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Margaritas / Pet Outings / Bicycling

Summer 2017

Indy’s southside magazine

Designing Man Dale Hughes’ aesthetic colors the community

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Getting the diagnosis is a shock—and knowing what to do and where to go next can be overwhelming. That’s why Becky is here for you. She is a person you can lean on who is trained to help you navigate the intricacies of your cancer care and treatment. She will help you schedule appointments, sort out medications, answer your questions and connect you with resources that will support you through recovery. You don’t have to go through this alone. Call Becky today and begin your journey to hope.

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JohnsonMemorial.org


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contents Ace and Sara Rink and daughter, Ava

Cindy and Joe Rene of Long’s Bakery

on the cover

Feature Stories

76

68 Dale Hughes

Popular interior designer paints the southside in his favored shades

76 Home and Family The Rinks have loads of backyard fun

84 Being Vocal About It The Chordlighters sing in four-part harmony

Dale Hughes photographed by Jennifer Dummett.

92 Triple Play

This three-course golf experience is worth the trip

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contents

Departments

15

This & That

Southside News and Views

20 Style

Picnic Accessories

23 Taste

Margaritas and Mexican Fare

30 Recipe Tomato Tart

32 Community Pet Fun

36 Health Cycling

Indiana furniture makers

42 Goodwill

54

CASA Program of Johnson County

46 Home Trends Calming Colors

54 Indiana Made Furniture Guild of Indiana Artisans

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60 Travel

Ranch Stays

In Every Issue

8 98 102

Welcome

108

Calendar of Events

114

A Look Back

Weddings Our Side of Town


welcome

Stay Golden

A

As I settled in to write this note, central and southern Indiana were edging into real, pure summer days. This is the season when we complain about the heat, the interminable length of the days and the frequency with which our lawns must be mowed. I get it: Like any season that features extreme temperatures, summer can be annoyingly harsh. When I was a child, I hated the less-structured learning. I despised the kids I met at day camp, and I spent countless days scratching at mosquito bites and or fanning at sunburned skin. I didn’t come to love summer until I was an adult; that’s when I realized that the best adventures happen under the summer skies. I love the golden cast of the evenings, when the sun begins its decline in the sky. I love the way lush green trees fringe an azure sky. A heat seeker, I love sitting in my hot car for a few moments, windows rolled up to take the edge off the air conditioning I sat in all day. I love taking a break while exploring one of our southside green spaces, taking a few moments to bask in the sun.

Summers in my home state, Ohio, are not that different, but it seems to me that Hoosiers embrace summer with more fervor and gleeful celebration. And more power to you. The summer is something one must seize and savor, like a slab of salted watermelon or a whole day to spend at the Indiana State Fair. Speaking of the state fair, summer always brings with it the opportunity to create vivid memories. Whether you’re headed out to see the Franklin Firecracker Festival (see page 17) or planning to get in some bike riding (see page 36), the season has lots of occasions for making beautiful days. I hope all of your summer days are golden.

Jenny Elig

jelig@aimmediaindiana.com

» Read and share SOUTH online at indysouthmag.com

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701 E. County Line Road, Suite 302 | Greenwood, IN 46143 | (317) 885-0114 www.raymondjames.com/greenwoodin

About Raymond James: Founded in 1962 and headquartered in St. Petersburg, Florida, we have grown into one of the largest independent financial services firms in the United States. Raymond James is a publicly traded, global company with distinct business units that serve a variety of clients, from individuals and small business owners to municipalities and major corporations.

Investments | Insurance | Liabilities | Qualified Retirement Plan/IRA | Stock Options Gifting to children/Descendants | Charitable Gifting During Life | Business Succession Planning Distribution Plan to Spouse/Descendants | Charitable Donations at Death

L to R standing: Gary Stringer (Branch Manager) Jim Evans, Bryan Epperson (Assist. Branch Manager), Mark Kirkhoff, Scott Mings, Kyle Hensley, Bob Parke, Steven Woods and Brian Linder L to R sitting: Doug Stewart, Sarah Eder, Jeff Kirkhoff, Chuck Hensley, Tim Hansen, Ulrich Koenig, Dean Abplanalp and Aaron Frye; Phil McAdams (not pictured)

Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC


SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

Summer 2017 | Vol. 13 | No. 1

Publisher AIM Media Indiana Chuck Wells

Editorial Editor

Jenny Elig Copy Editor

Katharine Smith

ACTUAL PATIENT

Contributing Writers

Rebecca Berfanger Carolyn Doyle Ann Georgescu Jason Hathaway Teresa Nicodemus Julie Cope Saetre Greg Seiter Joe Shearer Jon Shoulders Jennifer Uhl Glenda Winders

Art

REFRESHED LOOK, RENEWED OUTLOOK.

Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger

Discover how to turn back the hands of time by scheduling a consultation with one of Indianapolis Monthly’s Top Docs.

Contributing Photographers

Jennifer Dummett Renee Knight Haley Neale

Dr. Mark Hamilton, MD, FACS

Stock images provided by ©istockphoto

DOUBLE BOARD CERTIFIED FACIAL PLASTIC SURGEON

Advertising BEFORE

AFTER

Advertising Director

Christina Cosner

Patient received a facelift, blepharoplasty and laser resurfacing.

Advertising executive

Casey DeArmitt Hutchens Advertising art director

Amanda Waltz Advertising DesignerS

Julie Daiker, Tina Ray 533 E County Line Rd, #104, Greenwood, IN 46143 | 317.859.3810 | www.hamiltonfps.com

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Let our dedicated team handle the details and catering for your corporate meeting, retreat, wedding reception, rehearsal dinner or family gathering.

Flowers provided by JP Parker Flowers

Indianapolis South/Greenwood 5255 Noggle Way, Indianapolis (317) 888-4814

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SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

30 S. Water St., Second Floor Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-7101 indysouthmag.com SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

subscribe@indysouthmag.com (800) 435-5601 advertising inquiries

southmail@indysouthmag.com (317) 736-2767 story ideas

info@indysouthmag.com (812) 379-5671 Single copy sales

Copies of South magazine are available at southside Kroger, Marsh and Barnes and Noble locations. Subscriptions

To subscribe to SOUTH magazine, please send $12 for 4 issues, or $24 for 8 issues to the mailing address above. Call (800) 4355601 to subscribe by phone or place your subscription request online at indysouthmag.com. Address Change

Please send any address changes to the address or email address listed above. Back issues

To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone.

DJ-31961387

Š2017 by AIM Media Indiana All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.

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plan your

Summer Staycation

at victory field

INDIANAPOLIS INDIANS SCHEDULE Sun

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this & that

Compiled By Julie Cope saetre

Lauren Leech reads to Ariel during Tales for Tails at the Johnson County Public Library.

making reading

less ruff

mark it on your calendar!

Kids ages 5 to 11 can sign up for a Tales for Tails session by visiting or calling either participating branch: Tales for Tails at the White River Branch July 10 and Aug. 14, 6 to 8 p.m. Sign up at the children’s reference desk or by calling (317) 885-1330. Tales for Tails at the Clark Pleasant Branch  June 19, July 17 and Aug. 21, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Sign up at the information desk or by calling (317) 535-6206.

Kids and dogs: It’s a classic combination. At two branches of the Johnson County Public Library, pairing kids and dogs in reading sessions is also a fun way for young readers to build their vocabularies and their self-esteem. The Tales for Tails program pairs children and dogs for 15-minute sessions. Kids practice their skills by reading to a new furry friend, while canines soak up the love and attention. Sue Salamone, children’s services librarian, organizes the Tales for Tails program at the Clark Pleasant Branch (the White River Branch also hosts sessions). Formerly known as Woofs and Books, this new incarnation comes with a new sponsor, the Alliance of Therapy Dogs. During a typical 15-minute session, two therapy dogs (off the clock from their day jobs) cuddle up and settle in as students in kindergarten through Grade 5 read aloud to them. Sometimes the kids focus on a homework assignment; other times, they choose a book from a selection of 15-minute reads assembled by Salamone. Handlers accompany the dogs to make sure all goes smoothly for both animal and human participants. “The readers love the interaction with the dogs,” Salamone says. “The children read to uncritical, non-correcting, unconditionally loving dogs, who enjoy their company and attention. This builds self-esteem and encouragement for reading. The dogs love to be petted and complimented.” Occasionally, she adds, only one dog is able to visit, much to its benefit. “It always works out in fitting everyone in to read and double up if necessary, and that one dog gets all of the wonderful attention that night. It is a great program that provides intrinsic rewards to our little readers.”

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this & that

A little bit of romance

Aleatha Romig

and let them do their thing. Sometimes it’s as if I’m simply here to record their words and actions. My work is original because it belongs to my characters. They will wake me in the middle of the night to write. They will surprise me, as the story takes a turn I never expected. It’s like a friendship where these imaginary friends allow me to tell their story. They trust me to make it as real and unique as they each are.

Aleatha Romig, an Indiana University graduate and Greenwood resident, began writing as an escape from an empty nest and a bad economy. Today, she is the author of popular e-novels; her titles have appeared on best-seller lists from the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and USA Today. She’s also made a foray into traditional print publishing. Here’s how this mom of three became a queen of romantic thrillers. You were once a dental hygienist. How did you get into writing? I began writing in 2009 after the economy crashed. My husband was laid off and began working third shift. Our two older children were away at college (Purdue and Hanover), and our youngest went to bed early. I went from a bustling house of five to being practically alone. Writing was my escape. Our daughter, who graduated from Hanover with a degree in psychology, later said, “Mom, you couldn’t control your world, so you controlled your fake world.” She was right. I’d work all day as a dental hygienist thinking about my story. At night, I’d write. I never intended to publish. It was my escape. How did you decide to specialize in romantic fiction? I didn’t. I really didn’t. My first book, “Consequences,” was written as a psychological thriller. When I received reviews saying, “This book doesn’t have an HEA,” I didn’t know what an HEA was. (It’s the acronym for “happily ever after,” a “requirement” for a romance.)

Romig’s latest e-book.

