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Holiday Candy / Farmhouse Fare / Historic Hotels

Winter 2017

Indy’s southside magazine

A Good Read

inside

Load up on books, clothes, toys and more with our shop local guide

30 S. Water St., Franklin, IN 46131


NEW ARRIVALS MUST-HAVE STYLES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON available at in Missy and Women’s sizes

GR EENWOOD PARK MALL G reenwood 317.885.9936 CASTLETON SQUARE MALL Ind i anapolis 317. 594.1 870

mi ng wangknits .com


PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

Ask a Doc –

Q:

I am about to celebrate my 40th birthday and was thinking about treating myself to a Botox injection. How does it work and what results should I expect?

A: Botox is the brand name of a neurotoxin that is commonly injected into facial muscles to prevent the muscles from contracting. Botox is commonly used on forehead lines, glabellar lines (the famous “11” sometimes seen between one’s eyebrows) and crow’s feet (wrinkles seen at the edge of your eyes when you smile). Botox can cause wrinkles to soften, and prevents wrinkles from deepening over time. The procedure takes just a few minutes and does not require anesthesia. Botox is injected with a fine needle into specific muscles with very little discomfort. It usually takes three to seven days to for the full effect to take place, and when it does, these effects will last three to six months. As muscle action gradually returns, the lines and wrinkles begin to reappear and need to be treated again. However, the lines and wrinkles often appear less severe with time because the muscles are being trained to relax.

A NOTE ABOUT OUR DOCTORS Jessica N. Gillespie, MD, and Jaime M. Ranieri, MD, of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons, a Franciscan Physician Network practice, perform cosmetic surgeries and procedures that treat the results of trauma, birth defects and disease. Dr. Gillespie and Dr. Ranieri are board certified in plastic and reconstructive surgery. From tummy tucks and mommy makeovers to facial vein reduction and skin rejuvenation, the doctors and staff at Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons offer an array of life-enhancing treatments.

To meet with Dr. Gillespie or Dr. Ranieri for a consult or appointment please call (317) 528-7650. For more information visit IndyCosmeticSurgery.com or FranciscanDocs.org.

Jessica N. Gillespie, MD Jaime M. Ranieri, MD


contents Sweet Chili Chicken Wings at The Willard

25 Cindy and Joe Rene of Long’s Bakery

on the cover

Feature Stories

Tiffany Lauderdale Phillips of Wild Geese Bookshop. Photographed by Haley Neale.

74

Specialty Shops

84

Restored Beauty

92

Historic Hotels

Holiday gift giving is easy with southside stores

Darrell and Betsy DuSold refurbish their home

Start a new family tradition this holiday season

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contents The DuSolds’ German shepherd waits at the restored home’s front door.

Departments

15

This & That

Southside news and views

22 In Style Copper

25 Taste

Spicy foods, brisket recipe

36 Worth the Trip Farmstead fare

42 Arts & Lifestyles Craft + Cork

48 Home Trends Fireplaces

54 Health 58 Profile Dry skin

Mike Neal

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62 Profile Roger Cook

68 Indiana Made Candy shops

84 In Every Issue

8 98 104 110 114

Welcome Weddings Our Side of Town Calendar of events Directory


welcome » Read and share SOUTH online at indysouthmag.com

Warmest Wishes

A

A cold weather fan I am not, and as the end of each year draws near, I find myself regularly piling on layers of clothes, curling up in a chair next to the wood stove and opening a good book or magazine to pass the hours indoors. Here, I find comfort, not only thanks to a blanket, a warm fire and a cup of hot coffee, but also the words on pages, which either help to transplant me to another time and place — preferably a tropical one — or which remind me of my life’s many blessings. As editor, I have already read this magazine front to back, but I may just take a seat and read it again this season. This issue of South is filled with bite-sized stories about what make our side of town — and, in fact, our state — great. During the months when frigid temperatures offer us little comfort, there is much to do and see and eat to brighten our spirits. Round up the gang and head to Craft & Cork (featured on page 42) for an evening of crafts and holiday spirits. Stuff the kids’ stockings with goodies from one of several Indiana confectioners, profiled on page 68. And don’t forget something rich and delicious for yourself. Our roundup of local chocolate-covered treats (on page 34) will sate any sweet tooth. Hungry for a little locally raised comfort food for the family? Skip ahead to page 36, where we profile some of Indiana’s best farmto-fork restaurants, like Joseph Decuis in Roanoke and Zionsville’s The Loft Restaurant at Traders Point Creamery. And if, like me, you often find yourself simply wanting to stay home with a good book, the newly opened Wild Geese Bookshop in Franklin, pictured on our cover and included in our Shop Local section on page 74, has you covered. Best wishes this holiday season.

sdugger@indysouthmag.com

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E XT R A O R D I NA RY CO L L E CT I O NS T H AT W I L L AW E Y OUR S E NS E S .

Avon, Carmel, Fishers, Fort Wayne, Geist, Glendale, Greenwood, Willow Lake West & NOW OPEN on Mass Ave Corridor: 1853 Ludlow Ave, Indianapolis, IN 46201

(317) 579-7900 | MCNAMARAFLORIST.COM


SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

Winter 2017 | Vol. 12 | No. 3

Publisher AIM Media Indiana Chuck Wells

Editorial Editor

Sherri Dugger Copy Editor

Katharine Smith

ACTUAL PATIENT

Contributing Writers

Beth Clayton-George Starr Miller Teresa Nicodemus Julie Cope Saetre Joe Shearer Jon Shoulders Jennifer Uhl CJ Woodring

Art

REFRESHED LOOK, RENEWED OUTLOOK.

Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger

Discover how to turn back the hands of time by scheduling a consultation with one of Indianapolis Monthly’s Top Docs.

Contributing Photographers

Rob Goebel Josh Marshall Haley Neale

Dr. Mark Hamilton, MD, FACS DOUBLE BOARD CERTIFIED FACIAL PLASTIC SURGEON

Stock images provided by ©istockphoto

BEFORE

AFTER

Patient received a facelift, blepharoplasty and laser resurfacing.

533 E County Line Rd, #104, Greenwood, IN 46143 | 317.859.3810 | www.hamiltonfps.com

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Advertising Director Christina Cosner


Roncalli Salutes Our National Merit Scholars

Front Row (left to right): Morgan O’Brien, Kurt Cunningham, Michael Otley, Jonny Anderson Second Row: Cassidy McMahon, Chloe Owen, Katie Goebel, Julia Kurz, Claire Whalen Back Row: Aidan Parker, Timmy Miller, Matthew Woodruff, Neil O’Brien

Four members of the Roncalli High School Class of 2017 earned the distinction of National Merit Semifinalist (top 1% in the nation) and nine have earned the distinction of National Merit Commended Student (top 3% in the nation). They earned this distinction based on their PSAT scores taken during their junior year. Congratulations to the following Rebel National Merit Semifinalists: Katie Goebel, Timmy Miller, Neil O’Brien and Matthew Woodruff. Congratulations to the following Rebel National Merit Commended scholars: Jonny Anderson, Kurt Cunningham, Julia Kurz, Cassidy McMahon, Morgan O’Brien, Michael Otley, Chloe Owen, Aidan Parker and Claire Whalen.

Applications For Registration Now Being Accepted Call 787-8277, ext. 243 or visit www.roncalli.org


SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

reader services mailing address

30 S. Water St., Second Floor Franklin, IN 46131

phone

(317) 736-7101

fax

(317) 736-2754

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advertising inquiries southmail@indysouthmag.com (317) 736-2767

story ideas

info@indysouthmag.com (317) 736-2732

web site

www.indysouthmag.com

Single copy sales

Copies of South magazine are available at southside Kroger, Marsh and Barnes and Noble locations.

In a world of change, our focus is steadfast.

Subscriptions

To subscribe to SOUTH magazine, please send $12 for 4 issues, or $24 for 8 issues to the mailing address above. Call (800) 435-5601 to subscribe by phone or place your subscription request online at indysouthmag.com.

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Please send any address changes to the address or e-mail address listed above.

Back issues

To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone.

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© 2016 Diamond Capital Management

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©2016-2017 by AIM Media Indiana All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.


Compiled By Julie Cope Saetre

O

this & that

Chowing Down

On Gordon Ramsey’s popular cooking-related television programs, the blunt chef often bemoans a badly prepared dish by calling it “a dog’s dinner.” He would need to find a new insult, however, if he learned of the popular new menu created especially for the canine patrons of Revery in Greenwood. Late last summer, Revery owner/chef Mark Henrichs and general manager Eric Kett — both dog dads themselves — decided to introduce Fido-friendly meals after noticing that an increasing number of guests dining on the restaurant’s patio were bringing their dogs along to enjoy the al fresco ambience. Inspired by dog-friendly menus offered in restaurants from Chicago, Los Angeles and other major cities, Henrichs introduced a five-entree lineup featuring chicken and carrot bisque, pasta with salmon and peas, and three stews (chicken and sweet potato, tuna and salmon, and chicken and beef — the latter is available in grain- and gluten-free versions). Kibble lovers might prefer the chicken and brown rice offering made

by Simply Nourish. All meals are approved by the Association of Animal Feed Control Officials; each wet-food entry is $4, while the dry is $3. What meal is complete without an appetizer and dessert? Man’s (and woman’s) best friend starts the dining experience with complimentary unseasoned or liquid-nitrogen popcorn and can end with a Revery dog biscuit ($1.50) made at Bella Dog Bakery & Biscuit Co. on Indy’s south side. While the dog-diner concept is hibernating for the winter, it will return with spring warmth, and socialized dogs of all sizes are welcome. “We had a Great Dane out there that was probably as big as me,” Kett recalled, “and he was very well-mannered.”

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this & that 100th Anniversary Celebration Monday, Feb. 6, 6:30 p.m. Greenwood Public Library 310 S. Meridian St., (317) 881-1953, greenwoodlibrary.us

A Century Of Reading As director of the Greenwood Public Library, Cheryl Dobbs oversees a bustling community asset that goes far beyond loaning books, CDs and DVDs. The library hosts a variety of informational and educational events, clubs, author’s talks, youth programs and more. With the library’s 100th anniversary in 2017 rapidly approaching, Dobbs took time from her many day-to-day duties to discuss the venue’s past and the upcoming centennial celebration on Feb. 6. What is the mood of the library’s staff as you look forward to the celebration? We are really excited. We’ve been waiting for this one for 100 years. It’s going to be an all-day event. We’ll have some fun things throughout the day, cookies in the building and things like that, and then an event in the evening that will include as many of our library alumni — both employees and library users — as we can cram into the building. And we hope to have a lift-off of 100 paper lanterns that evening as well. The event is free, and everybody can come. Has the library been in the same building all along? We started out in 1917 upstairs in a room on Main Street for three years. And that little place opened with just a handful of books — about 38. They were all donated by the community. We actually have the original accession book, which is where they would record each book as it was purchased or added to the collection. And we’ve actually purchased as many of those opening-day books as we could find on eBay. So we have this really cool collection of these ancient books. Once the librarians took over ordering, they were pretty strategic about ordering what they thought the community

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needed. But those original books, since they were donated by the community, are even more interesting. We have several that are Irish-background books, and it just makes you wonder who was here and who donated those books. What happened after that three-year period? We moved into the community house, which used to be the city building, the Polk Building, and we were there for 40 years. We were in the upstairs room there, too. We had a corner of that upstairs area. They had movies in that building, and they had a bowling alley and a pool. A lot of our older patrons who are around 80 remember going there in the summer and doing all these things, and this was the center of their lives. We hear great stories from the people who remember that space. In 1963, we moved to this location and built our first library, which was roughly 7,000 square feet. We remodeled in ’74 and added square footage, and again in 1989 and in 2001, when our current building was finished. How large is the library today? Fifty-one thousand square feet. It’s big and beautiful. We’re very fortunate to have not just the size, but the layout. It allows us to have

some pretty special things. Like a huge children’s room with its own doors, so we can keep the kids contained and safe. And a teen room with doors. We have good community rooms as well. We feel like we are very, very blessed with this building as it was eventually constructed. How large has the library’s collection grown since those original 38 books? It’s 110,000. And, of course, that’s the print books. Now we also have electronic books, e-audio, CDs, DVDs. We have a lot of non-print materials as well. How many people have Greenwood Public Library cards? We have about 17,000 or 18,000. And we have 43,000 people a year who come for our programs. We have about 1,500 programs a year for all different ages. We are very heavy with children’s and literacy programs. For adults, we have everything from book clubs to cooking classes and crafts and financial information and education. We really see literacy as our main push, and that literacy can take lots of forms. If someone comes in and needs to be more literate with the computer, we can do one-on-one tutoring, or they might go to one of our computer classes. If they need to learn how to invest in the stock market or how to manage their retirement or do their taxes, we bring in experts to do those kinds of classes as well. What has been the most gratifying experience in preparing for your centennial celebration? We had a moment about five years ago when we nearly closed due to financial problems. And the fact that we are here, stronger than ever, the building is in great shape — we are just so thrilled to be able to celebrate this anniversary. Because when you almost don’t, I think you appreciate it so much more.


this & that An Event

with Purpose

A MAJOR AWARD Johnson County Public Library’s Adult Learning Center volunteer Wendy Preilis was recently selected to tutors and students were invited receive the Indiana Library Federation to share in a Tom Zupancic Literacy in Libraries traditional American Thanksgiving meal Award for 2016. The award honors and at the Annual ALC recognizes community advocacy of Thanksgiving Feast Luncheon. Inset, literacy in libraries by an individual Wendy Preilis or organization in cooperation with a library. As the Adult Learning Center (ALC) coordinator for the Johnson County Public Library, Preilis provides weekly programs for adults wishing to increase their English communication skills, reading skills, and overall understanding of the American culture. The programs offer free literacy services in adult basic education and English as a second language. The Adult Learning Center partners with Johnson Memorial Hospital to provide Baby TALK, providing new families with a literacy packet, books, and encouragement to use the library. Preilis is the leader of JCPL’s Literacy Awareness Month committee, which works to raise awareness of adult illiteracy and ALC programming. She also serves on a variety of local committees representing the Johnson County Public Library, including the Leadership Johnson County Public Relations Committee and the Immediate Services Council (United Way of Johnson County.)

The Johnson Memorial Hospital Foundation hosts its Inaugural Gala in February with proceeds aimed at improving community access to behavioral health care services in Johnson County. The event, set for Feb. 25, is to be held at JW Marriott in downtown Indianapolis and will include a cocktail reception with a view that overlooks Victory Field, silent auction packages, dinner, a live auction and entertainment. According to a press release by Johnson Memorial, “one in every five children and adults in America experiences a mental illness. … Now more than ever, behavioral health care concerns are in the news and on the minds of every citizen. JMH Foundation is committed to raising charitable funds to help this cause.” Event information:

Johnson Memorial Hospital Foundation Inaugural Gala $175 per person Feb. 25, 5:30 p.m. reception; 6:30 p.m. dinner Location: JW Marriott, 10 S. West St., Indianapolis Information: (317) 690-0774 Tickets: Date:

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this & that

Profile

JoLynda Wilson, left, and Jennifer Alter of J&J Petite Boutique

SMALL BUT MIGHTY

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*

Ready to shop for the holidays? See our special southside shopping section on page 74 of this issue.

