visitors. 7. Matt Hunt and Hannah Hunt, 8, of Greenwood, have been attending the Valentine's Dance since 2007. 8. Angela Stelljes and her son Jonah, 5, of Greenwood, have a blast on the dance floor. 9. Mark Casillas, with daughter Kaitlyn, 3.

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10. Zoe Mattingly, 10, and Mark Bruemmett, of Greenwood, have been attending the dance since 2005. 11.Aerielle Williams, 5, left, Grace Williams, center, and Deoni Goodrich, 5, of Greenwood decorate cookies. 12. John Stelljes and daughter Miriam, 15 months. 5

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weddings

Kimberly Kidwell and Brian Mitchell Married at St. Barnabas Catholic Church followed by a reception at the Riverwalk Banquet Center on Oct. 15.

Brian Mitchell and Kimberly Kidwell became friends while playing for their company softball team in Chicago. Conveniently (or rather not-so-conveniently), Kimberly says, they decided they wanted to take their relationship further right before she left Chicago to pursue her nursing degree at IUPUI. Their relationship withstood the three-hour driving distance, and Brian eventually proposed to Kimberly while they were on vacation in Mexico. The couple was married on Oct. 15 at St. Barnabas Catholic Church. The reception, with 450 friends and family members, was held at the Riverwalk Banquet Center. “We felt so lucky and blessed to not only be marrying each other, but to be surrounded by so many people that supported us and loved us," Kimberly said. Photography by Jordyn for Jennifer Driscoll Photography

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weddings

Erin Collins and Kerry Kaelin Married Nov. 12, 2011 at St. Jude Catholic Church and held their reception at Southern Dunes Country Club.

Erin and Kerry met one night in 2007 when Kerry went into a local restaurant where Erin was working. They clicked, she says, and quickly became friends. It wasn’t for eight months, however, before the pair decided to start dating. Two-and-a-half years later, they were on a trip to Myrtle Beach when Kerry pulled out a bottle of wine and asked Erin to step out onto the balcony of the hotel with him. “As the sun was setting over the ocean, he got down on one knee and proposed,” Erin recalls. They were engaged for a year and a half before being married on Nov. 12.  “We had a beautiful afternoon wedding, surrounded by our closest friends and family, at St. Jude Catholic Church,” Erin said. Afterward, the party moved to Southern Dunes Country Club, a venue that resembles a grand Southern plantation mansion. “The entire day,” Erin concludes, “was magical.”  Photography by Jeff Dillow

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events

Compiled by Amy NOrman

Joshua Bell with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, May 31-June 2

March Through May 6

Check out the eclectic collection of Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay in “Chaos is a Friend of Mine: Cultural Icons from the Jim Irsay Collection” at the Indiana State Museum. The collection features items ranging from instruments belonging to rock ’n’ roll icons like Jerry Garcia to Jack Kerouac’s original manuscript for “On the Road.” Location: 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org. The whole family will love community swim sessions, every Sunday through May 6 except during spring break. Cost: $2 per person. All

children 12 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. Time: 3 to 5 p.m. Location: Franklin Community Middle School pool. Information: 317-736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org.

March 1

Peter Frampton rocks the Old National Centre. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com.

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Don’t miss the 2012 Big Ten Women’s Basketball Tournament. Times: Vary. Tickets: $50 for all sessions. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www. bankerslifefieldhouse.com. The Murat Shrine Circus heads to town. SOUTH

Don’t miss the tigers, elephants, clowns and daredevils. Time: Varies. Tickets: $10 to $20. Location: Indiana State Fairgrounds Pepsi Coliseum, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. Information: 800-745-3000.

March 3

Gala for the Grove, sponsored by the Center Grove Education Foundation, is a special event that benefits the foundation, a nonprofit organization that bridges the gap between school programs funded with tax dollars and the need for additional innovative and imaginative programs to ensure that all students learn, grow and achieve their full academic potential. This year’s theme is “Denim and Diamonds.” Ladies, pair evening attire with your best denim or if you prefer wear a gown and heels.  Don’t forget your dazzling |