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It was the romance readers who adopted me. I believe that they were hungry for something different. It was the beginning of the self-publishing explosion. I was offering something that the big publishers weren’t. I wasn’t following their tested formula. The love and acceptance that I received from the romance community are what pulled me into that genre. What is it about romance novels that makes them so popular? I would say that it’s the same reason as why I began writing. Romance novels, even romantic thrillers, are an escape. We all have to deal with so much in our real lives that escaping into someone else’s life, especially with the idea of a possible bow or HEA at the end, even when the journey is difficult, is appealing. The birth of e-readers has also made the process of getting books so much easier. Many of my readers read a book a day. Romance readers are voracious. No one reads just one, or just one author. With so many romance novels out there, how do you come up with original ideas? I don’t have a good answer. I come up with the concept, create the characters

Do you have a personal novel/ series that you’ve written that is your favorite? If so, why? It has been said that answering this question is like choosing your favorite child. My “Consequences” series will always be special because it will always be my first. I love Tony and Claire. I also believe I’ve learned a lot in the last five years. My writing, in my opinion, has matured; however, there is something to be said about the raw emotion in that first series. My “Light” duet (“Into the Light” and “Away From the Dark”) was my first attempt at traditional publishing. The two books are published through Thomas and Mercer, the mystery/ thriller imprint of Amazon. I enjoyed the story. It’s cult-based with more action and story than romance. There is a romance, but it is truly secondary to the story. “Plus One” has been a fun break from my normal dark and angst. I truly have had fun with it. My “Infidelity” series to date is my all-time favorite. I pushed myself to release five full-length (four are over 100,000 words) books at a pace of one release every four months. I lived and breathed the characters of “Betrayal,” “Cunning,” “Deception,” “Entrapment” and “Fidelity” continually for over a year and a half. Sometimes I forgot the real world existed. I loved the characters and the twisted, layered story.


this & that EVENTS

Franklin Fourth

Franklin’s got a brand new flag

If you’ve driven through downtown Franklin lately, you’ve probably seen a new, more colorful city flag waving in the summer breeze. Gone is the profile of Benjamin Franklin that adorned the previous flag, designed in 1979. In its place: the pinnacle of the Johnson County Courthouse, flanked by three stars on either side, set against a band of sunny yellow. So why the change, and what’s behind the new design? We got the scoop from Franklin Mayor Steve Barnett’s office.

Why change the design after nearly four decades? The city no longer uses the Benjamin Franklin drawing as an emblem, and Franklin officials wanted new symbols to reflect ongoing revitalization efforts. How were the colors selected? Navy blue and yellow are Franklin College’s official colors; white stands for cleanliness and truth.

What’s up with the six stars? Each star represents a Franklin asset: Tradition: The ongoing cultural elements of parades, festivals and historic Franklin buildings (think the Artcraft Theatre and the Willard). Community: Downtown’s renovation, events that draw residents together and freely expressed ideas and opinions. Opportunity: Plenty of options for youths seeking education and businesses wanting to invest and grow. Education: Student-centered and innovative courses, along with a symbiotic relationship between the community and Franklin College. Innovation: Unique stores and trails, thriving east-side and downtown development and an overall modernization that complements, not competes, with beloved traditions. Commerce: A flourishing downtown along with a compatible balance between large and small businesses.

The Franklin Firecracker Festival moves from its longtime location at the Indiana Masonic Home. The festival will take place July 3 in downtown Franklin, East and West Court streets, from Jefferson to Monroe streets, and on Monroe Street between Main and Water streets. The move comes after the fireworks were set off downtown in October during the annual fall festival; according to the city’s Parks and Recreation Department officials, the downtown site yields a better view of the show.

Get to know Garfield Park Get your tickets now for guided walking tours of Garfield Park and the surrounding neighborhood. Set for Sept. 14 and 16, the walking and biking tours will be led by Indiana Landmarks representatives. The 90-minute walking tours on Sept. 14 depart every 15 minutes from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. Tickets cost $10 per person. The three-hour bike tour on Sept. 16 will also offer several timed-entry start options. Tickets cost $20 per person. Walking tour tickets are available at garfieldwalktour. eventbrite.com and bike tour tickets are available at garfieldbiketour. eventbrite.com SOU T H

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this & that

book nook

“The Silent Wife” By A.S.A. Harrison Jodi has consciously decided that being Pinterest-perfect is enough; she does not want children. She and her husband are wealthy, she works part time as a psychologist and picks and chooses her patients based on exacting standards of who is troubled enough, but not too troubled. She has a cleaning woman, but cleans her home daily. She cooks gourmet meals each night and has cocktails and hors d’oeuvres ready for her husband, Todd, when he arrives home from work. The price for this magazine-worthy life? Her husband cheats. Todd is a developer who works hard, plays hard, drinks hard and philanders with impunity. But things are changing, as Todd begins an affair that becomes serious. I can’t say I “liked” or “enjoyed” reading this book, but I absolutely could not put it down. The writing is descriptive and the plot unfolds in a leisurely fashion. There is something about these horrible people and their terrible situation that is compelling. Reviewed by Amy Dalton, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

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“Enter by the Narrow Gate” By David Carlson A wonderful mystery debut from a local author and Franklin College professor, this is the promising start of a new series. In the same vein as Tony Hillerman and other mysteries set in the Southwest (with a touch of Brother Cadfael), this suspenseful whodunit set in New Mexico will garner lots of fans. Father Fortis is on sabbatical at St. Mary’s and arrives just after a young nun is found brutally murdered. Soon after, his good friend Lt. Worthy is sent out to investigate a missing girl. Father Fortis decides that it is no mere coincidence that the two of them find themselves in the Southwest at the same time immediately after an unsolved murder. Lt. Worthy is determined to stay focused on his missing person case but is soon drawn in by the mysteriousness of the nun’s death. Full of intrigue, religious oddities and good old-fashioned sleuthing, this novel reads fast and is impossible to put down. Reviewed by Erin Cataldi, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

“The Rosie Project” By Graeme Simsion Don Tillman, a brilliant Australian geneticist who has had a successful career as a professor and researcher, is now in his 40s, still single, and feels like he’s missing something in his life. Don isn’t especially good with people. He suffers from Asperger syndrome and has some quirky habits. He approaches relationships scientifically and devoid of all emotion. But he’d still like a companion, and he believes his IQ, social status, good health and financial stability make him a good mate despite his odd personality. He enlists the help of his friends and embarks on “The Wife Project.” Enter Rosie, who’s all wrong by Don’s standards, yet there’s still something that pulls him toward her as they spend more time together. “The Rosie Project” isn’t your typical romance novel, but it’s still a fun, lighthearted love story. Reviewed by Kelly Staten, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library


“Flame in the Mist”

“Before the Fall”

By Renee Ahdieh

By Noah Hawley

Renee Ahdieh’s first series, “The Wrath and the Dawn,” is a young adult retelling of Scheherazade’s narrative from “One Thousand and One Nights.” “Flame in the Mist” was described to me as Mulan meets 47 Ronin. Set in feudal Japan, it tells the story of 17-year-old Mariko. The daughter of a prominent samurai, she is being married off for political advantage. After being attacked and nearly killed on her way to meet her betrothed, she disguises herself as a boy and infiltrates the group of bandits that attacked her. Political intrigue, deception and slow-burning romance abound. Both “Flame in the Mist” and “Wrath and the Dawn” are two-book series.

Painter Scott Burroughs barely makes a flight from Martha’s Vineyard bound to New York City on a luxurious private jet with 10 rich and privileged individuals. He’s not rich and is hopping a free ride back home. Eighteen minutes later, the plane crashes into the water. The only survivors are 4-year-old JJ and Burroughs. He courageously swims back to shore saving the life of JJ, who is now a very rich heir. There are lots of questions from the authorities on what caused the crash, and Burroughs is thrust into the limelight by the media. As the back stories of all the people on the flight are told, it becomes evident that many of them had dangerous secrets that point to conspiracy. A vivid and compelling mystery with a great climax that left me shocked on the cause of the crash.

Reviewed by Aubrey Watson, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

Reviewed by Sheila Harmon, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

“The Last Time We Say Goodbye” By Cynthia Hand Lex is a math genius and a high school senior who has worked hard to get into MIT. She’s a sister, a daughter and a girlfriend. She has friends she loves and a bright future in front of her. And her brother is dead. The future that was so bright seems lonely and unsure. Everything changed in one moment, with one text. And it haunts Lex. He haunts Lex. “The Last Time We Say Goodbye” is a story about a girl who is sad, and refreshingly there wasn’t someone telling her she shouldn’t be. It was thoughtful, sincere and genuine in its depiction of loss and regret. There was no aptly timed romance to pull Lex out of her depression, no overly preachy therapist bashing ideas into her head. Lex was a fully developed character, and through her you also get a full picture of her brother, Tyler, and their relationship. Her healing takes time and patience, but it pays off with a gradual understanding and appreciation for life, both her own and her brother’s. Reviewed by Emily Ellis, assistant director, Greenwood Public Library

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style

Photography by Haley Neale

Pack It Up, Pack It In Let us begin. As higher temperatures hold steady, it’s time to take our dining out-of-doors for a picnic. When you get down to brass tacks, all you really need for a picnic is some food, something to sit on and something to carry your food in. That, our dear friends, is your most basic picnic experience. But why keep it so simple? Dining in the great outdoors can and should be easy, but it can have hints of the luxury that you find in indoor dining. Here are some ways to up your picnic game and elevate your experience when you decide to eat out — way, way out.

Picnic basket, $100, JC Penney, 1251 U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 882-7339, jcpenney.com.

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1

2

3

4

5

1 Reversible picnic throw $19.99, TJ Maxx, 8811 Hardegan St., Indianapolis. (317) 8881367, tjmaxx.tjx.com. 2 Wooden dominoes $49.99, Kohl’s, 550 Fry Road, Greenwood, (317) 882-0001, kohls.com. 3 Bamboo cheese board set, $24.95, Pier 1 Imports, 6810 S. Emerson Ave. Indianapolis. (317) 783-2513, pier1.com. 4 Orchard Stand Honey Wine, $8.50 per bottle, Oliver Winery & Vineyards, 200 E. Winery Road, Bloomington. (812) 876-5800, oliverwinery.com. 5 Melamine plate, large $5.99, small $4.99, Kohl’s.