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Busy stay-at-home moms Jennifer Alter and JoLynda Wilson love following fashion trends. But at 5 feet 2 inches and 4 feet 1 inch respectively, the friends found shopping to be incredibly frustrating. Stores that specialize in petite sizes tend to stock mostly business apparel, Alter said. And at boutiques with trendier pieces, vanity sizing prevails in an attempt to rack up more sales. A small top in reality fits a medium frame, for example, while a medium top is the equivalent to a large. Tired of not finding stylish buys that fit properly, the two took matters into their own hands. After months of planning, Alter and Wilson opened J&J Petite Boutique at the end of April. The online venture stocks on-trend finds — leather and cargo jackets, booties, reversible totes, thick leggings — with wardrobe must-haves like skinny jeans and soft sweaters. From the comfort of their couches, shoppers discover mixand-match petite apparel such as jeans with 26-inch inseams and shirt sleeves that don’t drape past

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the fingertips, along with jewelry, scarves and boots. And prices are surprisingly reasonable. At press time, every item listed was under $100. Twice a year, Alter and Wilson leave their Hoosier homes (Greenwood-native Alter now lives in Westfield; Wilson remains in Greenwood) to travel to Las Vegas. Their goal is not to gamble, but to comb the displays at The Magic Show, a fashion marketplace, for stylish new finds. They also work with online wholesale sites and other specialized venues to find items that will fly off their virtual racks. And fly they do. The combination of fashion, fit and affordability appeals to women across the country, with orders coming from a variety of climates: Michigan, Florida, Utah, Colorado. Alter credits the far-flung response to an online advertising campaign and a strong social media presence, including posts from fashion bloggers. Still, the biggest sales driver is the need that prompted the venture in the first place: “a cute, trendy boutique with petite clothes that fit.” For more, visit jjpetite.com.


this & that

book nook

“When Breath Becomes Air” By Paul Kalanithi  I brought it with me on vacation, but put off reading this book because I knew it detailed the losing battle of a young neurosurgeon fighting Stage 4 lung cancer. However, I ran out of books and turned to page 1. I could not put it down. As I read, I realized that this story was more about life than it was about death. From his youth Paul Kalanithi was a seeker, and through his life and studies he sought to understand the meaning in human life. As a surgeon and as a patient, he considers the meaning of life as it is affected by death. This is a man who kept going and did not avoid his own frightening diagnosis, but instead thought deeply and lived a life full of meaning, wholly awake and aware. “The fact of death is unsettling,” Kalanithi writes. “Yet there is no other way to live.” — Reviewed by Cheryl Dobbs, library director, Greenwood Public Library

“The Tears of Dark Water” By Corban Addison Addison’s book is fantastic, and I discovered even while it is a fiction book, there was a lot of research done on historical accounts of kidnapping on the high seas by Somali pirates. The story is about a father and son who take a sailboat voyage around the world and end up kidnapped by pirates when close to the shores of Somalia. The FBI gets involved, since both are American citizens, as well as the Navy and a whole host of others who work to rescue the father and son. This thought-provoking, informational and entertaining tale brings to light the inner workings of pirate gangs, along with the politics of a government’s involvement in the search. — Reviewed by Liz Lickliter, patron services, Greenwood Public Library

“Adnan’s Story: The Search for Truth and Justice After Serial” By Rabia Chaudry A world-renowned podcast called Serial followed an investigation by Sarah Koenig into the story of Adnan Syed and Hae Min Lee. “Adnan’s Story: The Search for Truth and Justice After Serial” is by Rabia Chaundry, the lawyer and family friend who brought the case to Koenig. Chaundry felt that, although she was thankful for the press and interest Serial brought to Adnan’s case, it left a lot to be told and many unanswered questions. Chaundry’s story is filled with details that Serial left out — diary entries, maps, evidence lists and photos — making them accessible and viewable for readers to sort out the complicated details of the case. And Chaundry tells it like it is. She holds back little and makes storylines understandable. Readers of the book will have a greater understanding of Adnan’s case. — Reviewed by Jessica Smith, teen librarian, Greenwood Public Library

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“Truly Madly Guilty”

“Cathedral of the Wild”

“The Wonder” (Audiobook 10 CDs Hachette Audio)

By Liane Moriarty

By Boyd Varty

By Emma Donoghue

Three seemingly happy suburban couples get together for a barbecue. It’s a nice evening; the kids and dog are happily playing. What could go wrong? Two shocking events occur, causing cracks in lifelong friendships and forever altering life in the neighborhood. The story switches back and forth between the day of the barbecue and the events that follow, yet the narrators don’t let on what happened. Just when you think you’ve figured it out, a new wrench is thrown in the plot. It’s not until the book’s final few pages that one truly learns the truth. Liane Moriarty weaves another suspenseful tale dealing with friendships, marriage and parenthood.

Boyd Varty grew up on a game preserve in South Africa. His great-grandfather bought a farm, and after his death, his grandsons created the Londolozi (“protector of all living things”) Camp. The land had been drained and fenced off for farming, so the two grandsons had to bring it back to life, luring animals to return to the area. The men had to deal with apartheid, but they worked together with black South Africans on their mission. Varty and his sister still live and work at Londolozi, which is now a luxury safari resort. Elephants, wildebeest and jaguars are part of daily life, and caretakers work to preserve the land and keep the animals safe from poachers. This tale reads as part coming of age story, part adventure tale and part spiritual journey.

Emma Donoghue (best-selling author of “Room”) weaves a magnificent and haunting tale of a young Irish Catholic girl fasting herself to death and a nurse determined to save her. Eleven-year-old Anna O’Donnell is purported to have eaten nothing for months; Lib Wright, an English nurse, is sent over to a small Irish village to see if the rumors are true. This thriller starts off slowly but quickly picks up speed as the relationship between Lib and Anna deepens, and it becomes apparent that not everything is as it seems. The story comes alive with an impeccable narration by Kate Lock, who expertly narrates both English and Irish accents to such an extent that it’s easy to get lost in the story.

— Reviewed by Kelly Staten, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

— Reviewed by Erin Cataldi, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

— Reviewed by Amy Dalton, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

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style

Photography by Haley Neale

Copper Pineapple Tumbler $24.99, Bed Bath and Beyond, 723 U.S. 31, Greenwood

Moscow Mule Mugs $7.98/each, Stein Mart, 1011 N. State Road 135, Greenwood

Copper Tones Metallics may come and go in fashion circles, but the beauty of one malleable metal always catches our eye. If you’re into the warm hues of copper as we are, there’s nothing better than these shimmering showstoppers.

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1

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1 Copper Photo Frames $14.99-$19.99, Stein Mart, 1011 N. State Road 135, Greenwood 2 Copper Planter $7.90, Marshmallow Monkey, 41 W. Monroe St., Franklin 3 Copper Plant Stakes $2/each, Thanks for the Thyme, 396 E. Jefferson St., Franklin 4 Copper Display Case $9.90, Marshmallow Monkey 5 Antique Copper Pot $24, Thanks for the Thyme, 396 E. Jefferson St., Franklin 6 Copper Salt and Pepper Shakers $19.95/set, Pier 1 Imports, 6810 S. Emerson Ave., Indianapolis

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taste Heat Wave When the temp dips and the flurries fly, nothing’s better than a mugful of something to warm you up. But heartier meals also can provide heat that ranges from turn-your-cheekspink to a three-alarm, eyes-watering fire. Here, four southside eats that’ll toast your taste buds and have you reaching for something cold. by Jennifer Uhl Photography by Haley Neale

Cajun Beef Tips

Oaken Barrel Brewing Co.

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taste

Sweet Chili Chicken Wings The Willard 99 N Main St., Franklin, thewillard.com » Downtown Franklin is awash with new restaurants, but The Willard is a local institution with a history dating to 1860. The house-turned-hotelturned-pub and eatery attracts a mix of longtime devoted diners, families and couples on their way to catch a flick at next door’s Artcraft Theatre and antiquing day trippers. The menu is filled with a little bit of everything — American sandwiches and wraps are tucked in between an oyster dinner and a quesadilla platter — but pizza and chicken wings are the popular go-tos. Baskets of 10 wings (boneless, too) come tossed in your pick of eight sauces, including a sinus-searing x-hot. If you’d still like to feel your taste buds two wings in, opt for the sweet chili sauce instead. It’s not made in house, but that doesn’t matter when a sauce filled with diced garlic and crushed red pepper is this good. Ever since C.J Cash, an assistant manager, picked the sauce up two years ago, he’s seen customers request a side of it with other entrees — even salads — and notes, “It’s just sweet enough with a little bit of a bite.”

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Cajun Beef Tips Oaken Barrel Brewing Co. 50 Airport Parkway, Greenwood, oakenbarrel.com » Two decades before the brewpub craze began and craft beer was a thing, Oaken Barrel was already winning awards for its house beers and a menu that includes pasta and pizza alongside burgers, sandwiches and the southside’s best steak fries. Portions call for to-go boxes with the check, and even the 12 appetizers are meals in themselves, particularly the mile-high Idaho nachos and the Cajun beef tips. The latter will clear up a head cold right quick, thanks to a housemade Cajun spice mixture of paprika, garlic, onion powder and oregano, plus “a few other things to keep people guessing,” says chef Bryan Bates. After coating the filet mignon bites, Bates tosses them in a super-hot cast iron skillet to blacken before plating them with pico de gallo and a housemade horseradish sauce for added kick. One order is enough for two to share while bellied up to one of two bars to watch the game with a caramel-colored Indiana Amber or Snake Pit, a heavy porter. Better yet, grab a flight of the six standard house beers to find your favorite.

Portobello Mushroom Burger Court Street Cafe 39 E. Court St., Franklin, courtstcafe.com » This sweet little spot on the courthouse square easily filled the “pretty food” niche that The Indigo Duck left behind when it closed two years ago; even more important, Court Street’s sandwiches, salads, flatbreads and burgers taste just as good as they look. The menu was recently updated with some flavorful newcomers, including a buffalo chicken grilled cheese and cheesy jalapeno bacon bread starter, but diners craving something heartier with a little bit of zing — or a vegetarian alternative — opt for the grilled portobello burger. After two grilled portobello mushroom caps are saddled inside each other to ensure they stay put, the “burger” is topped with grilled onions, Swiss cheese and a sriracha aioli for heat. A substantial brioche bun holds it all together, while a pickle and peppery kettle chips complete the plate.

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taste

Thai Sour Sausage Dumplings Rook 501 Virginia Ave., Suite 101, Indianapolis, rookindy.com 28

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» Take the Americanized image you have of tiny, strip-mall ethnic restaurants and turn it on its head: This Fletcher Place hot spot serves contemporary Asian street food in a sleek red-and-black dining room pulsating with owner/chef Carlos Salazar’s favorite old school hip-hop tunes. Surprises abound on the menu as well, with an Asian take on the Big Mac and crispy pig ears among the rice and ramen bowls. Also on the apps menu are dumplings stuffed with a sausage that includes lemongrass, garlic, ginger and

fermented cooked rice. The sausage isn’t particularly spicy, but the tomato-based Nam Phrik sauce drizzled over the dumplings definitely brings the heat. Salazar grills every ingredient — tomatoes, garlic, shallots, green onions, lime and Thai chilies, which are tiny but pack a much bigger punch than a jalapeno or serrano pepper. The upside to the tongue-tingle you’ll have afterwards? Cooling off with the halo-halo, the most impressive dish of ice cream on the southside.


EXPERTS AT SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS. AND OUR COMMUNITY. West Smith Valley Road and SR 135

317-882-8200

Mike Combs NMLS #924181

Tricia Rake

Joselyn Pollock

NMLS #473860

©2016 The National Bank of Indianapolis

NMLS #1429491

www.nbofi.com

Member FDIC

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taste

Recipe

A Brisket, A Tasket Family in town this holiday season? Skip the bird and surprise your guests with a deliciously tender party-sized brisket. Photography by Haley Neale

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SHOP LOCAL

Brisket purchased from The Meat Shop, 954 N. State Road 135, Greenwood

Beef Brisket 2 tablespoons chili powder 2 tablespoons salt 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon onion powder 1 tablespoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon sugar 2 teaspoons dry mustard 1 bay leaf, crushed 4 pounds beef brisket, trimmed 1½ cups beef stock

Preheat oven to 350 F. Create a dry rub by combining chili powder, salt, garlic and onion powders, black pepper, sugar, dry mustard and bay leaf. Season the raw brisket on both sides with the rub. Place in a roasting pan and roast, uncovered, for 1 hour.

Add beef stock and enough water to yield about ½ inch of liquid in the roasting pan. Lower oven to 300 F, cover pan tightly and continue cooking for 3 hours, or until fork-tender. Trim the fat and slice meat thinly across the grain. Top with juice from the pan.

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taste

Prep tip

By Jennifer uhl

H2-Whoa Good intentions to exercise more, lose a few pounds or just eat healthier top lots of New Year’s resolution lists, but it can be tough to stick with those good intentions. One that can help with all three? Drink more water. If you just made a face, you’re not alone. Getting in the recommended eight glasses a day isn’t easy, especially if you’re used to drinks that have lots of added sugar and artificial ingredients. Better-for-you sparkling waters take up half an aisle at the grocery store, but it’s easy (not to mention cheaper) to make your own. If you can’t live without fizz, purchase sparkling water or DIY via a countertop gadget that will carbonate your tap water in a snap. Add your favorite fruit, like berries, watermelon or citrus (make sure it’s ripe for maximum sweetness) and mash or muddle with assorted herbs, like mint or basil. Still crave sweetness? Add a drizzle of honey, stir and sip away.

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Recipe

Orange Crush » Mid-May through fall, you can follow your nose — and a crowd of bakedgoods fans — to Jonna Barnett’s Bread With A Twist table at the Franklin Farmers Market. A Franklin resident and mom of four, Barnett has sold a range of treats from cinnamon twists to pie turnovers and homemade granola bars at the market since 2012. For those who can’t wait until market day, Barnett takes special orders by phone at (317) 538-6599 and on Facebook (Bread With A Twist) for items such as her lemon-blueberry quick bread, a perennial favorite. Here, she shares an updated version for winter, flavored with orange zest and cranberries by the cup.

Orange-Cranberry Mini Loaves

Orange syrup

1½ cups all-purpose flour

Juice from 2 oranges

2 teaspoons baking powder

¼-½ cup water

1 teaspoon salt

½ cup sugar

1 cup plain yogurt

While bread is cooling, make orange syrup in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a rolling boil for 1 minute, then remove from heat. Poke holes in the top and sides of each loaf with a toothpick, then use a pastry brush to spread syrup over loaves. Let syrup soak into the loaf and repeat, using all or most of the syrup.

1 cup sugar 3 eggs Zest of 2 oranges ½ teaspoon vanilla ½ cup vegetable oil 1½ cups dried cranberries (soak in water for 30 minutes and drain), or fresh cranberries, diced Preheat oven to 330 F. Coat the berries in 1 tablespoon of flour and coat 4 mini loaf pans with baking spray. In a large bowl or stand mixer, blend the yogurt, sugar, eggs, zest, vanilla and oil together. Sift dry ingredients into a medium-sized bowl and add. Fold in cranberries and pour batter evenly into pans. Bake 50 to 53 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let pans cool for 15 to 20 minutes, then turn bread out onto cooling racks.

Orange glaze

2 cups powdered sugar 2-3 tablespoons orange juice To make the glaze, whisk together the powdered sugar and orange juice to a thick but pourable consistency. Pour over or use a flat spatula to spread the glaze on the loaves, allowing it to spill over the edges. Let dry before serving or storing.