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jewelry and accessories. Gentlemen, tailor your favorite sport coat with your most stylish denim or mix a tux top and boots with pressed jeans. Tie not required. Time: 6 p.m. cocktails and appetizers; 7 p.m. dinner and dancing. The evening also will feature a silent auction. All proceeds benefit the Center Grove Education Foundation. Tickets: $85 per person; $850 for a table of 10. Location: Valle Vista Golf Club & Conference Center, 755 E. Main St., Greenwood. Tickets and information: 317-881-9326, ext. 1660 or www.centergrovefoundation.org. The Hoosier Herpetology Society brings its cold-blooded friends to Garfield Park. Come see a variety of different reptiles and amphibians from around the world. Time: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org. The Johnson County Historical Society’s annual fundraiser, “Wine, Cheese and All That Jazz,” offers a sneak preview of the new permanent exhibit “In the Business of Good Health” Enjoy samples from local wineries, a wide selection of cheeses and other hors d’oeuvres, live jazz

and a silent auction. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $25 in advance; $30 at the door. Location: Johnson County Museum of History, 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: 317-346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org.

March 4

The Columbus Symphony Orchestra performs. Christie’s Dance Studio and Dance Street will join the orchestra to perform dances from around the world. Time: 3:30 p.m. Location: Columbus North High School auditorium, 1400 E. 25th St., Columbus. During the Warren Miller Gallery Tour, Miller will speak of the inspiration, nurturing and education he received to pursue his passion to paint. It was discovered that he was deaf when he was 5 years old. Time: 1:30 p.m. Tickets: Free. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444.

March 6

Jim Cosgrove, better known as “Mr. Stinky Feet,” performs as part of the First Fridays for Families. Time: 6 p.m. Location: The Commons, 300 Washington St., Columbus. Information: 812-376-2681 or www.columbus.in.us.

"Steel Ponies" at the Eitelijorg Museum, March 10-Aug. 5.

March 6-11

Based on the stories of Sholom Aleichem, “Fiddler on the Roof” has been lauded by critics again and again and won the hearts of people all around the world. Time: Varies. Tickets: $20 to $74. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis.

March 8-11

Don’t miss the 2012 Big Ten Men’s Basketball Tournament. Times: Vary. Tickets: $50 to $70. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www.bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

March 9

Lisa Lampanelli brings her style of racy and raunchy comedy to Indy. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $33. Location: Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com.

March 9-11

From “Moonstruck” to “Apocalypse Now,” Hollywood’s biggest blockbusters have brought to life some of the greatest operatic hits of the ages. Join the Indianapolis Opera for a multimedia experience that pairs these timeless movie moments with the magic of live operatic performance. Time: Varies. Tickets: $30 to $115. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444. Guitarist Jim Curry and the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra celebrate legendary singer/songwriter John Denver. The show features timeless hits such as “Rocky Mountain High,” Take Me Home, Country Roads,” “Thank God I’m a Country Boy,” and “Annie’s Song.” Time: Varies. Tickets: $20 to $76. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org.

March 10

Chevelle rocks the Murat Theatre at the Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $27.50. Information: www.livenation.com. Spring is a great time to look and listen for birds in the park. See what feathered friends call Garfield Park home. Binoculars and

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field guides will be available, but feel free to bring your own. Registration required. Time: 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Cost: $2. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org.

Print is

DEAD.

March 10 – Aug. 5

The exhibit “Steel Ponies” will explore the art, history and cultures that have developed around the motorcycle. It features more than 25 motorcycles, each with a unique story illustrating the rich subcultures that have sprung out of the motorcycle. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org.

March 13-14

Shen Yun Performing Arts presents classical Chinese dance and music in colorful and exhilarating shows. Chinese dance is dynamic and expressive. Themes of kindness, compassion and courage are brought out through the songs and choreography. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $50 to $110. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444.

March 14

Don’t miss Dr. Dog as they perform songs from their new album. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $18. Location: Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com. If you have young kids, you know the Fresh Beat Band rocks their world. See them live at the Murat Theatre at Old National Centre. Time: 6 p.m. Tickets: $8 to $23. Location: 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com. If you’re in need of a good laugh, comedian Ron White and his Moral Compass Tour are in town. Tickets: $44.75 to $55.75. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Center, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www. livenation.com.

March 15-17

Concert halls across Indianapolis come alive with the performances of the Music for All National Festival, presented by Yamaha. The performances feature outstanding high school SOUTH

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into downtown Indy. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $35 to $120. Location: Lucas Oil Stadium, 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. Information: www. ticketmaster.com. Take part in the 21st Shamrock Run and Walk at 9 a.m. and then celebrate on Monument Circle. Information: www.indystpats.com. Music for All’s Honor Band of America is a prestigious ensemble featuring 100 of the most outstanding high school musicians from across the country. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $20 to $33. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444.