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EXPERTS AT SERVING EXPERTS AT SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS. OUR CUSTOMERS. AND OUR COMMUNITY. AND OUR COMMUNITY. West Smith Valley Road and SR 135 West Smith Valley Road and SR 135

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©2017 The National Bank of Indianapolis

©2017 The National Bank of Indianapolis

NMLS #1429491

www.nbofi.com

www.nbofi.com

Member FDIC

Member FDIC


taste Tasting away again

in Margaritaville

It’s summertime and the livin’ is easy, particularly if you have an ice-cold drink in hand. A good splash of tequila doesn’t hurt, either, as these four southside margaritas prove. They’re about as different as a drink with the same base can get — one includes champagne, another comes with a sidecar bottle of beer — but each is the ideal companion to any meal, south of the border or not. by Jennifer Uhl Photography by Jennifer Dummett

Spicy Rim Margarita

at La Revolucion

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taste

Coronita at Cheeseburger in Paradise

4670 Southport Crossing Drive, Indianapolis, cheeseburgerinparadise.com It’s an age-old question: Liquor or beer? Thanks to the legendary Mr. Buffett, you don’t have to choose. Whenever quitting time rolls around (and remember, it’s always 5 o’clock somewhere), this beachthemed chain serves the best of both worlds in the Conorita, a margarita made with two topshelf tequilas, orange juice, the restaurant’s own mix and a special clip on the salted rim that holds a 7-ounce bottle of Corona beer. Bar manager Joel Holaday agrees it’s an ingenious solution for diners who can’t choose. “The drink starts out as half and half,” he says. “Half margarita, half Corona. But at the finish, it’s all Corona.” The drink is only on special on Cinco de Mayo (circle your calendar for 2018) for $5.55, natch. The rest of the time, it’s $8.79. “It’s too good to be on special,” Holaday says. “It’s special every day.” On the flipside, Parrotheads who feel nostalgic for their childhood summers will want to try the Dreamsicle, a margarita that tastes just like the pool concession stand treat without all the mess. Out to dinner with the kids? Order a frozen drink (for you, obviously), and they’ll get a kick out of your fruit-concocted parrot or Lizard Lips, the cheeky lime wedge-face complete with a pineapple tongue and sunglasses pin.

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Watermelon margarita at Bar Louie

1251 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, barlouie.com This popular newcomer may have a martini logo, but the Greenwood Mall restaurant also includes a fair share of mojitos and margaritas. Grab one of 40-something spots at the horseshoe-shaped bar — or better yet, the wicker seating with red cushions if you have a large group — and pair the chicken bruschetta nachos with the watermelon margarita. Unlike most Mexican restaurants’ fruity margaritas, which are frozen-slush optional, Louie’s serves its on the rocks. Bartender Gabby Sanchez says the watermelon packs the most punch of all the margaritas (also available in strawberry, mango, spicy pineapple and the house), thanks to the higher alcoholic content of the Sauza Blue Silver vodka, which is shaken with watermelon syrup, sour mix and lime, sugar rim on request. (Though if you’re like most Hoosiers, you’ll ask for a salted rim to complement that summery watermelon flavor.) A plus? You don’t have to wait until Friday happy hour to indulge: Start the week off right on Mondays instead, when all margaritas are only $5.

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Mexican ’84 at La Margarita 1043 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis, lamargaritaindy.com Entering La Margarita feels a little like something out of a Lewis Carroll novel. The solid tangerine-colored door 10 feet inside the entryway of the old G.C. Murphy Co. building could lead to any number of spaces. The only thing pressing you onward is the restaurant name printed in small caps on the outside, like an afterthought, as though other first-timers also knocked, just to make sure they weren’t intruding. But once inside, La Margarita feels like the homey Mexican hotspot that it is, with plenty of top-shelf refreshments that could easily include a coercive “Drink Me” tag. The family-owned restaurant is celebrating its 30th year, which includes a storied history in Speedway, two moves on the northside and now five years in the heart of Fountain Square. The drink menu boasts “enough agave to be its own liquor store,” with artisanal beers on tap and thoughtful cocktails to accompany veteran chef Emilio Montes’ chipotle chicken, vegan-optional tacos and locally renowned carnitas. Our favorite partner to these plates or a sizzling skillet of fajita meat is the Mexican ’84, which bar manager Kayla Pappas describes as a “mom cocktail” because of its elegant presentation. (Indeed, it’s the only margarita we’ve ever seen served in a champagne flute.) The ’84 is a twist on the famous French ’75 cocktail: Longtime bartender Cruz Rodriguez uses the same build as the original, but swaps the ingredients for the Hispanic flavors of Espolon Silver tequila, simple syrup, fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice and sparkling rose chardon. The result is a baby-pink cocktail that’s perfect for sipping on the sun-kissed patio outside, just beneath the rooftop “You are Beautiful” sign that overlooks the Cultural Trail.

Spicy Rim at La Revolucion 1132 Prospect St., Indianapolis You could say La Revolucion is business in the front, party in the back, but the entire place has a lively atmosphere. The Fountain Square restaurant looks deceptively small from the street, and even once inside, most diners don’t realize the space continues back, and then back again. A small hallway leads to the surprisingly large tiki bar, complete with a bamboo-covered, thatch-roofed bar, party lights, long bench seating and Polynesian-themed decor, while another doorway leads to the spacious back patio, which features a fire pit. Should you stay up front, the main dining room has its own flair, with exposed wood beams and concrete floors set against mango-colored walls covered in crosses, Day of the Dead-inspired artwork and masks you wouldn’t want to see at the end of your bed at 3 a.m. But no matter where you choose to park with your paper boat of street-style tacos (the el pastor pork is a fave), nacho plate for a crowd or burger and fries, a matching drink is a must. The bar menu features the kind of pretty drinks that call for a paper umbrella or a skewered pineapple wedge, bottled beers and Mexican Coca-Cola, all well and good, but a night out with friends over a basket of chips and salsa calls for something with some heat, like the spicy rim margarita. Co-owner Roni Donaldson says customer buzz over Revolucion’s yummy hot sauces gave way to the idea for the habanero-infused tequila drink, rimmed with a spicy salt that includes two kinds of crushed peppers. Looking for something even hotter, literally? Try the Jet Pilot, a mix of rum with grapefruit juice and cinnamon, topped with a flaming lime.

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Roncalli Salutes State Champion Wrestler

Roncalli High School freshman Alec Viduya earned four victories to capture the IHSAA state wrestling title in the 113-pound class. Viduya is Roncalli’s fourth individual wrestling state champion and the first since 1985. He joins Don Mappes (1976, 145 pounds), Duane Lutgring (1980, 185 pounds) and Chris Maxwell (1985, 167 pounds) as Roncalli wrestlers with state titles.  All of Roncalli’s three previous wrestling state champions accomplished the feat in their senior seasons. Viduya finished his first season of high school wrestling with a 47-2 record. His teammate and fellow freshman, Tyce Freije, finished eighth in the state in the 120-pound class.  Freije concluded his season with a 38-10 record. Congratulations to Alec, his parents and Coach Wade McClurg!

Applications For Registration Now Being Accepted Call 317-787-8277, ext. 243 or visit www.roncalli.org


taste

Food finds

By Jennifer uhl

That’s a Wrap On the go

out to lunch

on the town

Every traveler knows gas station fare isn’t ideal. Who knows how long those hot dogs have been rotating, or when that turkey sub was packaged? But Ricker’s customers who venture inside after filling up the tank find that the Indiana-based convenience store is all that and a bag of chips — er, burritos. Almost four years ago, the company decided to roll out a food program focused on burritos and fresh ingredients. (You may have seen its food truck at last year’s Freedom Festival.) The trucks are now more of a marketing platform, but with almost half of the 54 statewide Ricker’s now featuring a burritos menu, you don’t have to go too far to find this to-go option; in fact, the Greenwood, Edinburgh and Mooresville locations all have the burrito station. “The beauty of what we do is almost everything is made to order,” says food programs coordinator Brad Pyle. “There’s a little bit of grab-and go, but otherwise, everything is made right then.” The have-it-your-way menu also includes quesadillas, tacos, nachos and salads, but the burritos have proved to be the most popular, with six different meat options available (Pyle favors the barbacoa shredded beef). They’re easy on the wallet, too, starting at $3.99, well under the prices at popular Tex-Mex chains and worth a stop long before your gas light comes on. Multiple locations, (317) 889-6230.

True Tex-Mex-loving southsiders worth their hot sauce know better than to hit the drive-thru at lunchtime; instead, they head for Roscoe’s Tacos, the small-time eatery that’s taken off in a big way. Roscoe and Rita Townsend decided to go into the restaurant biz in 1996 after Rita lost her job and work lined up for Roscoe didn’t pan out. He started making tacos with his mother’s taco chili recipe, and a southside lunchtime fave was born. He also added chicken and shredded beef to the menu, as well as nachos, tostadas, taco salads and a selection of burritos The Roscoe’s menu board cheekily states that “unorthodox hassles”— i.e., asking for your sour cream on the side — will run you an extra 25 cents, and in the case of his latest experiment, a $4 burrito dubbed the Black Fowl, we’re not asking him to change anything. The giant flour tortilla is stuffed with whipped pinto beans, rice, shredded chicken, seasoned black bean juice, Mexican cheeses, jalapenos, sour cream and Roscoe’s signature Cincinnati City Slicker and Smokin’ sauces. Those last two additions pack a punch, but if you want to kick it up, try one of Roscoe’s hotter sauces: Texas Brushfire, Tonsillectomy and — gulp — Lava, which, you’ll find at the longtime Madison Avenue location, as well as the other three southside franchises. Multiple locations, (317) 859-0043.

