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SOUTH Indy’s southside magazine

Winter 2013

Keeping up with the

McCartys Also Inside:

Indiana Dunes, comfort foods and new section: Authentic Indiana


For Sherri, bariatric surgery lifted the weight of the world. Between a full-time job and caring for six children, Sherri had little time to consider her own health. Comfort food and evenings spent on the couch led to a prolonged weight struggle. Determined to turn her life around, Sherri decided to have bariatric surgery at Franciscan St. Francis Health. Now, from a high of 236 pounds, she’s down to 132. “It’s so amazing,” she says. “I feel like I’ve been given my life back.”

Embracing the future. Call (317) 528-7525 for a free weight loss surgery information session or visit EmbraceALighterFuture.com.

®

EmbraceALighterFuture.com


! WOWit all! o d y The


contents

Photo by Dario impini

Rick Campbell in his garage.

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on the cover

Feature Stories

80 Winter Dunes

At Indiana Dunes, snow offers as many chances for diversion as sand

86 Built to Last

Rick Campbell finds perfection in his 23rd home

96 Breaking the cycle

Center for Global Impact provides skill training in Cambodia

Mike and Lynette McCarty. Read more about them on page 68. Photo by dario impini

102 Winter’s festivities

The not-to-be-missed events through Valentine's Day

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contents Brozinni's

Departments

This & That

Southside news and views

21 In Style 25 Taste Gym clothes

Comfort food

34 Worth the Trip Martinsville Candy Kitchen

38 Home Trends Home gyms

& 44 Arts Entertainment

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50 Lifestyle

62 Health 68 Profile

56 Education

76 Authentic Indiana

Holiday parties

Natural beauty

Oasis tutoring

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In Every Issue

Good choices

Mike and Lynette McCarty

Clabber Girl, Eric Phagan

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8 Welcome 106 Our side of town 114 South weddings 119 Calendar of events 130 A look back Correction

Scott Haas is the owner of the three southside locations of Jack's Pizza — two in Greenwood and one in Southport. The Web site for those locations is www.jackspizzagreenwood.com. Information about the owner and restaurants was incorrect in the fall issue of South magazine.

holiday lighting photo by josh marshall; style photo by andrew laker

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welcome

L

Last year around this time I was fully enjoying my ability to attack holiday meals and treats with reckless abandon. Just a few months away from my due date with my first pregnancy, I wasn’t checking the scale anymore, and I loved it. This year, I’m back in the majority. I stand helpless, listening to the good and bad angels over my shoulders fight about whether or not to have just one more cookie. However, that didn’t stop me from coming up with the idea for our cuisine feature this issue. Watching my waistline or not, I’m one to err on the side of indulging. I’m a life’s-too-short kinda gal, so I figure as long as there is an overall balance of give and take in my lifestyle, it’s OK. So in honor of the cold weather and holiday gatherings, we celebrate comfort food. The southside is teeming with options for diners to enjoy their favorite traditional down-home dishes, delectable desserts or decadent drinks. Conversely, as I mentioned above, it’s important to maintain balance in life. Although the holidays

are a time to celebrate and indulge, they are also the perfect time to give back. We’ve been mulling over the idea of adding a few new story categories to our quarterly lineup with South magazine. One such category we decided to adopt focuses on people and organizations in our community that donate time and resources to make the world a better place. Whether it is on a local, regional or global level, hundreds of southside residents give of themselves, asking nothing in return, day in and day out, and we think they deserve some credit. We figured this season of giving was as good as any to introduce the new section, which will remain a rotating feature in the magazine. You’ll notice a few other new features as well – it’s all part of our continuing mission to keep South magazine a reflection of the interesting and inspiring people who make up the southside. So while you’re indulging in that holiday dessert, set aside a little time to indulge in the pages to follow. And from all of us at South magazine, Happy Holidays!

Keep up with SOUTH happenings on Facebook. kdeclue@indysouthmag.com

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imagine & explore...

our holiday wonderland of decorating & gift ideas

your hometown florist since 1954

m namara florist c

NEW LOCATIONS now open in Geist & Avon!

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Proud Sponsor and Floral Provider of the Indianapolis Colts


SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

Winter 2013 | Vol. 8 | No. 3

Publisher Home News Enterprises Chuck Wells Editorial Editor

Kelsey DeClue Copy Editor

Katharine Smith Contributing Writers

Alisa Advani Sherri Dugger Melissa Fears Caroline Mosey Amy Norman Ashley Petry Greg Seiter

Art Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger contributing advertising Designer

Amanda Waltz Contributing Photographers

Chris Bergin Mark Freeland Dario Impini Angela Jackson Andrew Laker Danielle Mann Josh Marshall Image technician

Bob Kunzman Stock images provided by ©Thinkstock

C

THE CENTER FOR

COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY

Advertising Advertising Director

Christina Cosner ACCOUNT Executive

Miranda J. Stockdall 10

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SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

reader services mailing address 2575 N. Morton St., Franklin, IN 46131

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Copies of South magazine are available at southside Kroger, Marsh and Barnes and Noble locations.

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SOUTH | indysouthm1ag.com 12DC12036_SouthMag1112Exp.indd

©2012 by Home News Enterprises All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.

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10/31/12 11:50 AM


EXPERTS AT SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS. AND OUR COMMUNITY.

Mike Combs Tricia Rake

Shirley Best

West Smith Valley Road and SR 135

882-8200

Š2012 The National Bank of Indianapolis

www.nbofi.com

Member FDIC


this & that

Compiled by melissa fears

Franklin city and college collaborate An innovative new gathering place is taking shape and offering a plethora of partnership, career development and economic opportunities for the town of Franklin and the college community.The emerging Franklin College Art Café was created by members of the Franklin Development Corp. steering committee. “Several of our discussions last fall centered on the positive economic impact of culture and arts in a community,” says Lisa Combs Fears, vice president for planning and technology. The

Photos provided

art café hopes to leverage the town and college’s resources to make the community more attractive culturally and economically and provide a unique blend of educational opportunities. “The idea is to make the art café a destination, a place where students and community members can connect over coffee in a creative, collaborative environment,” says Fears. Plans for the 2,300-square-foot space include an art gallery, a smart classroom, a dining area and a bookstore. The college is exploring opportuni-

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this & that

ties to consign with local restaurants interested in offering limited menu items and is planning to offer the space for community group meetings during the art café’s non-operational hours. “With a presence in the heart of downtown Franklin, the possibilities for collaboration with community partners are going to be extensive,” says Fears. “Our vision is for the café to provide an intergenerational, intercultural, intereducational experience, making art and culture accessible to a wider constituency and increasing traffic for local businesses.” Fears added that they recently received a $7,500 grant from the Johnson Community Foundation to offset costs for food service equipment, art display materials and gallery lighting. Staffing for the art café will primarily be college students who will operate the retail aspects as well as manage their own art exhibits and coordinate guest artist shows and community classes. 16

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Members: Bob Hogan vocals and guitar Ryan Angrick guitar Josh Ware drums Kyle Page bass reverbnation.com/dirty30music

Southside rockers Formerly known as Killshot, Dirty 30 is an upbeat modern rock band from the southside of Indianapolis. Starting out as a cover band in June 2007, they began creating original music in 2008. Since May 2011, the band has become a sought-after group playing several shows across Indiana and producing music in Los Angeles. All four of the band members have diverse musical influences, ranging from Stone Temple Pilots and Black Stone Cherry to AC/DC and AX7.

Q&A Guitarist Ryan Angrick

What sets your band apart from others in the area?

What do you consider your music style to be?

Our sound, overall song writing and age are probably three big factors. We are an original band, but when we do cover another artist’s song, it is usually a “classic rock” song. For example, we have covered the likes of AC/ DC with “TNT, “Whole Lotta Rosie” and “Thunderstruck” and Queen’s “Fat Bottom Girls.” We’ve also done our share of country songs and put our own twist on it, making it more “rock” sounding. For example we did Blake Shelton’s “Old Red.” We like to have fun on stage too, whether it be breaking guitars, ripping shirts off or just joking around with the crowd.

Southern hard rock. We are clearly hard rock and have a dash of Southern rock (slide guitar) mixed in. I guess we don’t really have one specific sound because a few of our songs bounce from genre to genre, but for the most part I would say that’s us.

Where do you see the band in the next upcoming years? Soon we will definitely be playing more out-of-town shows to start branching out to new audiences and in the future could see ourselves doing, at the very least, a regional tour.

How is the group’s dynamic? Our dynamic is definitely hard hitting! With loud and upbeat guitars and drums and a forceful vocalist, whom some say looks like a mix between Jesus and Fabio, to bring it all together.

What upcoming projects or shows do you have? We traveled to L.A. summer of 2012, recorded a song and shot a music video after producer Santino De La Tore found us and was interested in us. We want to do another music video in the near future. We have recorded almost a full album and plan to do an EP release show.


this & that

Channel your inner Hobbit Greenwood Public Library celebrates Middle Earth Day at 1 p.m. Dec. 14. Celebrate the release of the movie “The Hobbit” and all things Middle Earth with an afternoon of games, crafts and activities. Try your hand at the “One Ring” Toss, join the scavenger hunt and search for Dwarvish treasure hidden by the dragon Smaug, run like a Hobbit and more! Furry feet and pointed December ears are optional but encouraged, so come dressed like your favorite Middle Earth character. The animated version of the movie, “The Hobbit,” shows at 3 p.m.

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new eats Southside residents have a new dining option in the quaint yet growing town of Bargersville. South Carolina native and chef Tracy Lemmonds opened Harvest Bistro in September at the junction of Indiana 135 and 44. The bistro features modern comfort foods, such as meatloaf, and upscale favorites, such as scallops and filets. Lemmonds says the restaurant's most notable feature is the Chef's Bar, where patrons can have a special tasting dinner or just interact with him during regular service. Harvest Bistro is open 5 p.m. to closing Tuesday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday for brunch. It is at 226 S. Indiana 135. Information: 317-422-2027.

Meals on wheels … for Fido In the hopes of bringing quality food to the four-legged residents of Indianapolis and its southside, Zach Pierson and Melissa Kelly started Grateful Pet, a pet food delivery service catering to Indianapolis and the southside, including Johnson County. Childhood friends Pierson and Kelly grew up on the southside and graduated from Perry Meridian High School. They started Grateful Pet last year. “With our own pets we really value nutrition, and in a lot of areas if you aren’t near a PetSmart or specialty pet store, you’re stuck with what’s available at the grocery stores, and we don’t consider those brands healthy options for pets,” Kelly said. “So we started the delivery service to keep these healthy foods cost-effective. “Good food shouldn’t be a budget issue.” Grateful Pet monitors the food intake of each pet it delivers for and sets up an automatic delivery system so that pet owners never run out of food. They carry about 60 different brands and are happy to make recommendations. “We don’t carry brands that you can find in the grocery stores because we don’t consider those to be nutritionally on par. There’s no corn, no wheat, no soy. We make sure meat is the main ingredient,” Kelly said. Grateful Pet delivers as far south as Franklin. Information: www.gratefulpetindy.com SOUTH

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this & that

Book Nook Provided by Greenwood Public Library

“The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying & Start Making” by Alana Chernila Alana Chernila from the Eating From the Ground Up blog brings us a gorgeous cookbook with “Homemade Pantry.” Like her blog, the book feels like being in her kitchen with a bit of personal background and reflection with every recipe. The recipes themselves offer homemade solutions to pantry staples many of us purchase. From instant oatmeal to condiments to pastas to snacks like fig bars and potato chips, this book really does cover it all. Chernila’s approach to the kitchen is pretty inspirational. Waste nothing and resist the easier, but less wholesome and rewarding temptation of prepared foods. At points in the book, like making mozzarella and ricotta, I certainly thought to myself, “Who has time for this?” As I worked my way through and found the recipe for the mouthwateringly beautiful lasagna using those homemade cheeses, it all seemed to make more sense. “Homemade Pantry” is a great reminder that quality food is worth the extra time and effort. It tastes better and is usually less expensive. I’d recommend this book to anyone looking for this awakening and a collection of great recipes to get you started. Reviewed by Sara O’Sha, reference librarian

“A Discovery of Witches” by Deborah Harkness Witches, vampires, demons – these aren’t things that I usually get excited about in a novel. Add some history, some romance and an old English library, however, and you have my interest.  “A Discovery of Witches” follows Diana Bishop, an academic studying the history of science.  Diana spends a great deal of her time doing two things – studying in the library at Oxford where she works and hiding the fact that she’s a witch. Diana’s life changes, however, when she opens a bewitched manuscript that was thought to be lost.  When she returns the manuscript to the stacks of the library, she finds that she soon becomes the center of attention for demons, vampires and other witches.  The other creatures have long been searching for the manuscript, Ashmole 782, which is believed to explain the existence of these magical beings. One vampire in particular, Matthew Clairmont, becomes fascinated with Diana and her reluctance to use her powers.  Matthew befriends Diana as he guides her through the world of magic that she had hoped to forget.  Despite the tensions of a vampire and a witch forming a bond, their friendship soon turns to love, much to the dismay of others. Despite the magical elements of this novel, it’s really a story about fate, family and learning to be who you’re meant to be.  Part adventure, part romance, part mystery, this novel really does have something for everyone.  I recommend this novel to fans of the fantasy genre, but I also encourage skeptical fantasy readers to give this one a try.  I’m looking forward to starting the second novel in this trilogy. Reviewed by Valerie Moore, reference librarian

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Cardiovascular innovation, healing and health start here. No other provider in central Indiana is home to more cardiovascular innovation, coordinated care and talent than Community Heart and Vascular located at Community Hospital South. We are dedicated to providing comprehensive care with groundbreaking heart and vascular innovation. We offer the most advanced diagnostic and interventional cardiology available, earning Chest Pain with PCI accreditation by the Society of Chest Pain Centers and certified by the Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center. We are the best choice when it comes to heart and vascular care. To learn more, visit eCommunity.com/heart.

eCommunity.com/heart


in style

Pink power Protect your delicate lady fingers while you fight calories on the heavy bag or in the ring. Everlast boxing gloves. $20 to $30 at Play it Again Sports on Indiana 135 in Greenwood.

Tough love After several weeks of indulging in the rich foods, treats and drinks that come with the holiday season, most of us start getting that exercise bug. Our pants start fitting a little tighter; our bodies feel a bit more sluggish. That means it’s time to get back to a more healthy routine, and who said you can’t look stylish and have the latest gear while doing it?