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taste

Food finds

By Jennifer uhl

Sweet Relief

Three delicious reasons to eat more chocolate

On the Go

Out to lunch

On the town

The saying “good things come in small packages” no doubt was meant for the front counter display case at Hoosier Cupboard Candy and Snacks, which is filled with more than 20 varieties of truffles. The small orbs hail from Vermont and Massachusetts, and come in just about every flavor you can think of, including key lime, champagne, tiramisu and seasonal flavors, but the sea salt caramel with its generous scattering of salt and silky caramel center is easily the most popular. Each truffle is only 93 cents and available in a trio of chocolate coverings — milk, white or dark — but the bittersweet dark definitely packs the most flavor. Gift-giving is made easy with pretty packages for truffles by the dozen, but there’s no need to bank on another’s generosity. Choose your own mini box of two to savor on your way back to work, or break for a quick nibble at a table outside the little yellow depot by the railroad tracks. 370 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 3460680, hoosiercupboardcandy.weebly.com

The Greenwood Park Mall food court has its share of after-lunch goodies — ice cream, cookies, even a cotton candy kiosk. But chocoholics have passed them all by since the September opening of Chocolate Moonshine Co., a familyowned company based in Pittsburgh that specializes in fudge, French and Belgian chocolates and moonshine bars. The questionable name has nothing to do with illegal activity — the bars with a truffle-like center contain no alcohol — rather, like backwoods still spirits, the recipe is a family secret, and the bars are made in micro batches. They’re also good for you, as far as sweets go, with only natural, gluten-free ingredients and no trans fat. Simply put, they’re the Cadillac of chocolates, hand-painted with Crayola-bright colors made from French cocoa butter. The dark toasted almond is swathed with a Salvador Dali-esque swirl of peacock-blue flecked with white; the dark pistachio is camo-minded with strokes of light and dark green. They’re almost too pretty to eat, but you can overcome that minor detail by posting your $3 dark mint bar to Instagram first, hashtag #gorgeousdessert. Greenwood Park Mall, 1251 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 339-3738, chocolatemoonshine.com

If your motto is “life is short, eat dessert first,” the cake case at downtown Greenwood’s Vino Villa deserves the top spot on your foodie bucket list. Bring your BFF or someone you don’t mind sharing a forkful with to help conquer the colossal, $8 slice of housemade dark chocolate cake with milk chocolate icing. Take your plate to the second floor and cozy up in the deep leather sofa in the last room on the right. The tables on either side are an ideal size for holding two glasses of wine, though choosing a wine could take all day. Day manager Donna Landers suggests pairing a standard red with the “chocolate on chocolate” concoction, but that’s easier said than done: Of Vino Villa’s 500 labels, 400 are red. We suggest you save time and ask for your server’s recommendation — because let’s be honest, chocolate goes with everything — then dig in. 220 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-9463, vinovilla.com

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Photos submitted


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Worth the Trip

Farmstead Fare When wintry winds blow, head for the farm, one with comfort food on the menu By CJ Woodring

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Photos submitted


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It’s winter in the heartland. And that calls for comfort food: mac ’n’ cheese; mashed potatoes and gravy; chicken (or beef) and noodles; super-duper stew. It’s been suggested that comfort food evokes forgotten memories of home-cooked meals from scratch. And in Indiana, where denizens often endure long, cold winter days under bleak, sunless skies, comfort food cheers us up while also warming our bellies. Farm restaurants, which continue to spring up throughout the Hoosier State, offer the best in comfort: farm-to-table offerings, often prepared and served fresh by restaurateurs who grew or produced the ingredients themselves. So bundle up. Head for the nearest farm restaurant. And remind yourself of just how comforting food can be.

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The Restaurant at Walhill Farm

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Jessica Hensley

Mike Moeller and Chris Stange

A

A southern Indiana classic

Opened in 2012 as The Butcher Shoppe, The Restaurant at Walhill Farm is described by owner Pete Hillenbrand as artisanal American. “Keeping it local and a farm-to-fork concept is really what I try to push in terms of branding,” he says. It’s a concept embraced by diners who visit the 250-acre working farm, which includes nearly 200 acres of pasture and

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a 10-acre sustainably grown garden that provides much of the restaurant’s produce. The compound also features Walhill’s Sulky Lodge, a converted chicken coop; The Barn, an event center; and a statecertified butcher shop. Creative, seasonal menus feature garden-fresh produce, along with beef, pork and poultry raised on-site. Hillenbrand says comfort food includes chili, signature


Worth the Trip

homemade soups, freshly baked bread, meatloaf, pork chops and hamburgers with various topping options. “Our bacon-infused Walhill burger has been very popular for a long time,” he says. “It doesn’t necessarily have bacon on top but is a mixture of beef and pork from our grass-fed Black Angus cattle and heritage Berkshire hogs.” If the farm doesn’t grow the ingredients, the restaurant outsources locally. This includes American wines, locally crafted beers and whiskey from Lucky 7 Distillery, an independently owned operation located on farm grounds. Tentative winter plans include a wine pairing dinner and a distilled spirits dinner, most likely to be held in January and February. More reasons to visit: Rural, historic setting. Live music by regional entertainers 6 to 9 p.m. Fridays. Optional stay at The Inn at Walhill Farm. Farm-produced meat and produce available at The Retail at Walhill. The Restaurant at Walhill Farm, 857 Six Pine Ranch Road, Batesville. (812) 934-2600; walhillfarm.com.

Starlight, star bright

The bright star in Starlight (est. pop. 900) is Joe Huber’s Family Farm & Restaurant, an eighth-generation enterprise

Joseph Decuis

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known for Hoosier hospitality and homemade dishes. The eatery has continued to gain fans — and fame — since commentator Paul Harvey first mentioned it on his radio program, prompting a regional magazine to feature the Huber family. Established in 1967 as a U-Pick-It Farm (green beans), the 300-acre farm primarily grows pumpkins and strawberries, along with vegetables for the restaurant, which opened in 1983. A Farm Market,

Joe Huber’s Family Farm & Restaurant

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Soda Pop Shoppe and Gift Shop are located on-site. Terra Huber-Mahan, director of sales and marketing, says the family establishment is nationally renowned, drawing busloads of visitors from throughout the United States. “You’re not going to find food as freshly prepared as ours, other than maybe your grandmother’s table,” she says. “It’s ‘real food,’ homemade and from scratch, and we serve lots of comfort food.” Bonnie Huber’s original recipes provide comfort in the form of fried biscuits smothered with the restaurant’s signature apple butter; fried chicken; chicken and dumplings; cobblers and pies; mashed potatoes and gravy; and Huber honey ham. The popular country platter dinner will be offered throughout December, when delivery and catering services are popular. “We all take pride in our business, and it definitely has charm,” Huber-Mahan says. “We are truly unique as a family-owned-and-operated restaurant for more than 30 years.” More reasons to visit: Beautiful drive to country setting. Seasonal children’s activities. Farm market with wide selection of fresh fruits and veggies. Joe Huber’s Family Farm & Restaurant, 2421 Engle Road, Starlight. (812) 923-5255; joehubers.com. SOU T H

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Worth the Trip

The Loft Restaurant Small town, world-class dining

Joseph Decuis restaurant isn’t exactly farm-based, but it’s close enough. Owners Pete, Alice and Tim Eshelman live on and work the land at nearby Joseph Decuis Wagyu Farm, which produces vegetables, herbs, free-range hens, Kobe-style Wagyu beef and Mangalitsa pork, all menu features. Located in a former bank building and opened in 2000, Joseph Decuis is considered one of the only restaurants in the United States raising — and serving — its own Wagyu beef. Traditional Japanese husbandry ensures it is 100 percent USDA “prime” grade. Alice Eshelman says the restaurant’s version of comfort food includes wonderful soups and homemade Wagyu Bolognese, a marriage of Wagyu and Mangalitsa in a tomato sauce served over potato gnocchi. “It’s a hearty, stick-to-your ribs dish, and definitely bumped up a notch with the quality of beef,” she explains. Top the meal off with toasted almond-mocha crème brûlée. Reserve a table in The Club, a sunny room with dark paneling, to cure any wintertime blues, or consider The Conservatory, where guests remain warm and cozy while watching the snow fall. More reasons to visit: Quiet, intimate atmosphere. A chance to dine at one of Indiana’s most honored restaurants. On-site Emporium featuring the farm’s signature foods, fine wines and select cuts of Wagyu beef. Historic downtown setting with eclectic shops and boutiques. Optional stay at the downtown Inn at Joseph Decuis or at the Joseph Decuis Farmstead Inn, a restored 1884 farmhouse located six miles from the restaurant. Joseph Decuis, 191 N. Main St., Roanoke. (260) 672-1715; josephdecuis.com.

It’s always Fair (Oaks) weather Established solely as a farm in 1996, Fair Oaks Farms has emerged as an enterprise that includes the Farmhouse Restaurant and Conference Center, opened in 2014. Owned by local business operators, 40

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Jane Elder Kunz and Dr. Peter (Fritz) Kunz

including five dairies, the farm sprawls across 25,000 acres, offering not only sustenance but an educational, back-to-nature setting for all ages. Winter dining in the 265-seat rustic restaurant centers on a huge stone fireplace, reason enough to cozy up and settle in for a spell. Eighty percent of menu ingredients on the rotational, seasonal menu are grown on-site or by local growers; the farm also supplies dairy, pork and beef items. Restaurant general manager Richard Arthur says comfort begins with a bacon

maple appetizer (“The bacon is made from pork belly from the farm’s pigs,” he says.) and extends through the chocolate frenzy brownie. Arthur also suggests fried chicken, chicken pot pie, pot roast or ribs: “Some of the best ribs I’ve had,” he adds. For guests 21 and older, reserve a spot in the Chef ’s Dining Room, where a glass-enclosed kitchen allows diners to view food preparation. Other reasons to visit: Educational farm experience that includes dairy, pig and crop adventures, “Mooville” and the pork


education center. The Farmhouse Market & Bakery, Cowfé and Gift Shop. The Farmhouse Restaurant at Fair Oaks Farms, 754 N. Road 600E, Fair Oaks. (219) 394-3663; fofarms.com/farmhouse.

Crème de la Creamery

In 2003 owners Jane Elder Kunz and Dr. Peter (Fritz) Kunz established Traders Point Creamery, an award-winning, working dairy farm that features a cheese creamery and farm store. Aptly named for its location on the upper level of a restored 1860s barn, The Loft Restaurant began as a dairy bar about 2006, says communications manager Lauren Bobbitt, and it gradually developed into “a cornerstone of the kind of immersive farm-to-table experience we want to offer visitors.” Rotating, seasonal menus pair farmto-table dishes with organic, local and sustainable ingredients, many grown on the farm. “There’s no comfort food more timeless than mac ’n’ cheese, and our version is made with grass-fed artisan cheeses, plus seasonal additions like bacon, roasted squash and peppers,” Bobbitt says, noting that comfort-style cooking techniques such as braising and roasting for beef, pork and chicken — often raised on-site — are employed this time of year. The brunch menu also includes biscuits and gravy, featuring rosemary and Fleur de la Terre biscuits. The Loft’s French toast elevates banana bread to a new level and tops it off with a whipped fromage blanc, pear butter and candied pecan topping. Other reasons to go: Farm atmosphere in remote, relaxed, rustic setting. Events, such as wine and beer dinners; local musicians Friday nights throughout the year. Self-guided farm/nature walk and private tour of the 150-acre farm, which showcases four antique barns. Fun times by the Patio Dairy Bar’s fire pit. The Loft Restaurant & Dairy Bar, Traders Point Creamery, 9101 Moore Road, Zionsville. (317) 733-1700; traderspointcreamery.com.

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Arts & Lifestyles

uncorked

C

creativity

Southside craft studio brings friendship and fun to the table By Beth Clayton-George

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Craft + Cork, a southside crafting studio and all around hangout spot, has been open since last March, but owners Vanessa Kenworthy and Kathryn Woodward admit they still have trouble describing their newest venture. There really isn’t anything quite like it, they say. Craft + Cork is an apt name. There is, indeed, plenty of crafting at the space, and many wine bottles are uncorked in the process. It’s just that the name doesn’t cover everything. At the studio, creativity reigns supreme as crafters of all stripes gather for structured classes, meet-ups dedicated to specific art forms, and open studios, where guests can take advantage of Photos submitted


Arts & Lifestyles

available supplies and equipment to create. And while the finished products that are taken home at the end of a session are often impressive, Kenworthy and Woodward say Craft + Cork’s real value is in the connection attendees feel with one another and the individual benefits of time well spent. “Do you want to go to a shrink, or do you want to go out with your girlfriends and have a drink and make a piece of home décor?” asks Kenworthy. Craft + Cork has its roots in another, less formal business Kenworthy and Woodward started several years ago while working together at a corporate office in downtown Indianapolis. The duo became known in their circle as the go-to planners for birthday parties, anniversaries and wine tastings. About two years ago, the women began hosting office parties during which they would pour drinks while attendees 44

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Some upcoming events at

Craft + Cork

Dec. 17 at 10 a.m. Kids: Advent Calendar

Dec. 17 at 1 p.m. Country Snowman painting

Dec. 17 at 6 p.m. Paint Your Pet

Dec. 19 at 6 p.m. Spindle Snowman

Dec. 21 at 6 p.m. Winter Stream

Dec. 22 at 6 p.m. Bar Glass Sets

Dec. 23 at 6 p.m. Nightcap

Dec. 27 at 6 p.m. Baby It’s Cold Outside painting  

Dec. 30 at 6 p.m. Happy New Year painting

painted on canvas. The events were so popular that they quickly gained a following and several repeat customers. But with repeat business came a new conundrum — what would guests do with their growing stack of personal creations? Kenworthy and Woodward learned that the artwork was languishing in closets and basements, unseen, and occasionally even tossed out. They started hosting events that helped guests repurpose their old projects, and as those sessions grew, so did the idea that their fledgling business needed a home base. One night while sitting around a bonfire with friends, the idea for Craft + Cork began to come into focus. The pair can’t recall who articulated the idea first, but by the time the words were spoken, it was practically a foregone conclusion. “The train was already moving at that point,” said Woodward. Within a month, the friends were checking out available


spaces and nailing down a business plan. A key part of their strategy was visiting every painting and craft studio in the market. What they found only solidified their confidence in their idea. “Craft + Cork is a totally different experience,” said Kenworthy. For one, they’ve chosen to eschew any rules about how guests are to complete their projects, and they let crafters interpret each painting for themselves. Skilled teachers are on hand to help painters with their techniques, but freeform designs and color schemes are encouraged as well. They also designed their space to encourage lingering. Kenworthy — an avid scrapbooker who loathes the utilitarian stools often provided at her scrapbooking conventions — insisted on comfortable chairs, which flank long, wooden tables that beg to be covered in paint splotches, paper scraps and wood remnants. And while the last session is scheduled to wrap up each day by 9 p.m., the women have been known to stay late to ensure that each artist leaves with a completed masterpiece. Finally, they wanted to share more than just painting with their guests. While traditional canvas projects do play a key role in the class lineup, the subjects vary widely in style and complexity, and include more personal projects, like Paint Your Pet night or Paint Your Loved One, sometimes emotional events that help attendees capture their fondest memories on canvas. Other popular projects include painted bar glass sets and seasonal crafts such as December’s stocking hanger project. The studio also hosts BYOC (Bring Your Own Craft), which allows guests to bring their own supplies and simply use the space to spread out and keep surprise presents a secret from their recipients at home. Most notably, Kenworthy and Woodward take requests. Visitors to their website are encouraged to SOU T H

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Arts & Lifestyles

submit photos and descriptions of projects they would like to recreate. “If you can pin it, we can craft it,” promises Woodward. While Kenworthy and Woodward lead a majority of the sessions, they also rely on a growing network of artists who lend their skills in specific genres. During these sessions, the pair are on hand to offer technical assistance and an artistic eye — and keep glasses full of liquid creativity. They have taken care to curate a wide selection of wines available by the glass or by the bottle, in addition to beers on tap from local brewers MashCraft and Taxman, plus imported and domestic bottled beer, coffee, tea, soft drinks and juice. While the majority of Craft + Cork’s events take place in the studio, Kenworthy and Woodward often host

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events at the Johnson County Public Library and select Kroger locations (through the grocery store’s Krafting with Kroger community outreach program). Other regular events include Color Me Calm (a coloring book club for grown-ups), trivia and game nights, and even a monthly book club meeting. “Those don’t have anything to do with crafting, but we like reading, so why not?” said Kenworthy. The hours are undoubtedly longer than what they experienced in their previous jobs, and they spend nearly every weekend at the studio, entertaining guests, perfecting project plans and putting the finishing touches on their masterpieces. But you won’t hear any complaints out of them. “Let’s be honest,” said Woodward. “What would we be doing if we were at home, anyway?”

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Home Trends

Some Like It Hot

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Today’s fireplace designs encompass eclectic options for a variety of tastes

By Teresa Nicodemus

Through the centuries, fireplaces, wood-burning and rudimentary, have served as main sources of heat, but today the modern fireplace has become a state-ofthe-art heating innovation that is efficient and fashionable. The perfect fireplace comes in a variety of types and styles. The fragrant ambience of a wood-burning fireplace or the convenience and efficiency of a gas or electric fireplace — all are worthy of a second look. State-of-the-art heat exchangers can be built into wood-burning fireplaces to help channel air. Fans can be added to quickly move heated air throughout a room. Fireplace inserts, which increase heating efficiency and expand uses beyond typical wood burning, including the option to use

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electric logs, pellets or gas, are other popular accessories. Inserts that use recycled wood pellets are an eco-friendly option. They also allow fires to be turned on and off with a switch, increasing safety. Electric fireplaces, with imitation log sets and high heat output, are portable and easily moved from room to room. Interior designer Kris Ragsdale, owner of Kris Ragsdale Designs in Greenwood, says electric logs can mimic flames, and some even offer sound effects to create the look of a real open fire. Often our busy lifestyles, says Melanie Piper, owner of Interiors by Melanie in Greenwood, make the gas fireplace, with its practically maintenance-free flame, the way to go. Gas fireplaces may not produce


Home Trends

as much heat as burning wood, but they are aesthetically appealing and offer unique ways to sit fireside in your home. “Fire pits aren’t just for the outdoors anymore,” says Piper. With the onset of new technologies with gas fireplaces, manufacturers now offer vent-free, open-flame fire pits, or “fire furniture,” that can create a design statement within your home. These unique gas flames can be surrounded in glass, erupt from crushed, colored glass nestled in a decorative vessel bowl or flicker through free-standing decorative grates. The modern gas fireplace has become a high-tech option for homeowners who want convenience. With the touch of a button, the flame is on, and these fireplaces can be equipped with amenities such as adjustable flame height and heat temperature, changeable fan speeds, accent lighting and remote start capability.