Time: 8:30 p.m. Tickets: $15. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444.

The 14th International Wine Auction, which benefits the Indianapolis Zoo, is a blacktie optional event featuring live and silent auctions and also includes non-wine items such as original works of art, winery trips, private dinners, designer jewelry, behind-thescenes tours at the zoo and more. Tickets: $150 to $300. Location: Conrad Hotel, 50 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: www.indyzoo.com.

March 16-17

March 18

The Mythbusters: Behind the Myths Tour, March 21

and middle school ensembles selected through a national audition process. Time: Varies. Tickets: $18 for adults and $10 for students for single day tickets; $40 for adults and $25 for students for three-day passes. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444.

March 16

The festivities kick off early in downtown Indianapolis with the Greening of the Canal at 6 a.m. More than 100 parade units will take part in the 32nd annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade at 11:30 a.m. See bands and drill teams, floats, Irish organizations and family clans, schools, local dignitaries and entertainment for the whole family. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., enjoy a parade tent party with food, a beer garden and live Irish entertainment on Vermont Street. Information: www.indystpats.com.

Music for All’s Jazz Band of America is a national honor jazz band featuring high school musicians from across the country, performing as part of the Music for All National Festival.

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Cosmic personalities collide in Holst’s wildly popular suite, “The Planets.” Krzsztof Urbanski conducts as the ISO performs this concert that promises to be an out-of-this-world experience. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $20 to $80. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org.

March 17

The Ethos Art Show & Hands on the Arts Day showcases local artists. Location: Franklin Cultural Arts & Recreation Center, 396 Branigin Blvd., Franklin. Information: 317-736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org. The AMA Monster Energy Supercross roars

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The Pink Floyd Experience follows up “Dark Side of the Moon” with “Wish You Were Here,” which explores the idea of absence and takes a cynical view of the music business. It’s a spectacular light and video show, full sound and outstanding musicians dedicated to bringing the most authentic Floyd experience possible. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $27.50 to $63. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.thepinkfloydexperience.net. It’s time to start getting ready for springtime gardening. Learn more about the different heirloom varieties of popular garden plants and start some seeds to take home. Time: 2 to 3 p.m. Cost: $4. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org.

March 20

America Ferrera is probably best known for her role on “Ugly Betty,” but she also is a devoted humanitarian who dedicates her time, energy and star power to generating attention to the causes that are near to her

Photo © 2012 DavidAllenStudio.com

The Black Keys return to Indianapolis with special guests Arctic Monkeys. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $29 to $59. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www. bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

Challenge your skills at spotting energy foes, conduct water quality experiments, plant your own garbage garden and create masterpieces of recycled art during the Going Green Festival. Time: 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org.


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heart, particularly those impacting children and their education. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: Free, but required. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

March 21

The Mythbusters: Behind the Myths Tour stops in Indy. Join Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage for an unexpected evening of on-stage experiments, audience participation, rocking video and behind-the-scenes stories. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $17.50 to $123. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Center, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www. livenation.com.

March 23

Bring the family to enjoy a tropical festival at the conservatory. Grab your favorite floral shirt and enjoy crafts, treats, games and more. Learn what life is like for people who live in the tropical rainforests. Time: 6 to 8 p.m. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www.garfieldgardenconservatory.org. The Johnson County Museum of History recently acquired items from the former Shaffer Drug Store in Edinburgh. The items, along with other pharmacy-related artifacts, are featured in a new exhibit “In the Business of Good Health.” Don’t miss the grand opening of this new permanent exhibit. Time: 6 to 8 p.m. Location: Johnson County Museum of History, 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: 317-3464500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org.

Curse of the Black Pearl Live in Concert.” The ISO will perform the complete film score to accompany the film, which will be projected onto a large screen above the musicians. The soundtrack edits allow the orchestra to perform the underscore in live synchronization with the film for an exciting and powerful concert and movie experience. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $40 to $60. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

March 23-April 1

The Buck Creek Players will perform “Harold and Maude,” one of the most unconventional love stories ever penned. Harold is 19 and Maude is 79. With Maude’s “reach out, take a chance” encouragement, Harold learns to truly live and love. Dates: March 23, 24, 25, 30, 31 and April 1. Tickets: $15 for adults; $13 for children and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-862-2270 or www.buckcreekplayers.com.