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in style 1

For the

trail

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Lightweight yet durable

Chic and comfortable

Text while you sweat

Make every step count

Protect your ears

Attack the trail

A Kälke down vest in white, lime green and gray camouflage, $99, Dick’s Sporting Goods

A white SPYDER CORE sweater, $99, Dick’s Sporting Goods

A pair of tech touch performer gloves by 180s, $24, Dick’s Sporting Goods

A Striiv Smart Pedometer, $99, Best Buy Mobile

A gray Storm Cold Gear headband, $19, Dick’s Sporting Goods

A pair of Skechers GOrun Ride in charcoal-lime, $80, Skechers

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A 24-ounce insulated Polar Bottle in pink and silver, $9, Dick’s Sporting Goods

For the

gym

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Stay hydrated

Hold it back Under Armour braided head band, $10, from Dick’s Sporting Goods

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Protect your peepers A pair of Oakley Commit YSC sunglasses, $170, from Sunglass Hut

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Colorful comfort Victory definition sports bra in magenta and white by Nike,$50, from Dick’s Sporting Goods

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stand out Performance fleece hoodie in atomic green by Nike, $65, from Dick’s Sporting Goods

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Run hard A pair of Skechers GOrun Ride shoes in charcoal and hot pink, $80, Skechers

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road

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A Garmin Forerunner 110 watch and heart monitor, $199, Dick’s Sporting Goods

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Know the time and your stats

Insulating and lightweight A Nike Dry-Fit crewneck shirt, $55 from Dick’s Sporting Goods

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Road racer A pair of Skechers GOrun Ride shoes in charcoal and black, $80, Skechers

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Photos by andrew laker | Styling by Danielle Smith of Fresh Fettle

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Warm and stylish A Nike Shield running vest, $80, Dick’s Sporting Goods

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At OrthoIndy and the Indiana Orthopaedic Hospital (IOH), our patients’ journeys are important to us. Each patient has a different story to tell and we found that each person is proud of his or her injury or surgery scars because of what it represents. Because of Aidan Fitzpatrick’s cerebral palsy, he has undergone a number of orthopaedic procedures, as well as received Botox injections for his muscle spasms. His mom, Kim, says that because of the treatment he receives at OrthoIndy and IOH, Aidan can be a more active child.

Tell us what your scar means at

MyScarMeans.com. #MyScarMeans

Watch Aidan’s story at MyScarMeans.com


By caroline mosey // Photography by Josh marshall

taste

Getting comfortable We all know the feeling—the sleepy contentment that washes over us once our bellies are filled with hearty, satisfying meals. When temperatures plunge or our spirits just need a boost, we can’t help but crave our favorite comfort foods. Although the definition is ambiguous, the result is not: It warms us to our cores. Here, we’ve uncovered five dishes that nourish our bodies and souls alike.

Hot Toddy at Bluebeard

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taste

Piper’s Café and Catering Meatloaf, $15

Chef/owner Will Osgood opened Piper’s—a nod to his mother’s maiden name—with a vision of modernizing old-fashioned American classics. While the chicken pot pie enjoys unwavering popularity among customers, it’s the meatloaf that Osgood singles out as the quintessential comfort dish. Formed from a combination of freshly ground pork and beef, Osgood seasons the mixture with a blend of sautéed onions, carrots, garlic, green peppers and thyme. Piper’s makes a sweet, tangy mustard in house for the finishing touch. “It adds a great sweet flavor to the crust,” Osgood explains. “It’s very moist and tender, and served alongside real mashed potatoes with a beef pan gravy made from our braised beef brisket stock,” he adds. “It just warms you to the bone.” 2130 W. Southport Road, Indianapolis, 46217. 888-7667, www.piperscatering.com

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also try

Meatloaf Sandwich, $5.49

Jonathan Byrd’s Cafeteria, 100 Byrd Way, Greenwood. 887-8888.


taste

Indigo Duck Carolina Chicken Bog, $25

In Franklin, chef Joseph Hewett stays busy marrying the age-old flavors of the American low country with local, sustainable Indiana ingredients. Drawing from his South Carolina roots, his menu is heavily influenced by the hearty, soulful dishes that define the region. Case in point: the Carolina Chicken Bog, a slightly spicy Creole-like stew that dates back 300 years and is on the menu during the colder seasons. Hewett was first introduced to the dish as a young cook in Charleston. (“And it’s probably my favorite dish to date,” he adds.) Chicken, sausage, tomatoes, vegetables and spices are simmered in chicken stock, and the mixture is ladled over a scoop of jasmine rice. “Without rice the stew is simply not a bog,” Hewett says. “We Sandlappers love our rice.” 39 E.

also try

Pueblo Chicken, $13.99

Stone Creek Dining Co., 911 N. State Road 135, Greenwood. 889-1200.

Court St., Franklin, 46131. 560-5805, www.theindigoduck.com

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taste

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taste

Bluebeard Pappardelle with Butcher Shop Bolognese, $24

Few dishes say “comfort” like pasta with meat sauce, and Bluebeard executes a version many diners declare addictive. Husband and wife duo John and Abbi Adams are co-owners of the Fletcher Place newcomer, dishing up Italian-inspired concoctions with a heavy reliance on local ingredients. The pappardelle is no exception. “It consists of house-made, wide egg noodles with a meat tomato sauce including pork, beef, lamb and liver,” says John Adams.“We grind our own blend of meats, typically using pork shoulder and liver from Gunthorp Farms in La Grange, beef chuck eye roast from Fischer Farms in Jasper and lamb shoulder from Viking Lamb in Morristown. Then we grate a huge pile of reggiano and drizzle it with herb oil. [It] warms your soul instantly.” 653 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis, 46203. 686-1580, www.bluebeardindy.com

also try

Penne Beef Bolognese, $18

Richard’s Kitchen, 229 S. Main St., Franklin, 46131. 738-5451. www.richardskitchen.com

Warm your spirits A hot toddy—a mixture of liquor, hot water and sweetener or spices— was once believed to treat the common cold if consumed before bed. These days, the throwback cocktail is still considered a “soul warmer” on winter evenings. JB Adams, the bar manager at Bluebeard, shares his favorite versions of two drinks that are sure to fight off the chill.

Winter Old-Fashioned

Hot Toddy

(above)

(shown on page 25)

3 ounces J&B blended scotch ¾ ounce maple syrup 2 dashes aromatic bitters 2 dashes orange bitters

3 ounces cognac 1 ounce honey syrup (recipe below) 3-6 ounces hot Earl Grey tea

Combine bitters and maple syrup in an old-fashioned or rocks glass. Add three ice cubes and stir to combine for 10 to 15 seconds. Pack the glass with additional ice and add the scotch. Stir for 20 to 30 seconds. Garnish with an orange twist.

Combine all ingredients and stir in a heatproof glass or mug. Garnish with a lemon wedge or zest. *To make honey syrup Combine 1 cup of local honey, 1 cup of water, zest of 2 oranges and two vanilla beans in a pot over high heat. Stir frequently to keep the honey from burning. Remove from heat at the first crack of a boil. Let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Strain and bottle. The honey syrup should keep for two weeks refrigerated.

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taste

Mama Irma Chupe de Camarones, $14.75

Hilda Cano runs her Peruvian eatery in Fountain Square with an experienced hand, drawing from her native background and the teachings of her mother, Irma. While guests crowd the small space to sample portions of tangy ceviche and fried plantains, there’s another dish on the varied menu that spells comfort, Peruvianstyle: chupe de camarones (shrimp chowder). The thick, creamy seafood bisque is made with authentic corn, potatoes and spices from Peru and topped with shrimp and succulent chunks of fried tilapia. “Chupe de camarones is a very traditional dish from Peru,” Cano says. “People love it!” 1058 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis, 46203. 423-2421, http://indianapolisonline.net/mama/mama.html

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also try

Lobster Bisque, $5 every Friday

Hal’s Fabulous Vegas Bar and Grill, 1133 N. State Road 135, Greenwood. 888-3427.


sparkles.

The tree doesn’t have to be the only thing that

1263 N State Road 135, Greenwood (317) 888-7662 | www.jljohnsons.com


taste Santorini Greek Kitchen Galaktabouriko, $6

Connoisseurs of Greek cuisine—and good food in general— still eagerly flock to this Mediterranean mecca after 10 years in business. The Fountain Square mainstay suffered extensive fire damage last year, but rebounded quickly and remains a popular destination, thanks to a well-crafted menu and lively atmosphere (don’t miss music and belly dancers on weekends!). Although many of the dishes at Santorini can claim comfort points, the proof is in the pudding—or rather, the custard. Greek galaktabouriko is a sweet custard dish encased in layers of phyllo and topped with honey syrup and cinnamon. “We serve this warm, and it just hits the spot,” says co-owner Jeanette Sawi. “It pairs very well with Greek coffee or any of our dessert wines.” 1417 Prospect St., Indianapolis, 46203. 917-1117, www.santorini-greek-kitchen.com also try

Baklava, $2.

Greek Islands, 906 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis. 636-0700.

WINE

DINE

FIND

Pork Tenderloin

» Shopping for the wine lover on your list? Help them

remember each bottle they’ll crack open this year with a wine cork cage from Vino Villa (200 N. Madison, Greenwood). “Cork cages are popular gifts, especially during the holidays,” says owner Paul Jacquin. “We carry different styles and sizes.” The ornate metal cages serve as the perfect accent for displaying a growing cork collection. www.vinovilla.com, 882-9463

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» The much-anticipated Cerulean Restaurant is slated

to make its debut this month in CityWay development, an eight-block multi-use area in a southeast pocket of downtown. The self-described “Midwestern postmodern menu” will feature highly seasonal, local elements in a fine dining atmosphere. “Lunch and dinner will be different experiences, but both will include as much Midwestern sourcing as possible,” says manager Cameron Abbott. 339 S. Delaware St., Indianapolis. www. ceruleanrestaurant.com

Turn up the holiday magic this season with a sugarysweet, custom-made gingerbread house. At Tulip Treats based in Greenwood, owner Deborah Luzier sells the seasonal treats to customers looking for one of the season’s most beloved icons. “Gingerbread houses make great centerpieces during the holidays,” says Luzier. “You can call us to place a custom order. We’re happy to work within any color scheme you’d like.” Prices start at $40, which includes the cost of delivery. www.tuliptreats.com, 258-8046


The premiere event of 2013 that you won’t want to miss! Stagehands to Movie Stars … from casual to formal wear … dress the part and join the party!

%/8(6.,(6 The Future of the Center Grove Education Foundation

2

13

Premiere Coming Soon to the Indiana Roof Ballroom!

blue skies: plural noun \ˈblü-ˈskīs\ 1) Optimistic plans for the future. 2) Visionary. “Nothing but blue skies, from now on.”

The 2013 Gala for the Grove 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, February 23, 2013 Indiana Roof Ballroom 140 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204 New! Private VIP Reception at 6:00 p.m. followed by Cocktails (cash bar), Silent Auction, Dinner, Live Auction, Music and Dancing. Blue attire suggested. Order tickets today! www.centergrovefoundation.org or 317.881.9326, ext. 1660 Now accepting sponsorships and silent auction donations! Please call or email Terry Spradlin for more information: 317.750.2056 or cgef@centergrovefoundation.org.


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worth the trip

Raising

Cane What started as a misunderstanding turned out to be a sweet deal for the town of Martinsville

Martinsville Candy Kitchen 46 N. Main St., Martinsville (765) 342-6390

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worth the trip

Above: The Badgers pour a molten candy mixture onto a marble slab to begin the process of making canes. Right: John and Pam Badger.

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John and Pam Badger purchased the Martinsville Candy Kitchen in 2004, saving it from closure when the store’s former owners were ready to retire. But the Badgers admit they went into the purchase mistakenly thinking each was doing it because the other wanted it. “She wanted it; she got it,” John still says of the purchase. “No, I didn’t,” Pam quickly and teasingly corrects him. “It’s way more work than I ever wanted.” John says he wasn’t even a big fan of candy canes when they borrowed against his retirement account to buy the business. “I’m more of a cookie man,” he said. And as for Pam? She was diagnosed with diabetes when she was 13. Candy, up until 2011 when she had a pancreas transplant operation that erased the problem, was not really an option. Nonetheless, the couple spent a slow summer month in 2004 learning the tricks of the trade from the shop’s previous owners and then introduced themselves as Martinsville’s newest candy makers by July of that same year. Both John and Pam have day jobs (he delivers fuel for Martinsville’s Co-Alliance; she works in the county clerk’s office), but they spend their evenings and weekends keeping alive the traditions (and original

recipes) that Greek immigrant Jimmy Zapapas began when he first opened the shop in 1919. The purchase has become a family affair. During the week, John’s mom and sister, as well as the couple’s son, John, and their nephews, along with other family members and friends, help to run the store. Making 17 flavors of candy canes, along with other confections like dark chocolate peanut butter cups, white chocolate truffles and their homemade Tiger Butter (white chocolate, milk chocolate and peanut butter fudge), they use the same tools (a copper pot, a marble slab and a metal hook) that Zapapas originally used. Each year, the Badgers make approximately 30,000 candy canes (in 2011, they estimate they made upward of 35,000), the majority of their business falling during the fall and winter holidays, with seasonal orders coming in as early as July. During the busy season, “we can’t make canes fast enough,” John says. “People get angry if we run out.” Guests are serious about getting their sugar fixes … and with good reason. The shop, blanketed out front with an appropriately striped red-and-white awning, offers glass-enclosed rows of goodness … in the form of truffles, mints, cookies and flavored fudges. During the summer


months, the 20 or so flavors of ice cream housed along the shop’s west wall become the stars of the show, but it’s the front case, which features candy canes and candy cane pieces in flavors like peppermint, wintergreen, cinnamon, cappuccino, lemon and cherry, that remains busy all year. The same molten sugar recipes used to create candy canes also go into the striped lollipops, swizzle sticks and ribbon candy, as well as the seasonal hearts, shamrocks, Easter baskets and Indianapolis Colts-inspired horseshoes the couple creates. In 2007, the Badgers bought and renovated the former Bertelsen’s Jewelry Store in Martinsville’s courthouse square and moved the Candy Kitchen there, just a few doors down from its original location. The move gave them more space. Now, near the back of the store, tables await customers who wish to be seated to enjoy their sweet treats, and an adjacent wall of windows showcases the back room, which allows curious visitors to see the candy-cane–making process, a task John usually tackles on Saturday mornings. The sweet scent of peppermint quickly fills the air when he spreads the flavoring over the molten sugar and corn syrup mixture on the marble table. He has to work quickly, adding food coloring to separated sections of the approximately 12-pound mass while it’s still pliable. John does much of his work next to a hooded flame to keep each batch, which produces approximately 200 6-inch canes, from cooling too quickly. He twists the mass of bi-colored candy into rope, and then Pam, his helper on this particular Saturday, cuts and handcrafts each piece into its final shape. The result is a cane that they swear tastes nothing like the boxed varieties you can find in most big-box stores—especially when the canes are still warm. Lucky guests to the shop when they’re making the canes can ask questions and judge the difference in taste themselves. When asked about the learning curve of running a candy store, Pam seems a little less than enthusiastic. The couple have had to teach themselves the ways of business ownership every step of the way. “We learn something new every day,” Pam said. As for whether owning a candy store is a dream job, Pam isn’t quite sure. But John does have hopes of retiring into the business by working there full-time one day. “That’s the plan,” he says. “It’s going to be 10 years. I’ll be an old man before I can do that.”