A Fletcher Place newbie, Mr. Tequila’s Cantina & Grill serves traditional Mexican fare in a surprisingly contemporary setting. The restaurant’s interior, with its Ikea-like lighting and wall of windows, is decidedly more modern than the wildly colorful mom-andpop Mexican establishments we’re used to, and the unique bar area with nearly 100 kinds of tequila is a stunner (as is the blue Colts margarita). The business is a family affair, owned by brothers-in-law Martin Mecati and Sergio Mahuic. Both grew up in Puebla, Mexico, and decided to open their own restaurant after more than 20 years in the industry. The menu features quite a few vegetarian options, including a welcome veggie burrito in place of the usual bean-and-cheese, as well as more unique dishes, like the Alambre Hawaiano, a plate of chicken, chorizo and pineapple topped with cheese and sliced avocado. Fajita and burrito options are plentiful, but you needn’t choose between the two, thanks to the $11.99 burrito fajita, which is filled with grilled chicken or steak, peppers, onions, tomatoes and beans, and smothered in cheese and ranchero sauce — the best of both worlds. Order a cocktail or tequila flight, watch your server make fresh guac at the backlit bar, then enjoy dinner on the sunny patio — another new addition, built by Martin’s father-in-law. 931 S. East St., Indianapolis, (317) 991-3058.

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Three delicious options for the ultimate portable food


BRINGING YOUR VISION TO LIFE.


taste

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Recipe

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A Real Tomato Here’s one way to tart up your savory fruit Photography by Haley Neale

Tomato Ricotta Phyllo Tart 1 roll (about 21 sheets) phyllo dough ¼ cup olive oil 1¼ cups ricotta cheese 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil, plus more for topping 1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives, plus more for topping ½ teaspoon lemon zest Salt and pepper, to taste

» 1½ to 2 pounds tomatoes, sliced to ¼-inch thickness (and/or grape tomatoes, sliced in half) » Heat oven to 400 F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Lay 1 sheet of phyllo dough on parchment paper. Brush lightly with olive oil. Top with another sheet of phyllo dough; brush lightly with oil. Repeat until all phyllo dough sheets are stacked. In a medium bowl, stir together ricotta cheese, basil, chives, lemon zest and salt and pepper to taste until well combined. Spread evenly on top of phyllo dough, leaving a 1-inch border along edges. » Top with sliced or halved tomatoes. Sprinkle with more salt and pepper. Bake 30 minutes or until dough is golden brown and flaky. Cool tart slightly; top with more chopped basil and chives and salt and pepper, if desired. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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Community

Dogs are welcome on the patio at Taxman Brewing Co.

Pets Get Together Southside businesses let companion animals join in the fun

T

By Jason Hathaway

The United States is full of animal lovers. According to the American Pet Products Association National Pet Owners Survey, 68 percent of U.S. households own at least one pet. That’s 84.6 million total households having at least one furry, feathered or scaled friend. The survey also predicts that Americans will spend about $69.36 million on their pets in 2017 and even more in years to come. We love our pets, and many of us consider them members of our immediate families. But pets are family members that we often have to leave at home while we pursue outside entertainment, although we may bring home a doggy bag. Now that scenario is beginning to change.

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Across the country, pet owners are making it known that they are happier when their furry friends accompany them; add to that the animal-assisted therapy trend in behavioral health care. Certified therapy animals that provide emotional support for conditions such as anxiety and depression are permitted to accompany their owners, and although Indianapolis has not moved as quickly as other metropolitan areas in giving pets carte blanche access to entertainment options, companion animals are now able to poke their noses around more public spots. “I think we’re all gradually moving in that direction,” says Anne Sutton, executive director of Johnson County Humane Society. “Pets are now being viewed more as family members, and there are so many mental health benefits to being able to take your pet with you to more places. My dog goes everywhere with me. She even comes to work with me every day.” Nudging the door open a little farther are business owners who see value in catering to pets as well as people. The southside has a growing variety of venue and event options for folks who want to take their pets out on the town this summer. Dog-friendly businesses are important to Jon Sprong of Beech Grove, whose miniature schnauzer, Cookee, is a certified therapy dog. Cookee provides Sprong with emotional support for his depression and anxiety conditions; the relaxed, well-behaved dog often accompanies Sprong and his wife, Aimee, on trips to stores and restaurants. “I think it’s really great that I can take her with me to places,” Sprong says. “If my wife is working and I have to go to the store, I have a good friend right there to take with me. Cookee’s very popular at Between the Bun in Greenwood. They love her there. They’ve always got a fresh bowl of water for her, and sometimes they’ll even give her a slice of bacon.” Photos provided


Dogs get the run of the pool at Franklin Aquatic Center before it closes for the season. Inset, Ruthie Leeth cuddles her pup after a dip in the pool.

At Greenwood’s Revery, not only are dogs welcome at the patio tables, they have their own menu. The restaurant, which features artistically presented American-style cuisine made with fresh, locally sourced ingredients, also offers dogs a selection of beef, chicken and vegetable dishes (such as the popular roasted sweet potato and chicken entrée) as well as biscuits made by Bella Dog Bakery in Greenwood. Plenty of popcorn is always available for the pups, offered gratis to good boys and girls. Revery owner Mark Henrichs, a dog owner himself, began offering the canine-centric menu last year having read about the growing trend of dog-friendly restaurants in cities like Los Angeles,

to themselves. We want to create a nice, friendly atmosphere, though, and are always considerate of those who may not like having dogs around. So far, we have not had any problems.” Southside microbreweries that feature outdoor seating have put out the welcome mat for canine customers. Fireside Brewhouse in Greenwood has extended the invitation for patrons to dine with their dogs every Sunday on their patio. All dogs that show up receive a free bag of treats and a pup cup of water. For extra-hungry dogs, there are pup patties available for purchase. Taxman Brewing Co. in Bargersville also welcomes dogs to join their owners on its patio. Another favorite pet-friendly southside food

Chicago and New York. The specialized menu was a hit right from the start, and the dining-out dogs have been a welcome presence. The dogs have all been well behaved, and there haven’t been any complaints from the pet-less patrons, Henrichs said. “We really haven’t had any issues with the dogs not getting along with other dogs,” he says. “Usually when there are two or three dogs on the patio, they keep SOU T H

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Community

Pictured on these pages, pups with their owners at Mallow Run Winery.

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and drink venue is Bargersville’s Mallow Run Winery, which offers a full outdoor evening concert schedule during the summer and spacious grounds for families and their pets to roam. Unless specified on the winery website, dogs are welcome to join their owners at the summer concerts and other outdoor events. “We encourage people to bring their dogs out here,” says Sarah Shadday, marketing and wholesale coordinator for Mallow Run Winery. “We’re dog lovers, and we love to see the pups come out and have a good time, too. We also have a lot of barn cats who like to wander over to


the grounds and check things out. Our customers love them.” Some venues and events exist to benefit pets. This year saw the opening of the Nine Lives Cat Café in Fountain Square, where patrons, for a $5 per hour fee, can enjoy a cup of coffee or tea in the Cat Lounge. In the lounge, where reservations are strongly recommended, people can enjoy the company of highly social rescue cats that are also available for adoption. If you’re just visiting Nine Lives for the coffee, don’t worry: The cats have to stay on their side of the building. Mallow Run hosts several fundraiser events throughout the year for dog rescue groups. On July 23, the winery’s event center, The Sycamore, will host Art Unleashed, a sale of animal-themed art to raise funds for the Johnson County Humane Society. On Sept. 10, the winery hosts the seventh

annual Labapalooza, an all-day festival designed to raise awareness and funds for Love of Labs Indiana, a southside-based Labrador retriever rescue group. Southside dogs and the people who love them can wrap up their summer fun at public pools at the Franklin Aquatic Center or Freedom Springs Aquatic Center in Greenwood. Before the pools are drained for the season, dogs are allowed to have a swim on Sept. 9. The event, now in its second year, serves as a fundraiser for the Johnson County Humane Society; its 2016 debut was well-received by humans and pooches alike. “Last year at Freedom Springs, we had about 75 dogs, and at Franklin Aquatic Center, there were 30 or 40,” Sutton says. “They had tennis balls there, and the dogs got to play around in the water. Everyone had a good time.”

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Health

Gray Goat Bicycle Co. staff organize regular bicycle rides for the community.

Spinning wheels

W Cycling is a health tour de force By Greg Seiter

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When Jim Jensen was growing up on the southside of Indianapolis in the 1970s and early 1980s, his bicycle represented freedom and provided a reliable mode of transportation for his part-time job as a paperboy. However, when Jensen, who now co-owns Jensen Ford Insurance Agency on State Road 135, suffered a heart attack in 2003, bicycling took on a much different meaning in his life. “Walking and jogging were part of my rehab, but since I couldn’t drive for the

first two to four weeks, I decided to get on my bike,” Jensen says. “It was great to feel the wind blow and the freedom that comes with it. Plus, my knees didn’t bother me like they did when I was jogging. I was hooked.” Jensen now rides four to six days per week and during the summer months averages 225 miles each week. He has lost approximately 50 pounds, wears jeans that are one size smaller than what he wore while attending Perry Meridian

Photos provided


»

“My weight is down, my cardiac health is excellent and all of my cholesterol numbers are low. I’ve had three different cardiologists, and they’ve all said the level of cycling I do did nothing but strengthen my heart faster than usual.” —Jim Jensen

High School and boasts a resting heart rate between 40 and 50 beats per minute. However, the overall experience was truly a wake-up call for him. “I had very few risk factors for a heart attack,” Jensen says. “I was only a little overweight, and my cholesterol and triglyceride levels were in pretty good shape. I had lived in Fountain Square for a while and had worked in downtown so I did ride my bike a little to commute the three miles, but that was more about not want-

ing to pay for parking than it was about doing what was right for me.” Pedaling the way to health According to Harvard Health, a publication of the Harvard Medical School, bicycling yields numerous benefits. In fact, aside from the obvious cardiovascular gain, those in the medical profession say cycling is easier on joints than some other activities, is known to strengthen muscles, can improve balance and the way a person walks.