Hearths aglow

A grand fireplace may be the focal point of a room’s design or serve as a sleek backdrop to ultra-modern decor. Ragsdale notices the increasing popularity of multiple fireplaces throughout the home. “You may see a fireplace not only in the great room, but in the kitchen, transforming the room into a cozy hearth room, or even a master suite may have a built-in fireplace,” she says. Ragsdale sees a growing trend in two-way fireplaces as well, in which the same fireplace serves a kitchen and great room. Open on each side, this unique twoin-one fireplace sports a different façade for each room. Many homeowners, wanting a fireplace to blend seamlessly with their industrial-style home design, will opt for classic marble fireplace surrounds or planed wood surrounds with no embellishments. Trending in contemporary décor, says Ragsdale,

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are floating hearths, in which the hearth is raised off the slab at a minimum of 20 inches and juts from the wall. “Floating hearths are typically built with fireplaces that are built into the wall,” she says. “These fireplaces generally do not have a mantel. Nothing is on the wall but the fireplace surround, creating a chic, seamless appearance.” The fireplace is understated and elegant, often enclosed in black mesh screens or glass doors. According to Piper, the contemporary fireplace is taking the front seat in modern décor. The traditional and earthy look of a brick or stone fireplace is being replaced with the smooth look of a Carrara marble surround, for example. The sleek lines of

marble fit easily into classic Scandinavian designs popular in homes today. Outsized Carrara marble subway tiles accented with gray and black veining offer a classic design. Tile can be used with a contemporary look, adds Piper, but only in simple patterns and subtle accents, such as a herringbone pattern. Contemporary fireplaces, which are more linear in design, says Piper, are often built in to the wall, with a rectangular fire opening, without a hearth or mantel. The fire looks as if it’s shimmering within the wall, she adds. Perfect for traditional or farmhouse décor are mantel pieces taken from salvage yards. For example, a rustic beam from an old barn, painted or in natural wood, or even a concrete slab or piece of marble, says Piper, can be a stylish mantel piece when decorated correctly. “Anything goes when designing a fireplace, and that’s what’s fun,” she says. “You can make it your own.” 52

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Health

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Skin Deep Aside from the typical culprits of aging, there is real danger lurking, especially during the winter By Starr Miller

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Our skin is our largest organ, and it requires daily attention to keep it in tiptop shape. We are inundated with messages of caring for the skin on our face, but dermatologists and skin care professionals agree: All skin is worthy of added protection, especially during the most drying months of the year. Dr. Kenneth Crawford, a dermatologist with Forefront Dermatology in Greenwood, says that staying hydrated — even during these months when general water consumption lessens — is the key to optimum skin health. “Keeping your body hydrated, combined with eating a healthy diet, enables your skin to hold on to and produce the natural oils and lubricants that it needs to operate well.” Sandra Thompson, aesthetician and owner of Thompson Esthetics, concurs. “Drinking enough water is definitely the first step to battle dry winter skin from inside your body, and you can aid that process from the outside by using a good humidifier on your home’s heating source. The heat inside our homes robs the air of moisture and can dehydrate your skin


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Health

even worse,” she said. “Most newer home heating systems offer a humidifier feature, and it is an excellent tool to use that can benefit your entire family. If that’s not an option for you, placing just basic home humidifiers in rooms where people sleep or spend most of their time can help tremendously.” In addition to hydrating from inside and outside the body, both Crawford and Thompson say one thing is a major culprit in dry, itchy winter skin, and it’s something most of us do daily without much thought: bathing. “While it is important to maintain good personal hygiene in the winter, some people confuse that with showering or bathing too often and in water that is too hot,” Crawford said. In winter months, people tend to take hotter and longer showers, but the prolonged exposure can strip natural oils from the skin, causing unnecessary damage. That’s because our skin is covered by sebum, which is the natural oil product of sebaceous glands and the component that

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helps prevent skin dehydration. But when the fatty oils are stripped away, the skin loses its protection and ultimately, it’s overall moisture. Crawford says that during the winter, showers or baths should be kept to lukewarm water, because hot water aggravates the skin and is an open opportunity for increased irritation.

The best temperature test for bathing water is not feeling any temperature at all, according to Thompson. “I tell my clients that if you can’t really feel whether the water is hot or cold, then it’s perfect,” she says. “Using extremely hot water is more damaging to your skin in the winter, when it’s in a constant battle to stay hydrated already. The weather outside is more harsh in the winter, the air inside your home or workplace is heated and robbed of moisture, and then to clean the skin in the shower or even just washing your face with extremely hot water is so detrimental to good skin health.” Frequency and temperature are not the only things to consider for your winter skin protection plan: cleansers, soaps and lotions are also seasonal. Avoid overly abrasive or harsh cleansers and opt for soaps that are alcohol-free. Moisturizers should transition from lighter lotions of the summer to more heavy, cream-based emollients, which keep the skin supple by providing a protective


Choose the lifestyle where your satisfaction is... film and reducing water loss from the epidermis, the most outer layer of the skin. Hydrating your skin immediately after showering is key. “I recommend patting skin dry, and that’s also the best time to put on a layer of moisture,” Crawford says. “You are literally locking in the moisture immediately after showering, which is the ultimate goal and good overall skin protection.” If preventive and proactive measures don’t meet all of your skin’s needs, Crawford says, you should know the signs that indicate you need a visit with your dermatologist. “If you are starting to get a breakdown of the skin, if you are seeing cracks or the skin itself is breaking down, you most likely need a more aggressive therapy, like a topical steroid ointment. Some “While it is patients see important to flares of eczema maintain good or psoriasis that personal hygiene worsen in the in the winter, winter months, some people confuse that with and a dermatolshowering or ogist can offer bathing too often treatments for and in water that these kinds of is too hot.” problems.” — Dr. Kenneth We all have Crawford our unique skin types. Whether skin is oily or dry or a combination of the two, one key protective step is known by three important letters: SPF. The sun protection factor is the first line of defense against all outside elements. It is one that Crawford and Thompson say can simply not be avoided, even in the winter. “Most people don’t think too much about sun protection in the winter, plain and simple,” Thompson says. “The cosmetic products that women are more likely to use typically have some sort of SPF included in them. But men should be just as aware of protecting their skin during the winter months. The sun is always in the sky, so there is always a need for SPF.”

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Profile

Travelin’ Man Mike Neal endeavors to make his mark on Johnson County By Jon Shoulders

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Photo by Rob Goebel


Since relocating to Greenwood in December 2014, the daily life of Crown Point native Mike Neal has been somewhat of a whirlwind. It was during that month that he was tapped to assume the position of external operations director for Gov. Mike Pence, for which he travels to counties throughout the state regularly, and for the past year he has also taken on the presidency of the Johnson County Convention, Visitors and Commission Board. With additional roles as national committeeman for the Indiana Federation of Young Republicans and precinct committeeman for the Johnson County Republican Party, Neal, now 29, has very little downtime these days, but he wouldn’t have it any other way.

»

How did your early life and educational experiences shape the way your professional career has evolved?

I was raised in what Hoosiers lovingly call the Region, which is generally Lake, Porter and LaPorte counties in the northwest corner of our state. I graduated from Valparaiso High School and later attained a business administration degree from American InterContinental University. Through high school, I was involved in student council and did a lot of student aiding for the school’s administration, resource officer and the head of our debate team. That, along with some great teachers and administrators, really helped me focus on what I felt I was good at and what I wanted to do long term, which was management, problem solving, etc. Have you always had an interest in government and the public sector?

From an early age, I was very much attracted to politics and government. In 2000, at the age of 13, I volunteered for my first campaign for my pastor, who ran for state representative. Since then, I have had a fascination with public service. Even while holding other jobs outside of my current government position, I always stayed involved in my community by connecting with local leaders and elected officials to be a part of serving our community. In 2014, I was elected and sworn in to the St. John Township Advisory Board, which

served some 70,000 constituents. However, shortly after being elected, I was offered a position in the Pence administration and moved to Greenwood to serve Hoosiers and the governor. Walk us through your role as external operations director for the governor.

The team that I have the privilege of leading, the governor’s external operations team, is the logistical, event and travel side of the governor’s office. Any time the governor is invited to an event such as a chamber lunch, a tour of a factory or a business, a ribbon cutting, a veterans event, etc., my team works with the schedulers to see if we can make it happen. Once we determine that we are able to accept their invitation, our team works out the logistics and gathers information about the events planned for that day. With the information in hand prior to the event, we arrive at the venue before the governor’s arrival to verify the agenda, where the governor is heading once he arrives and who he will be meeting when he arrives, help executive protection make sure everything is secure during the governor’s stay and evaluate optics. Once the governor arrives, it is our job to give the governor a final briefing and then to keep him moving from point to point at the event venue so that he can get to his next event or meeting on schedule. Being with the governor at events makes us the first point of contact when dealing with constituent

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Profile

Michael Neal briefs Vice Presidentelect Mike Pence before an event at the Statehouse on Dec. 2.

issues that they may bring to the governor during his visit. We work with the constituent to help get them the help or answers they seek by connecting them with the proper agency or policy liaison. We typically see it through until an answer is received. This is the best part of my job, because we help connect Hoosiers to their government and make it work for them. Neal is sworn in as president of the Johnson County Convention, Visitors and Tourism Commission.

What is happening with the Johnson County Convention, Visitors and Tourism Commission?

In 2016, I was appointed by Greenwood Mayor Mark Myers to be one of the city’s three representatives of the newly formed Johnson County Convention, Visitors and Tourism Commission, which takes the local innkeeper tax and invests that money in increasing awareness of convention, visitor and tourism access in Johnson County. From the Greenwood

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Park Mall to Franklin College, from apple orchards to wineries, Johnson County has a lot to offer, and there is tremendous economic benefit to showcasing what we have and to also attracting visitors to our hotels, restaurants and stores while in the Indy metro area. I was elected president of the nine-member commission at our January meeting, and it is my role to shepherd our team through the process of making this organization successful. Since January, we have been working diligently to study different types of convention, visitors and tourism organizations across the state of Indiana. We have had several counties make presentations of how their organizations work, several experts in the destination marketing field come and give us advice on how to build, and leaders in our local community share their insights on how to move forward. We recently had our 2017 budget approved by the Johnson County Council so that we can begin the process of marketing our county to the outside world. What do you find most appealing about the south side of Indy?

The south side gives you easy access to the city and airport without feeling like you are right in the city. My commute from my home to the statehouse is typically 25 minutes and about 20 minutes to the airport. The south side also has a lot of parks, restaurants and shopping centers so you don’t have to go to the city, yet


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the city is right there for sporting events, restaurants, shopping and other events. Johnson County has really started to catch its own identity and build up in terms of restaurants, shopping, hotels, smaller convention space and things like that.

©2016 MKJ Marketing

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We want to plan ahead. where But whereBut do we start? do

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What are some hobbies and pursuits you gravitate toward during your downtime?

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I really enjoy spending time with friends. Whether it’s for a meal, a game night or just sitting around and enjoying each other’s company, I like spending time with others. I’m also big into board games and card games. From Monopoly to a friendly game of poker, or even playing some of the more obscure games such as The Settlers of Catan, I’m always up for a relaxing game night. I really enjoy trail riding with all-terrain vehicles and boating at lakes across the state. Medaryville is always a lot of fun. I enjoy traveling, but since a lot of my day job involves travel, I don’t do much traveling outside of that in this stage of my life.

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What might you be doing professionally if you weren’t on your current career path?

I’ve always gone back and forth on this. I’ve always had a desire to be in management positions, but would love to have a job in the future with a travel component across the country and the world — in short bursts, of course. However, I’m a proud Hoosier who loves living in Indiana, and I don’t see Anchorman myself moving from this great state.

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Profile

Figure of Speech

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Roger Cook’s passion for history and oratory has inspired a unique career path By Jon Shoulders

Photography by Josh Marshall

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D Profile

uring his high school years Roger Cook, 72, received a friendly suggestion from a teacher that set him on a path he is still exploring today. While Cook was a student at Southport High School in Indianapolis, the coach of the debate team saw potential in him and told him it might be worth his while to join the squad. “It changed my life, because for one thing it taught me how to research, and it taught me the value of rhetoric and clear expression of ideas,” Cook recalls. “I think it inspired me to eventually study speech in college and start my educational video company much later on.” Cook flourished on Southport’s debate team, earning a debate scholarship to Butler University and eventually transferring to Indiana University, where he earned a master’s degree in speech com-

“I was lecturing my class on famous speakers from the past and I mentioned Franklin Roosevelt and John Kennedy, and in both cases I got these vacant looks from students like they didn’t know who I was talking about. They had no idea.” — Roger Cook

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munication. He taught history at Franklin Central and Warren Central high schools through the 1970s. “I also taught debate and directed plays. Back then if you had taken a three-hour course on a subject you could teach it, so in those days you did everything,” Cook says. “But as time went on I got more and more interested in history.” His interests in speech communication and history would eventually converge in 1985 when he founded Educational Video Group, a company that offers DVDs and on-demand videos on subjects such as speech and business communication, women’s studies, political studies and a series of historical speech compilations. The original spark of inspiration for the business again found Cook in a classroom setting — this time as a professor of history and speech at Indiana Central University (now the University of Indianapolis). “I was lecturing my class on famous speakers from the past and I mentioned Franklin Roosevelt and John Kennedy, and in both cases I got these vacant looks from students like they didn’t know who I was talking about. They had no idea,” Cook says. “I realized what a shame that was and realized how much it would help if they could actually see their speeches.” Cook promptly bought the rights to five speeches, including John F. Kennedy’s inaugural presidential address and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, D.C., and compiled them onto one video, calling the finished product “Great Speeches Volume 1.” “That was the start of the company, and schools all over the country wanted it,” he says. “We didn’t even know if there would be a Volume 2, but we recently finished Volume 29, and we’re


now over 30 years into the business since we started back then in 1985.” The “Great Speeches” series remains EVG’s flagship product, and schools and libraries in countries all over the world, including Japan, Saudi Arabia, France and England, stock materials from the company. Cook and his wife, Susan, also an Indiana University graduate, operate the business out of their Greenwood home with the help of their son, Kevin, 40. The earliest footage Cook has been able to acquire? Calvin Coolidge’s presidential nomination acceptance speech from 1925. “Footage actually goes back quite a ways into the 1880s and 1890s, but film dissolves and deteriorates over time, which is another reason why I think what we’re doing with preserving these speeches is important.”

Harold Rogers, a lifelong southsider and Greenwood resident who has served as program editor and video technician for EVG since 1995, recalls when Cook helped prevent film footage stored at the National Archives and Records Administration

Kevin, Roger and Susan Cook

from being lost forever. “He was trying to locate some footage of Franklin Roosevelt, and when he reached out to the National Archives they went to their vaults to pull it and found that a lot of their film was actually degrading, which of course happens to celluloid film over time,” Rogers says. “By his inquiry, they managed to save a lot of historic footage. That’s an important contribution that will go completely unrecognized.” Cook’s interest in American and world history recently fueled a desire to investigate his family’s past, which in turn led to his first novel, “The Other Side of the Window.” Based on true events he was able to compile about the relationship between his grandfather, a cook during World War I, and grandmother, a Beech Grove native who became a nurse as well as an associate of U.S. Army Gen. John J. Pershing, the book was published in June through Alistair Press, a division of EVG.