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home trends

The home gym of Brett Mann

Home sweet gym Having workout equipment close at hand removes biggest excuse for not exercising By Greg Seiter

H

Hitting the gym for a strengthtraining session, a cardio workout or even a muscle-stretching class seems to be as popular now as it ever has been, but what’s really interesting is that a lot of today’s health-conscious Americans are electing to exercise in the comfort of their homes rather than at a local fitness club. Many industry experts agree that home gyms are on the rise and credit at least part of that trend to the public’s desire to remain fit while saving time and money. “I like the convenience of being able to work out whenever I want,” said Brett Mann, a pediatric dentist on the south-

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side of Indianapolis who has four primary workout stations in his home basement that allow for the training of various upper-body muscle groups. “As far as expenses go, sure, there’s an initial cost for the equipment, but over time, that pays for itself in comparison to what I would pay for a gym membership. Besides, I enjoy working out with my sons at home. It’s nice family time.” Chris Lutz, co-owner of Bob Block Fitness, agrees that home gym expenses don’t need to be extensive. “The investment required to have a good fitness selection at home is much Photos by Danielle Mann


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home trends

less than what people usually expect,” he said. “You really don’t need to spend a lot of money to have what you need. “Even if you’re talking about stretching mats, a medicine ball and one or two pieces of equipment, you can have what you need for less than a thousand dollars. Of course, you can spend more than that, too. It all depends on your budget and the types of items you purchase.” Lutz believes the growing popularity of in-home exercise facilities is a direct reflection of the public’s growing interest in physical fitness. “We’re seeing an increase in the desire for people to become more healthy and fit, and that has led to a proliferation of health clubs in central Indiana,” he said. “More people have health club memberships now, but they also want to have a solution at home to support what they can’t get at the gym.” Generally speaking, most membershipbased health clubs offer a wide variety

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home trends

of exercise and cardio equipment, free weights and classes, but accessibility is oftentimes a problem during lunchtime and after-work hours, a peak usage time for members trying to fit a quick workout into what is already more than likely a busy schedule. In that regard, as Mann indicated, convenience is a factor to consider. “My wife has had a gym membership, but she also uses what we have in our basement,” Mann said. “I know that I’m working out more than I would have otherwise because I have the equipment here. Plus, the music is much better in my gym. Of course, that depends on whether or not my sons are with me,” he said with a laugh. As far as equipment goes, potential buyers have a wide variety of options and equivalent prices. According to Lutz, one of the most popular items at Bob Block right now is the Life Fitness – G7 functional trainer,

priced at a little less than $3,000. With dual weight stacks, the compact machine, which incorporates 20 smooth pulley adjustments that allow users to exercise one or both sides of the body at a time, also makes it simple to focus on either upper or lower muscle groups. In short, the flexibility offered by the Life Fitness – G7 and others similar to it is reflective of a relatively new approach to workout philosophies and techniques. “The way we exercise has changed, and that trend is here to stay,” Lutz said. “It used to be that we tried to do a lot of isolated focus on one muscle group at a time, but now with the inclusion way, we get as much of the body involved as possible. “The trend is toward strength movements that involve multiple joints while engaging core muscles and the trunk.” Of course, not everyone is looking for a $3,000 piece of equipment. In that regard, Bob Block stores, located in Greenwood, Castleton and Carmel, have a wide vari-

“Even if you’re talking about stretching mats, a medicine ball and one or two pieces of equipment, you can have what you need for less than a thousand dollars.” —Chris Lutz

Located at Orchard Park on 135 in Greenwood

(317) 888-8995 MOnday-Friday, 10aM tO 8PM and Sat, 10aM tO 5PM

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home trends

ety of equipment options, including stationary bikes, leg press machines, adjustable flat benches for chest and shoulder work, squat racks and treadmills. “Elliptical machines are also very popular now, and everybody knows how to walk and/or jog so there’s really no learning involved,” Lutz said. “The movement on these types of machines as well as on modern treadmills allows for controlled impact so they help maintain bone density.” When shopping for equipment, the amount of available space in a home is another thing to consider. “What we have is pretty large, and it was a fiasco getting it into our basement,” Mann said. “We had to disassemble a door frame, but the installer and one of the owners from Bob Block was there, so we got it done.” Lutz is quick to point out that home gym equipment doesn’t necessarily need to be placed in the basement of a home.

“We have equipment that will fit nicely into the corner of a spare bedroom, and we also see people who want items in their master bedroom,” Lutz said. “If a person is committed to leading a healthy lifestyle, they’ll find the space for whatever they have or want to get.” Ultimately, Lutz says there are many advantages to having a home gym.

“Having stuff at home is great because it takes away many excuses associated with going to health clubs, like traffic, having to talk with people you don’t want to and having to wait in line to use equipment,” he said. “You get all of that out of the way, and so ultimately, it’s just up to you. All you have to do is find motivation.”

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WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS 42

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arts & entertainment

You’re invited … To throw a fabulous holiday get-together

P

By Melissa Fears

Planning a holiday party this

Mulled wine warms up a holiday party Ingredients

Directions

2 bottles dry red wine of choice 4 ounces port or brandy 12 whole cloves 4 cinnamon sticks 1 large orange, zested

Combine ingredients in a large pot and let simmer, but do not allow mixture to boil. Heat for 20 minutes and serve in a large, heat resistant punch bowl. Garnish with whole cinnamon sticks.

Serves 10 | Courtesy of The Food Network

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year? It can be challenging to make your event stand out when the Christmas season seems like one gathering after another, all rolled together into one big eggnog fest. Well, we have the solution for you. Make your party festive, memorable and stress-free with a little help from local caterers and party planners. South magazine polled the experts on ways to set your gathering apart, and here’s what they told us. “First thing is to start planning early,” says Kim King-Smith, owner of Kim King-Smith Events of Indianapolis and Columbus. Having the party at home can be costeffective and comfortable, but decorating can be tricky. “There needs to be a ‘wow’ in the entrance,” she says. “Set the tone for the party by using a major focal point, such as a table that draws all the attention or lots of candles. No matter the budget, you can have candles.” According to the experts, people love a theme when it comes to parties. Here are just a few ideas.


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arts & entertainment

“Keep small stockings on the buffet tables to display and store hot chocolate necessities.” —Kim King-Smith Don't forget fresh whipped cream and grated nutmug when serving hot chocolate.

The traditional cocktail party Holiday time calls for drinks, celebrations ... and more drinks. Woo your guests with just the right stocked bar for any occasion. Simple classics such as vodka, rum, whiskey, wine and beer work well. Make sure to have cranberry juice, club soda, tonic water and lots of lemons for mixers. Guests will be pleased to indulge in a simple rum punch or a signature festive cocktail. Bigger is not always better. These days small portions are popular. Rather than the classic buffet style, consider hiring someone to walk around and pass out appetizers instead.

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Ugly sweater The rules are simple: Everyone has to wear an ugly sweater. Other Christmas attire, such as hats, socks, shoes, pants, etc., can be worn to enhance the outfit, but ugly sweaters are mandatory. Ugly sweaters, argyle socks, tacky Christmas stockings hanging on the walls or mantel make great decorations, says Brandy Ison, consultant for Simple Celebrations LLC of Greenwood. Fruitcake, sweater-shaped cutout cookies or sandwiches made to look like sweaters are great food options. “For drinks try martinis with candy cane rims, eggnog in tacky cups like the moose cup from “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” or jello shots in Christmas colors,” Ison says. Classic Christmas songs like “Feliz Navidad,” the Chipmunks’ Christmas songs and “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” in cheesy versions will get guests laughing. Unravel the sweater is a great game to play, and whoever can unravel their sweater the fastest wins,” Ison says. “It can be done individually or in groups.” Prizes can be gift cards to get a new sweater.

Stockings and hot cocoa Parties with a purpose are a big trend, says King-Smith. Start by asking guests to bring stockings and participate in a stocking exchange for charity. “People around the holidays want to give,” she says. “Stock up the stockings with socks, personal hygiene items, pet items and donate them all to charity.” Keeping with the warm and snuggly theme, refreshments can be hot spiced apple cider with cinnamon sticks or hot chocolate with marshmallows, peppermint sticks and chocolate shavings. Eggnog, hot apple cider and oversized cookies are all easy to make. “Keep small stockings on the buffet tables to display and store hot chocolate necessities. Load them up with straws, silverware, peppermint sticks, sugar cubes, chocolate chips, cinnamon sticks and spoons,” says King-Smith.


arts & entertainment Create a waffle bar for your holiday brunch with unique sauces and toppings like chocolate mousse, hazelnut spread and berries.

Winter wonderland and ornament exchange

Holiday brunch Evenings fill up fast during the holidays. Who says your party has to be for night owls? Holiday brunches are always popular and having the perfect mimosa or waffles on hand will create a fun daytime affair. “This is the perfect excuse to get your finest china out,” says King-Smith. “Serve little bites of food, as those are a huge trend.” Miniature sandwiches, appetizers and desserts are all popular.

Sparkly or icy decorations can be out in full force with this theme. Blues, silvers, crystal and whites are all appropriate colors to use. Consider asking guests to wear these colors. Try an ice sculpture for a main centerpiece and serve a blue punch with ice cube shapes for the main refreshment, along with other fizzy, sparkling drinks. Serving snowflake-shaped cookies, cotton candy and gourmet marshmallows will make the perfect dessert table, says King-Smith. Have guests bring and exchange a “winter wonderland” themed ornament.

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11/1/12 2:37 PM


arts & entertainment

“Cheesecake, mousse, cakes and cupcakes are also all desserts prepared beforehand and will take no preparation once you arrive at the last home.” —Brandy Inson

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A dessert bar is ready to go when guests arrive. This one is provided by Kim's Kake Kreations.

Fondue

Progressive dinner

Invite each guest to bring a fondue dish. Cheese fondue can be served with platters of assorted breads, vegetables, apples and chips. For the dinner portion serve beef, poultry and pork. Also include potatoes and vegetables for sides. “Make sure to have dipping sauces like barbecue, teriyaki and honey mustard,” says Ison. “Dessert can include any type of chocolate. Platters of strawberries, cheesecake, marshmallows, bananas, graham crackers and any other goodies you can think of are great options.”

Looking for a more intimate idea for close friends or family? Try a progressive dinner. This is usually best with a small number of people, where three couples have houses close to one another. Each couple hosts one of the following: appetizers, dinner or dessert. “More than one couple can participate in preparation or hosting of one of the categories even though it is only held at one of their houses,” says Ison. The first course could range from a sampling party to heavy appetizers depending on how much time is spent in between this first home and the dinner home. Dinner could be items like ham or turkey, mashed potatoes and green beans or corn.


“These are all items that can be quick to prepare or be prepared ahead of time,” says Ison. “Cheesecake, mousse, cakes and cupcakes are also all desserts prepared beforehand and will take no preparation once you arrive at the last home,” says Ison. Favors could be boxes to take home any leftovers. “Since there is driving involved, I would not recommend alcoholic drinks unless there are designated drivers for the evening, but great nonalcoholic drinks could be served, like hot apple cider, hot tea, coffee, hot chocolate or punch,” says Ison. If designated drivers are in place,  flavored martinis, such as chocolate, gingerbread, candy cane or white chocolate, can be served. So if the party bug has hit you and you’re ready to entertain, try something new with these party themes.

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lifestyle

How to feel like a natural woman 50

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Beauty products made from natural ingredients gain popularity By Alisa Advani


Quick Home Refi. It’s the fast and easy way to save thousands!

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Your potential interest savings with a Quick Home Refi loan2 Your current mortgage balance

With a .5% lower rate3

With a 1% lower rate4

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$100,000

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$200,000

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oldnational.com Limited time offer. Rates and terms effective as of 11/5/12. Subject to credit approval. Other restrictions may apply. See bank for details. 1Property insurance required. Available on first mortgage refinances with 80% maximum loan to value. Based on $100,000 loan, 180-month term, $717 payment, 3.50% rate, $299 fee results in 3.544% APR. Additional costs may apply if escrow and/or title insurance required. 2Advertised interest savings based on 180-month term & $299 fee. 3Based on 4.00% rate, payment is $7.44 per thousand. 4Based on 4.50% rate, payment is $7.70 per thousand. 5Based on 5.50% rate, payment is $8.22 per thousand. 6Interest savings based on the comparison of a $50,000 loan refinanced at an interest rate/APR of 3.500%/3.587% from a 4.000%/4.089% or a 4.500%/4.590% or a 5.500%/5.592%. 7 Interest savings based on the comparison of a $100,000 loan refinanced at an interest rate/APR of 3.500%/3.544% from a 4.000%/4.044% or a 4.500%/4.545% or a 5.500%/5.546%. 8Interest savings based on the comparison of a $200,000 loan refinanced at an interest rate/APR of 3.500%/3.522% from a 4.000%/4.022% or a 4.500%/4.522% or a 5.500%/5.523%. 9Interest savings based on the comparison of a $400,000 loan refinanced at an interest rate/APR of 3.500%/3.511% from a 4.000%/4.011% or a 4.500%/4.511% or a 5.500%/5.512%. 1012-005


lifestyle

N

Nature has always provided

the best available methods to preserve youth and restore vitality. In fact, cosmetics companies spend billions of dollars annually to mine the natural world searching for the key ingredients needed to create those very potions we slather on daily. Aveda, Repechage and Estee Lauder are among a few of the well-known brands that base some or all of their product lines on tapping pure essential oils and isolating organic compounds. “Not only is it better for the environment, it is better for your skin. Companies used to use more harmful chemical preservatives in these products. Scientists have developed safer, more effective ways to harness them now,” said Shar Ellison, spa director at Transformations Salon and Spa in Greenwood. As natural products have grown in quality and popularity, spa directors now rely on their efficacy and look to include these lines when designing spa menus. Natural Concepts Salon and Spa, on Madison Street in Greenwood, offers a bevy of choices. As an Aveda concept salon, all of its products are 97 percent natural.

“Yogurt contains high amounts of lactic acid, proven to be successful in refining pores, exfoliating the skin and stimulating collagen production.” — Shar Ellison

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“We offer an awesome herbal seaweed body wrap,” said Jennifer Gerber, a massage therapist at the salon and spa. “The seaweed formula is made of brown and red algae which re-mineralizes the skin by adding vital nutrients to it.” Red and brown algae are super-foods for the skin. They contain high amounts of vitamins, minerals and omega fatty acids. Ellison added that Transformations carries Repechage, a line made in the U.S., which also relies fundamentally on multiple species of seaweed. “The things in seaweed mimic our human plasma. The products we use now are very gentle and effective because chemically, they match the body,” she said. Both salons also offer their clients aromatherapy treatments. Gerber said that Natural Concepts Salon and Spa offers choices that are based on Ayurvedic science. Aveda recently performed a consumer test and reported that 83 percent of respondents felt better after experiencing one of the line’s chakra balancing aromas. “Our estheticians work with the client to identify the best essential oil for their personal needs that day,” Gerber said. “It helps them balance their mood and well-being. It can be very soothing and healing, and it is based on a proven ancient, Indian practice.” In between spa visits, women (and men) can use natural ingredients right from the refrigerator and pantry to create at-home beauty treatments. “Yogurt contains high amounts of lactic acid, proven to be successful in refining pores, exfoliating the skin and stimulating collagen production,” said Ellison. “It can be used on any type of skin — even sensitive. It moisturizes mature skin and helps breakouts on younger skin. It is the most important ingredient for a do-ityour-self recipe.” Honey is a natural humectant, retaining water to help keep the skin soft and moisturized. It also functions as an antimicrobial agent and can even be used to treat minor burns and cuts.


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lifestyle skin

nails

Moisturizing mask for dry skin

Calming mask for irritated skin

Aspirin mask for treating acne

Cuticle cream for dry cuticles

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients

2 tablespoons plain yogurt (the fattier the better) 1 tablespoon honey 1-2 tablespoons cooked and cooled oatmeal

½ cup plain yogurt 2 tablespoons Aloe Vera gel or juice 1 tablespoon honey Half a peeled cucumber A few drops of chamomile oil

5 uncoated aspirins 2-3 tablespoons plain yogurt 1 dollop honey

1 teaspoon natural clay 1 teaspoon olive oil 3 drops lavender essential oil

Instructions

Mix everything together until it forms a smooth paste. Spread over the face and leave on for 10 to 15 minutes. Wash off with a warm washcloth

Instructions

Mix everything in a blender. Leave on face for 10 to 15 minutes.