March 24

View and purchase basketry, fiber arts, ceramics, paintings and other works by regional

female artists. The Women in Art Market is a celebration of creativity from a woman’s perspective. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org. Don’t miss accordion national champions Dan and Kim Christian as they entertain with a variety of music. This husband and wife team has played at Branson and Disneyland. They have established themselves among the premier accordionists in the world. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Asbury United Methodist Church, 1751 27th St., Columbus. Information: 812-372-4555 or www.accordions.com/christian.

March 27

Join artists as they talk about their work in response to the theme “Courage and Hope” during the gallery opening for the fourth annual Spotlight Art Exhibition. All artists will donate a portion of their sales to the Indiana AIDS Fund and HIV/AIDS education and prevention. Time: 5:30 p.m. Tickets: Free; no ticket required. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

14th International Wine Auction, March 17.

Photo provided by INdianapolis zoo.

March 23-24

The Alfred Hitchcock Film Festival will be at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. On Friday, the lineup is Vertigo at 7:30 p.m. and North by Northwest at 10:30 p.m. On Saturday, don’t miss Notorious at 2 p.m., Strangers on a Train at 4:30 p.m., Rear Window at 7:30 p.m. and The Birds at 10:30 p.m. A weekend pass, which includes all six films, is available for $25 for adults and $15 for children. Tickets also are available at a cost of $5 per film. Information: 317-736-6823 or www.historicartcraftheatre.org The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra sets sail on a pirate adventure with the presentation of Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: The SOUTH

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events Bela Fleck & the Flecktones, March 30

March 27-28

Enjoy the breathtaking new production of “South Pacific,” based on the 2008 Tony Award-winning production. Rodgers & Hammerstein’s musical is a powerful love story brimming with colorful characters. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $38 to $60. Location: IU Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: 812-855-1103 or www.iuauditorium.com.

March 27-April 1

The Indiana State Museum and the Boy Scouts of America Crossroads of America Council invite you to race your derby cars on the tallest, longest and fastest Pinewood Derby track. The two-story, 126-foot Pinewood Derby track will be open to the public March 27 through April 1. The official race is March 31. All participating cars must be registered by 1 p.m. The track will continue to be open for fun runs on April 1. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org.

March 29-31

Krzysztof Urbanski conducts Smetana, who wrote a vivid symphonic poem representing his homeland. Time: Varies. Tickets: $20 to $75.

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Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org.

bulbs will be for sale beginning at 10 a.m. April 7. Information: 317-327-7183 or www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org.

March 30

March 31

Groundbreaking banjoist/composer/bandleader Bela Fleck reconvenes with the original Bela Fleck & the Flecktones. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $30 to $40. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

C.S. Lewis’ novel “The Screwtape Letters” reveals spiritual warfare from a demon’s point of view. This funny, provocative and wickedly witty theatrical adaptation starring Max McLean as Screwtape will change the way you think about how demons influence your everyday life. Time: 4 and 8 p.m. Tickets: $29 to $89. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

Founded and hosted by Grammy-nominated Christian music mainstay NewSong, the Winter Jam 2012 Tour Spectacular is headlined by Skillet this year. The tour also features Sanctus Real, Building 429 and more. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $10 at the door. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www. bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

March 30-April 6

Come see the stunning display of tulips and other spring blooms against the backdrop of the permanent tropical collection. Cost: $3. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Note: The

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Head over to the Easter egg hunt sponsored by Friendship Church. Kids ages 2 to 10 can bring their Easter baskets and collect fun-filled eggs as well as meet the Easter bunny. Time: 10 a.m. Location: Craig Park main shelter in Greenwood. Rain date is April 7. Information: 317-881-4545 or www.greenwood.in.gov.

The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic presents composer/conductor Michael Tilson Thomas’ extraordinary musical that presents portions of Anne Frank’s story of hope,


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determination and the resiliency of the human spirit. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $10. Location: Erne Auditorium at Columbus North High School, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: www.thecip.org.

April April 1

Imagination Movers’ bring their high-octane rock concert to the stage during the 2012 RockO-Matic Tour. With their danceable pop songs, they will engage the littlest of kids along with their older siblings, parents and grandparents. Time: 3 p.m. Tickets: $30.75 to $40.74. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

April 4

Noel Gallagher, the ex-Oasis songwriter/ guitarist, is touring with his latest project, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $29.50 to $49.50. Location: Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com. Visit the Garfield Conservatory and make a spring break craft. Learn about different animals and make an animal track bandana to take with you on your next hike. Time: 2 to 3 p.m. Cost: $4. Registration required. For ages 5 to 15. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7580 or www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org.