“I think today everything is focused on just communicating a simple message, whereas with those great orators of the past, it’s hard not to be moved by what they’re saying.” — Roger Cook

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Profile

Having found his novel-writing stride in recent years, Cook has two novels yet to be published, one of which was featured in the four-part documentary “Hoosiers: The Story of Indiana,” which was released this year by WFYI Public Media and examines the state’s 200-year history. The novel is based on another true story of love and loss, this time set during the War of 1812 — a period that saw the birth of Indiana’s statehood. “When we became a state in 1816, most of central and northern Indiana didn’t exist. It was just wild lands,” Cook says. “There were no cities or anything, and the first capital was in Corydon. It wasn’t until much later that they moved it to Indianapolis. It’s also interesting knowing the person who designed Indianapolis, (Alexander) Ralston, helped design Wash-

Susan Cook

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ington, D.C. If you look at the layouts, it’s all circles with spokes going out.” Rogers stresses the importance of studying historical speeches and language generally, particularly with the rise of social media and what he sees as a declining focus on grammar and composition. ”We’re in the age of sound bites and 140 characters on Twitter,” he says. “I think today everything is focused on just communicating a simple message, whereas with those great orators of the past, it’s hard not to be moved by what they’re saying. So we’ve filled a niche out there that was really necessary.” Cook looks back on his company’s history with pride as his own historical studies march on. “I got a letter from a professor several years ago who had watched Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech with his class, and he said he had forgotten why he got into his field and then watched that speech and remembered how important public address is. Anything I’ve done that would forward our understanding of history so people could see, so these figures aren’t just names in a book, is valuable. It brings them to life.” For more information on Educational Video Group Inc. visit evgonline.com.

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Indiana Made

A Sweet Spot

Hoosier confectioners create mouthwatering treats for the holidays By cj woodring

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Photos submitted


Any time is a good time to indulge in a concoction that, most often, melts in our mouths. But the absolute best time is throughout the holidays, when sugarplums dance in our heads. Fortunately for Hoosiers, Indiana is home to storied confectioneries, where generations of artisans have created holiday goodies using original family recipes.

Olympian Candies 625 E. Main St., Richmond (765) 962-4989 Website olympiancandies.com Hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays through Easter Founded 1909 Founder James Chagares Owners Kim Mitchell Employees 2 Sweet specialty Homemade English toffee Address Phone

Owner Kim Mitchell has been making candy for 35 years, 18 at home and 17 at the store, which she bought in 1999 from founder James Chagares’ grandson. Known for her cooking and baking, the Hagerstown resident took candy-making classes at Country Kitchen in Fort Wayne, initially just offering goodies to relatives and friends. quick bite With the exception of English tofOlympian Candies is fee, for which she formulated her own located in the only building recipe, Mitchell uses the original recipes on the block that survived an April 1968 of Chagares, who first opened the store double explosion in New Castle, relocating to Richmond in downtown Richmond. a year later. Greek cream chocolates are still hand-dipped and handcrafted, using 100 percent pure Guittard chocolate, butter, whole milk and sugar; sugar-free options also are available. Customers like her toffee, Mitchell says, because of the wonderful buttery-almond combination. (In addition, they tell her, it doesn’t stick to your teeth.) Other holiday favorites include soft butter caramels, white chocolate Santas and reindeer that Mitchell colors and decorates, and various novelties that can be used as stocking stuffers. And, of course, there are Dittles, the Richmond confectioner’s version of turtles.

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Indiana Made

McCord Candies

536 Main St., Lafayette Phone (765) 742-4441 Website mccordcandies.com Hours 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; noon to 4 p.m. Sundays Founded 1912 Founder Lee Glatz Owners Michael Becker Employees 7 Sweet specialty Hand-crafted candy cane Address

G.A. Schimpff’s Confectionery Address 347

Spring St., Jeffersonville Phone (812) 283-8367 Website schimpffs.com Hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays quick bite Founded 1891 Founder Gus Schimpff Jill Schimpff once overheard Sr., Gus Schimpff Jr. a little girl at the soda fountain tell her friend she Owners Warren and Jill never bought anything there Wagner Schimpff because they used “sewer water.” She showed the Employees 18 youngster a bottle of soda water and cleared up the Sweet specialty Cinnamon red misunderstanding. hots, hard-to-find candy fish

Schimpff’s Confectionery is celebrating its 125th anniversary in historic downtown Jeffersonville this year. In the same location. The company’s history extends back to the 1850s, says Jill Schimpff. Schimpff and her husband, Warren, have been owners since 1990; Warren’s great-grandfather and grandfather were founders. Schimpff’s signature candies are cinnamon red hots — “mildly spicy,” Jill says — along with 20 flavors of candy fish, a holiday favorite, and Modjeskas,

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caramel-covered marshmallows. Holiday standards include ribbon candy, candy canes and toy candy: clear, hard candy that looks like glass, molded into various shapes. Schimpff’s also features a candy museum, a repository of advertising, containers, equipment and vending machines that chronicles America’s candy industry from the 1800s through the 1940s. Tours include a 20-minute demonstration of candy making, using century-old, original equipment.

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quick bite They once made a 6-foot candy cane that filled the entire showcase.

Michael Becker has been owner of the downtown Lafayette landmark since 2005, retaining most of the original flavor — literally and figuratively — established in 1912 when Lee Glatz opened his namesake candy store and continuing throughout the McCord family’s ownership. McCord’s offers a wealth of chocolate confections — including Snappers, oversized chocolate-covered pecan and caramel turtles — and a wide selection of hard candies. Seasonal offerings change annually, manager Kirsten Pogue says, but most often include ribbon candy or other “nostalgic” holiday candies. Pogue says that due to space constrictions, about 40 percent of the shop’s candy is made in third-floor kitchens; the balance is sourced from regional suppliers. The Saturday after Thanksgiving, staff begins mixing the signature handcrafted candy canes in Glatz’s original copper pots, selling an average of 1,500 canes daily. Last year, Pogue says, they sold nearly 40,000 during the holidays. More than just a candy store, McCord’s also features an old-fashioned soda fountain, where customers can opt for vanilla Cokes, root beer floats and made-from-scratch luncheon fare. Call or visit the website for 2016 candy cane tours. Then just look for the red-and-white striped awning.


Good’s Candy Shop Address 1423

W. 53rd St., Anderson (765) 642-7247; (866) 375-0309 Website goodscandyshop.com Hours 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; 1 to 9 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays Founded 1940 Founder Dehlia Lowery Owners Randy Good Employees 30 Sweet specialty Milk chocolate-covered toffee Phone

It’s a sweet trip to Good’s, central Indiana’s largest purveyor of candy. The family-owned company, founded by Randy Good’s great-aunt Dehlia in her Kennard basement, was moved to Anderson in 1981. Along the way, company ownership passed to his grandmother and parents, from whom he bought it in 1992. With the 2003 addition of Good’s son, Jason, a fifth-generation of candy makers is in place, with a sixth in training.

Milk chocolate-covered taffy remains a customer favorite. The original recipe — “pure butter, sugar and a lot of hard work” — hasn’t been altered a bit, Randy Good says. Assorted chocolates, in gift boxes presenting from one to 120 pieces, remain the top Christmas seller. “The variety ... milk and dark chocolate, fudge, caramels ... covers every single desire that anyone might have and comes gift wrapped and ready to give,” he says.

quick bite During World War II, the founder made Easter egg molds from coconuts cut in half and lined with waxed paper. They were the family’s first chocolate molds.

Good’s also offers caramel corn, pretzels, chocolate-covered cookies, truffles, fudge and more. Gift boxes, baskets and containers are available in a range of sizes and price points. Tempt your hidden sweet tooth with homemade ice cream concoctions, gourmet jelly beans, candy and ... well, you get the idea. Then tour the facility, built in 2003.

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Indiana Made

Martinsville Candy Kitchen Address 46

Candy Kitchen sells fudge, old-fashioned chocolate stars, English N. Main St., Martinsville toffees, caramel apples, chocolate eggs, pies and much more Phone (765) 342-6390 throughout the year. But at Christmas, it’s all about handmade Hours 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through candy canes: 28,400 flew out the door in 2015, John Badger says. Thursdays; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays; Customers also look forward to fruitcake, made from an old 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; family recipe by his mother, Agnes Badger. Although the Badgers have full-time day jobs, they 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays bought the company in 2004 as the sixth owners. Founded 1919 “Basically, what we bought was the name and Founder Jimmy Zapapas quick bite recipes,” John says. Owners John W. Badger XIV and Three years later they bought and renovatJohn Wooden, legendary UCLA Pam Badger basketball coach born near ed a historic building a few doors from their Martinsville, loved the Candy Employees 6 previous courthouse square location, saving it Kitchen’s dark orange jelly. from the wrecking ball. It’s the perfect setting Sweet specialty Signature Wooden’s physician ordered boxes to be sent to him as for a century-old gas stove, marble slab, cophandcrafted candy canes birthday and Christmas gifts, and friends took some along when visiting his California home.

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per kettles and candy-making tools. A candy store, replete with display cases and jars of goodies, a soda shop and ice cream parlor are incorporated in the building; visitors can watch candy canes being made daily.


Olympia Candy Kitchen Address 136

N. Main St., Goshen Phone (574) 533-5040 Website olympiacandykitchen.com Hours 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays; 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays; 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sundays Founded 1912 Founder Nick Paflas Owners Kathy and Kare Andersen Employees 15 Sweet specialty Handmade turtles; candy canes in four flavors Nick Paflas began making hand-dipped chocolates in 1912 while running the soda fountain at Olympia Candy Kitchen. He and his wife bought the enterprise in 1920 and added a diner. Still operating from its original location in downtown Goshen, the candy store/diner is a fourth-generation, family-owned and operated business, says Kare Andersen, whose mother, Kathy, now owns it. Kare Andersen says the shop’s overall best-sellers, especially during Christmas holidays, are turtles. “In December, we make 2,000 a day, all by hand, and a lot of companies buy them as corporate gifts.” Other holiday specialties include peppermint, cinnamon, wintergreen and clove candy canes made on site from scratch; peppermint and cinnamon ribbon candy; solid chocolate Santas and Christmas trees; chocolate creams and chocolate-covered almonds and cashews. A tin ceiling, wooden booths, vintage candy cases and an old-fashioned soda fountain — all original quick bite — make any Olympia Candy Kitchen visit to this lois the oldest restaurant cal landmark a in Elkhart County nostalgic blast — by 50 years. from the past.

Christmas Tree Safety Tips • Choose a Christmas tree with fresh, green needles. • If you have an artificial tree, make sure that it is labeled as fire-retardant. • Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from heat sources such as fireplaces or radiators. • Only use lights that are labeled with the certification of an independent testing laboratory. • Always turn off Christmas lights before leaving home or going to bed. Tips from the National Fire Protection Association. For more Christmas tree safety tips, visit www.nfpa.org/education.

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g n i r a be ’Tis the season — not just for carols, coats, candy canes and company, but for seeking out unique gifts that will put smiles on the faces of friends and loved ones. Break out your gift list and explore the following southside boutiques and specialty establishments. By Jon Shoulders

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Photo by haley neale / Model: Karina Reske; Location: Wild Geese Bookshop

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ow Monkey ll a m h s r a M The

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Antiques

Curly Willow Antiques and Treasures 498 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 346-0033 With a focus on 19th century primitive items, including home furnishings, lighting, glassware, prints, candles and even pharmaceutical and medical objects, the owners at Curly Willow offer unique gift ideas with plenty of history. Chalk paint classes are also available. Call or visit the store for details. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Exit 76 Antique Mall 12595 N. Executive Drive, Edinburgh (812) 526-7676, exit76antiques.com If shoppers can’t find any gift ideas at Exit 76 Antique Mall, it’s certainly not due to a lack of options. More than 600 booths spread across 72,000 square feet are replete with crafts, books, furniture, toys, collectibles and more, so wear comfortable shoes and make sure you’ve blocked off plenty of browsing time. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Manor House Antique Mall 8039 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis (317) 888-8887, manorhouseantiques.com Get lost in Manor House examining vintage furniture, antique lamps, rare vinyl records, oil paintings, collectible glassware specimens and more. Open daily 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Salvage Sisters’ Antique Market 398 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 736-4353 A far cry from your typical antique mall, Salvage Sisters’ Antique Market houses an ever-growing, eclectic variety of industrial, repurposed and shabby-chic items. Scour the shelves for vintage holiday decoration possibilities. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sundays noon to 4 p.m.

Southport Antique Mall

2028 E. Southport Road, Indianapolis (317) 786-8246, southportantiquemall.net Antiques are only the beginning here. You also will find electronics, clothing, pop culture trinkets and other oddities

among the 200-plus dealer booths. Visit the official website and click the Wishlist tab on the home page for a space to submit descriptions of desired items, and a staff member will contact you if they track down what you need. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m.

Thanks for the Thyme 396 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 736-9866 Unpredictability is probably a useful word in describing the browsing experience at this converted house on Jefferson Street. The staff actively seeks handmade, one-of-a-kind vintage and antique furniture, paintings, advertisements, figurines, dishes and much more. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m.

Vic’s Antiques and Uniques 11490 N. U.S. 31, Edinburgh   (812) 526-2000, vicsantiquesanduniques.com Expect the unexpected at Vic’s, which houses antique and repurposed items through the midcentury era. Vintage musical instruments, furniture, decorations and games are all part of the diverse inventory, and you will likely spot a retro car or motorbike parked out front for sale. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Vintage Whimsy 462 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 736-9446 The name says it all. Booths of offbeat vintage, retro and antique treasures, including jewelry, glassware, garden relics and painted furniture, await your perusing pleasure. Painting workshops are also offered, and the staff regularly stocks furniture paint and finishing products. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays noon to 4 p.m.

Architectural Salvage

Madison Street Salvage 350 E. Madison St., Franklin (317) 736-6823, fhisalvage.org   The proprietors of Madison Street

Salvage (formerly Franklin Heritage Architectural Salvage) promote the preservation of historic local buildings and operate as a nonprofit salvage shop in the process, with a warehouse packed with reclaimed wood, fixtures, lighting, furniture, shelving and more. The staff also hosts a workshop series featuring restoration tips. Open Fridays and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Children’s Accessories

Toodleydoo Toys 1 W. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 346-7529, toodleydootoys.com Specializing in items not found in many big-box stores, the owners at Toodleydoo Toys describe themselves as toy experts eager to guide shoppers to the perfect toy, game, book or baby gift. The staff offers play classes and storytelling time, as well as party planning and hosting on-site. Call for information on upcoming events, including dates and times. Open Mondays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Clothing and Accessories

Anna’s Style Boutique 108 W. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 739-3111, annasstyleboutique.com The shelves and racks at Anna’s, filled with women’s, children’s and toddlers’ clothing, shoes and accessories, are constantly updated to reflect current fashion trends. Visit the website to shop online and sign up for emails with updates on new arrivals. Open Mondays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays noon to 4 p.m.

Brianne’s Boutique 49 N. State Road 135, Greenwood (317) 888-8995, briannesboutique.com Search Brianne’s selection of women’s clothing, handmade jewelry, handbags and accessories to find that perfect gift for a relative, friend or significant other. Children’s and young adult clothing and backpacks are also available. Open Mondays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. SOU T H

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re Boutique Dottie Coutu

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Brick Street Boutique 34 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 739-0525, brickstreetboutique.com Self-described as a contemporary women’s clothing and accessory boutique, Brick Street adds new items every week, including sunglasses, hair accessories, handbags, beach bags, hats and jewelry, in addition to hand-picked wardrobe pieces. Open Mondays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sundays noon to 4 p.m.

Dottie Couture Boutique 789 N. U.S. 31, Suite E, Greenwood (317) 888-8242, dottiecouture.com Trendy, fashion-forward dresses, tops, bottoms, footwear and accessories for females of all ages are available at Dottie Couture’s Greenwood store, and the official website features a fashion blog and an online store updated daily. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sundays noon to 4 p.m.

JenDaisy Boutique 1279 N. Emerson Ave., Suite H, Greenwood (317) 889-1150, jendaisy.com Cross multiple friends and family members off your shopping list with one stop at JenDaisy. The store stocks a mix of trendy fashion styles for women of all ages and all sizes. Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sundays 1 to 5 p.m.

RaeLynn’s Boutique 455 S. Greenwood Park Drive, Suite E, Greenwood (317) 889-7766, raelynns.com RaeLynn’s stocks prom dresses, pageant items and complete outfits for social occasions, as well as everyday women’s wear. Visit the website for an online store and a blog with beauty tips, trend alerts and more. Open Mondays through Fridays 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m.