In addition, research has shown that cycling boosts blood flow and oxygen to the brain, is an effective form of stress relief and can assist with sleep-related disorders. “My weight is down, my cardiac health is excellent and all of my cholesterol numbers are low,” Jensen says. “I’ve had three different cardiologists, and they’ve all said the level of cycling I do did nothing but strengthen my heart faster than usual.” To say Jensen is a bicycling enthusiast would be an understatement. He com-

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Health

Cyclists gather in front of Gray Goat for one of the shop's Saturday morning rides.

petes in mountain bike and cyclocross races. Cyclocross is a bicycle race that takes place over a cross-country course. During the race, riders generally face steep hills, turns and sometimes even muddy terrain that can occasionally force them to actually have to carry their bicycles over fences and up stairs. Jensen also assists Gray Goat Bicycle Co. in Franklin with club meetings, coordinated rides and social media initiatives. He has developed an undeniable passion for biking that seems to be reflective of the widespread popularity boom for the sport. “It keeps growing year after year, and we’re seeing the demand grow with people of all ages,” says Brandon Street, Gray Goat manager. “People want to get off the couch and enjoy the outdoors. Families are riding together, too. What better way

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is there to spend time with the family than by exercising?” Connie Szabo Schmucker, advocacy director at Bicycle Garage Indy, echoes this sentiment. “People have always biked for various reasons, including to save money. But now, more people seem to be interested in incorporating it into their daily lives,” she says. “Green space and health have always been factors, but now there’s more of an emphasis on the social aspects.” The city of Indianapolis is a perfect example. “Ten years ago, in downtown Indy, you might see a few people riding

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their bikes here and there, but now you can’t go more than a couple of blocks without seeing bikes parked everywhere and bicyclists riding everywhere,” Szabo Schmucker says. In response to the apparent growing popularity of bicycling, Indianapolis officials have continued to add bike lanes on roadways and have created additional bike paths and resources for cyclists, including the Indy Bike Hub YMCA, a combination bicycle commuter hub and full fitness facility. Located on the east wing of Indianapolis City Market, the Indy Bike Hub YMCA is the first facility of its kind in the country. “The idea was to have secure indoor parking, lockers, a fitness center and showers all in one place,” Szabo Schmucker says. “We’re trying to take away any excuses people might have for not riding their bikes.” That enthusiasm extends well into the southside. MapMyRide.com,

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Health

A Gray Goat ride

a website on which users can share bike routes, features 633 cycling course entries for Franklin alone. Safety first Sadly, as the number of cyclists continues to increase, so does the number of bicycle-related accidents. According to AAA, on a national scale hundreds of cyclists are killed each year, and tens of thousands more are injured with accidents occurring on busy streets, bike paths, driveways and sidewalks. With that in mind, bike safety is imperative. “Bikes, in general, are lighter now, and brakes are a lot stronger,” says Szabo Schmucker. “There is also a movement toward having daytime running lights. Helmets are lighter, too. They all have to pass the same requirements, but the differences have to do with adjustability and

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the amount of air that can pass through for cooling.” Accidents with cars are of particular concern. “I’ve been hit by a car twice,” Jensen says. “The first time was in 2006, and the second was in 2013.” It’s a problem that Street sees far too often. “A lot of drivers out there still don’t know the laws,” he said. “Sometimes, you see drivers buzz riders with their mirrors or they may speed up and try to go way too fast around a rider, just to make it to a stop sign before the rider does.” While cyclists strive to benefit from the numerous health-related aspects of cycling, industry experts say they need to do everything they can to keep themselves safe and comfortable. “When you’re first starting out, the biggest thing is the helmet,” Street says. “You have to make sure it fits your head or it won’t work the way it’s supposed to.” AAA research indicates that head injuries are the most common cause of death and serious injury among bicyclists. In fact, it’s estimated that bicycle helmets reduce the risk of brain injury by up to 85 percent. But Street also says proper attire, including gloves and riding shorts, should be considered. “And it’s always recommended that you have a bicycle fit to you,” he adds. “You take a flexibility test and your body measurements, and you adapt that information to a bicycle.” Szabo Schmucker believes bicycling is an activity that everyone should try. “It can be done socially, alone or with a family,” she says. “And it can be done for transportation, fun, fitness or competition. “I started riding with a group several years ago, and I can honestly say I felt more connected to the city just by riding my bike,” she says. “It just gives you more of a connection to your surroundings. “People sometimes wave to you or even say ‘hi’ as you pass or as they pass you. “That’s something you usually don’t get when you’re in a car,” she says. “For me, cycling is just a great way to experience the city and community where I live, and it’s an outstanding form of exercise.” SOU T H

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Goodwill

I

When home isn’t so sweet CASA Program of Johnson County serves the best interests of children By Rebecca Berfanger

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Imagine that you are a small child. Maybe you only have one parent living at home or a grandparent is taking care of you. Maybe you have missed a lot of school, even if you weren’t sick. Maybe you haven’t eaten much today. Maybe you haven’t had a bath in a while. Maybe that’s normal in your home. Maybe a neighbor or a teacher or another child in your class suspects something is wrong; maybe this person told someone they didn’t think you were safe. Maybe a caseworker shows up at your house. Maybe there is a police officer with her. Maybe the caseworker tells you and your siblings to grab whatever you can fit in a plastic trash bag. Photos submitted


Maybe you remember to grab your favorite stuffed animal and you hug it tight as the car drives away from your house. Two days later, you haven’t been back to your home. In a courtroom you see a person in a black robe, more strangers, the caseworker who came to your house, an aunt you barely know. The person in the robe orders a court-appointed special advocate, or CASA, to represent you. That CASA will likely be involved in your case for the months, if not years, that your case is open. He might be the only consistent person on your case, even if case managers or therapists come and go. That adult will get to know you and your family. He will ask you questions about how you are doing in school, if you are getting along with your siblings, and questions that are all about you. Before that adult was appointed to the case, he first decided to volunteer for an organization like the CASA Program of Johnson County.

The need for support

Since 1988, CASA Program of Johnson County, one of the first CASA organizations in the state, has been the voice for cases involving children in need of services (CHINS), as well as termination of parental rights (TPR) cases. In such cases, the goal is no longer to reunite the children with their parents. Johnson County CASA Director Tammi Hickman had been a CASA volunteer since the late 1990s. She first got involved when she was a stay-at-home mom and saw an ad for volunteers in the Daily Journal. Hickman says that the need for Johnson County CASAs is greater now than ever because of the high number of newly filed CHINS cases. While she currently has 50 to 60 dedicated volunteers, she would like to have double or even triple that number to meet the increasing demand. The number of new cases spiked in 2011

CASA volunteers at the 2017 CASA rally with Justice Steven David of the Indiana Supreme Court.

to 249, Hickman says. Each case number represents one child, something she attributed to high numbers of meth-related arrests of parents. The number decreased to less than half, 107, in 2013 thanks to the work of local police officers in handling drug cases in Johnson County. However, that decrease would be shortlived. The numbers have steadily crept back up: 157 new cases in 2014, 159 in 2015 and 208 in 2016. The new cases filed in 2017 are on track with 2016 numbers at this time last year, says Hickman. She added that while each case represents one child, CASAs are assigned to cases by family, which could be one or several

children. New volunteers are assigned one family at a time. As for the recent increase, Hickman says more cases involve parents who abuse heroin and prescription opioids, as well as meth and other types of drugs. “I used to see maybe four heroin-related cases a year 25 years ago, now I see four or five every day,” says Johnson County Circuit Judge K. Mark Loyd. “Those cases include criminal cases, but also domestic relations and CHINS cases.” Loyd says that if a parent is arrested for stealing due to a drug addiction and it’s discovered there is no one else to take care of the kids while he is in jail, or if SOU T H

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Goodwill

Tammi Hickman, Johnson County CASA director.

due to addiction the parents are leaving the children alone or not meeting their basic needs, it’s likely that DCS will file a CHINS case as a result. There have also been a number of cases in which a parent’s mental health is an issue, Loyd says; many new CHINS cases will also have a combination of drug use and mental health concerns, he added. Those cases also are staying open longer, Hickman says. Cases close when the court decides there is no longer a need for intervention. In 2010, the average timeline of a case was eight months. In 2017, the average span of a case has jumped to 15 months. That increase can be linked to the high numbers of drug-related cases, Hickman says. “When you’re dealing with drug addictions, the minimum amount of time for a person to get into a program 44

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and stay clean is about three years,” she says. “If parents are serious about it and are attempting services, even if they are relapsing, we’re not going to terminate on them.” She adds that if the parents are not seeking court-mandated help, they are more likely to ask the court to change the child’s plan to adoption after the case has been open at least a year, especially if there is another family willing to adopt the child.

Training days

To train volunteers, Stan Piercefield, who has been a volunteer along with his wife since 2004 and is a former director of Monroe County CASA, will meet for a total of 30 hours with them. The training includes how to investigate cases, which Hickman says is the most time-intensive part for the CASA volunteer. That’s when

the volunteer is first learning about the family, reading the case file, meeting the case manager and service providers. That part of the process can take five to 10 hours, depending on how in-depth the volunteer is in her reporting. To help learn how to interview, Piercefield says they do a role-playing exercise with the volunteers to give them a taste of what it will be like to speak with uncooperative parents, grandparents, even teenagers. According to former CASA trainer Ebbie Crawford, the most important thing to stress with volunteers is the importance of values when it comes to their investigations. “We live in a world of gray. The continuum is lighter gray versus darker gray,” Crawford says. “They have to take a step back and look at that child in that own child’s environment and try to understand that particular family, not from a middle class perspective, but that family’s perspective.” Similarly, Hickman says that she and Piercefield remind volunteers in training that the goal in the beginning of the case is always reunification of the family. “Often volunteers think if this child has been neglected or abused, we need to find them a better home,” she says. “That is not what our role is.” Following those investigations, the CASA then drafts a report, which Hickman will review before it’s submitted to the court. This can be daunting to volunteers, but they write a practice report as part of the training. After the initial investigation, even though some cases last 18 months or longer, the CASA’s tasks are mostly follow-up and maintenance of the case, such as reading the monthly reports by the case manager and service providers. The exception is when the case goes to trial or if something changes. “I try to make the CASAs feel like they are parties to the proceedings, because they are,” says Loyd. At the end of training, they are sworn in as officers of the court and reminded of the importance of their role.


I thought we lost everything in the fire. My agent was there before the flames were out.