Instructions

In a bowl, mix the honey into the yogurt. Drop the aspirins into the yogurt and wait for them to dissolve (if you’d like you can also add water/aloe juice to help the tablets dissolve faster). Mix into a paste and leave on the face for 10 to 20 minutes. NOTE: Do not use if you have an aspirin allergy.

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Ingredients

Instructions

Mix into a paste and put into a sterile ointment jar or small pot. (Wash and clean old makeup jars. They make great storage containers.) Massage into nails and cuticles.


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education

Ready, set, read

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Oasis tutoring program pairs eager volunteers with reluctant students By Alisa Advani Photography by Josh Marshall

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education

T

There’s a special program in Indianapolis and its southside that links the young and the young at heart. The Oasis Intergenerational Tutoring Program matches adults age 50 and older with children age 5 to 9 to provide additional assistance with language arts. Since 1991, more than 21,000 Indianapolis Oasis tutors have helped children improve their reading skills and overall academic performance. This year, Greenwood’s program turns

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16. “It’s part of the national Oasis program, which realizes that retired people still have a lot to offer. The adult and student spend at least one hour a week together and usually a very special bond forms. The tutor usually ends up serving as a mentor,” said Janie Adcock, who has coordinated this program for the Greenwood city school system for three years. She also tutored for five years before taking on this role. Mary Dorney, Oasis’ executive director


Mary Marin works with Lukas Grider at Northeast Elementary.

for the greater Indianapolis area, chose Greenwood as the first district in which to expand. The first day of training was in January, and it was five degrees below zero. There were 17 people signed up to train, and every single one showed up. All tutors receive a 12-hour training program, but most tutors quickly realize that creativity, flexibility and patience are the most necessary skills for the job. “I always adapt to the kids,” said Thomas Foster, who is on his ninth year of tutoring. “Some kids are eager; some resist a bit. I used to create a plan, but I learned that it will likely change.” Foster has had some unique experiences full of great rewards. One particular boy he tutored opposed doing work for the entire term. Foster was forced to think fast. He brought playing cards, getting the child to engage verbally. Their bond deepened over time, so much so that when grandparents day rolled around, the surprised Foster received an invitation to attend the special school event. “I think I’ve gotten more from it than the kids. It’s been fun for me, and it gave me a good feeling to be a surrogate. I am just happy to help, to have something to offer,” he said. SOUTH

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education

Arni’s TM

Indianapolis 96th St. & Gray Rd. 317-571-0077 Greenwood SR 135 & Curry Rd. 317-881-0500

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Superintendent David Edds greets tutors for the 2012-13 school year. Opposite page: From left Sue Hacker, David Edds, Amy Merriman and Jim West

From an administrative standpoint, the tutors fill a tremendous need. Sandra Wooton, principal at Isom Elementary, says that the school is fortunate that her volunteers come prepared with something special every time. “We have been using the program for the past four years. We are incredibly grateful for the assistance. Many of the volunteers are retired teachers. They are just wonderful and caring, and they provide mentorship where it is needed,” said Wooton. “We see students excited about the relationship and reading and writing.” This year’s tutoring cycle began in November and includes approximately 45 volunteers. Some offer to take more than one child. Teachers identify students who are struggling with literacy or other communication skills. The timing is strategic because it gives the teachers time to assess the student’s needs. “By November, they have a good grasp on who needs help,” said Adcock. The duos find creative spaces within the schools to meet. “Some tutors take their kids to the library or even eat lunch with them in the hallway. You’d be amazed at some of the stuff they’ll do, and the kids

love it,” said Adcock. “We don’t have many challenges, but sometimes we just need to find a quiet space.” English as a Second Language students can also present another area where the volunteers need to embrace their ingenuity. Adcock is fortunate to have support from within the community. Margarita Hart, who serves as executive director of Esperanza Ministries, offers a Spanish workshop to assist in this effort. Esperanza Ministries is on Madison Avenue in Greenwood. The nonprofit organization’s strategy is to help students and parents learn about healthy choices, English, healthy relationships and life skills. Bilingual children in Johnson County have access to literacy club meetings twice weekly through the ministry. It also offers a weekly program, called Step Ahead, which allows parents and children to practice English skills together. “Hart really helps our effort,” said Adcock. “These kids need much more one-onone help because English is not spoken in the home. Through Oasis, our tutors give them the chance to practice in a non-judgmental place.”


health

Middle management Plain talk about exercise and weight loss so your diet doesn’t go to waist By Alisa Advani

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T

The abundance of conflicting

diet and exercise tips available to women is enough to weigh down a Macy’s parade balloon. Back in the late 1980s and early ’90s, the experts said to eat a lowfat, complex carb-laden diet. Not long after, Dr. Adkins advised dieters in 2002 to forgo most carbohydrates and consume protein and fat. So what is a person to eat? How can dieters maximize exercise to lose weight and maintain health?

All of the misinformation and diet fads stick around like adhesive from a price tag smack dab in the middle of a new picture frame. In an effort to clear the metaphorical glass, South asked local experts to clarify the following myths. Myth» Skipping breakfast will help you lose weight. The Reality» “Skipping breakfast is a habit to be avoided if you want to lose


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health weight,” said Elizabeth Tapp, a registered dietitian who owns Nutrition Advancement near Greenwood. Tapp received her master’s degree in nutrition from Indiana University. Eating within two hours of waking helps to stabilize blood glucose levels and jump-start the metabolism. She recommends that the ideal breakfast contain whole grain, fruit and protein and also urges people to avoid sugar. Tapp says instead to reach for black and green tea. “Research shows they increase metabolism and possess protective antioxidants,” she said. Myth» The 80/20 rule, i.e.,

controlling weight is 80 percent diet and 20 percent exercise. The Reality» Controlling weight is a balance of energy. “If you need to lose weight, you will need to burn more calories than you are consuming,” explained Nicole Barnes, clinical nutrition manager at St. Francis Hospital. Balancing this equation “can be done by either increasing your activity level to burn more calories or by decreasing the calories you consume. The ideal method is a combination of both. Some individuals may focus more heavily on the exercise and others more on their diet. The idea of an 80/20 rule does give a good overall picture that an individual needs to make healthy food choices, however, according to Barnes. “Choose healthy foods much more often than unhealthy choices, but still allow yourself to include some less favorable choices in your diet,” she said. Trying to have a perfect diet often causes individuals to go back to less favorable eating habits. “Once they feel as though they have ‘fallen off the diet wagon,’ they give up trying to eat healthfully. Eating habits should not be looked at as a diet, but making food choices to promote good health and still fit into your lifestyle,” said Barnes. Myth» Doing crunches or working out on an ab machine will decrease belly fat. The Reality» “I can’t count how many times I have talked to people who want rock hard abs and think that doing 1,000 crunches a day will work,” said Southside trainer, Lisa Michaelis. She earned her bachelor’s degree in exercise science at Utah State University. “The truth is that

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Elizabeth Tapp

Registered dietitian and owner, Nutrition Advancement.

Nicole Barnes

Clinical nutrition manager at St. Francis Hospital.

people already have a ‘six pack’ hiding under layers of soft padding.” Multiple studies over the years have proven that spot reduction does not work. Michaelis urges her clients to embrace “good old diet and exercise” to reduce belly fat. “Yes, you will have to do cardiovascular exercise and reduce junk food in order to lose the layer of extra padding hiding your gorgeous abs, but they are waiting to be set free.” She also warns, however, not to ignore core workouts. “Core strength is the foundation to any good workout routine, as it protects the back and offers power to the entire body.” Myth» You need to eat a gram of protein per pound of body weight to get an athletic build. The Reality» An “athletic build” is a very open term, explained Barnes. “The general population can live a healthy lifestyle consuming around 0.8 to 1 gram of protein per kilogram (2.2 pounds) of body weight,” she said. “You can achieve a physically fit physique at this protein level.” According to Barnes, the higher intake levels, 1.4 to 2.2 grams per kilogram (1 gram/pound), of protein are for only the most competitive athletes and body builders. “This increased level of protein intake is for otherwise healthy individuals. Those with kidney disease or other medical conditions should get the advice from a medical professional prior to increasing the protein in their diet,” advised Barnes. Myth» : Don’t eat after 8 p.m. The Reality» “The amount of calories

Lisa Michaelis Southside trainer

you eat during the day is more important than eating later at night,” said Tapp. “The foods we choose after 8 p.m. can be different than what we choose to eat at a 6:30 p.m. dinner. At night our minds are quieter and the stress in our lives can be more apparent. Stress increases the desire for the feel-good hormones, melatonin and serotonin. Carbohydrates produce melatonin and serotonin.” She suggests trying air-popped popcorn, plain oatmeal sweetened with fresh fruit and a drizzle of honey, or even whole-wheat spaghetti with a drizzle of olive oil and squeeze of lemon juice for a stress-reducing snack. “These are filling, healthy food sources of melatonin and serotonin to calm stress and aid in sleeping,” she said.


r u o Y l a e v e R

! k o o L d e w Rene Myth» When it comes to working out, I need to feel some pain to gain benefits. The Reality» “Everyone has heard the saying ‘no pain, no gain,’” said Michaelis. “For the thousands of exercisers who make goals to tone up and lose weight each year, this saying can be the start of their undoing.” Michaelis warns that exercise should most certainly not be painful and that headache, nausea and dizziness are signs of over-exertion. She recommends using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale. “It is a scale from one to 10 that we use to rate exercise intensity. At a 10, you would be pushing yourself to a maximum point of pain and exhaustion. At a six, you should be in your comfort zone, able to carry on a conversation, and at an eight, you should be slightly breathless and talking should be more difficult,” she said. Myth» You need to lose a significant amount of weight to see any health benefits. The Reality» “Any amount of weight loss will reap health benefits. Congratulate yourself if you’ve lost one pound or 50 pounds,” said Tapp. She recommends that slow and steady weight loss (one to two pounds per week) is a healthy rate and warns that losing more may actually cause the body to “instinctually go back to your previous, higher weight.” Tapp says that weight maintenance is an excellent goal during the holidays. “Many people gain weight during the holidays, and maintaining your exercise regimen

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health

“Slow and steady changes are the best way to become healthy and let your weight balance to what is right for you.” —Elizabeth Tapp

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and healthy eating habits will serve you well. Healthy metabolic changes start right away with healthful eating and exercise, even if weight loss does not occur. Those who yo-yo back and forth between restrictive healthy eating and a diet laden with fast-food and desserts tend to have higher weights and can be more prone to developing chronic diseases,” she said. “The hardest job with weight loss is patience and consistency. Even when you are not losing weight know that your healthy eating habits and consistent exercise are building a healthier you for tomorrow.” Myth» Running on a treadmill puts less stress on your joints than running on pavement. The Reality» “Running on a soft surface is easier on joints than running on pavement,” explained Michaelis. Running in any form, however, will put more stress on joints than doing low-impact exercise on an elliptical or stationary cycle. “If you have knee, hip or back pain, running

is not the best exercise for you,” she said. Michaelis suggests swimming or spinning as alternatives to running. Myth» Going on a diet is the best way to lose weight. The Reality» “Going on a diet can accomplish three things: help you crave foods not on your diet, feel bad about your body and feel bad about your lack of ability to stick to a diet. Slow and steady changes are the best way to become healthy and let your weight balance to what is right for you,” said Tapp. She urges focusing on foods that are health-promoting, like different vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, beans, whole grains, cold-water fish (tuna, salmon, mackerel, sardines) while incorporating some eggs, low-fat dairy, seafood, poultry and meat in the rotation. “You deserve to like what you eat,” said Tapp. “Incorporate healthy food into your diet slowly, and the foods that are not as healthy will have less room in your grocery cart and home.”


Distinctive Kitchen & Bath

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profile

The call of the mall Mike McCarty has stayed the course with Simon Property Group By Ashley Petry | Photography by Angela Jackson

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profile

W

When Mike and Lynette McCarty go on vacation, they always set aside

time to visit the local shopping malls. Lynette hunts for bargains, but Mike spends his time inspecting the bathrooms and checking for scuffs on the floors. As the executive vice president of development operations for Simon Property Group, shopping mall reconnaissance is just part of his job. “My family is in Nebraska, and one time we had to stop in a mall in Illinois on the way back after Christmas,” Lynette said. “It wasn’t the nicest mall in the world, and we had to walk the whole thing.” For Mike, life has been a true Cinderella story. Raised in Kansas and Iowa by his mother and stepfather, he didn’t meet

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his biological father until he was in high school. During Mike’s senior year, his stepfather took a job in South Dakota, but Mike, who wanted to graduate with his friends, rented an apartment and stayed behind. On his own at age 17, he never even considered going to college. “Nobody in my family had ever gone to college, so it was just assumed that when I got done with high school, I was going to work,” he said. He worked as a short-order cook until graduation in May 1975, when he joined the management training program at Sirloin Stockade, a mid-priced steakhouse chain. His first assignment was as assistant manager of a failing restaurant in Fremont, Neb., which he quickly helped turn around.


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“I was naïve enough to say, ‘Hey, if you just keep it clean and have good food and good service, you’ll do well,’” he said. “I got noticed and felt good about what was going on, and I felt like that was my career path—managing restaurants.” Mike was quickly promoted to store manager and then district manager in Oklahoma City. But then, a tragedy changed the course of his career. In August 1978, Roger Dale Stafford, his wife, Verna Stafford, and his brother, Harold Stafford, robbed a Sirloin Stockade in Oklahoma City, killing six employees— including four teenagers. Harold Stafford died in a motorcycle accident a few days later, but Roger and Verna Stafford were convicted of what became known as the Sirloin Stockade murders, as well as several other murders that had previously gone unsolved. The police found the bodies in the restaurant freezer. “I wasn’t at the store at the time, but I came to the store, and it just changed my life,” Mike said. Wanting to get out of Oklahoma City, SOUTH

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profile

“Nobody in my family had ever gone to college, so it was just assumed that when I got done with high school, I was going to work.” —Mike McCarty

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he headed back to Fremont, where he had connections in the business community— including the manager of the Fremont Mall, which was across the street from the Sirloin Stockade. The mall was owned by Melvin Simon and Associates, the predecessor of Simon Property Group. The mall manager offered Mike the job of maintenance director, essentially a janitorial position. Mike had also been offered a management position at a local McDonald’s, but he chose the mall job. “I did all the maintenance work, striped the parking lot, painted the ceilings, did all kinds of things,” Mike said. “But (the manager) told me there were advancement opportunities.” And advance he did—to operations director in Springfield, Mo.; mall management trainee in Joliet, Ill.; and mall manager in Merrillville. In 1984, five years after starting his Simon career as a janitor, Mike was promoted to the corporate leasing department in Indianapolis. He’s been moving up the ranks ever since. Now, he oversees redevelopment at more than 160 Simon properties, spearheading projects such as the recent overhaul of Keystone at the Crossing and the redevelopment of the former anchor space at Greenwood Park Mall—an area that now houses a Cheesecake Factory, Barnes & Noble and other popular retailers. “My main job is to plan better environments for all of our properties,” he said. “How do we make these assets better?” Meeting at the mall

The McDonald’s-versus-mall career decision also changed his personal life. The Fremont Mall was where Mike met Lynette, who was working her way through college as a teller at First State Bank’s mall branch. “He would send us memos telling us that as employees we had to park at least 13 spaces away (from the entrance), and we would go, ‘Who is this guy?’” she said. But one night, at a tavern in the mall, they both met up with a mutual friend. When Mike asked Lynette on a date—to see the movie “Nine to Five”—she agreed. Their relationship flourished, even when they both left Fremont and had to conduct a long-distance romance. “When I moved to Ames, Iowa, I got a call from the phone company a month after I had lived there, and they wanted to SOUTH

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profile

McCarty and Greenwood Park Mall manager John Campbell.