T-Shirt Express 165 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 736-6461, companycasuals. com/t-shirtexpress A full-service screen-printing, embroidery and all-ages clothing retail shop in downtown Franklin. Visit SOU T H

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the website for an online catalog of clothing, sports apparel, occupational wear, bags and accessories. Open Mondays through Fridays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon

Gift Stores

Sarah’s Hallmark

D Ray Decor

Greendale Centre 745 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood (317) 888-8408, sarahshallmarkshop.com Catch up on your gift shopping for friends and family and stock up on home decorations while you’re at it. Sarah’s has collectibles, figurines, ornaments, kids’ gifts, greeting cards and more. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m.

Teresa’s Hallmark 49 N. State Road 135, Greenwood (317) 888-1206, teresashallmark.com

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A locally owned establishment carrying specialty items, including jewelry, home and garden enhancements, dishes and serving sets, clothing and an extensive assortment of figurines and collectibles. Gift-wrapping services are available on-site. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Wild Geese Bookshop 107 S. Water St., Franklin (317) 494-6545 Recently opened, the 400-square-foot Wild Geese Bookshop in Franklin offers young adult, memoir, fiction, cooking titles and more, plus an array of writing accessories, like journals, stationery and calendars. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Come Back New Whether you want to sail to the Caribbean, Alaska, Europe, Coastal Getaways, or beyond, you’ll discover more with Princess Cruises. We bring the colors, cultures and flavors of the regions you visit on board for a more enriching experience. Plus there’s world-class cuisine, live entertainment, casino gaming and more. You’ll see the world in a whole new way. Call AAA today to book your Princess Cruises vacation!

Handicrafts and Hobbyists

The Back Door 2503 Fairview Place, Suite W, Greenwood (317) 882-2120, backdoorquilts.com If it’s quilt-related, you’ll likely find it here. The owners carry a large array of quilt fabrics as well as samples, books and patterns. Classes and custom quilting services are available; contact the store directly. Open Mondays through Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Open every first and third Sunday 1 to 4 p.m.  

AAA Vacations® Exclusive Amenities* • Up to $100 per stateroom Onboard Spending Credit • Exclusive Wine Tasting with Sommelier • Priority Check-In on Day of Embarkation • AAA Best Price Guarantee** and 24/7 Member Care

AAA Greenwood 1309 E. Stop 11 Road (317) 882-1533 *Valid on select Princess departures for 1st and 2nd passengers only. Offer is not transferrable. AAA booking agent is to confirm the associated group code is tied to their booking (TAA or TAC). Bookings made outside of the AAA Vacations® program that do not include assigned group code will not be eligible for the exclusive AAA Vacations® program features and benefits. Onboard Credits are per stateroom for the first and second guests and are shown in US dollars. All categories are eligible for the onboard credit which has no cash value. May be used on a single voyage only; expires at the end of that voyage and is not redeemable for cash. Wine tasting experience has no cash value and may not be substituted, transferred, exchanged or credited towards other purchases. Preferred Check-in does not grant priority boarding. This promotional piece was created and distributed by an independent travel agency, not by Princess. **If you make a booking with us for a qualifying AAA Vacations® cruise vacation, and you find a valid better rate for the exact itinerary within 24 hours of your booking, AAA Vacations® will match the lower rate and send you a $50 AAA Vacations® future travel credit certificate. Certain restrictions apply. For complete terms and conditions for the AAA Vacations® Best Price Guarantee and AAA Vacations® 24/7 Member Care, visit AAA.com/AAAVacations. ©2015 Princess Cruises, Ltd, Ships of Bermudan and British registry.

Simplify

44 N. Jackson St., Franklin (317) 346-0320, shopsimplify.com Take a breather from the big-box experience in favor of the Simplify concept — a cooperative of local artists offering handcrafted goods. Chalktype paint and painting workshops are also offered. Visit the Simplify website for artist information and instructional videos. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Home Goods and Décor

Gallery 31 1908 Northwood Plaza, Franklin (317) 346-0558, gallery31llc.com Browse gently used bedroom, dining room and living room furniture as SOU T H

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well as one-of-a-kind works of art, lithographs, antique collectibles and more at Gallery 31. Live auctions featuring individual items and estate collections are also offered; call for dates and times. Open every day 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Wednesdays.

The Rugged Roost 383 E. Madison St., Franklin (317) 868-8121 All manner of unique home décor — vintage, antique, restored and repurposed — as well as holiday decorations, seasonal accessory pieces and framed prints can be spotted throughout The Rugged Roost’s array of vendor booths. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sundays noon to 4 p.m.

untry Store Take Root Co

Take Root Country Store 202 N. Madison Ave. No. 1, Greenwood (317) 882-0497 Specializing in country and farmhouse décor, Take Root carries braided rugs,

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NEW SERVICE TIMES STARTING JANUARY 7/8 (ASL Interpretation available) Bibleopolis children’s classes provided for nursery-4th grade

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curtains, lighting, shelving, decorative prints and more. Decorating classes are offered periodically; call or visit the store for dates, times and pricing. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m.

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The Marshmallow Monkey 41 W. Monroe St., Franklin (317) 494-6020, themarshmallowmonkey.com Variety is the spice of life at the ever-stylish Marshmallow Monkey, where home décor products, flower and garden items, lighting and re-styled furniture, as well as baby gifts, bags, purses, scarves and jewelry are offered. Event, floral and wedding design services are also available. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Interior Design

D Ray Decor 1799 Michele Lane, Greenwood (317) 300-1000, draydecorhome.com Unique home furnishings and accessories, including painted antique reproductions as well as indoor and outdoor traditional furniture pieces, adorn the showroom at D Ray Decor, a full-service residential and corporate interior design business. Gift certificates and delivery services available. Open Mondays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. SOU T H

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Passion Project Darrell and Betsy DuSold bring new life to their historic home

Written on back of photo: Going away party held at Fisher home for family moving to Los Angeles. Circa 1915.

By Jon Shoulders // Photography by Josh Marshall

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In order to restore and preserve his Franklin-based historic farmhouse, Darrell DuSold has worked diligently for years, even before he owned it. In 2001 a friend of Darrell’s was remodeling the upstairs bathroom for the previous owners of the four-level home in Needham Township and needed assistance. Darrell, an accomplished handyman and recipient of several awards for his work repairing and refurbishing a number of Franklin and downtown Indianapolis buildings, promptly obliged and was immediately struck by the quality evident in the interior construction and design of the home. “The friend of mine that was doing the remodel needed help carrying out the castiron tub, and I got a tour of the house while I was there,” he recalls. “It needed a lot of work at that time, but I could tell it was a nice home.” Two years later Darrell would get the chance to add all the restorative touches he desired when he and his wife, Betsy, became owners of the early1900s house, which features four bedrooms and three-and-a-half bathrooms, and spans 6,000 square feet, including an unfinished basement. For the next year he threw himself wholeheartedly into the task, repairing and painting the exterior by day and bringing the windows back to his previous residence one at a time for rehab work by night. Rather than replacing old fixtures, windows and flooring, Darrell strove 86

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to retain the home’s original materials wherever possible and resurrect its unique personality, which he felt had been somewhat neglected through the years prior to their ownership. Functional, coal-powered fireplaces with decorative motifs, original ceiling light fixtures and custom wood trim all add charm throughout the ground floor. “I worked on all of the windows, and they’re all operable now,” Darrell says. “There’s only one new window, which is the small casement window in the kitchen that we replaced for more wall and counter space. The first and second floor were all covered in limegreen shag carpet, so we uncovered the nice oak flooring downstairs and Douglas fir floors upstairs.” In 2008 the DuSolds chose to tear out the concrete deck that wrapped around half of the home’s exterior and install a railed porch, on which they often sit and enjoy their morning coffee next to Zoe and Porter, both German shepherds. “We like to relax there, and sometimes we’ll sit under the pergola I put onto the milk house out back for shade,” he says, adding that Elmon M. Fisher, the local businessman who first owned the home with his wife, Cora, kept cows on the property for his family’s milk consumption. According to reports archived in the Johnson County Museum of History, the floor plan was inspired by a design Cora spotted in an issue of Ladies’ Home Journal and was built by Elmon’s cousin Ed, a carpenter and barn builder. Upon close inspection of the original wood used for the doors, trim and flooring, a stunning level of craftsmanship and detail becomes apparent. Each room on the ground floor features a distinct wood type, from tigerstripe oak in the living area to mahogany in the front sitting room to ash in the kitchen. According to Darrell, the house


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was designed by one of the state’s most prominent architects who happened to be close friends with L.S. Ayres, founder of the former Indianapolis-based regional department store L.S. Ayres and Co. “You can tell there was a lot of care put into the construction and carpentry,” he says. “The doors even have different woods on each side to match the room they face. The tiger-stripe only comes out of white oak, and only out of one in 300 trees.” Additional renovation measures included the installation of a geothermal air system for the house and a bathroom on the third floor, which once served as a ballroom. Darrell says his children, Adelle, now 24, and David, 21, were “practically raised there, and there were a lot of sleepovers and time spent up there. “It’s a nice space, and apparently people from the town would gather there when it was used as a ballroom and settle up their bets after the horse races that used to be big in Indiana,” he adds. In the spirit of recovering the home’s original charm and functionality, this spring Darrell restored a rainwater collection system in the backyard, which connects all of the gutter downspouts into a 1,000-gallon underground cistern and draws the collected water upward through PVC pipe via a chaincontrolled pump. As a result, the DuSolds have constant rainwater for

their flower and vegetable gardens. Rob Shilts, executive director of Franklin Heritage Inc., was immediately impressed by Darrell’s attention to detail in preserving the building’s character. “They happen to have an old photo of the home, and it shows that with the work he’s done to it, it now looks almost identical,” he says. “All the work he did paid off.” Such extensive repairs and restorations

might seem overwhelming, but Darrell, a Crown Point native, brought many years of expertise to bear. After graduating from Purdue University with a degree in agricultural economics and working in the nursing home industry for years, he invested in several buildings in the historic Herron-Morton Place district of Indianapolis and quickly learned how to apply much-needed rehab to the structures. Several

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A decorator’s note preserved by wallpaper.

The second floor hallway.

Now a lounge area, the third floor was originally a ballroom.

property investments and restoration projects later, the FHI staff took notice and enlisted Darrell to help with their own work on historic building preservation throughout Franklin. Betsy earned a law degree from Indiana University in 1990 and currently works at Eli Lilly and Co., and the couple called Greenwood home for several years before relocating to Needham Township. “We were a getting a little tired of the congestion in Greenwood,” Darrell

recalls. “We like the birds and the quiet out here. There are no traffic jams out this way, unless it’s the occasional combine (harvester) coming down the road.” The DuSolds were given the 2016 FHI Kathleen Van Nuys Historic Farmstead Award for their work on the house, which was featured on the 2016 Franklin Heritage Historic Home Tour. “Darrell quietly spent about eight years working tirelessly on the home,” Shilts says. “There are not a lot

of folks who’ll commit that kind of time and effort for something like that.” Darrell’s enthusiasm for restoration shows no signs of flagging any time soon, and his next project involves assisting the FHI staff with restoring the outdoor marquee at Franklin’s 96-year-old Historic Artcraft Theatre. “I’ve always viewed real estate as an investment, and if you improve it that only helps,” he says. “I’ve always wanted to make it better than I left it.” SOU T H

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historic Holidays

New traditions begin at these time-tested hotels By CJ Woodring

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Photos submitted


H

Holidays are all about traditions: Family gatherings. Cookies browning in the oven. Trees adorned with garlands of remembrance. Carols being sung by a yuletide choir. But even as family units and traditions are being redefined, familiar holiday gatherings are being replaced with new faces in faraway places. Places that include luxurious historic hotels. In order to recognize these stellar throwbacks to the late 19th and early 20th centuries — and to promote tourism — the National Trust for Historic Preservation (savingplaces.org) in 1989 founded Historic Hotels of America as an official program. Nearly 300 hotels in 45 states have “faithfully maintained their authenticity, sense of place and architectural integrity in the United States of America,” according to Historic Hotels of America (historichotels.org). If you’re considering a family or couple’s holiday getaway, bear in mind the following accommodations. Each offers a unique setting, giving more than a nod to the past while bowing to amenities of the present: The Vinoy Renaissance, St. Petersburg, Florida; Hotel del Coronado, Coronado, California; and Mountain View Grand Resort & Spa, Whitefield, New Hampshire.

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Skating by the Sea

Hotel del Coronado Coronado, California

The resort village of Coronado, also known as Coronado Island, has a storied history that began in 1542 under the Spanish flag. Ownership changed hands several times after 1846, culminating in 1885, when businessmen Elisha Babcock Jr. and Hampton Story and their partners purchased the peninsula for $110,000 and, two years later, broke ground for the Hotel del Coronado. Nicknamed “The Crown City,” Coronado is a quaint, laid-back community with sparkling sand beaches consistently voted among the best in the United States. Global visitors enjoy historic mansions, small-town ambience, eclectic restaurants and a range of shopping opportunities. Beach and water activities abound, and include romantic gondola cruises. Downtown San Diego, just five miles away, offers visitors a range of options: cultural attractions, shopping destinations, sports games and a world-class zoo. San Diego’s cuisine scene extends from the historic Gaslamp District to the Little Italy District, just north of downtown, with a plethora of dining options in between. A visit to Coronado and San Diego, any time of year, is a trip to a yearround playground. During the holidays, it’s the plum in plum pudding, offering visitors a treasure trove of memories to be reopened each year.

WHERE TO STAY Hotel del Coronado (1500 Orange Ave.; 619-435-6611; hoteldel.com) has drawn global dignitaries and regional camera crews since the 19th century. Proximity to the beach and downtown San Diego makes it a popular destination for guests of all ages. The Del features three room options: the original hotel, replete with grand staircase and a working turn-of-thecentury elevator; the poolside wing; and luxury Beach Village cottages and villas. Holiday packages include “Beach Village Seaside Skating Memories,” with four passes to The Del’s

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beachfront ice rink and a $50 food and beverage credit.

WHAT TO DO

Holidays at The Del showcase a two-story lobby tree as centerpiece and twinkling white lights that trim the Victorian hotel. The 12th annual Skating by the Sea, a spectacular beachfront ice rink, will be open Nov. 24 through Jan. 2, as The Del celebrates “A Season to Sparkle.” The hotel offers several New Year’s Eve options, ranging from black-tie gala to special restaurant and bar menus. Explore Coronado at your own pace by sailing, surfing, kayaking, biking or golf

carting. Or opt for a 50-minute San Diego Bay cruise through The Gondola Co. LLC (503 Grand Caribe Causeway; 619-429-6317; gondolacompany. com). Orange Avenue offers shopping, galleries, restaurants and a visit to the Coronado Museum of History & Art, located inside the Coronado Visitor Center (1100 Orange Ave.; 866-599-7242; coronadovisitorcenter. com). Also consider Coronado Ferry Landing (1201 First St.; 619-234-4111; coronadoferrylandingshops.com), a dining, shopping and event mecca with ongoing happenings. San Diego means a visit to the world-class San Diego Zoo (2920 Zoo Drive, Balboa Park; 619-231-1515; zoo.sandiegozoo. org). The seaside community of Point Loma features stunning beaches for strolling or scuba diving, with shops and restaurants at Point Loma Marina, San Diego’s newest marina (4980 North Harbor Drive, Suite 201; 619-718-


travel

Mountain View Grand Resort & Spa Whitefield, New Hampshire

6260; pointlomamarina.com). Historic landmarks include the Old Point Loma Lighthouse at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park (Sunset Cliffs Boulevard) and Cabrillo National Monument (1800 Cabrillo Memorial Drive; 619-5575450), each a destination that features much more than artifacts.