Hickman says that she encourages anyone who is interested to contact her about upcoming trainings and ask how they can observe court proceedings; CHINS cases are generally closed to the public. She also appreciates it when people take their time and consider all that is involved with being a CASA before they step up to volunteer. “I have found that my volunteers who are the most successful and longest-serving are the ones who approach me and say, ‘I heard about CASA a few years ago, it wasn’t the right time. But I kept the notice on my fridge, and now I’m ready,’” Hickman says.

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Left, Andrew Roesener, juvenile magistrate, oversees the majority of the CHINS cases. Circuit Court Judge K. Mark Loyd is the supervisor of the CASA Program.

She also realizes that the gig is not for everyone, but it is ultimately rewarding to make a difference for a child. “I joke and say I have a box full of name tags and hair nets at home because I’ve worked so many different jobs,” Hickman says. “But the thing that always kept me coming back to CASA was that every case was different. Not every case was wrapped up with a nice little bow the way I wanted it to, but every time my spirits got down, I got another case with a positive outcome, and it would keep me hooked.”

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Home Trends

News of Hues Interior designers offer colorful insights By Teresa Nicodemus

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“I notice many homeowners wanting to surround themselves with calming colors when they return home after the chaos of the day.” —Kris ragsdale

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In an era of rapid-fire fads, color trends move quickly. In bygone days, particular colors would define a decade, sticking around for all 10 years or more, says Kris Ragsdale, owner of Kris Ragsdale Designs in Greenwood. “There was a period of time to introduce and phase out a color,” she says. “In the pre-internet age, it took a few years for the industry to introduce a color, a few years for it to gain in popularity and then a few years for it to dwindle.” The interior designer has seen home color trends come and go. Regardless of how long a trend lasts, color is a powerful decorating tool that can be combined in infinite ways and can be pleasing to the eye. Color can excite or color can calm.

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White walls and greener pastures

Ragsdale says walls swathed in white are the perfect neutral backdrop for bright hues to debut. The starkness and impartiality of white create a stable foundation for making color stand out in a room. “I notice many homeowners wanting to surround themselves with calming colors when they return home after the chaos of the day,” she adds. Trendy neutrals like muted blues, taupes, pale pinks and earthy greens will continue to settle into our homes throughout 2017. The Pantone Color Institute, a color forecasting company, annually names a color of the year, setting in place trendy hues of the season. The 2017 color, greenery, is “a fresh and rich shade of green,” says Heather Diers, co-owner of ProArt Gallery in Greenwood. As an artist and designer, Diers recognizes the subtlety of a hue and how it can impact a piece of art and the design of a room; greenery, she says, is just such a hue. “It’s flourishing in design circles,” she says. A refreshing welcome from the winter blues, greenery can add focal points of color to an otherwise neutral room, and adding artwork in various colors according to your design theme is an excellent way to draw the eye into a room, adds Diers. Pick up other cues from Mother Nature as you create color pairings in your home’s design, recommends Kim Schwamberger, Sherwin-Williams color program supervisor for Franklin, Center Grove, Greenwood and surrounding areas of Indianapolis. “Nature’s backdrop of green and blue creates a calming effect, or take your inspiration from a flower garden as you witness the various colors of the flowers and how they combine,” says Schwamberger. “You can bring home these colors in fabric or paint.”

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50 shades of greige

Ragsdale suggests pairing dusty rose or corals with grays to make striking SOU T H

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combinations. Another winning match: charcoal color on the walls and white or soft gray furniture provide a cool and calming atmosphere. A popular combination, Schwamberger says, is navy and greige, that is, a mixture that falls somewhere in between gray and beige. Adding a feature wall in a deep color, such as navy, surrounded by neutral gray walls makes a strong design statement. Layering color in a neutral room is a common technique. Trendy methods for layering color, explains Schwamberger, include painted cabinetry. In the past, cabinetry was typically white or stained. Today’s fashionable kitchens, bathrooms, mudrooms and laundry rooms sport painted cabinets, often in shades of blue or gray.

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Painted pieces add vibrancy to your décor. “You can paint a lamp base in your favorite accent color or a side table or a china cabinet,” she says. Use accent pillows, window treatments, throws and area rugs for even more splashes of color. For a unique accent, try painting a coordinating color around an architectural feature in your home. The fireplace can be highlighted by painting around its perimeter, making this your room’s feature wall. Consider adding color to your entryway by painting the inside of your front door. Front doors are often white, blending into the background. However, adding a unique accent color to the inside of the door makes your entire entryway sparkle.

“When I help homeowners with paint color choices, the average person tends to try to match every color exactly. In good design, you want colors to be complementary.” —Kim Schwamberger

Don’t be matchy-matchy

“When I help homeowners with paint

color choices, the average person tends to try to match every color exactly,” Schwamberger says. “In good design, you want colors to be complementary.” An easy way to manage color combinations in design is to use a color wheel available at any craft store, she suggests. Look at the color wheel and identify colors that are opposite your color choice; these colors contrast and make perfect duos. “Remember, you can go a little out of range and move slightly to the left or right of the color opposite, which makes a more vibrant color statement,” she says. “A common mistake I see people make is to pepper the room with too many colors that are not complementary,” says Schwamberger. “It is much more pleasing to the eye to see minimal splashes of color. Many homeowners are afraid of using color; don’t be.”

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Go beyond the brush

Paint is not your only tool for bringing color and texture into a bare room. Brass is coming back to stay for a while, says Ragsdale. The bright gold finish of brass hardware and light fixtures is becoming increasingly popular. Homeowners can take advantage of other methods of applying color, including an oft-vilified throwback medium: wallpaper. “It’s not the nightmare it used to be. Wallpaper on the market today offers easypeel application with a simple removal process,” Schwamberger explains. You can dress up a feature wall or dress up bookshelves by applying wallpaper. If you want to show off your wallpaper design, opt for a less cluttered look in the rest of the room and choose wallpaper in unusual geometric patterns or natural fibers.

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Indiana Made

Knotty Problem Guild aims to bring furniture craftsmen out of the woodwork By Ann Georgescu

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Indiana has a long history of furniture making, a history that is best embodied by the Hoosier cabinet. In the early part of the 20th century, this handy, three-part cupboard, which featured a large base and a pullout workspace, was a staple piece of furniture. At the height of production, the Hoosier Manufacturing Co. made 700 cabinets per day. The Hoosier cabinet has long been relegated to antique stores and memories, but furniture

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Furniture Guild Exhibit

making in Indiana is by no means extinct. Quite the contrary: Since 2014, a group of furniture makers has worked together under the Indiana Artisan name. Known as the Furniture Guild of Indiana Artisans, the group’s returns are that of exposure. The organization aims to help furniture makers market themselves and to educate the public on Hoosier-made furniture. Photos submitted


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Its parent group, Indiana Artisan, was formed in 2008, spearheaded by Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman. “The organization was designed as a way to help art and food artisans expand their businesses through increased sales and to build a brand, based on their work, that defines Indiana by its exceptional arts and foods,” says Indiana Artisan Executive Director Eric Freeman. Today, Indiana Artisan is a self-supporting, nonprofit organization featuring 208 artisans and representing 58 Indiana counties. The handmade products its artisans produce vary and include, along with furniture, soaps, marshmallows, wine, paintings, photographs, ceramics, glassworks, wall-hangings and rugs. Three years ago, the Furniture Guild broke into a subgroup while remaining under the larger Indiana Artisan label. “They can work together on promotion and marketing, making the explanation of value a little easier and reaching a larger audience

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Who’s Who? with a similar message,” Freeman says. Guild Chairman Peter Falk aims to create pieces that fit a client’s personal style while also using local wood, sometimes from the clients’ own trees. “One of the key features of my work is telling your story in wood,” he says. Falk has his own sawmill, which makes fabricating his furniture a little easier. Marketing his work, he says, is more difficult. “As a wood artist, I realized that it is much easier for me to create art than it is to be networking and selling my own work,” he says. “Realizing the time and energy this section of business development was taking, I thought that I am probably not alone.” Soon after Falk was accepted into Indiana Artisan, he and Freeman began working together to develop the guild. From its inception, the Furniture Guild was an opportunity to get the world to notice the artisans. Freeman and Falk recognized

invites you to the

that there were a number of craftsmen who were isolated in small Indiana towns, without access to the customers they needed to be successful. The guild helps get members’ works in front of the public. There’s a Facebook page, @Furniture Guild of Indiana Artisans, populated with photos and content about the members’ works. There are events, such as the May 2015 exhibition at the Judge Stone House in Noblesville. The show featured members’ furniture, arranged and accessorized by an Indianapolis-based interior designer; later that year, the guild was the focus of the annual Indiana Artisan marketplace. These shows help drive up sales and expose guild members to in-state markets. Greg Adams, a furniture maker based in Lapel, creates rustic willow branch furniture that he sells in his retail store in downtown Lapel. His foray into wood crafting began in 1983 while he was com-

The Furniture Guild of Indiana Artisans was formed in 2014. The members are: Peter Falk of Falk Wood Studio in Cutler. Greg Adams of Willow by Greg Adams in Lapel. Kent Susott of Straightgrain Custom Woodworking in Zionsville. Darin Caldwell of Darin Caldwell Design in Tell City. George Abiad of Abiad Woodworking in Anderson. Andrew Cole of Cole & Sons in Russiaville. James Wamsley in Wolcott. Pete Baxter of Pete Baxter Woodworks in Seymour. Nathan Hunter of Bloomington.

For more information about the Furniture Guild of Indiana Artisans, visit indianaartisan.org.

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Indiana Made

From left, furniture by Greg Adams and Darin Caldwell. Opposite page, a chair by Peter Falk.