American led passion play of its kind. This powerful, awe-inspiring musical production boasts a cast of more than 200. Time: 7 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday. Tickets: $27 to $40. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org. Nicholas McGegan, known throughout the world for performances that match authority with enthusiasm, returns to the ISO for Haydn’s “Alleluia” symphony. Internationally acclaimed pianist and composer Stephen Hough presents the world premiere of his “Missa Mirabilis.” Time: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $20 to $75. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org.

April 10-15

Cameron Mackintosh presents a brand new 25th anniversary production of Boublil & Schonberg’s legendary musical, “Les Miserables,” with new staging and reimagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo. Based on Hugo’s classic novel, “Les Miserables” is an epic and uplifting story about the survival of the human spirit. Time: Varies. Tickets: $20 to $79. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602

Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-9406444 or www.cloweshall.org.

April 12

Expand your knowledge about herbs and their uses with the Central Indiana Herb Society. Join other herb enthusiasts and explore the topic of teas and infusions. Time: 10 a.m. Cost: $5 suggested donation that goes toward the Central Indiana Herb Society. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www.garfieldgardenconservatory.org. Needtobreathe: The Reckoning 2012 Tour with special guest Ben Rector stops in Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $21.50. Location: Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com.

April 13

The Indianapolis Indians battle the Toledo Mud Hens in the season home opener at Victory Field in Indianapolis. Time: 7:15 p.m. Tickets: $14 for box seats; $10 for reserved seats; $9 for the lawn. Location: 501 W. Maryland St., Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolis.indians.milb.com.

“Upon This Rock: The Passion Play,” April 6-7

Photo by Drive-By Prayer Indianapolis

April 7

Visit with Strawbery the Bunny during the annual Easter egg hunt in Province Park. Children ages 2 to 10 can enjoy this free event. The hunt will take place in a grassy area by Sunset Shelter. In case of rain, the hunt will take place in the Cultural Arts & Recreation Center. Time: 10 a.m. Location: 396 Branigin Blvd., Franklin. Information: 317-736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org.

April 6-7

“Upon This Rock: The Passion Play” is touted as the largest and longest-running AfricanSOUTH

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April 13-14

Pink Martini is a rollicking around-the-world musical adventure. After a thrilling debut with the ISO in 2010, this eclectic, 12-piece ensemble returns with its intoxicating mix of cabaret, samba, jazz and Hollywood musicals. Time: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $20 to $67. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org.

everything after a long winter. Participants mulch flower beds, pull weeds, paint, pick up trash and sticks, and much more. If you are interested in helping, call 317-346-1190 for more information.

April 20-22

Sesame Street Live: Elmo’s Super Heroes lands in Indianapolis. Time: Varies. Tickets: $13 to $30. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com.

“Coppelia” is one of the most revered and often imitated stories of ETA Hoffman. Come join in this family favorite set to the beautiful music of Leo Delibes, performed by The Butler Symphony Orchestra and the Butler Ballet. Time: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $21.50 to $28.50. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

April 14

April 20-21

April 13-15

The Greater Greenwood Community Band performs its spring concert. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: Free. Location: Greenwood High School auditorium, 615 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood. Information: www. greenwoodband.com.

April 14-15

Check out the many displays of blooming orchids from across the Midwest, all competing for awards. Vendors will be available with orchids for sale. Presented by the Central Indiana Orchid Society. Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost: $3. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org.

Travel to the sun-drenched shores of Spain as told through the eyes of the French in Debussy’s “Iberia” and Ravel’s “Rapsodie Espagnole” during “Vive La France!” Time: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $20 to $50. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org.