WHERE TO EAT

Holidays at The Del mean Santa Brunches, a Christmas Eve Victorian buffet and a Christmas Day buffet dinner. New this year: Polar Bear Tea, a family event with special children’s activities and Mrs. Claus. The hotel’s 1500 Ocean restaurant and Sheerwater bistro pair special menus, offered throughout the holidays, with on-site activities. Coronado bases much of its culinary efforts on fresh seafood. Bluewater Boathouse Seafood Grill (1701 Strand Way; 619-435-0155; bluewatergrill. com) offers some of the best, along with exceptional ambience: They’re located in the Del’s historic former boathouse. Grab a table on the heated deck. Chez Loma (1132 Loma Ave.; 619435-0661; chezloma.com) presents an eclectic menu — at reasonable prices — with selections from shrimp to short ribs and duck breast. Located at Point Loma Marina, Jimmy’s Famous American Tavern (4980 North Harbor Drive, Suite 201; 619-718-6260) is a gastropub serving regional dishes with a twist. Notable among trendy dining experiences, Juniper & Ivy (2228 Kettner Blvd.; 619-269-9036; juniperandivy.com) offers “refined American food with Left Coast edge.”

A New Hampshire holiday getaway is an exhilarating adventure: A winter wonderland of sparkling snow and invigorating outdoor activities, countered by relaxing respites in front of the fireplace or at a local spa. The state motto is “Live Free or Die”; the tourism slogan is simply “Live Free.” Visitors from Boston, New York and Philadelphia first sought freedom from heat and pollution in the White Mountain State following the advent of railroads. Whitefield (population 2,200) translates freedom as open spaces blanketed in emerald green and frosted in white. Located in the state’s Grand North Region, where there’s no fun like snow fun, it is defined by Mount Washington (elevation 6,288 feet) and the Johns River, which runs through the village. Harvest Tavern Whitefield’s proximity to a half-dozen villages makes the Mountain View Grand Resort & Spa the perfect launch point for exploring the region. Along with a range of activities hosted by the hotel, visitors can enjoy natural and manmade regional tourist attractions, trails and tours, shopping, dining, snowmobiling, skiing, sled dog rides and a scenic mountaintop weather station. WHERE TO STAY

The palatial Mountain View Grand Resort & Spa (101 Mountain View Road, Whitefield; 855-837-2100; mountainviewgrand.com), is situated on a stunning, 1,700-acre setting in the White Mountains. The resort’s welcoming, accommodating staff and amenities, including a Health and Wellness Center, indoor and outdoor pools, a golf course, award-winning spa, and a choice of dining venues, add up to an incomparable experience. An activities calendar offers guests a range of options throughout the day, from morning Adult Axe Throwing through a Hotel History Tour, Wine Cellar Tour and evening Parlor Board Games.

WHAT TO DO Drawing on its agricultural roots, the

resort’s Mountain View Farm grows herbs and vegetables for its menu. Guests can Meet the Farmer, enjoy seasonal farm activities and interact with animals. A visit to Santa’s Village (528 Presidential Highway, Jefferson; 603-586-4445; santasvillage.com) includes meeting Mr. and Mrs. Claus, themed food and gift shops and more than a dozen rides beneath half a million Christmas lights. The family-centered New Year’s Eve Partybration event, held 4 to 9 p.m., sells out each year; reserve online. In Littleton (golittleton. com) take a sweet trip to Chutter’s (43 Main St., Littleton; 603-444-5787; chutters.com), a Guinness world-record holder for the “longest candy counter.” Shops and restaurants are popular year-round destinations. Lancaster (lancasternh.org) hosts an Olde SOU T H

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Tyme Christmas and skating behind the courthouse. Book an Overnight EduTrip, which includes round-trip transportation, meals, sightseeing and a night in the Mount Washington Observatory (2779 White Mountain Highway, North Conway; 603-3562137; mountwashington.org) at White Mountain’s summit. Experienced hikers sign up for alpine mountaineering throughout winter by contacting the Appalachian Mountain Club (361 Route 16, Gorham; 603-466-2721; outdoors.org). A two-hour family adventure awaits via Conway Scenic Railroad’s (38 Norcross Circle, North Conway; 603-356-5251; conwayscenic. com) Journey to the North Pole, offered weekends through Dec. 23. Limited availability; bookings only by phone. Finally, travel to Bethlehem (bethlehemwhitemtns.com). Enjoy dining and shopping, outdoor sports and activities and more in the “Star of the White Mountains.”

WHERE TO EAT

Enjoy farm-to-table menus in the resort’s Harvest Tavern, or relax in the quiet intimate setting of the 1865 Wine

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Cellar. The Club House, Veranda and in-room dining are additional options. Thinking breakfast? Think homemade vittles at Grandma’s Kitchen (187 Lancaster Road, Whitefield; 603-8372525). The Inn at Whitefield (381 Lancaster Road, Whitefield; 603-8372400; innatwhitefield) is a restaurant and pub with country charm and warm hospitality. In Littleton, great food means the historic Littleton Diner (145 Main St., Littleton; 603-444-3994; littletondiner.com). Traditional homecooked meals include breakfast, which is served all day. Venture from Santa’s Village and enjoy the hospitality at The Water Wheel Breakfast and Gift House (1955 Presidential Highway, U.S. Route 2, Jefferson; 603-5864313; waterwheelnh.com) for country breakfast at its finest. Locavores have discovered the star of Bethlehem: Cold Mountain Café (2015 Main St., Bethlehem; 603-869-2500; coldmountaincafe.com), a family-owned and community-supported venue with full bar, an exciting menu and works by local artists. Looking for amazing burgers and awesome ambience? Don’t miss McGrath’s Tavern (3465 White

Mountain Highway, North Conway; 603733-5955; mcgrathstavernnh.com), a family-owned Irish pub and restaurant. For classic New England culinary marvels, from handmade pasta to Maine lobster, dine at The White Rose at Stonehurst (3351 White Mountain Highway, North Conway; 603-356-3113; stonehurstmanor.com).

1865 Wine Cellar


travel

Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg, Florida

It’s nicknamed “The Sunshine City,” but St. Petersburg might also be called “Arts Alive” with a nod to the Dali Museum, two dozen galleries and the city’s six arts districts. Located on Florida’s west coast, St. Petersburg is a bustling, worldclass city that respects its past while realizing its future. Situated on a peninsula between Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, it is the secondlargest city in the Tampa Bay area and included in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater metro area. Along with museums and galleries, St. Petersburg offers a range of shopping and dining destinations, parks and several professional sports clubs. City beaches have been cited for their beauty; the iconic St. Petersburg Pier, now closed for reconstruction, is set to reopen in 2018. Historic buildings, many of them enjoying new life through creative adaptive reuse, line downtown corridors enhanced with stunning streetscaping. Nearly all attractions are within walking distance of the Vinoy. You can also take the “Looper” trolley (loopertrolley.com), which, for 50 cents per person, per trip, connects with all the city’s major museums and attractions, including the Vinoy. A visit to St. Petersburg and its historic, luxury hotel holds special magic. And magic is what holidays are all about. WHERE TO STAY A marina, golf course, pool, spa and fitness center are just a few reasons the Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort & Golf Club (501 Fifth Ave. NE, St. Petersburg; 727-894-1000) remains a top destination for global travelers. Centrally located near downtown St. Pete, the architectural masterpiece combines Old World charm with 21st century luxuries and amenities. Consider a Bay View or Tower Balcony room for a special guest experience. Many room packages are available, including the Kids Eat Free in St. Petersburg, Florida, for youngsters up to 12 years.

WHAT TO DO The Vinoy features spectacular holiday decorations and events, which vary from year to year, as well as culinary specials. Nearby downtown St. Petersburg decks the land with holiday lights on Beach Drive and throughout North Straub (400 Bayshore Drive, NE) and South Straub (198 Bayshore Drive NE) parks. Santa Claus and live entertainment will be featured

through Dec. 23. The Mahaffey Theater (400 First St. S; 727-893-7832; themahaffey.com) will present three performances of the Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker, as well as a State Ballet Theater of Russia: Swan Lake presentation. Sundial St. Pete (153 Second Ave. N; 727-8003201; sundialstpete.com), the city’s premier downtown shopping and dining destination, showcases a nearly three-story working sundial, bronze dolphins and stunning architecture. Housing the largest collection of the artist’s work outside Europe, the Salvador Dali Museum (One Dali Blvd.; 727-823-3767; thedali.org) will host Frida Kahlo at the Dali beginning Dec. 17. Century-old Sunken Gardens (1825 Fourth St. N; 727-551-3102), the city’s oldest living museum, is a fouracre botanical paradise showcasing more than 50,000 tropical plants and flowers amidst meandering paths. Fort DeSoto Beach (3500 Pinellas Bayway S, Tierra Verde; 727-5822267), a 900-acre beach located off St. Pete’s southern tip, is composed of five interconnected islands. A coastal habitat harboring more than 300

species of birds, Fort DeSoto offers miles of sugary sands, trails, fishing piers, picnic pavilions with grills and a boat launch with floating docks, making it a popular midwinter destination.

WHERE TO EAT

On-site dining options at the Vinoy include Marchand’s Bar & Grill, Fred’s Cellar, the Veranda Café and Alfresco’s. Enjoy relaxed coastal dining at 400 Beach Seafood & Tap House (400 Beach Drive NE; 727-896-2400; 400beachseafood.com) near the hotel. Great service, great food and a convenient location close to downtown hot spots. The Moon Under Water (332 Beach Drive, North Straub Park; 727-896-6160; themoonunderwater. com), a lively pub, brings Indian and British Colonial cuisine to the region, while Z Grille (104 Second St. S; 727822-9600; zgrille.net) stands out for weekend brunches. Try chicken and waffles: cornflake sage fried chicken. Rococo Steak (655 Second Ave. S; 727-822-0999; rococossteak.com) is not just another steakhouse: Try truffle fries and lobster mac ’n’ cheese or one of more than 650 wine selections. Worth the trip to Tampa: The Refinery (5137 N. Florida Ave., Tampa; 813237-2000; thetamparefinery.com). Owners Greg and Michelle Baker believe good food is a necessity, not a right. Menu prices won’t leave you stranded in the historic Seminole Heights neighborhood, but will buy you a fantastic farm-to-table experience at an award-winning restaurant cited by national publications.

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Connor McCulley & Arin Mollmann Oct. 29, 2016 Ceremony and reception at Ritz Charles in Carmel Connor and Arin met in early 2014 through an online dating website and had their first date in March of that year. Arin says she knew on their first date that “Connor was the one. I went to work the very next day and could not stop smiling.” By December of that year, the pair was dating exclusively, and they adopted their first “child,” a dog named Scooby, shortly thereafter. Connor proposed to Arin in October 2015 in the backyard of her mother’s house in Greenwood. The ceremony was held in the Ritz Charles chapel and the reception inside the facility’s ballrooms. “The wedding was absolutely perfect,” Arin says. “Our wedding was very traditional, but also had a twist to it. I had my brother, Chad, as my Mr. of Honor, and my mom and other older brother, Nic, walked me down the aisle.” The newlyweds honeymooned at Sandals Grande Resort in St. Lucia. Photography by George Street Photo & Video.

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Ross Smith & Taylor Whittier Oct. 15, 2016 Ceremony and reception at Hopewell Presbyterian Church in Franklin Ross and Taylor originally met when they were competing against one another at a high school speech competition in 2010. They casually stayed in touch the next few years, eventually going separate ways to attend college. In early 2014, the two reconnected and met for coffee, and the rest, Taylor says, “was history.” The pair soon started a business together, which quickly became a focus in their relationship. “We started an all-natural produce and meat operation on Ross’ family’s farm, and he is the sixth generation to farm the same piece of land,” Taylor says. “I fell in love with Ross over rows of tomatoes and peppers, on the antique John Deere tractor, and out baling hay.” In June 2016, Ross proposed while out on a long drive in the country. The couple stopped at a lake they’d stopped at before, and Ross took one knee to ask Taylor to be his wife. The two were married on Oct. 15, 2016, in Franklin, before a honeymoon stay in a historic farmhouse in East Burke, Vermont — a perfect ending, Taylor says, “to our perfect wedding.” Photography by Day La Paz Photography

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Dakoda Johnson & Jennifer Flanagan Sept. 3, 2016 Ceremony and reception at The Cardinal Room, Lebanon Dakoda Johnson and Jennifer Flanagan met when they were students at Eastern Michigan University and began dating in May 2013. Three years later on May 28, 2016, Dakoda surprised Jennifer by taking her back to a drive-in movie theater in his Indiana hometown where he’d previously asked her to be his girlfriend on one of their early dates. “We were watching the trailers begin and all of a sudden the final trailer had Dakoda in it,” Jennifer says. “This is where he shared his story of our relationship and proposed. We were in the back of his pickup truck and people surrounded us as he got down on one knee. He had also surprised me by having both of our families there to witness our special moment.” The couple got married at The Cardinal Room in Lebanon and honeymooned in Fiji. Photography by April Wherle

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South magazine’s Ladies Night Out Oct. 6 Hilton Garden Inn 1. Kim Hohlt from Petro’s Culligan of Johnson County and April Stogsdill

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10. Refreshments 11. Hilton Garden Inn banquet room for Ladies Night Out 12. Carolyn Goldenetz from Damsel in Defense 13. Megan Evans and Jessica Baker from Small Cakes a Cupcakery 14. Carrie Molloy and Brandi Wilcoxin from Style Encore

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7. Jennifer Tennell, Kim Minton and Stephanie Wagner 8. Christine Alfrey and Jennifer Mann 9. Joe and Amy Kelsay, (JCCF Board) 10. Lyman Snyder, Stew Yount, Corbie Snyder, and Dee Yount 11. Garnet Vaughan and David Payne 12. Steve and Bonnie Wohlford 13. Joanna Ryan and Jared Boomer 14. Elaine Pesto, Erin Smith (JCCF chairwoman), Joe and Julie Waltermann 15. Gala overview

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Dancing with the Johnson County Stars Sept. 10 // Historic Artcraft Theatre 1. Kate Erickson dancing for Care Net Pregnancy Centers of Central Indiana 2. Betsy DuSold dancing for Human Services 3. Jim Powell dancing for Youth Connections 4. Lydia Wales dancing for KIC-IT 5. Amy Kelsay dancing for Johnson County 4-H 6. Teresa Gotthardt dancing for Johnson County Historical Society 7. Greg Allen dancing for Haven Sanctuary for Women 8. Mike Wood dancing for Johnson County Autism Support Group 108

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Franklin Education Connection Barn Raiser Ball Oct. 29 The Barn at Crystal Spring Farm

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1. Franklin Community School Board member Kristi Ott and Brad Ott 2. Guest speaker and grant recipient Karle Hougland (teacher at Northwood Elementary) 3. Line dancing 4. Dylan Purlee, principal of Needham Elementary, and Katie Smith, principal of Northwood Elementary

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5. Event overview 6. Tony Nally, Deb Brown-Nally, Anne Wilson (FCSC Teacher of the Year) and David Wilson

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Calendar of Events

December, January, February

IMA’s rich permanent collection. Location: Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 N. Michigan Road, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 923-1331 or imamuseum.org

Through Jan. 16 Now in its seventh year, the Eiteljorg Museum’s Jingle Rails is a journey to the Great American West. Location:

Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-WEST or eiteljorg.org.

Through Jan. 21 As the state celebrates its bicentennial,

» Ongoing

Through Dec. 30

Surround yourself with the magic and beauty of the holiday season as the Indianapolis Zoo hosts its annual holiday tradition, Christmas at the Zoo, presented by Donatos and Teachers Credit Union, with an extra weekend of fun added this year. The zoo is open from noon to 9 p.m. Wednesday to Sunday, with event activities starting at 5 p.m. Location: Indianapolis Zoo, 1200 W.

Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 630-2001 or indianapoliszoo.com.

Through Jan. 1

This year’s Celebration Crossing comes alive with holiday merriment from the

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“You Are There 1816: Indiana Joins the Nation” recreates the Corydon meeting house where delegates met to draft Indiana’s first state constitution. Engage with the debate over principles that would guide the birth of America’s 19th state.

Location: Indiana Historical Society, 450 W. Ohio St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1882 or indianahistory.org.

Through Jan. 28 Daddy/Daughter Dance

sounds of bands, bell and vocal choirs, and of course Santa and Mrs. Claus, who will entertain visitors in their cozy home now on Level 1 of the Indiana State Museum through Dec. 24. Location: Indiana State Museum,

650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: indianamuseum.org.