“He doesn’t go back on his promises.” —Lynette McCarty

know if I had a crisis in the family because the phone bill was so high,” Lynette said. “It probably made us better communicators, because our time together was so rare.” When Mike moved to Joliet to train as a mall manager, he promised Lynette they would get married when he got a mall of his own—a process that usually took two years. Instead, he was promoted after just five months. They married on a Sunday in January 1983, and the next day they packed up a U-Haul and headed to Merrillville. “He doesn’t go back on his promises,” Lynette said. The McCartys now have two daughters, Megan, 25, and Ali, 21, who both attended Center Grove schools. When they were younger, Mike tempered the impact of his frequent travel by giving each girl a map of the United States. Before he went on a trip, he put a pin in the city he would visit. “I missed some things, no question about it,” Mike said. “But I also had reunions quite frequently. I’m not sure, but if I was working nine to five and going home every night, would I have had the same kind of approach with my daughters.” 74

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Megan, who has a degree in sports marketing from Miami University of Ohio and a master’s degree from Georgetown University, now lives on the north side. Ali is a senior at Bradley University in Illinois, where she is studying retail merchandising. Hearing about his daughters’ college experiences sometimes makes Mike regret not earning a degree—or building lifelong friendships with fellow students. He took a few college classes during his time in Fremont, but his frequent moves interrupted his studies. “I decided, OK, I’m going to be a student of this business rather than a student of higher education,” Mike said. “But when it came time to talk about college with my daughters, there was no doubt, in this environment, they’re going to college.” Faithful steward

Mike credits his church, Resurrection Lutheran Church, for teaching him more than he ever learned at work or in school. Over the years, he has served several terms as president of the congregation.

“You find people around the table who are passionate about what they’re wanting to do, and sometimes in business, in general, not everybody at the table has that same passion and energy. You find that in a church,” he said. Mike draws on his experience as a short-order cook to prepare breakfast for a monthly men’s Bible study. His specialty is omelets, but he’s been known to make dishes ranging from pancakes to biscuits and gravy. One morning, the focus of the discussion was a question: If your life were a book, what would the title be? For Mike, the answer was easy: “Stay the Course.” At 55, he has been with Simon for 33 years, more than half his lifetime. In January, he and Lynette will celebrate their 30th anniversary. When you’re growing up, you get worried, and those big decisions seem overwhelming,” Mike said. “I always just did the next thing. I look back and say, did I have a career path to take me from where I started to here? I have no clue whatsoever. But you apply yourself to what you do, and you work hard doing it.”


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Photos courtesy of Clabber Girl Corp.

Local producers, merchants and entrepreneurs By Sherri Lynn Dugger

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Authentic Indiana

You Go, Girl

With new breweries, wineries, farmers markets and craft festivals around every corner, Indiana is abuzz with opportunities to shop local. South’s section, Authentic Indiana, celebrates the offerings and tells the stories of the many local producers, merchants and entrepreneurs our state has to offer.

Known for its baking powder line, the Clabber Girl Corp. got its start under the Hulman & Co. name, a wholesale grocery business that was opened in 1850 in Terre Haute. With the addition of a storeroom and spice mill behind the store in 1869, the business branched out into manufacturing a variety of products, including spices, coffees and baking powder under many brand names. In 1893, the company expanded again and moved into its current location at the corner of Ninth and Main streets in Terre Haute. By 1899, Clabber brand baking powder was in-

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troduced to the cooking scene, and the Clabber Girl brand, as it was renamed in 1923, is now distributed all over the world. The company sold items ranging from peanut butter to coffee, but “as the world changed, as the business evolved, baking powder became a very big part of our makeup,” says Teresa Shaffer, executive director of public relations. The grocery business eventually closed in the late 1990s, and its space in the red brick headquarters remained an “empty warehouse,” Shaffer says, until around the early 2000s, when Gary Morris came on board as the company’s new president. Thanks to the new leader’s vision, the building is now also a thriving tourist destination. Morris felt the headquarters should be a showplace, Shaffer says, and so renovation was begun on the entire first floor. “It is now a museum dedicated to the history of the Hulman family, the history of baking powder and the history of our community in Terre Haute,” she says. The building has a mock grocery, circa 1940, a gallery space available to local artists to display their artwork and a Clabber Girl bakeshop, where breakfast and lunch are served. Cooking demonstrations and private classes are available in the building’s culinary classroom, and it also now houses the Rex Roast-

The Art of Business Eric Phagan’s art comes easily. The Indianapolis Herron School of Art and Design graduate and Madison-based artist has won awards and garnered attention for his 3-D sculptures and landscape paintings for years. Eric’s interest in art dates all the way back to his kindergarten years, he says, when he completed a drawing of Bugs Bunny to the delight of his teachers and classmates. But managing a family business, which includes an art gallery, a café and overnight guest suites, has been a little less than easy. Which isn’t to say Eric, along with his parents, Jeff and Peggy Phagan, his sister, Sarah, and his wife, Jessica, has made mistakes along the way. In fact, they’ve made plenty of good decisions, like buying and remodeling the downtown Madison building, home to the former Dusty Miller Antiques store, in October 2011 and putting every square foot of it to good use. In April the Phagan family opened Gallery 115, which houses the Gallery Café, Eric Phagan Art Studio/Gallery, plus overnight guest suites and a conference room, all available for rent. But being a business owner and marketing himself as

Photos courtesy of Eric Phagan

ing Co., where small-batch artisan coffee is made. The coffee, Shaffer says, is “roasted in an exhibition-style setting. People can watch coffee being roasted” during coffee tour packages. In-house catering is available for private events. “We have a lot of people who come here for special occasions, bridal showers, rehearsal dinners, baby showers, and people can rent out space in the building to have business meetings,” Shaffer says. Home to the Clabber Girl Country Christmas, where kids are invited to spend the day with Santa and Mrs. Claus, a barbecue fest in the summer and summer and winter farmers markets, the headquarters is now busy year-round. Beyond all the in-house activities, the company’s focus remains fixed on its origins: providing for the food industry by manufacturing and distributing cookie and dessert mixes, gelatins, cheesecakes and baking powder all over the world. “We export to about 40 different countries,” Shaffer says. For more information, go to www.clabbergirl.com. SOUTH

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authentic indiana

an artist, as well as remaining a dedicated husband to Jessica and father to his toddler son, Vinson, has amounted to months of long days, long nights and a large learning curve for the 33-year-old. A learning curve that’s definitely been worth the wait. For years, Eric says fans of his work regularly asked him where his studio was located, when—in fact—the artist was working out

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of his one-car garage at home. “There was no space,” he said. “It wasn’t very professional.” Eric’s art sales were taking off about the same time the building at 115 E. Main St., which was constructed in 1840, came up for sale. He says his mom had often expressed an interest in one day opening her own restaurant, and when he heard the building went on the market, an idea quickly formed. “Having a gallery and a café meant you were hitting all angles,” Eric said. “People could come and see my work and hang out. It’s a gathering place. That’s what Madison needed.” And what Madison needed, Madison received. Thanks to the artist’s vision and six “long months” of combined efforts of his family, the building now features an early20th-century ambience. “I love the 1920s through the ’40s,” he said. Because of that, the building has a strictly antique feel, with vintage-inspired colors and lighting and Big Band music playing in the background. “I

feel like that’s a really romantic, sweet time in our history.” It’s a sweet time in the history of the Phagan family, too. The building’s transformation has brought them all into the fold of a common goal. Eric’s father maintains the building’s upkeep. His mother runs the café. Eric’s wife handles the bookkeeping, while Eric stays involved with every aspect of the business. “There have been a lot of positives for opening this business with my family,” Eric said. “It has brought us closer, and, of course, we are all getting to do something that we love. “Of course there are days that are slow and times that something we do does not work, but that is when we collaborate and figure out what we can change to make it better. A business is what you make of it. We are going to just go for it and, if it doesn’t work out, then we know we did our best.” Gallery 115, 115 E. Main St., Madison, (812) 2744371, www.gallery115madison.com


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* Manufacturer’s rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/15/12 – 12/15/12. A qualifying purchase is defined as a purchase of any of the product models set forth above in the quantities set forth above. If you purchase less than the specified quantity, you will not be entitled to a rebate. All rebates will be issued in U.S. dollars, in the form of an American Express® Prepaid Reward Card. This rebate offer may not be combined with any other Hunter Douglas offer or promotion. © 2012 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

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At Indiana Dunes, snow offers as many chances for diversion as sand By Ashley Petry photos provided by Indiana Dunes Tourism

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Winter at

Indiana Dunes

At the southern tip of Lake Michigan, winter winds rush in from the north and west, freezing the shallow waters along the coastline. Waves push the ice toward shore, where it piles on top of itself, breaks, melts and piles up again—finally solidifying into the strange and beautiful formations known as shelf ice. At the southern tip of Lake Michigan, winter winds rush in from the north and west, freezing the shallow waters along the coastline. Waves push the ice toward shore, where it piles on top of itself, breaks, melts and piles up again—finally solidifying into the strange and beautiful formations known as shelf ice. “If we have a cold winter, the shelf ice starts accumulating on the shore, and it creates an Arctic landscape that is just beautiful,” said Brandt Baughman, property manager for Indiana Dunes State Park. Because it is known primarily for its beaches, the Indiana Dunes region is considered a summer destination. But winter in Dunes Country offers its own kind of beauty, from the hush of wooded crosscountry skiing trails to the shrieks and giggles of the region’s tallest sledding hill. “Compared to a July weekend, it’s just a drop in the bucket, but people are still surprised when they see how busy we are in the winter,” Baughman said. “I think there’s a prevailing thought that it’s a ghost town here in the winter, and that’s not the case at all.” The Indiana Dunes region includes 15 miles of Lake Michigan coastline, running from Gary to Michigan City. Communities along the way include Portage, Porter, Chesterton and Beverly Shores, with Valparaiso just a short drive south. One of the main winter attractions in the area is Devil’s Slide, a designated sledding and tubing dune within Indiana Dunes State Park. It is more than 100 feet high, with a top-to-bottom run of at least 600 feet. But the biggest draw by far is cross-country skiing. Both Indiana Dunes State Park and the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore have award-winning hiking trails, such as the 6.4-mile Ly-co-ki-we Trail, which are ideal for skiers when the snow accumulates. Combined with other parks, such as the Coffee Creek Watershed Preserve, Dunes Country has more than 70 miles of cross-country trails. “We have phenomenal cross-country skiing, and on a weekend day, if we have a lot of snow on

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the ground, people come from all over to utilize our trails,” Baughman said. Other outdoor activities, such as snowshoeing and geocaching, are also gaining in popularity. The state park started an annual geocaching event in January 2009, which now draws big crowds even in terrible weather. The park is also planning to offer guided snowshoe hikes this season.

Five More Finds Have a few more hours to spend in Dunes Country? Try one of these memorable outings.

* Lace up your skates and head to Hebron, where the outdoor Hebron Ice Rink stays open from dawn to dusk, weather permitting. 199 Professional Court, Hebron; (219) 996-4641; www.visithebron.org

* Call ahead to book a tour at the Hoosier Bat Co.,

where you can see how bats are made for Major League Baseball professionals. 4511 E. Evans Ave., Valparaiso; (219) 531-1006; www.hoosierbat.com

* Check an item off your holiday to-do list by choosing a

Christmas tree at Guse Christmas Trees (14685 S. Road 600W, Wanatah; (219) 733-9346; www.gusechristmastrees. com) or Santa’s Holiday Forest (95 E. Road 700N, Valparaiso; (219) 462-1068; www.santasholidayforest.info).

* Peek into the studio and gallery of Chesterton painter

Holly Jackson, who is known for her abstract landscapes of the dunes. Other galleries, such as the Chesterton Art Center, are within a few blocks. 103 S. Second St., Chesterton; (219) 926-8290; www.hollyjacksonart.com

* Visit Sunset Hill Farm County Park, where a

holiday lights festival runs on weekends from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day. 775 Meridian Road, Valparaiso; (219) 465-3586; www.porterco.org


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Winter at

Indiana Dunes

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guide

Bartlett’s Gourmet Grill and Tavern 131 E. Dunes Highway 12, Beverly Shores, (219) 879-3081 www.eatatbartletts.com Coffee Creek Watershed Preserve 219 S. Calumet Road, Chesterton, (219) 926-1842 DunesWalk Inn 1491 N. Furnleigh Lane, Chesterton, (219) 728-6393 www.duneswalkinn.com Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore 1215 N. State Road 49, Porter, (219) 395-8914 www.nps.gov/indu Indiana Dunes State Park 1600 N. Road 25E, Chesterton, (219) 926-1952 www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2980.htm Indiana Dunes Tourism 1215 N. State Road 49, Porter, (800) 283-8687 www.indianadunes.com Strongbow Inn 2405 E. U.S. 30, Valparaiso, (219) 462-5121 www.strongbowinn.com Tonya’s Patisserie 321 Broadway, Chesterton, (219) 929-1415


Even without snow, though, the Indiana Dunes area is ideal for quiet getaways. Winter hikers can find solitude on even the most popular trails, where the dunes shelter hikers from lake-effect winds. Likewise, children don’t need snow to enjoy the thrill of zipping downhill. “If there’s no snow, there’s nothing more fun than climbing up a dune and running down it,” said Ken Kosky, promotions director for Indiana Dunes Tourism. After spending a day outside in the cold, area visitors often warm up with cozy comfort foods. One option is Bartlett’s Gourmet Grill and Tavern, an upscale but casual roadhouse in Beverly Shores. The eatery serves up homestyle favorites like roasted chicken, Low Country shrimp and grits and signature five-hour pot roast. The Strongbow Inn, 20 miles south in Valparaiso, is also a popular choice. “People come from all across the Midwest for the turkey at Strongbow Inn,” Kosky said. “It’s a place that’s been around for generations.” Its signature meal is the Strongbow Turkey Dinner, with carved slices of turkey, potatoes, gravy, cranberry sauce, rolls and apple pie. Also on the menu: turkey pie, the Gobbler’s Delight (a whole tom-turkey drumstick), turkey schnitzel and Swiss turkey Marsala, just to name a few. Chesterton—a tiny community known for its arts scene—has a surprising selection of locally owned restaurants, including Tonya’s Patisserie. The café, which is famous for its baked goods, also serves quiches, soups and other light meals. At bedtime, winter visitors often head to the DunesWalk Inn. The fiveroom boutique hotel, in the restored Furness Mansion, is located near the Ly-co-ki-we trailhead. A cozy chair pulled up to the fireplace in the guest lounge is the perfect place to end a fun-filled winter day. “Everything that makes the Indiana Dunes great during the summer makes them great during the winter,” Kosky said. “A lot of people enjoy fall in Brown County, and you hear of winter skiing in Michigan, but really I think Indiana Dunes Country is a nature destination year-round.”