April 20-29

Our Town Players, a community theater group based in Franklin, will perform "The Curious

Savage" at the Theater Room at the Cultural Arts & Recreation Center in Franklin. Cost: $10 for adults; $8 for seniors and children. Tickets may be purchased at the door or reserved in advance by calling 765-810-4813. Show times: 7 p.m. April 20, 21, 27 and 28; 2 p.m. April 22 and 29. Information: 317-736-3689 or www. franklinparks.org

April 21

Don’t miss the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, which includes a Survivor Celebration, a 5K run/walk and one-mile Family Walk. Join in the fight to end breast cancer. Location: Military Park in downtown Indianapolis. Information: www.komenindy.org. Cindy McMillin and Ray Hass perform a flute and piano recital. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: First Presbyterian Church, 512 Seventh St., Columbus. Information: 812-372-3783. Kozo Kaneko, one of Japan’s top pianists, performs at Asbury. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Asbury United Methodist Church, 1751 27th St., Columbus. Information: 812-372-4555. Storyteller Danny Russel recounts Abraham Lincoln’s Hoosier days, combining lighthearted tales of Lincoln’s boyhood with the triumphs, challenges and personal tragedies that shaped

April 15

The Columbus City Band performs its spring concert. Time: 2 p.m. Location: Asbury United Methodist Church, 1751 27th St., Columbus. Information: columbuscityband.org.

April 21

The Voices from the Past Storyteller Series presents Abraham Lincoln: Hoosier Hero at the Johnson County Museum of History. Time: 2 p.m. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: 317-346-4500 or www. johnsoncountymuseum.org Celebrate Earth Day by helping clean up the Franklin parks during the Franklin Clean Community Challenge. Each year, several volunteer groups join together to spruce up

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The Republic Home & Garden Show, April 21-22


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4 to 12. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org. Since the European Union Youth Orchestra was founded in 1976, audiences around the world have been impressed with the level of mastery present in each new grouping of the 14- to 24-year-olds who comprise the ensemble. The orchestra, containing members from all 27 European Union countries, makes a special visit to Bloomington. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $29 to $49. Location: IU Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: 812-855-1103 or www.iuauditorium.com.

April 23

Dan Rather, April 23

the future president. Time: 2 p.m. Location: Johnson County Museum of History, 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: 317-346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org.

April 21-22

The Republic Home & Garden Show features two buildings of displays, demonstrations, ideas for inside and outside the home as well as kids activities. Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday; noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Cost: Free. Location: Bartholomew County Fairgrounds.

April 22

Snow Patrol brings its style of rock to the city. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $28.50. Location: Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com. The Columbus Symphony Orchestra performs “A Tour of Europe,” featuring the music of Rossini, Ravel and Beethoven. Time: 3:30 p.m. Location: Mill Race Park Amphitheater in Columbus. Enjoy a colorful and exciting afternoon when Dance Kaleidoscope and the ISO bring characters to life in “Imaginations Run Wild — Carnival of the Animals.” Time: 3 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $30 for adults; $12 to $15 for children

2007. The catchy tunes and sight gags will have audiences smiling, then chuckling, then laughing out loud. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $38 to $60. Location: IU Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: 812-855-1103 or www.iuauditorium.com.

April 26-28

Andre Watts returns with Grieg’s sparkling Piano Concerto. With elegance and unparalleled skill, Watts leaves his legacy in this ever-popular concerto. Time: 11 a.m. Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday; and 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets: $20 to $75. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org.

Dan Rather is one of the most recognized and renowned reporters of our time. He has reported from front lines around the globe, including Iraq, Vietnam, Tiananmen Square and the Middle East. He has reported on the civil rights movement, Watergate and every presidential campaign since 1952. Enjoy an evening with Dan Rather. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: Free, but a ticket is required. Limit 2. Available at 10 a.m. March 9. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

April 27

April 24

April 28

With sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, David Sedaris has become one of America’s pre-eminent humor writers. Sedaris will visit Indianapolis for one night only, featuring allnew readings of his work and a book signing. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $40 to $55. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

April 25

Wilbur is a pig with a problem. Thank goodness for his true friend, Charlotte, who devises a solution that just might save him. Enjoy this adaptation of the treasured tale of “Charlotte’s Web.” Time: 10 a.m. Tickets: $13 for adults; $8 for children. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

April 26-27

Based on Mel Brooks’ 1974 film, “Young Frankenstein” debuted on Broadway in SOUTH

Join The Color Cafe and the Greenwood Parks & Recreation Department to celebrate Arbor Day with a free tree seedling giveaway at the Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. Time: 8 a.m. Information: Rob Taggart at 317-887-5284. Get ready for the Discover Downtown Franklin 4th Friday Cruise-ins. On the fourth Friday of each month from April through October, head to downtown Franklin for fun. Information: 317-346-1258.