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muning with nature on the banks of the Wabash River. “I saw some willow saplings and wondered if I would be able to make a basket from them,” he says. At a festival in Metamora, Adams met a furniture maker who made pieces out of willow. Adams, once again, was inspired. Now, Adams crafts his furniture of recycled wood, willow branches, leather, birch bark and fabric. His end goal is to reach an audience that extends beyond Indiana’s state lines. “I hope to have my work embellish homes throughout the country and hopefully enrich my customer’s lives by the presence of natural items in their everyday lives,” he says. Reaching such a wide market means tapping into markets outside the Hoosier state. Adams’ out-of-state ventures began at a show on the East Coast; soon he was doing 30 shows a year across the country. These days, he divides his time between traveling to shows (about 10 per year) and working at his workshop/retail space, Willow by Greg Adams. He knows that to be successful, the younger artists need access to the larger markets on the East and West coasts. But the shows that would lead young artisans to those prime coastal markets have expensive entry fees and take time, he says. “And most of the guys have day jobs, which prevents them from going.” To become a Furniture Guild member, one must first go through the juried process of becoming an Indiana Artisan. It’s a process Freeman encourages Hoosier craftspeople to undertake. “Hoosiers have a tendency to be awfully demure about their work and have a tendency to say, my work is not good enough,” he says. “If they are a furniture maker, I would encourage them to apply to Indiana Artisan.”

For information on how to advertise in

Indy’s southside magazine

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Travel

Working vacation Ranch stays are a popular travel option By Glenda Winders

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Photos submitted


Photography by Kate Matheson

I Zapata Ranch

It seems that the more global, mobile and technologically sophisticated people become, the more they long to roll back the calendar to a simpler time and to experience life as their parents and grandparents might have lived it. Now, thanks to the growing number of farm- and ranch-stay options, they can spend their vacations doing exactly that. “We tend to appeal to families with children,” says Scottie Jones, founder and executive director of Farm Stays U.S., a trade association and support group for farms and ranches that welcome guests. “They are interested in the health of their kids and in where their food comes from,” she says. “They also tend to be urban, and their children don’t have any connection with eggs other than taking them out of a carton from the grocery store. One of the most frequent questions we get is, ‘Can I milk something?’” Jones says their guests also want to be able to disconnect. “The plugged-in part of their lives has made it difficult to communicate in any other form, like sitting down at the dinner table and talking,” Jones says. “People are so surprised that not only can they brush a donkey or collect eggs or play in the creek, but they talk and play together. It’s kind of like 1950s Beaver Cleaver time.” Contrary to a popular misconception, Jones says guests are not required to do chores, but they’re welcome if they want to. “It’s very un-programmed,” she says. “We absolutely respect the fact that you’re paying us to stay. If you want to sit on the deck and drink a cup of hot chocolate or a glass of wine, that’s fine, too.” It all sounds good, but before

you zip into your overalls or strap on your spurs, you need to do some research. Each farm and ranch has its own special attractions; one farm might have chickens, goats or horses. At another, the owner might teach you to make cheese or let you help hoe the garden or pick peaches. A ranch might invite you to go horseback riding or teach you to brand cattle or learn to twirl a rope. Some destinations that have antiques in the rooms and take their guests wine-tasting are more attractive to couples looking for a romantic getaway. Some can accommodate only six guests at a time, while others can host wedding parties and family reunions. And the people you’ll meet might make your holiday even better. Ranchers report that many of their guests are Europeans who want to come to the United States for this uniquely American experience. One approach is to choose a destination close to other places you want to see, such as the Grand Canyon. Some owners organize trips to museums, art galleries and places to shop. Whatever you decide, Jones makes a promise to guests. “You won’t be bored; you won’t get dirty — unless you want to,” she says. “And we’ll make it fun.” We’ve limited our search for farms and ranches to the Southwest, but farm experiences are available all over the country. A good place to start is www.farmstaysus.com; on the site, you can enter the part of the country where you want to travel, and you can further narrow your search by indicating what types of activities interest you. Or just Google “farm stays” or “ranch stays” and explore the many choices that come up.

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Scurlock Farms

Scurlock Farms 301 Scurlock Farms Road, Georgetown, Texas. (512) 639-4433, scurlockfarms.com  Scurlock Farms is located in the Texas Hill Country on the San Gabriel River, which offers fishing, tubing and kayaking as well as fossil-hunting along its limestone banks. The area is good for bird-watching and hiking and in the fall for leaf-peeping and pecan harvesting. “The farm is a good base for day-trips and equally good for lying in a hammock and listening to the birds,” owner Sheron Scurlock says. Guests enjoy interacting with cattle, goats and horses, and they keep their cameras ready for the deer, foxes, bobcats, opossums, coyotes and raccoons that sometimes visit. Scurlock bakes fresh muffins and provides fruit baskets for breakfast. The houses are stocked with food basics and condiments so guests can choose to picnic at tables outside. A trip into town leads to art galleries and theater, and it’s just a two-hour drive to Fredericksburg, known for its art studios, galleries and wineries. Scurlock’s mother was the Texas landscape artist C.P. Montague, who was one of President Lyndon Johnson’s favorite painters. She and her husband built the homes (one of which was her studio) on the farm themselves with stones they gathered from the river. Scur62

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lock has placed notebooks in each room with snippets from her mother’s journals for guests to enjoy. Concho Hills Guest Ranch 1522 Remuda Trail, Magdalena, New Mexico. (575) 772-5757, conchohillsranch.com  This is a working ranch, so a stay begins with riding lessons to provide visitors with the skills they’ll need to take part. “When we’re riding out there on the open plain, we never know when some critter is going to run in front of us or you run

Stagecoach Trails Guest Ranch

across some obstacle, such as an arroyo,” says owner Tim Norris. In addition to riding, guests can learn to chop wood, tend a branding fire, crack a whip in order to herd cattle, throw an atlatl (or spear-throwing tool) and shoot a pistol. They can also take a tour of Magdalena, which grew up when the railroad came to haul ore from the local silver, gold, lead and zinc mines and allowed cattlemen to ship their animals to stockyards in the East instead of driving them. They’ll hear about how Geronimo was first captured 25 miles away and be regaled with tales about such icons as the Apache Kid. “The ranch is completely about the area’s Western heritage and lifestyle,” Norris says. “This area of New Mexico is where the Wild West really happened.” Because of safety issues, children younger than 12 are not invited, but Norris says parents of older kids like to see them up and doing things instead of sitting on the sofa with an electronic device. “They like for someone else to tell their kids they can’t use the internet,” he says.


Stagecoach Trails Guest Ranch 19985 S. Doc Holliday Road, Yucca, Arizona. (866) 444-4471, stagecoachtrailsranch.com  J.P. McCormick, who along with his wife, Patricia, owns the ranch, says one attractive feature of their property is that they are located near the Grand Canyon and two hours south of Las Vegas, so guests can combine visits to those areas with a ranch stay. Another plus is that they offer ATV rides to old gold mines along with mountain bikes, a pool, riding lessons, archery, cowboy action shooting, wagon rides — especially when there’s a full moon — and a petting zoo. They welcome all riding skill levels and often take their guests out into the mountains and desert for a lunch before heading back. “We are a family-oriented ranch,” McCormick says. “Parents like to be able to let their kids run around and not have to worry about them.” Those same children would probably enjoy the opportunity to sleep in the ranch’s Conestoga wagon to experience how pioneers spent the night under the stars. The only difference is that this one comes with heat and air conditioning. Stagecoach Trails is the only ranch in the country to offer complete accessibility for disabled visitors. Because the McCormicks have a daughter in a wheelchair, they have outfitted every room with subtle changes such as roll-in showers and wide doorways. Best of all, they have a lift that can raise a disabled person to the height of a horse so that he can join in the riding fun. Three Sparrows Farm 2325 Silver Juniper Ranch Road, Prescott, Arizona. (928) 9252988, 3sparrowsfarm.com  When owner Erin Van Patten and her husband, Doug, met at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, their love of adventure drew them together. They headed west and eventually established this farm, which they call “a little bit of heaven on earth.” On the two-acre farm they have just one cabin that sleeps six people, but their description of collecting warm eggs for breakfast and having coffee on the porch with a good book

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Stagecoach Trails Guest Ranch

or taking a hike sounds positively blissful. The cabin is equipped with a kitchenette so guests can be as independent as they want. “We’re family-oriented,” Van Patten says. “Kids don’t usually get to run free, but here they can. And they can ask questions.” The farm animals consist of Mini Mancha goats, chickens and Button, a mini Sicilian donkey. “I love kids, and this is hands-on for them,” Van Patten says. “They can help

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causes that matter


with the chores, watch a baby goat being born, bottle-feed the newborn kid and collect eggs. I’ve taught a 2-year-old how to milk goats, and recently four little boys helped me weed my garden.” Children can also play on a tree swing and gather sticks for that night’s fire pit, and Van Patten says she always has her own kitchen stocked with all of the ingredients for making s’mores. Zapata Ranch 5305 State Highway 150, Mosca, Colorado. (719) 378-2356, zranch.org  Zapata Ranch is in a category of its own. Owned by the Nature Conservancy and managed by Ranchlands, the ranch is run with the aim of restoring the property’s ecosystem to health. “Most of our guests are interested in an active outdoor adventure with an emphasis

Zapata Ranch

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Zapata Ranch

on learning about nature, wildlife and how conservation can be a product of ranching,” says Kate Matheson, manager of marketing and guest operations. “They have the opportunity to learn about our holistic management practices, the chance to be hands-on in day-to-day operations, ride without set trails and to really explore more than 190,000 acres of protected meadows, prairie, creeks, sand dunes and mountains.” Matheson says guests can look forward to participating in such activities as checking herd health, putting out minerals for livestock, repairing fences and taking horseback rides that enable them the freedom to explore the ranch through a 2,000head wild bison herd, taking horseback rides in the Great Sand Dunes National Park, hiking, leather-working, massages and such off-ranch activities as rock-climbing, fly-fishing and rafting on the Arkansas River. They can also come to the ranch for 66

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workshops and seminars in such areas as horsemanship, painting and photography. The ranch’s principles are in evidence at mealtime, too. “Our food program is very important to us,” Matheson says. “We source as much local produce as possible from our very productive farming valley. Everything is homemade from scratch.”  Mountain Goat Lodge 9582 Highway 285, Salida, Colorado. (719) 539-7173, mountaingoatlodge.com  As the name implies, this farm is all about goats. Guests can pet them and milk them, and this summer they’ll be able to

take part in a new activity, goat yoga, where people do yoga while goats intermingle with them. “People like coming out and staying on a farm and learning how to do things and seeing things in action and having a good time without having to have a farm of their own,” says Gina Marcell, owner and self-described “chief goat wrangler.” “It’s a little weekend version.” Lodge guests get to watch the staff milk the goats, and if they take a tour of the barn they are encouraged to interact with all of the animals. They can also take classes in how to make cheese and raise goats and chickens. “We use the products we make — goat yogurt, goat cheese and goat milk — for breakfast,” Marcell says. “I use produce from my own greenhouse.” Her love of animals extends to welcoming visitors’ pets. They have special areas for dogs and horses and one room devoted to visitors with cats, since many people are allergic. Something else that makes this spot appealing is the opportunity to stay in retro 1950s campers. “People who stay in them can be as involved with the farm as they want but still have their own camping experience,” she says.