keeper

This one’s a

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Builder Rick Campbell takes his work home with him

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Interior Photos by Dario Impini

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The first thing Rick Campbell did after he started his business in 2001 and began to make money was to buy a house. And then another one and another one and another one. “I have had 23 homes in 34 years of marriage,” laughs Campbell. “When the paint gets dry, it’s time to move. Most of my homes have been within a three-mile radius of Center Grove.” Changing his environment is in his blood, he suggests. After all, the builder and owner of Rick Campbell Builder Inc. is in the business. “For some people it’s cars that they swap in every three or four years instead of the seven or eight years normally.” In this case, changing his environment entailed purchasing his dream lot in Center Grove, along with its neighboring property and acreage. Campbell and his wife finally appear to be losing enthusiasm for moving again. “I’m getting older, and I’m happier here than any home I have owned before,” says Campbell. “I love the layout, and I love the location. It’s on property, but still close to everything. It is a great house to show.” No question the large, beautiful property would make for an extraordinary listing. Completed in May, the home is warmed with neutral wall colors, wood floors and detailed, high ceiling beams. “I had driven past this property before, and I just knew,” he says. Standing a story and a half tall, its light blue paint and brick and stone structure cut a striking presence in its wooded surroundings. “I really enjoy building houses and have a passion for it,” Campbell says. “They say try and find two things you really like and do the second one as your business. I love collecting cars and I love building houses, so I decided housing would help me collect cars.” Overall, Campbell believes the home is great for entertaining because guests can

sit on the screened-in veranda and feel as if they are not in a neighborhood. “My wife loves that. Unfortunately I don’t have time to enjoy it, but everyone loves the peacefulness out there. One of the things I do when I design a home is I try to look at each individual space,” he says. His personal home was no different. “I took it room by room and thought what can I do in that room that is kind of different or unique,” he says. “I made differences in ceiling and ceiling trim. I try and individualize each room rather than starting on the whole concept.” Research and homework have done wonders for streamlining the building process, as he can suggest good spots for an art niche or a built-in, for example. His research

The basement entertainment area

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“I’m happier here than any home I have owned before.”   —Rick Campbell

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shows in the craftsmanship of his home. When entering the front double doors, guests are greeted by two wood and stone columns, which lead them into the luxurious, yet understated, living area. Keeping an open floor plan in mind, Campbell made sure to extend that into the other main-floor spaces. The kitchen and great room are popular hangout spots for the family. “I tried to make the kitchen, the hearth room that is connected to that and the great room all have a nice flow,” he says. “Typically my wife and my daughter are in that hearth room every single day.” The hearth room is home to a display of photos marking important memories for the family, which includes two daughters. The tall stone fireplace ledge lends itself to holding colorful artwork. The kitchen is spacious, with customstained wood cabinets and an island bigger than most dining tables. The dark wood contrasts with the speckled tan and brown granite countertops and hides the Sub Zero appliances. The dining and living areas are as stunning as the outdoor space they overlook. With large, arched windows, ceiling detail and recessed lighting, guests could be tempted to stay all day. “This has a homier feel than my last home,” says Campbell. “You want to sit down and relax when you come in. My last house basically gave everyone the feeling of a great show house, but no one would want to live there. I think that’s what I accomplished with this home.” White column bedposts and a high ceiling make the master suite look fit for a king. The neutrals and burgundy colors are warm and soft. The open basement has two bedrooms, a Jack-and-Jill bath, granite-topped rounded bar, storage space, game area and, of course, a home theater. Movie posters and sports memorabilia line the walls, including a Peyton Manning Indianapolis Colts jersey and a “Home

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Alone” poster. The basement is more for show than anything, Campbell admits. “The design we have here is that if someone is sitting at the bar or in the game area, they can still communicate back and forth through basically three rooms,” he says. “People have gotten away from the enclosed theater rooms because you feel shut in. The media rooms now are very open to entertaining.” Indiana is conducive to lower levels, he says. “By putting windows or walk-out basements, you don’t feel like you’re in a lower level or basement,” says Campbell. “It opens up a lot of opportunities to entertain. Kids can go down and be separate. It gives you secondary space if you need extra bedrooms, workout space and things like that.” While the bar and the game area may not be Campbell’s favorite space, the comfy, black leather couch in the theater area certainly calls his name every weekend. I watch football games on Sunday down here, and that’s my thing,” he says. The masculine garage could be considered Campbell’s “thing” as well. His love of vintage muscle cars is no secret. The man cave is complete with car memorabilia and, of course, his four precious rides. “I have been collecting cars since I was 15 years old, and my first one was a 1970 Mustang Mach 1 for $1,950,” says Campbell. “My dad said when I give him $1,950 and get my driver’s license I could have it. I met my wife right after. We dated in that car, and we kept it for 33 years. Life happened. Kids happened. I finally redid it in 1992 when I got into the housing business.” A lot of marriages fall apart after the children are grown because there is nothing left in common anymore, he says. “Me and my wife, we have the cars in common. We take weekends to go to shows and so forth. I think the cars have helped bridge any gap.” The Campbells’ forever home has Andersen windows, poplar wood, granite, and Kohler faucets, all making it as luxurious inside as it looks from the outside. “All those things equal a quality product and quality home and give it longev-

ity,” says Campbell. “I want things that you don’t see anywhere else. I want it to be unique. “Being a builder and a homeowner, I want to lay my head on my pillow at night knowing I built the best product I could for the amount of money people want to spend. My home has been a combination of ideas that I have had and also things that I have seen that I have incorporated all into one house.” His office above his 40-by32-foot garage was actually a secondary thought. “I found that the office works a lot better having it separate and upstairs,” he says. “I can walk clients through, show them what I do and then bring them up here. Then my wife and daughter can still use the main house.” The result of this particular home has been positive, he says. “I think the exterior and interior complement each other, and that doesn’t always happen. I had a vision, and my guys put it together.”

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Improving lives,

one woman at a time

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Center for Global Impact works to empower the poor in Cambodia

By Caroline Mosey Photos provided by Center for Global Impact

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Chris Alexander in Cambodia. Opposite page: Sonja Overhiser with culinary training center students at the Green Mango Cafe.

see global poverty as an issue that could be addressed in specific, strategic ways. Alexander envisioned an organization that could empower the poor in the international community. Ultimately, he wanted to connect people with the desire and resources to help with the people who need it most. So he created Center for Global Impact (CGI) in 2008, with a mission to do just that. The issue

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It isn’t every day that you find yourself in a small house outside Phnom Penh, Cambodia, locked in a heated discussion with a local woman about her young daughter. Especially when the discussion involves pleading with her to reconsider the sale of her daughter’s virginity. Chris Alexander, the founder of Center for Global Impact in Greenwood, probably never envisioned himself in that discussion, either. But when you run an organization that’s intimately involved in the complex ramifications of poverty in Cambodia, it starts to make sense. Alexander, a longtime southside resident, has dedicated a large portion of his life to understanding the needs of the developing world. After marrying his wife, Donna, they spent 10 years as missionaries in Zambia and another five years in the Ukraine. “After returning to the U.S., we raised our family here on the southside. I was the missions pastor at Indian Creek Christian Church for many years,” he says. It was through each of these experiences that he began to

CGI is a faith-based nonprofit organization with a mission “to connect people to people through projects that empower the poor and open a door for the Gospel.” CGI’s emphasis is in Cambodia, where poverty claims nearly a third of the country’s population. Impoverished Cambodian women and girls are at a much greater risk of being sold into sexual slavery as a way to generate income for their families. While this might be unfathomable to those in more developed countries, it’s tragically common in this Southeast Asian country. Sometimes girls as young as 12 are sold by their parents to earn money for the family; other times they are lured into slavery by false claims of legitimate jobs, only to discover they’ve been exploited. “In most of the developing world, when poverty collides with crisis, bad things tend to happen,” Alexander says. “In Cambodia the bad things often involve the sale of a child.” In the case mentioned above in which he found himself discussing the sale of a girl’s virginity with her mother, the issue becomes disturbingly vivid. “[The mother] needs to have a surgical procedure done that will cost about $500. Five hundred dollars in our world may seem like a surgical bargain, but in the world that she lives in — a world without a job, without health insurance, without savings, without anything of value — it is virtually an impossible amount of money to find. In her world — with an alcoholic husband who SOUTH

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“Much of what we do in Cambodia is prevention driven.” — Chris Alexander

is sick with TB — the only resources that she can see are found in a 14-year-old daughter, a 15-year-old daughter and a 16-year-old niece who has been left in her care. [To] find the money for the surgery she was preparing to sell the virginity of all three girls. Please understand that ‘selling’ in this context involves an agreement between the mother and a local broker (pimp) that the girl’s virginity can be taken without her consent and sold to a client. For an amount of money that will be divided between the mother and the broker, the girl is taken or sent, locked in a hotel room or home, and then raped at the whim or discretion of the client.” 100

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The approach

Recognizing the root of the problem, CGI seeks to alleviate poverty in parts of Cambodia through targeted projects. Currently, there are three major initiatives in place, each designed to provide the training and tools necessary for making a living and therefore, being empowered to take control of their future. “Much of what we do in Cambodia is prevention driven,” Alexander explains. Culinary Training Center

CGI operates a two-year culinary program for at-risk and formerly trafficked women. The program is run from the Green Mango Café and Bakery in Bat-


Want to get involved? CGI needs your help. If you’re interested in giving your time, resources or talents to empowering at-risk women in Cambodia, contact Chris Alexander at chrisalexander.cgi@gmail.com.

tambang, Cambodia, a popular restaurant where the culinary students learn and work throughout their training. A cookbook was released in October that includes recipes from the Green Mango Café. All proceeds go to continued support for the program and can be purchased on CGI’s website.

international community. “We’ve got 39 participants in the program right now,” says Alexander. “They range in age from 18 to 65. It’s a good mix because the older women can be in a mentoring role for the younger ones.” Items can be purchased at www.bytavi.com. Daughters

ByTavi

Named for a Cambodian woman, Tavi, this project exemplifies her spirit to rise above her desperate circumstances, learn a skill and earn a living for herself and her family. The byTavi project teaches women the valuable craft of sewing, and their handbags and accessories are sold to the

This project teaches the art of making prom and bridesmaid dresses, all while living in a safe home together and learning life skills. Dresses are sold in the U.S. at partnering retailers. Learn more at www. cgidaughters.com. Alexander divides his time between his Greenwood office and Cambodia, where he

travels several times a year to oversee each of the projects. On a recent trip, he visited the byTavi workshop. “A little boy, probably 6 years old, ran inside and then left with his mom who is one of our byTavi participants,” Alexander says. “I was curious to see where he rushed off to, so I followed them outside.” A few blocks away, Alexander saw the boy and his mother enter a gate and disappear. The sign over the gate was the name of a private school. “Scenes like that motivate me to keep going. This woman was in dire poverty, and now she’s able to send her son to a private school,” he says. “It just changes everything.” 2650 Fairview Place, Suite W, Greenwood. (317) 522-6092. www.centerforglobalimpact.org. SOUTH

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The 2011 Holiday Tree Lighting — Franklin — Top to bottom: Braydon Kirby dresses as Santa. An overhead view from the courthouse roof shows the turnout for the annual holiday tradition of lighting the courthouse. Caroline Harmon sends her letter to Santa.

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keep the holiday spirit going

By Melissa Fears photos by josh marshall

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W

Winter in Indianapolis and surrounding areas is packed full of events and activities for residents of all ages. From shows to museums and elaborately decorated mansions to a visit with Santa Claus himself, there are plenty of ways to celebrate winter and get in the festive spirit. And if you think it all ends after Christmas, you’re wrong. We found a few gems to add sparkle to the dull days during the dead of winter. Here’s a listing of just a few of the season’s must-go-to events and celebrations.

Through Dec. 24

The 18th annual Festival of Trees at Lanthier Winery in Madison puts on a dazzling display of trees decorated for the holidays. Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Free admission. Location: Lanthier Winery, 123 Mill St., Madison. Information: www.lanthierwinery. com or call 812-273-2409.

Through Dec. 31

Enjoy the annual holiday train and poinsettia show in downtown Indianapolis. Tickets: $3 each or $8 per family. Location: Garfield Park Conservatory, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: www.garfieldgardensconservatory.org or 317-327-7184.

Through Jan. 6

Jolly Days Winter Wonderland is a treat for the whole family. Jolly Days offers a baby-play Snow Castle for the littlest visitors, a reindeer barn where families can help prep Santa’s reindeer for their flight, an indoor “ice skating” area for children to “skate” in their socks, an ice fishing area, holiday train, kitchen

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area to make holiday goodies, including traditional cookies, staff-facilitated snow ball fun and photos with Santa. Location: The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-334-3322 or www.childrensmuseum.org.

Dec. 1

Families are invited to share a festive breakfast with Mrs. Claus, Raggedy Ann and other holiday characters. Once you’ve enjoyed your buffet meal, visit Santa at his holiday home and ride the Santa Claus Express train in Celebration Crossing. The breakfast also includes gift bags for children and museum admission. Location: Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Reservations required. Call 317-232-1637. Tickets: non-member $26.50 adult, $16 child; members are $20 adult, $12 child. Children under 3 free.

Dec. 1

Visit with Santa at the Johnson County Museum from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Also enjoy the Winter Market from 2 to 8 p.m. at 56 E. Jefferson St., Franklin.

Dec. 1

The Holiday Tree Lighting is one of the biggest events in Franklin. A parade, Santa at the Johnson County Museum, choral performances, carriage and trolley rides all lead up to the grand finale of the courthouse tree lighting followed by fireworks. The Artcraft Theatre will show “A Christmas Story” on the big screen. Start location: Courthouse Square, Franklin. Time: 7 p.m.

Dec. 1

The Festival of Lights Parade in Columbus celebrates with floats, walking groups and thousands of twinkling lights, plus Santa’s arrival and fireworks. Free admission. Time: 6 p.m. Location: downtown Columbus. Information: www.facebook.com/columbuslights or 812-390-6912.

Dec. 15

Enjoy breakfast with Santa Claus, which includes pancakes, sausage, eggs, fruit, juice, milk and coffee. Have your children visit with Santa and take your own photo.  Space is limited. Time: 9 a.m. Location: Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. Tickets: $3 residents; $5 non-residents. Information: 317-881-4545.


keep the holiday spirit going

Andrew Lehman and his daughter Madeline.

Happy New Year!

Dec. 31

Celebrate the New Year with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. An evening of music and food will bring everyone together to ring in 2013. There will be music, dancing and a complimentary champagne toast at midnight. Tickets: $35-$60. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org. Grab your Valentine

Grab your valenti

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Feb. 8

Join the fun at the 11th annual Valentine’s Dance for parents and children. This dress-up event features dancing, refreshments and crafts. Free admission. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. Information: 317-881-4545.