In Mike Birbiglia’s “My Girlfriend’s Boyfriend,” Mike shares romantic blunders and miscues that most adults would spend a lifetime trying to forget. Discover more about Mike’s comedic storytelling by taking part in a preperformance discussion with Dean Metcalf, producer of The Bob and Tom Show at 7:15 p.m. The discussion is free with your paid ticket to the event. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $35. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org. Don’t miss the Earth Day Indiana Festival, a free outdoor, family-oriented festival promoting environmental awareness and sustainable living. The festival features more than 140 exhibits, live music, children’s crafts and entertainment, a display of alternative fuel vehicles and more. Time: 11 a.m. Cost: Free. Location: White River State Park, 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: www.earthdayindiana.org. |

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The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic presents Di Wu, pianist extraordinaire, performing Rachmaninoff’s powerful Piano Concerto No. 2. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $10. Location: Erne Auditorium at Columbus North High School, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: www.thecip.org.

April 30

Spend an evening with new age pianist Yanni. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $39.50 to $79.50. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com.

May 2

Start the month of May in style with the 500 Festival Kickoff to May. Come see the 2012 Indianapolis 500 pace cars and the 2012 500 Festival princesses while listening to live music. Participate in free 500 Festival giveaways and the first 500 people receive free food. Time: Noon to 1:30 p.m. Location: Monument Circle. Information: www.500festival.com.

May 4

Rise Against with A Day to Remember and Title Fight at The Lawn at White River State Park. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $32.50. Location: 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com.

May 4-6

Sell your soul to the devil and there will be hell to pay. Old and disillusioned, Faust forfeits his soul in exchange for youth and pleasure. Don’t miss “Faust.” The show is performed in French with easy-to-read translations projected above the stage. Time: Varies. Tickets: $30 to $115. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

May 5

The OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon isn’t just for runners and walkers. Many activities are planned for all ages in addition to live music and a variety of food vendors. Location: Military Park in downtown Indianapolis. Information: www.500festival.com. SOUTH

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Enjoy the sweet sounds at the Voices of Franklin Spring Concert. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org.

May 7

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There could be no better way to conclude the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir’s 75th anniversary season than by featuring Berlioz’s Requiem, one of the largest choral-orchestral works. The season of celebration ends with more than 200 singers, the ISO and four offstage brass bands. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $20 to $70. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org.

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event is for automobiles manufactured between 1920 and 1970. Information: www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com.

May 11-12

James Bond comes alive in a symphonic tribute featuring music from five decades of Bond films, including “Casino Royale,” “Goldfinger,” “From Russia with Love” and more. The ISO celebrates 50 years of 007. Time: 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Friday; 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets: $26 to $48. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org.

May 12

Bring the kids to Monument Circle for Chase 500 Festival Kids Day, the state’s largest outdoor free festival for children. Time: Noon to 4 p.m. Information: www. 500festival.com.

The best of Indianapolis’ performing arts community come together for one night of heart-stopping, pulse-raising, thoughtprovoking performances on the Clowes Hall stage. See dance, theater, spoken word, musicians and singers. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15 to $115. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org.

Don’t miss A Garden Tea, a fund-raising event for the Book Buddies program. Location: Terrace Room of the BCSC Administration Building, 1200 Central Ave., Columbus. Information: 812-376-4461.

May 9

May 13

Don’t miss “Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters.” Often called the “African Cinderella,” this story is based on the Caldecott Award-winning book by John Steptoe. Time: 10 a.m. Tickets: $13 for adults; $8 for children. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org. Spend an evening with one of the all-time most successful American storytellers. The always-entertaining Garrison Keillor is best know for his popular radio program “A Prairie Home Companion.” Keillor will share hilarious anecdotes about growing up in the Midwest, the people of his beloved Lake Wobegon and late-life fatherhood. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $40 to $55. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-9406444 or www.cloweshall.org.

May 10-13

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway is calling on owners of classic and vintage passenger cars to display their magnificent machines in competition during the second Celebration of Automobiles. The

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Go back in time and celebrate Garfield Park’s history and enjoy a lovely afternoon tea. Garfield Park started as a race track so wear your fanciest hat when you visit. Registration

At the Artcraft Theatre Don’t miss these classic movies on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theater in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays unless indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or www.historicartcrafttheatre.org

March 9 and 10: “Hoosiers” March 30 and 31: “To Kill a Mockingbird” April 13 and 14: “The Caine Mutiny” April 27 and 28: “Singin’ in the Rain” May 11 and 12: “The Wizard of Oz” May 25 and 26: “Goonies”


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required by May 10. Time: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost: $5. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org.