Through Jan. 7

The exhibit “19 Stars of Indiana Art: A Bicentennial Celebration” celebrates the artistic achievements of men and women who were born, raised or worked in Indiana. The state’s 200-year history will be explored in key chapters that demonstrate creative accomplishment in painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking, and decorative, design, and fashion arts drawn from the

Come see 200 unique, interesting and important objects that shaped Indiana during the “Indiana in 200 Objects Bicentennial Exhibition.” As we celebrate the state’s 200th birthday, this is a chance to explore Indiana’s past and present, while being inspired to think about its future.

Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org.

December Dec. 2-18 What begins as another Buck Creek Players production of “A Christmas Carol” soon devolves into a slightly irreverent look at all our favorite beloved holiday classics, including “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Frosty, Rudolph, Charlie Brown and more during “Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some).” Times vary. Tickets: $18 adults; $16

children, students and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern


By Joe Shearer

Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 862-2270 or buckcreekplayers.com.

Dec. 14 The group responsible for bringing a cappella back to modern pop returns home as Straight No Chaser stops by the IU Auditorium as part of its “I’ll Have Another … World Tour.” Originally assembled on the campus of Indiana University, the group has produced a number of mostly holiday-themed chart-topping albums and a variety of hit singles. Their sharp humor and tight vocals have made them a Yuletide favorite. Tickets: $48-$78. Location: IU

Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: iuauditorium.com.

Daily Journal Bridal Show

Dec. 17 Indy is a sports town. We embrace our minor league teams in a major way, as evidenced by the way the city has welcomed its hockey team. The Indy Fuel are back for another season. Check out the Fuel as they take on the Quad City Mallards and see what the fuss is all about. Time:

7:35 p.m. Location: Indiana Farmers Coliseum, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. Cost: $10$44. Information: indyfuelhockey.com.

Dec. 17 Before he loads up his sleigh for Christmas, Santa is making a stop at The Sycamore

at Mallow Run for Pancakes with Santa. Enjoy flapjacks with St. Nick, as well as Christmas crafts and horses. And parents, maybe the best news is that the bar will be open for mimosas, bloody marys, and specialty coffee drinks. Time: 9 to 11

a.m. Cost: $25 adults, $15 kids, 2 & under free. Location: 7070 West Whiteland Rd, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com

the horses and, of course, an appearance from Santa Claus. Pancakes with Santa includes two time options: breakfast from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and brunch from noon to 2 p.m. Tickets (required) are $25 per adult,

$15 per child (children 2 and under are free). Location: 7070 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556.

Dec. 18 Sample some Reindeer Red and Winter White at Mallow Run Winery’s Holiday Open House. Snuggle next to a loved one in their tasting room or mingle on the patio and enjoy live music and holiday treats while you sample some great wine. While you’re there, pick up a few bottles for that special someone on your list! Time: 12 to 6 p.m. Location: Mallow

Run Winery, 6964 West Whiteland Rd., Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

Dec. 28 Help your kids explore their creativity at

Dec. 17

Mallow Run Winery’s “Cocoa and Canvas” kids-only art class. Taught by

are invited to enjoy a morning with Jolly Old St. Nick as he makes an appearance at The Sycamore the weekend before his big night. There will be fun Christmas crafts for the kiddos, music, a visit from

a professional artist and elementary school art teacher, this course will teach your kids step-by-step how to create their very own masterpiece, and enjoy some hot cocoa to warm their souls as their art warms yours! Time: 2:00 p.m.

Pancakes with Santa! Kids of all ages

& 3:30 p.m. Cost: $20. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 West Whiteland Rd., Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

january Jan. 8

Rev up and get ready for the Super Sunday Indy Automotive Swap Meet & Car Sale, an indoor, all make and model swap meet. Hosted by Freeman’s Muscle Car, you can find parts to your old jalopy, check out some cherry classic hot rods or just browse the selection. Whether you’re in the market to buy or just daydream, you’ll find yourself inspired by what you see. Time: 8 a.m. to 3

p.m. Location: South Pavilion, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. Cost: $7. Information: supersundayindy.com.

Jan. 10 The hills are alive at the Murat Theatre as “The Sound of Music” touring show comes to town. Time: 7:30 p.m. Cost: $88,

$28. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: concerts.livenation.com.

Jan. 13-15 You don’t need Harvey the Rabbit to tell you the Indy 1500 Gun & Knife Show is a Circle SOU T H

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City tradition. For 25 years this has been the show for gun, knife and hunting enthusiasts in the area. Times vary. Cost: Single day adult $12, children $5, 3-day pass $20, active duty police and military in uniform, free. Location: South

Pavilion, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. Information: indy1500.com.

Jan. 18-22

At the Artcraft Theatre Dec. 16, 17 and 18: “Christmas Vacation” Jan. 6-7: “Jailhouse Rock” Jan. 13-14: “Sixteen Candles” Jan. 20-21: “Muppet Treasure Island”

There are few events more magical to young children than Disney on Ice. This year the “Follow Your Heart” tour expands to include characters from films like “Inside Out,” “Frozen” and “Finding Dory,” as well as favorites like Cinderella, the “Toy Story” gang, Ariel and the rest of the Disney princesses. Tickets: $12-

$73. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: ticketmaster.com.

Jan. 29

The Daily Journal Bridal Show. Attend this upscale event to gather information about dozens of local wedding vendors, including caterers, jewelers, DJs, florists, venues, limousine services, and more. Cost: Free. Time:

Feb. 24-25: “The Princess Bride”

Noon to 3 p.m. Location: Valle Vista Country Club, 775 E. Main St., Greenwood. Information: (317) 736-7101

Mar. 3-4: Heartland Film - Best of the Fest

Jan. 26

Feb. 10-11: “The African Queen”

Mar. 10-11: “Vertigo” Mar. 17-18: “Clue” Mar. 24-25: “The Philadelphia Story” Classic movies are shown on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless otherwise indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 orhistoricartcrafttheatre.org.

Jim Jeffries brings his “The Unusual Punishment Tour” to the Circle City, and you can bet he’ll have opinions on what’s going on. The Aussie comic’s diatribe on gun control is an Internet favorite, and whatever he chooses to discuss in his act, his wit is as sharp as his commentary. Time:

8 pm. Cost: $49.50, $39.50. Location: Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey, Indianapolis. Information: livenation.com.

Jan. 27-Feb. 12 The Buck Creek Players spotlight an “average day in the life of your average

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blockhead” in a presentation of “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” The gang’s all here, from Lucy and Linus to Snoopy and Charlie Brown himself.

Tickets: $20 adults, $18 children, students and seniors (62 and up). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: buckcreekplayers.com.

Jan. 28 The best sports action you haven’t experienced in this town just might be the Naptown Roller Girls. Their hard-hitting brand of roller derby is a cult sensation, and the most fun you didn’t know you haven’t been having. The girls kick off their 2017 season with two home bouts. Time: 6

p.m. (first bout). Cost: $15 adults, children 7-12 $8, 6 and under free, military $8, students $12. Location: Elements Financial Blue Ribbon Pavilion, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. Information: naptownrollergirls.com.

February Feb. 7 The timeless tale of Ariel, Sebastian and Flounder leaps off the big screen and onto the stage with Disney’s “The Little Mermaid” stage show. This tale, about the mermaid who wonders about what life is like above sea level, is a marvel, with some of the most memorable songs of any Disney film. Time: 7:30 p.m. Cost: $92,

$82, $68, $28. Location: Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey. Information: concerts.livenation.com.

Feb. 8 The Indianapolis Symphony turns the Hilbert Circle Theatre into the classiest tavern you’re ever likely to see during its Happy Hour at the Symphony. Local restaurants offer free food and drink samples, and you’ll get to enjoy an hour of music with the group Time for Three and the ISO. Tickets: adults

$25, children $10. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle,

Suite 600, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org or 317-639-4300.

town … with your kids. Dads get gussied up to the nines and accompany their little girl(s) to the Daddy/Daughter Dance at

Basketball is still king in Indiana, and the game’s highest level is represented in the Hoosier State by the NBA’s Indiana Pacers. A revamped roster and a new style of play have energized the team, and Paul George and Co. will look to turn away the world champion Cleveland Cavaliers. Can PG13 send LeBron James packing?

Franklin’s Beeson Hall. Dancing, appetizers, sweets and photo opportunities will make for a night you’ll never forget. Moms also get in on the action with the Mother/Son Night Out at the Hiway Lanes bowling alley, for unlimited bowling, pizza, breadsticks and more. Must register for both events. Tickets: Daddy/Daughter, $37 per couple, $25 for additional daughter. Mom/Son, $27, $20 for additional son. Location: Daddy/Daughter,

Tickets: $47-$1,853. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: ticketmaster.com.

Feb. 10 Christian music’s largest annual tour comes to Indy, with 10 of the Christian music industry’s top acts, including Crowder, Britt Nicole and Tenth Avenue celebrating their faith in song at “Winter Jam 2017.” Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse,

125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

Feb. 14

Comedian Adam Devine is on the cusp of stardom, with prominent roles in films like “Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates,” “The Intern” and both “Pitch Perfect” films. He stops in to Butler’s Clowes Memorial Hall for a date from his “Weird Life Tour” comedy tour.

Tickets: $35-$39. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: butlerartscenter.org/events.

Feb. 17 Get ready for rockin’ and wrapping with the rock comedy band Here Come the Mummies, bringing The Vogue to life. But don’t worry: These mummies aren’t scary. Their unique blend of 21 and over humor and rock ’n’ roll makes this one of the more unique concert experiences you can have, and it won’t be one you’ll regret.

Time: 9 p.m. Location: The Vogue Theatre, 6259 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. Tickets: $30, $27.50. Information: livenation.com.

Feb. 18 Franklin parents, get ready for a night on the

Beeson Hall, 70 E. Monroe St, Franklin; Mother/Son, Hiway Lanes, 400 Morton St., Franklin. Information: franklin.in.gov.

Feb. 22-23

Based on the music of ABBA, “Mamma Mia” is a favorite among stage and screen lovers alike. Don’t miss your chance to see this feelgood time at the theater during its farewell tour. Tickets: $69, $56, $45. Location: IU

Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: iuauditorium.com.

Feb. 25

The Johnson Memorial Hospital Foundation hosts its Inaugural Gala in February with proceeds aimed at improving community access to behavioral health care services in Johnson County. The event will include a cocktail reception with a view that overlooks Victory Field, silent auction packages, dinner, a live auction and entertainment. Tickets: $175 per person.

Time: 5:30 p.m. cocktails; 6:30 p.m. dinner. Location: JW Marriott, 10 S. West St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 690-0774.

Feb. 26 Surround yourself with some of the scalier members of the animal kingdom as the Midwest Reptile Show comes to Indianapolis. With hundreds of frogs, snakes and lizards, you’ll have plenty of slithery, creepy, crawly things to see. Time:

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Price: $5, 8 and under free. Location: South Pavilion, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. Information: midwestreptile.com. SOU T H

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Southside Business Directory Antiques

Attorney

Automotive

Builder

Sugar Creek Antiques

Johnson Gray Johnson

Fletcher Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

Rick Campbell Builders, Inc

7452 W. State Road 44 Shelbyville, IN 46176

63 E. Court Street Franklin, IN 46131

3099 N. Morton Street Franklin, IN 46131

1122 W. Stones Crossing Rd. Greenwood, IN 46143

(317) 512-4313 sugarcreekantiques.com

(317) 738-3365 jgmlawfirm.com

(317) 738-4170 fletcherchrysler.com

(317) 752-5469 rickcampbellbuilder.com

Catering

Church

Clothing & Accessories

Coffee Shop

Archer’s Meats & Catering

Mount Pleasant Christian Church

Anna’s Style Boutique

Benjamin’s Coffeehouse & Deli

259 S. Meridian Street Greenwood, IN 46143 (317) 881-9300 cateringbyarchers.com

381 N. Bluff Road Greenwood, IN 46142

108 W. Jefferson Street Franklin, IN 46131

49 E. Court Street Franklin, IN 46131

(317) 881-6727 mpcc.info

(317) 739-3111 annasstyleboutique.com

(317) 736-0048 benjaminscoffeehouse.com

College & University

Countertops

Country Club

Day Camp

Franklin College

Cutting Edge Concepts Inc.

Hillview Country Club

Baxter YMCA

3220 S. Arlington Ave., Ste. H Indianapolis, IN 46203

1800 E. King Street Franklin, IN 46131

(317) 352-1630 cuttingedgeconcepts.biz

(317) 736-5555 hillviewtime.com

Day Spa

Digital Services

Education

Family Fun

Transformations Salon & Spa

AIM Media IN

Roncalli High School

Indianapolis Zoo

101 Branigin Boulevard Franklin, IN 46131 (800) 852-0232 franklincollege.edu

8083A S. Madison Avenue Indianapolis, IN, 46227 (317) 882-1773 transformations salonandspa.com

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30 S. Water Street, Suite A Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-2741 aimmediaindiana.com

3300 Prague Road Indianapolis, IN 46227 (317) 787-8277 roncalli.org

7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN 46227 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org

1200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46222 (317) 630-2001 indianapoliszoo.com

Financial Institution

Fine Art

Fine Jewelry

Fitness Center

Mutual Savings Bank

Rick Wilson Fine Art

Reis Nichols Jewelers

Baxter YMCA

80 E. Jefferson Street Franklin, IN 46131

201 E. Main Cross Street Edinburgh, IN 46124

789 US 31 North Greenwood, IN 46142

(317) 736-7151 Facebook.com/mutual savingsbank

(812) 371-1699 rickwilsongallery.com

(317) 883-4467 reisnichols.com

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7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN 46227 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org


Special Advertising Section

Florist

Funeral

Hair Salon

Home Furnishings

JP Parker Flowers

Wilson St. Pierre

Transformations Salon & Spa

Miles Home Furnishings

8083A S. Madison Avenue Indianapolis, IN, 46227

7499 Big Bend Road Martinsville, IN 46151

(317) 882-1773 transformations salonandspa.com

(317) 834-6150 mileshomefurnishings.com

377 E. Jefferson Street Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 738-9837 jpparkerco.com

481 W. Main Street Greenwood, IN 46142 (317) 881-2514 wilsonstpierre.com

Home Goods & Décor

Hospital

Hotel

Insurance

McNamara

Johnson Memorial Health

Hilton Garden Inn South

Franklin Insurance

1125 W. Jefferson Street Franklin, IN 46131

5255 Noggle Way, Indianapolis, IN 46237

359 N. Morton Street Franklin, IN 46131

(317) 736-3300 johnsonmemorial.org

(317) 888-4814 hiltongardeninn3.hilton.com

(317) 736-8277

Interior Design

Investments

Mall

Media

Dale Hughes Interior Design, INC.

Raymond James

Edinburgh Premium Outlets

AIM Media IN – Daily Journal

11622 NE Executive Drive Edinburgh, IN 46124

30 S. Water Street, Suite A Franklin, IN 46131

(812) 526-9764 premiumoutlets.com

(317) 736-2730 dailyjournal.net

862 S. State Rd 135 C Greenwood, IN 46142 (317) 579-7900 mcnamaraflorist.com

981 W. Jefferson Street Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 698-3253 dalehughes interiordesign.com

701 E. County Line Rd., Ste. 302 Greenwood, IN 46143 (317) 885-0114 raymondjames.com

Pet Daycare

Pizza

Plastic Surgeon

Real Estate

PetSuites Pet Resort & Spa

Arni’s Restaurant

Hamilton Facial Plastic Surgery

Mike Watkins Real Estate Group

533 E. County Line Rd. #104 Greenwood, IN 46142

170 N. Madison Avenue Greenwood, IN 46142

(317) 210-4339 hamiltonfps.com

(317) 882-6453 mikesoldme.com

1032 N. Emerson Avenue Greenwood, IN 46143 (317) 207.6317 petsuitesofamerica.com

1691 W. Curry Road Greenwood, IN 46143 (317) 881-0500 meetyouatarnis.com

Remodeling

Restaurant

Teahouse

Travel

Dukate Fine Remodeling Inc.

The Willard

Suzy’s Teahouse

AAA Travel

99 N. Main Street Franklin, IN 46131

25 E. Court Street Franklin, IN 46131

1309 E. Stop 11 Road Greenwood, IN 46227

(317) 738-9668 thewillard.com

(317) 739-0800 suzysteahouse.com

(317) 882-1533 hoosier.aaa.com

2111 Holiday Lane Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-9961 dukate.net

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SOUTH Winter 2017  
SOUTH Winter 2017  
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