Feb. 9 and 10

A sweet Valentine’s Cabaret of puppets is perfect for anyone wanting to bring their little sweethearts to a Valentine

Johnson County Museum

Valentine's Dance

event. A drink and sweet treat are included. Ages 2-10. Location: Peewinkle’s Puppet Studio, 25 Henry St., Indianapolis. Times vary. Tickets: $10 and free for children under 2. Optional post-show workshop is $3. Information: 317-917-9454 or www.peewinklespuppets.com/puppets2.html.

Feb. 14-16

The Romantic Violinist: Daniel Hope is live and will perform Max Bruch’s greatest creation, the First Violin Concerto. Music Director Krzysztof Urbański leads Brahms’ lyrical First Symphony in this spotlight of Romantic era hallmarks. Times: 11 a.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Tickets: $12-$46. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org.

photo courtesy johnson count y libr ary

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our side of town

The Johnson County Community Foundation’s 18th Annual Gala 1

Nov. 10 // Johnson County National Guard Armory

1. Candice and Jay Moseley with Gail Richards 2. Susan McCarty and Erin Smith 3. Amazing dessert selection prepared by Executive Chef George Neely of Culinary Innovations 4. Amy and Joseph Kelsey with Rafael Sanchez 5. Anne and Joe McGuinness 6. Loren Snyder, Morgan Greenlee, Corbie Snyder, and Lyman Snyder

7. Jennifer McCarty 8. Eric Feathers, Scarlett Syse, Gary and Tammy Smith, Chris Cosner, Dennis Drake, Suzanne and Chuck Wells 9. Josh McCarty with Jeff Goben 10. Ro Umbarger, Margie Davis, and Sandi Huddleston 11. Centerpieces

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Pub Crawl for Cancer Aug. 25 // Franklin Elks

1. Jeanie Barnett and Anne McGuinness. 2. A group of pub crawl participants enjoys a seat outdoors. 3. Team poses. 4. Dale Hughes, DeeDee Thompson, Terry Blair, Carolyn McFarland and Jenny Edwards 5. Amy and Tevis McLaughlin

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90th Anniversary of the Artcraft Theatre Sept. 28 // Franklin

1. Katie Omara and Joshua Cline. 2. Alicea Schaeffer and Mark Howell 3. Audria Larsen performs with The Lil' Darlins Vaudeville Troupe. 4. Vern and Jane Johnson 5. Shalin and Jason Allender 6. Pamela, left, and Lilly Konchinsky Pate.

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Wine at the Line Oct. 6 Mallow Run Winery

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1. Ben Huston, 23, the winner of the 5k, finishing in 16:28:6 from Bargersville 2. The event had a large turnout. 3. Booths containing different varietals served runners after the finish. 4. Sarah Smith is marketing and advertising contact for Mallow Run Winery

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South magazine’s Ladies Night Out Oct. 5 // Greenwood Park Mall 1. Mark Smith and daughter Stephanie Smith from Fred Astaire Dance Studio 2. Molly Wade with the Daily Journal 3. Bruce and Frieda Dowler, Cindy Powers, Mike Thomas, and Kimberly Watts from the American Cancer Society 4. Transformations Salon & Day Spa 5. Jessica McGainnity, Tasheana Hanza, Jeff and Shelly Johnson, Bronnwyn Cole, and Jennifer Hollingshead from J. L. Johnson's Fine Jewelers 6. Ray Skillman Ford 7. Representatives from Community Health Network 8. Karen Raymond with The Center for Cosmetic & Family Dentistry 9. Sherry Long and Ameara Turner from Southside Harley-Davidson & Buell

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Staff Photos


weddings

Katie Kaylor and Dan Sonnenburg Married Aug. 11, 2012, at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Indianapolis Reception at the Indiana War MemorialÂ

Dan proposed to Katie during a 2011 trip to California the couple took in celebration of his finishing his second year of medical school. The couple rented a convertible and drove up Highway 1 from Los Angeles to San Francisco along the coast of Big Sur photographing the landscape and stopping to hike. On the fourth day of the trip Dan asked that the two make one more stop before lunch, so they took a curvy dirt road to a beach, where huge waves crashed onto a shore of purple sand. While strolling along the beach, Dan stopped to ask Katie if she was enjoying the trip and then asked her if she’d like to take trips with him for the rest of their lives. He proposed, and she, of course, said yes. The couple met at Purdue University. Katie is a nurse at Riley Hospital for Children and Dan is a medical student at IU School of Medicine in Indianapolis. Photography by Seth Rainwater, Carpe Diem Photo Video

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Katie had her photo taken in the same loveseat where her mother and grandmother had their bridal photos taken. It is a family tradition.

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weddings

Nicole Pierle and Tyler Smith Married Sept. 17, 2011 at St. Roch Catholic Church Reception at the Columbia Club in Indianapolis

Nicole Pierle and Tyler Smith met through a mutual friend at Ball State University, of which they are both graduates. Tyler proposed on his birthday, Dec. 23, 2010, by asking Nicole to look at an ornament he had purchased for his Christmas tree. When Nicole walked up to the tree, she studied it for a while, searching for the ornament. Finally she spotted it, one she’d never seen before. It was engraved with “Will you marry me?” and the date on the back. Nicole’s wedding theme was “pink champagne.” The bridesmaids wore blush pink dresses, and Nicole wore a Vera Wang gown with gold accents. Pink and gold accents and candlelight served as decoration for the reception. Photography by Seth Rainwater, Carpe Diem Photo Video

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events

Compiled by Amy NOrman

AP photo

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra presents the live debut of the band’s multi-platinum rock opera, “The Lost Christmas Eve.” | Dec. 9

December Through Dec. 2

A holiday family tradition, Butler Ballet is proud to present “The Nutcracker.” Twirl with the snowflakes and waltz with the flowers while waiting for the dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and the Nutcracker Prince. Enjoy Tchaikovsky’s magnificent score performed by the Butler Ballet Orchestra and the Indianapolis Children’s Choir. Times: 2 and 8 p.m. Dec. 1; 2 p.m. Dec. 2. Tickets: $28.50 and $21.50 for adults; $23 and $17 for children. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents “Dragons.” This show brings together mystic dragon lore with authentic circus feats. Tickets: $26 to $87.50. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www.bankerslifefieldhouse.com

Through Dec. 16

Celebrate Christmas with the Buck Creek Players “A Little Christmas Spirit.” This Yuletide fantasy is full of holiday spirit and humor. Tickets: $15 adults; $13 children, students and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-8622270 or www.buckcreekplayers.com

Through Dec. 23

Share a festive breakfast with Mrs. Claus, Snowflake Sam and Raggedy Ann. Visit Santa at his holiday home and ride the Santa Claus Express. Time: 8:30, 9 and 9:30 a.m. Saturdays; 9, 9:30 and 10 a.m. Sundays in December. Cost: $20 for member adults; $12 for member child; $26.50 for non-member adult; $16 for non-member child. Reservations required. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org Indy’s own Angela Brown and Broadway star Ben Crawford join Jack Everly, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and an extraordinary cast of singers and SOUTH

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events

dancers during the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s “Yuletide Celebration.” Don’t miss the flying reindeer, tap dancing Santas, magical toy shop, and amazing music that makes this one of Indiana’s greatest holiday traditions. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Through Dec. 30

As the temperatures drop, let holiday traditions at the Indianapolis Zoo warm your heart. Christmas at the Zoo is a magical time as the zoo is covered in twinkling lights. Sip a hot beverage, visit the animals, and enjoy exhibits and special activities. It runs Wednesday to Sunday only. Location: Indianapolis Zoo, 1200 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: www.indyzoo.com

Through Dec. 31

Come enjoy the annual winter wonderland at Conservatory Crossing. See the conservatory decked out in its holiday best with a brilliant display of poinsettias, enjoy running model trains, a train village and thousands of twinkling lights. Cost: $3 per person; $8 per family with a two adult maximum. Location: 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: www.garfieldgardenconservatory.org

Through Jan. 6

Enjoy a locomotive wonderland with a network of trestles, bridges, tunnels and chugging trains during “Jingle Rails: The Great West Adventure.” Travel west on the Great Western Adventure and witness detailed replicas of national treasures while making holiday memories. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org

Through Feb. 10

National Geographic “Greatest Photographs

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Christmas at the Zoo | Through Dec. 30

of the American West” features the best images of the West published by National Geographic during its 125-year history with works by nearly 80 different photographers. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org

Dec. 1

Don’t miss the 2012 Big Ten Football Championship game at Lucas Oil Stadium. Tickets: $50 to $125. Game tickets include admission to Big Ten Fan Fest. Location: Lucas Oil Stadium, 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. Information: www.lucasoilstadium.com

Shop the season’s best regional art market with handmade art from more than 40 artists at the Eiteljorg Museum at the Winter Market. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org Come out and celebrate the 54th anniversary of the downtown Franklin holiday lighting ceremony. The day kicks off with the Tri Kappa Breakfast with Santa at St. Rose Elementary at 9 a.m. Gingerbread house contest entries/voting will take place from 2 to 5 p.m. at Mutual Savings Bank. Cookie contest entries can be dropped off at 2 p.m.

Photo by Jason Wright

“Celebration Crossing,” the Indiana State Museum’s annual holiday exhibit, continues the tradition begun in 1991 when the Santa Claus Express was acquired from the downtown Indianapolis L.S. Ayres store. Please note that no personal photos can be taken in Santa’s House except by his elves. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org


share wine this holiday with with judging at 3 p.m. at Mutual Savings Bank. Visits with Santa will be from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the Johnson County Museum. The Winter Market will be open from 2 to 8 p.m. in the former GC Murphy Building at 56 E. Jefferson St. There will be a pipe organ concert at First Presbyterian Church at 4 p.m. The lighted holiday parade down Jefferson Street will be at 5:30 p.m. Various performances and happenings will take place beginning at 6 p.m. around the courthouse with the lighting of the courthouse at 7 p.m. Information: www. franklincoc.org; www.jcplin.org/contests The Festival of Lights Parade features floats, animal units and walking groups. The streets of downtown Columbus light up with thousands of twinkling lights. Don’t miss the fireworks as well as Santa as he passes City Hall. Time: 6 p.m. Information: 812-390-6912 “Rock of Ages,” nominated for five Tony Awards, features reprised songs from famous 1980s glam metal bands to frame the musical’s rock ’n’ roll culture and all the troubles that come with it. Times: 3 and 8 p.m. Tickets: $38 to $60. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: www.iuauditorium.com Make a few ornaments for the library tree and some to take home for your tree during the Christmas tree decorating at the library. Time: 10 a.m. to noon. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Trafalgar Branch, 424 Tower St., Trafalgar. Information: 317-878-9560 or www.jcplin.org

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Arts for AIDS raises awareness of HIV/ AIDS, generates support for those affected and connects communities through artistic expression. A family event will be from 2:30 to 4 p.m. featuring the Griot Drum Ensemble with story-telling, African arts and crafts and children’s activities. Cost: $5 per person at the door. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. there will be an evening fundraiser featuring the Griot Drum Ensemble, Zimbabwean sculpture, African and Haitian art and much more. Cost: $60 per person in advance. Location: Mill Race Center, Columbus. Information: artsforaids.org or www.artsincolumbus.org

Dec. 2

Plan to take the kids to see Max & Ruby in “The Nutcracker Suite 2012.” Time: Noon SOUTH

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and 3:30 p.m. Tickets: $15 to $30. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Ensemble. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $14 to $20. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: www.iuauditorium.com

Don’t miss the 15th annual Mom & Me for Tea for mothers and their daughters, ages 3 to 8. The event includes tea, punch, sandwiches, sweets, crafts, games and a fashion show of the attending daughters wearing holiday finery. Time: 1 p.m. Cost: $22 per pair. Location: Donner Center, 22nd and Sycamore streets, Columbus. Information: 812-376-2680

Bring a buddy and get ready to play some of your old favorites and maybe learn a new game during Game Night. For children in Grades K through 5. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Clark-Pleasant Branch, 530 Tracy Road, Suite 250, New Whiteland. Information: 317-535-6206 or www.jcplin.org

Enjoy a variety of holiday favorites for chorus and orchestra during the Columbus Symphony Orchestra’s concert, “Winter’s Passion.” The show will feature guest artist Kathy Dell’s Parkside Choir and such popular songs as Anderson’s “Sleigh Ride,” Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus” and more. Time: 3:30 p.m. Location: The Commons, Washington Street in downtown Columbus.

Don’t miss “The Charles Dickens Show” featuring information on his writing, his life, his family, his travels and the magic performed. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Trafalgar Branch, 424 Tower St., Trafalgar. Information: 317-878-9560 or www.jcplin.org

Dec. 5

Love TLC’s “The Cake Boss”? Then you’ll love seeing The Cake Boss live on stage in “Buddy Valastro Live!” Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $24.75 to $85. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com Enjoy the sounds of the holidays at Chimes of Christmas, Indiana University’s joyous annual holiday program, featuring the Singing Hoosiers and the IU Wind

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Dec. 7-8

Butler’s annual gift to the community, “Rejoice!” continues in its 26th year. Hosted by the Butler Chorale and University Choir, this year’s concerts also feature the musicians of the Butler Symphony Orchestra. The combined forces perform Puccini’s exuberant “Gloria” and other festive musical fare. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: Free but are required. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org Bloomington’s own Straight No Chaser brings its a cappella sound to Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $20 to $50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Dec. 4

Looking for the perfect Christmas gift? Join us at the library to make your own adorable Christmas mini-album. Learn how to make a one-of-a-kind album that will hold your favorite holiday photos and keepsakes. Materials will be provided. Space is limited so be sure to sign up. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Franklin Branch, 401 State St., Franklin. Information: 317-738-2833 or www.jcplin.org

comedy is a high-energy, over-the-top, funfilled show for kids of all ages. Time: 6 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: The Commons in Columbus. Information: www.artsincolumbus.org

Dec. 8

Don’t miss Breakfast with Santa, sponsored by the Franklin Parks & Recreation Department. Time: 9 to 11 a.m. Limited space is available. Location: Franklin Cultural Art & Recreation Center. Information or to register: 317-736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org “Buddy Valastro Live!” | Dec. 5

Dec. 6

Moody Blues performs at Old National Centre. Tickets: $39.50 to $79.50. Location: 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com You are invited for a fun evening with Santa so bring your camera. Refreshments will be served. Kickapoo Preschool will present its holiday program at 6:30 p.m. in Beeson Hall. The Franklin Community Band will present a holiday concert following the preschool program. Time: 6 to 9 p.m. Location: Franklin Cultural Arts & Recreation Center, 396 Branigin Blvd., Franklin. Information: 317-346-1198 or www.franklinparks.org

Dec. 7

Old National Bank’s First Friday for Families features “Babaloo.” This one-man musical

Enjoy a traditional and relaxing holiday experience with Santa at the Johnson County Museum in Franklin. Time: Noon to 3 p.m. Photos with Santa will be available for purchase. Admission to the museum is free. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 346-4500 or www.johnsoncountymuseum.org The Greater Greenwood Community Band will perform a Christmas concert. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Greenwood High School auditorium, 605 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood. Tickets: Free. Information: www.greenwoodband.com Meet Santa and see Conservatory Crossing. Head to the Arts Center and make toys with Santa’s elves. Mrs. Claus will also have some tasty treats. Photos with Santa are available for $3. Time: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org