Celebration of Automobiles, May 10-13.

May 18-19

The ISO performs Ravel & Shostakovich. Time: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $20 to $50. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org.

May 19

The Franklin Memorial Swimming Pool opens for family fun and relaxation. Location: Corner of South Street and Branigin Boulevard in Franklin. Information: 317-7363689 or www.franklinparks.org. The Master Gardener plant sale is not just a sale. In addition to vegetable, annual and perennial plants for sale, the Master Gardeners will also be on hand to give advice. Time: 9 a.m. to noon. Location: Garfield Park, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: 317-327-7183 or www.garfieldgardenconservatory.org. Experience a Victorian afternoon tea and learn the fascinating story of how the affluence of the Gilded Age made silver one of the must-haves of the Victorian era. Tickets: $10. Location: Johnson County Museum of History, 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: 317-346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org.

May 23

IMS Photo by Shawn Gritzmacher

Feel like an Indy car driver as you take a lap around the legendary Indianapolis Motor Speedway during the American Family Insurance 500 Festival Community Day. Time: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Cost: $8 per person in advance; $10 per person at the gate; children 6 and younger free.

May 25

Legendary American rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd headlines the Miller Lite Carb Day concert at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The concert is free with admission to Carb Day. Also scheduled are the final practice for the 33 starters in the Indianapolis 500, the Freedom 100 race for Firestone Indy Lights

and the popular IZOD Pit Stop Challenge. Carb Day admission: $20. Information: www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com. Don’t miss the Discover Downtown Franklin Streetfest. It’s a great chance to experience all that downtown Franklin has to offer. Information: 317-346-1258

a program of heroic musical dedications. Time: 11 a.m. Tickets: $20 to $50. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org.

June

May 26

Get into the spirit of the Indy 500 at the IPL 500 Festival Parade as it celebrates 55 years of tradition. Time: Noon. Location: Downtown Indianapolis. Information: www.500festival.com.

May 27

Get ready for an exciting race as the Indianapolis 500 continues to be “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” Time: Gates open at 6 a.m.; racing begins at noon. Tickets: $20 to $150. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Information: www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com.

May 31

Star violinist and long-time ISO friend, Joshua Bell, joins Krzysztof Urbanski in SOUTH

June 1-2

Violinist Joshua Bell performs Brahms’ Violin Concerto and Beethoven’s “Eroica.” Time: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $20 to $63. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org.

June 2

Kick off the beginning of summer at the Greenwood Community Pool Party. Cost: $1, which includes pool admission. Enjoy music; the first 200 guests receive a free hot dog, chips and drink. Time: Noon to 2 p.m. Information: 317-881-4545 or www. greenwood.in.gov. |

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a look back

Ready, set, go! At the center of an Easter egg hunt stands (wearing a dark hat and coat) Omer Wildman, of Wildman Jewelry in downtown Franklin. Born on May 22, 1924, Wildman passed away on Jan. 21, 2009. He was a graduate of Loogootee High School and he attended jewelry school in Corydon. A Franklin resident at the time of his passing, Wildman was a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He flew 28 bombing missions in Europe as a ball turret gunner in B-17 bombers.

Photo courtesy of

Johnson County Museum of History

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Roncalli Salutes Our AP Scholars

(From left to right) David Saylor, Haley Craig, Kate DeMoss, Rachel Law, Bryan Rainey, Alyssa Loebig, Amy Hemmelgarn

Roncalli is delighted to announce that 41 current or former students earned academic distinction for their performance on their AP tests. An AP Scholar is a student who has received a score of 3 or higher on three or more Advanced Placement exams. Current Roncalli seniors who earned this distinction are Haley Craig, Kate DeMoss, Amy Hemmelgarn, Rachel Law, Alyssa Loebig, Bryan Rainey and David Saylor. Congratulations to these outstanding students on their extraordinary performance!

Academic Excellence. Preparation for Life.

Three times recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a Blue Ribbon School of Excellence

Big enough to meet your needs, small enough to know them.

APPLICATIONS FOR REGISTRATION NOW BEING ACCEPTED • CALL 787-8277, EXT. 240 WWW.RONCALLI.ORG

Roncalli High School. 3300 Prague Road. Indianapolis, IN 46227. 317/787-8277



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