Celebrate the holiday season with “Classical Christmas” amid the exquisite environs of the Scottish Rite Cathedral when the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Raymond Leppard and Apollo’s Voice chorus join for a semi-staged production of Handel’s elegant and witty “Acis and Galatea.” Time: 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $45. Location: Scottish Rite Cathedral, 650 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Dec. 9

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra presents the live debut of the band’s multi-platinum rock opera, “The Lost Christmas Eve.” Times: 3 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $44.45 to $82.90. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www.bankerslifefieldhouse.com The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic and Children’s Choir celebrate with “The Phil Brings It Home for the Holidays.” Enjoy favorites including “Let it Snow,” “Drummer Boy” and “Bugler’s Holiday.” Choose from an afternoon family-oriented concert or The Phil’s traditional evening concert. Time: 3 and 7 p.m. Tickets: starting at $10. Location: Columbus North High School, Erne Auditorium, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: 812376-2638, ext. 110 or www.thecip.org

Dec. 10

530 Tracy Road, Suite 250, New Whiteland. Information: 317-535-6206 or www.jcplin.org Find out how to use coupons to save money on your festive dinners and baking goodies. There will be coupons to cut, ideas to keep them organized and websites to save you money. If you are a coupon veteran, please come share your ideas, tips, tricks and shopping strategies. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Franklin Branch, 401 State St., Franklin. Information: 317-738-2833 or www.jcplin.org

Dec. 15

Experience the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and Indianapolis Symphonic Choir in Handel’s holiday masterpiece, “The Messiah,” with its iconic “Hallelujah Chorus.” Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $23 to $56 for adults; $12 to $29 for children 12 and younger. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org Basketball fans will enjoy the Crossroads Classic. In Game 1, IU takes on Butler. Purdue will battle Notre Dame in Game 2. Game times: 2 and 4:30 p.m. Tickets: $30 to $80. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www.bankerslifefieldhouse.com

Get into the holiday spirit with a visit from Jingle John the Elf, his animal friends from the North Pole, and a special appearance from one of Santa’s helpers from the Reindeer Reserve. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Clark-Pleasant Branch, 530 Tracy Road, Suite 250, New Whiteland. Information: 317-535-6206 or www.jcplin.org

Visit the Johnson County Museum of History during the Holiday Open House. Check out the holiday displays and vote for your favorite Dec-A-Tree entry. Holiday treats will be served. The Voices of Franklin will perform. Admission is free. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: 317346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org

Dec. 11

Gingerbread has been a holiday tradition in Bartholomew County for almost 200 years. Explore the background of this holiday treat, make gingerbread mix and decorate a cookie. Time: 11 a.m. Location: Bartholomew County History Center, 524 Third St., Columbus. Information: www.bartholomewhistory.org

Hanukkah is Dec. 9 to 16. Come learn about the history of this Jewish holiday, sample latkes and play a game of dreidels. Time: 4:30 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Trafalgar Branch, 424 Tower St., Trafalgar. Information: 317-878-9560 or www.jcplin.org Learn how to make beautiful snowflakes and swirly painted glass ornaments for your tree or anywhere in your home. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Clark-Pleasant Branch,

Dec. 16

The Concert Series at St. Paul Lutheran Church features a Christmas concert by Voce Choir & Orchestra. Time: 7 p.m. Cost:

381 N. Bluff Road, Greenwood, IN (ASL Interpretation available @ 6pm service)

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Jan. 5

Music lovers will enjoy the Columbus Bluegrass Jamboree Concert. Time: 4 p.m. open jam; 5 p.m. group performances. Cost: Free. Location: Donner Center, 739 22nd St., Columbus.

Jan. 6

The St. Paul Lutheran Church Concert Series features an organ recital by Janette Fishell, chairwoman of the IU Jacobs School of Music Organ Department. Time: 3 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Paul Lutheran Church, 6045 E. State St., Columbus. Information: 812376-6504 or www.stpaulcolumbus.org

Straight No Chaser | Dec. 7-8

Free. Location: St. Paul Lutheran Church, 6045 E. State St., Columbus. Information: 812-376-6504 or www.stpaulcolumbus.org The First Presbyterian Music Series presents “Lessons & Carols” featuring the adult choir. Time: 9:30 a.m. Location: First Presbyterian Church, 512 Seventh St., Columbus. Information: 812-3723783 or www.fpccolumbus.org

Dec. 22

The St. Bartholomew Concert Series presents “Let There Be Light” featuring the St. Bartholomew and Fairlawn Presbyterian chancel choirs performing the “Ceremony of Candles” Advent and Christmas cantata. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Bartholomew Catholic Church, 1306 27th St., Columbus. Information: 812-379-9353, ext. 237 or www.saintbartholomew.org

Ring in the New Year with Drew Hastings as he performs during the YES Comedy Showcase. Time: 7 and 9:30 p.m. Cost: $20 in advance; $25 at the door. Location: YES Cinema, Columbus. Information: 812-379-1630 or www.yescinema.org End the year with a bang with a family-friendly alcohol-free celebration at the Indiana SOUTH

Ring in the New Year with the ISO with an elegant evening of music and celebration. Opt for a pre-concert dinner just steps from your seat. Enjoy the post-concert bash featuring more live music, dancing and a complimentary champagne toast at midnight. Time: 9 p.m. Tickets: $35 to $60. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

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State Museum. Face painting, stilt walkers, clowns and music highlight the evening. A balloon drop at 8 p.m. allows the little ones to celebrate the New Year in style. Reservations are accepted, but not required. Time: 6 to 9 p.m. Cost: $6 per member; $11 per nonmember. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org

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Jan. 4

Old National Bank’s First Friday for Families features Jason Huneke. Well-known for his Michael Jackson dance routine on “America’s Got Talent,” Huneke sets himself apart with his comedy and juggling. Time: 6 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: The Commons in Columbus. Information: www.artsincolumbus.org

Jan. 9-27

Winner of the 2006 Tony Award for Best Musical, “Jersey Boys” tells the story of how Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons went from being unknown New Jersey kids to international pop superstars. Time: Varies. Tickets: $39 to $97.50. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Jan. 10

It’s the beginning of a new year and if saving money or getting out of debt is on your resolution list, make sure you attend “Frugal Living.” This class will bring a variety of tips on how to save on everything from utilities to laundry; groceries to gifts and everything in between. This class is for everyone. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Bartholomew County Public Library, 536 Fifth St., Columbus. Information: 812-379-1255 or www.barth.lib.in.us

Jan. 11-13

“You can’t stop the beat” when Jack Everly, the ISO, filmmaker John Waters and a starstudded Broadway cast present a concert production of “Hairspray.” Relive this quirky classic through songs from the musical that follows a young girl’s dream to star in a dance show and ends up changing the world. Tickets: $20 to $85. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Jan. 11-27

Come see beautiful functioning fountains created with repurposed materials at the Funky Fountains Art Show. These quirky


and unique works of art will be on display among the conservatory’s tropical botanical collection. Location: 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org

Jan. 12

The St. Bartholomew Concert Series presents “Nuevo Tango” featuring piano duo Mirabella and Bogdan Minut. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Bartholomew Catholic Church, 1306 27th St., Columbus. Information: 812-3799353, ext. 237 or www.saintbartholomew.org Did you know that 2013 is the Year of the Snake? Look at this cultural celebration, sample some traditional foods and make your own dragon to take home. Time: 11 a.m. Location: Bartholomew County History Center, 524 Third St., Columbus. Information: www.bartholomewhistory.org

Jan. 18-19

Out of an initial hushed shimmer of strings unfolds Bruckner’s massive Fourth Symphony. Distinguished conductor and Krzysztof Urbanski’s teacher, Antoni Wit, makes his ISO debut with Bruckner’s famous romantic symphony. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $29 to $75. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Jan. 19

During “Ice Age: The Overnight,” join the Ice Age friends for a night of fun and adventure. Explore the museum’s labs and take a flashlight tour of the prehistoric collections. Discover how mammoth skeletons fit together. Find out if you have what it takes to be an Ice Age hunter going after a mastodon. Time: 7 p.m. Jan. 19 to 8 a.m. Jan. 20. Cost: $40 per member; $50 per non-member. Registration required. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org Celebrate the birthday of A.A. Milne, the author of “Winnie the Pooh.” Enjoy reading a selection from “Winnie the Pooh,” make a craft and watch a Winnie the Pooh cartoon. Refreshments provided. Time: 10:30 a.m. Location: Johnson County Public Library – Franklin Branch, 401 State St., Franklin. Information: 317-738-2833 or www.jcplin.org SOUTH

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Jan. 21

The world-famous Harlem Globetrotters visit Indianapolis bringing the world’s tallest pro basketball player who is 7-feet-8-inches and the shortest Globetrotter ever at 5-feet2-inches. Time: 2 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $117. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www.bankerslifefieldhouse.com Walk the Moon perform. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15. Information: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com Bring a canned food item and receive free admission to the Indiana State Museum in celebration of the life of Martin Luther King Jr. Films, live music, poetry and performance art fill the galleries and public spaces of the museum as the life and times of this great man are explored. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org

to $70. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www.bankerslifefieldhouse.com

Jan. 24-26

Common, hailed as one of hip-hop’s most poetic and respected lyricists, delivers messages of self-respect, love and activism in music and speeches. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: Free but are required. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

Jan. 23

Enjoy the beautiful music performed by the musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra with special guest Joshua Bell, a Bloomington native and IU graduate. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $38 to $60. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: www.iuauditorium.com

Jan. 23-27

Disney on Ice presents “Worlds of Fantasy.” Get excited about high-speed stunts as Lightning McQueen, Mater and the crew from “Cars” race across the ice. Dive into “The Little Mermaid’s” enchanting undersea kingdom and enter the mystical world of Pixie Hollow with Tinker Bell. The toys are back in town when Buzz Lightyear, Woody, Jessie and the “Toy Story” gang escape from Sunnyside Daycare. Tickets: $10 opening night; $12

Jan. 27

Brides to be, get all the information about weddings and more from 50 vendors all under one roof during The Republic Bridal Fair. Time: Noon to 4 p.m. Location: The Commons, Washington Street, downtown Columbus.

Jan. 30

If you’re a fan of Eric Carle, then you’ll love Mermaid Theatre’s adaptation of “Guess How Much I Love” and “I Love My Little Storybook.” Told with an assortment of innovative puppetry styles and imaginative lighting, these stories will delight young children. Time: 10 a.m. Tickets: $15. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org Joshua Bell | Jan. 23

Jan. 22

Join Doktor Kaboom for a sidesplitting, interactive journey that creatively blends theater arts with the wonders of scientific exploration. Time: 10 a.m. Tickets: $15. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

The YES Cinema Comedy Showcase features Patti Vasquez. Time: 8 p.m. Cost: $20 in advance; $25 at the door. Location: YES Cinema, 328 Jackson St., Columbus. Information: 812-378-0377 or yescinema.org

February Cellist Zuill Bailey returns with works by Bloch and Muhly, and Jun Marki completes the program with the thunderous Organ Symphony by Saint-Saens. Tickets: $20 to $75. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Jan. 25-Feb. 3

The Buck Creek Players present “Escanaba in da Moonlight.” Tickets: $15 adults; $13 children, students and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-8622270 or www.buckcreekplayers.com

Jan. 26

Tiempo Libre and its seven members are heirs to the musical traditions from their native Cuba. The performers have found a way to bring their Cuban roots to the forefront of their music, making them a hit abroad and in the United States. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $35. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

Feb. 1

Blues at the Crossroads celebrates two blues legends, Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. The Fabulous Thunderbirds join Blues at the Crossroads as the core band backing greats JJ Grey, James Cotton, Bob Margolin and Jody Williams. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $35. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org Paul Taylor’s inspiring dance troupe of six members, Taylor 2, carries on the modern dance technique that Taylor has been creating and refining for the past six decades. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $20 to $35. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: www.iuauditorium.com Old National Bank’s First Friday for Families features “Rumpelstiltskin.” ArtsReach’s Theatre presents this lighthearted play that captivates children with its imaginative retelling of this well-loved story. Time: 6 p.m. Cost: Free.


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Drive, Indianapolis. Information: www. garfieldgardenconservatory.org

Feb. 15

The YES Cinema Comedy Showcase features Tim Cavanaugh. Time: 8 p.m. Cost: $20 in advance; $25 at the door. Location: YES Cinema, 328 Jackson St., Columbus. Information: 812-378-0377 or yescinema.org

Feb. 15-16

Fusing the traditions of circus with the dynamism of street performance, Traces is a display of raw emotion and physicality in an intimate urban setting. It’s an awardwinning, high-energy, urban acrobatics routine. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $28 to $48. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: www.iuauditorium.com

Traces | Feb. 15-16

Feb. 16 Location: The Commons, Columbus. Information: www.artsincolumbus.org

Feb. 2

The Phil presents “Live from New York!” Enjoy music from “Lion King” and “Les Miserables” plus the cool jazz sound of Charlie Parker. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: Starting at $12. Location: Columbus North High School, Erne Auditorium, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: 812376-2638, ext. 110 or www.thecip.org

Feb. 5-6

Shen Yun Performing Arts presents classical Chinese dance and music in colorful and exhilarating shows. Time: 7 p.m. both nights. Tickets: $60 to $110. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: 317-940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

Feb. 8

Don’t miss the 11th annual Greenwood Valentine’s Dance for parents and children. This special evening is a dress-up event featuring dancing, refreshments and crafts. Information: Nick Schwab at 317-881-4545

Feb. 9-10

A sweet cabaret of puppets designed especially for grandparents and parents

who want to bring their little sweethearts to “Valentine’s Day Cabaret.” Tickets: $10; free for children younger than 2. Location: Peewinkle’s Puppet Studio, 25 Henry St., Indianapolis. Information: 317-917-9454 or www.peewinklespuppets.com

Feb. 14

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with treats from the tropics including chocolate and coffee, all in the candlelit romantic atmosphere of the conservatory. Reserve your spot by Feb. 13. Cost: $8 per person or $15 per couple. For ages 16 and older. Location: Garfield Park Conservatory, 2505 Conservatory

Don’t miss the popular Daddy/Daughter Dance for girls ages 3 to 12 and their dads. The event features dancing, appetizers, sweets, photo opportunities, event CD and party favor. You must pre-register to attend. Time: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Cost: $35 for residents; $37 for non-residents. Information: 317-736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org Moms, enjoy a night out for just you and your sons, ages 3 to 12, at Hi-Way Lanes in Franklin. Cost includes two hours of unlimited bowling, shoe rental, pizza, soft drinks and party favors. Cost: $25 for residents; $27 for non-residents. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Information: 317-7363689 or www.franklinparks.org

At the Artcraft Theatre Don’t miss these classic movies on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or www.historicartcrafttheatre.org. Dec. 1 & 2: “A Christmas Story”

Jan. 11 & 12: “G.I. Blues”

Dec. 7, 8 & 9: “It’s a Wonderful Life”

Jan. 25 & 26: “Pete’s Dragon”

Dec. 14, 15 & 16: “Christmas Vacation”

Feb. 8 & 9: “The Man Who Knew Too Much”

Dec. 28 & 29: “The Sound of Music”

Feb. 15 & 16: “Roman Holiday”


a look back

For the kids Firefighters gather around a decorated tree with presents at the inaugural Children's Christmas Party at the Franklin Fire Station.

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Stop 12 Rd.

31 US

SOUTH Winter 2013  
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