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highly

decorated Dale Hughes has carefully crafted a distinguished career in interior design By Jon Shoulders / Photography by Jennifer Dummett

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Dale Hughes and Terry Blair in Hughes’ 1965 Thunderbird.

D

Dale Hughes doesn’t believe in problems; he prefers to treat them as opportunities.

Throughout more than a decade as a full-time residential and commercial interior designer based in Franklin, Hughes has used this simple, sanguine philosophy, coupled with a tireless work ethic and an inborn flair for design and color, to guide him to the top of his field. Being at the top includes accolades and numerous awards; in fact, 2017 saw Hughes voted best interior designer on The Indy A-List.

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Endlessly active around Franklin in professional, philanthropic and social capacities, he often can be found sporting one of his signature porkpie hats. “It doesn’t matter that there’s an issue, whether it be something with the start of the design process or when the work begins and the contractors are in,” Hughes explains. “What matters is how you approach it and how you resolve it. That’s


Bowls handed down from Hughes’ mother.

Hughes and Blair’s kitchen is decorated with a retro feel.

the important thing: being proactive and working hard to make sure the end result is satisfactory for everybody.” Raised in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, Hughes studied art at Cumberland College (now known as University of the Cumberlands) in Williamsburg, Kentucky, before working for several years as an assistant in the psychiatric department at Community Hospital South in Indianapolis and in various capacities at Valle Vista Hospital in Greenwood. In 1988 he began selling artwork for In-

dy-based Final Touch Art Gallery, visiting potential buyers in their homes to pitch his products. Soon discovering that he had an innate sense for salesmanship, Hughes spent almost 20 years with the business, winning several company sales awards along the way. Looking back, he feels the experience was the perfect precursor to a successful design career. “I started doing some design work part time while I was still selling artwork full time, and around 2005 I was ready for a change,” he recalls. The perfect networking

opportunity to help launch his interior design operation arose in 2005, when one of Hughes’ home designs was featured as part of Home-A-Rama, an annual residential showcase event organized by the Builders Association of Greater Indianapolis. “There were over 30,000 people on that tour of nine houses or so, and I must’ve given away hundreds of business cards,” Hughes says. “It was such an important moment to have gotten on that tour and be able to put myself out there. With all the years gone by I still have people who SOU T H

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Blair handles the business side of Dale Hughes Interior Design. The framed photo is of Blair’s grandfather’s 1967 Buick Electra 225, the car that inspired him to get his own Buick Electra. Below, Hughes’ mother, Virginia May, in the Thunderbird that he also calls Virginia May.

remember me from that, or people who’ve kept my card and called me years later.” By 2006, Hughes had officially founded Dale Hughes Interior Design, with a growing clientele and boundless newfound energy for what he feels is his true calling. “I think most everyone has that certain something that they just have a talent for,” he says. “I can go into a client’s home almost every time, and between seeing their home, getting an idea of the lifestyle and having a conversation, I can pretty well nail what it is that they’re wanting.” With a client list consisting of home and business owners as far south as Bedford and as far north as Carmel, Hughes consults on virtually every aspect of interior design, from paint colors and lighting to flooring and cabinetry to furniture and artwork placement. “Dale has a great eye for detail and color matching, and knowing what’s really going to come together,” says Dr. Scott Miles, for whom Hughes has helped design two homes. “He can put the whole package 72

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together — flooring, cabinets, paint choices — and he has an innovative eye that’s second to none.” Hughes assisted with the interior redesigning of Miles’ former Center Grove residence in 2010, and when the time came to choose a designer and art coordinator for his new home in Jacksonville, Florida, last year, Miles knew exactly where to turn. “Beyond the great instincts Dale has, where he really excels is that once he’s got the design laid out, he’s got great subcontractors and he oversees everything,” Miles says. “He never walks away from a job until the client is completely satisfied.” Since 1989 Hughes has worked out of his Franklin home on

Jefferson Street and says the nature of his design duties lends itself well to a home office. “I continue to work that way because I outsource everything, and it keeps costs down,” he says. “Kentucky logic says if you keep your costs down, you can pass that savings on to the client.” Hughes is quick to attribute much of his company’s success to his life partner, Terry Blair, a Bluffton native who studied business at Ball State and who handles the accounting for the design company. “Terry is really an unsung hero of this operation,” Hughes says. “He doesn’t get the praise that I get because I’m on the front line doing all the design stuff. He does all the bookwork, which allows me to go out and have my mind free to be able to do a good job for people. If it wasn’t for Terry and his skills, I would probably be living in a tent right now.” Hughes brought his talents to bear in a community service capacity last year, designing the bar area at the new Jefferson Street headquarters for the Franklin Elks Lodge, of which he is a member and trustee. He serves as chairman for a few local benefit events, including the annual Elks


Hughes’ collection of hats.

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Hughes recently decorated the living room and bedroom, above and below left, of Kim and Kenny Pearson, as well as rooms at the Johnson County Community Foundation, below right.

Submitted Photo

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Lodge Jammin’ for a Cure cancer research fundraiser and the Franklin Chamber of Commerce Cash Bash, which generates funds for maintenance and improvements to the chamber’s office building on Jefferson Street. When they’re able to step away from company duties, Hughes and Blair often fire up their mobile trailer for camping excursions, or jump in one of their vintage cars — Blair’s 1967 Buick Electra 225, dubbed “Bernice” after the car’s first owner, or Hughes’ 1965 Thunderbird convertible, named “Virginia May” in honor of his mother — for road trips.

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Give customers anywhere access to features you all the need on one platform. customers throughout their buyingAre decision. your family business on and the go? friends Give customers anywhere access to full alla the features you need on one platform. customers throughout their buying Jackfor&you. Jill bathroom. Entertain all your here with walk out your website while generating more business your website while generating more business for you. MOBILE WEBSITE basement complete with theater room, pool table room, full kitchen and a large MOBILE WEBSITE DESIGN DIRECTDESIGN EMAIL —Dale Hughes DIRECT EMAIL RESPONSIVE WEBSITE DESIGN RETARGETING Reach the right people at the gathering area. Step outReach to amazing tops, the right outdoor people at kitchen the right with time. granite counter Today, more local Build customers are searching your Create the bestRegain user experience on all devices. lost customers. your email marketingfor campa smartphones. Are base! you losing Help your business become more credible and visible to with their customer Usingcustomers your mostse c Today, more local customers are searching for your business built in bar stools, built in grill station and a heated in-ground pool! And if this Say goodbye to spending money onlost multiple website updates. Don’t miss out on business. Today’s take Build yourcustomers email marketing campaigns and expand your your business on the Give customers anywhere potential customers with professional Logo Creation. Create yourgo? campaigns reach active and h their smartphones. you losing customers searching for and more local customers searching for yourmore business This cutting-edge technology provides one website thatAre adjusts Help yourare business credible and visible to with your website whileDirect generating business for you “We go Today, to Michigan every year to become camp, customer base! Using your most current data ensures consistent branding across all platforms stand out from Email more will help to micro-targ isn’t enough check out the huge barn with its own office! Priced at $1,200,000. with their smartphones. Are you losing customers searching for to the size and resolution every device - automatically! Get customers Now Create youfor can keep in touch stay relevant to your your business onand the go? Give anywhere access to leads. provide you with real-time email m potential customers with professional Logo Creation. your campaigns reach active and high-quality business on the go? Give branding customers anywhere to features all the you need onyour one platform. LOGO CREATION customers throughout their buying decision. moreCall which is a your great time,” Hughes says. “I website while generating business for you. yourtoaudience Immediate possession. TODAY see inside! consistent across allaccess platforms and stand out from Direct Email will help to me micro-target and your website while generating more business for you. SOCIAL MEDIA OPTIMI Make a strong impression. provide you with real-time email metrics. always love going on vacation, but I love MOBILE WEBSITE DESIGN How many places do and youvisib shin Help your business become more credible DIRECT EMAILCREATION LOGO potential customers with media professional Logoword-of-m Creation Visit smartchoiceindy.com information. Social is the new Build, manage, for and grow more your online business with coming back to Franklin where everybody consistent branding across all platforms and stand Reach the right people at SOCIAL the right time. that businesses who engage theiro MEDIA OPTIMIZATION E-Commerce. With the ability to reach customers 24/7, you Make a strong your impression. your competitors with uniquethan logothose design. growa faster who don’t. Today, more local Build customers are searching business your email marketingfor campaigns and expand your knows your name. Franklin is a magical loyal customers updated and gain more potential customers, and AreHelp you losing customers searching for places How many do and you shine? your business become more credible visible to eliminate missed revenue Help your business become more credible and visible to with their smartphones. customer base! UsingRETARGETING yourWEBSITE most current data ensures RESPONSIVE DESIGN E-COMMERCE your business on the go? Give customers anywhere access to leads. Logo Creation. Create potential customers with professional Logo Creation. Create your campaigns reach active and high-quality potential customers with professional place. When friends come visit and goyour online media is the new word-of-mouth. It’s no coincidence Build, manage, andwe grow withgenerating more business forSocial REPUTATION MONITOR yourbusiness website while you. your Manage your store from anywhere. consistent branding across all platforms and stand out from Direct Email will helpRegain to micro-target audience and consistent branding across all platforms and stand from Create the best user experience on all devices. lost customers. SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION that businesses who engage theirout customers via social media With are the ability to reach customers 24/7, you Know what your business customers Build, manage, and grow your online witha RESPONSIVE WEBSITE DES provide you with real-time email metrics. RETARGETING around town, they say,E-Commerce. ‘Gosh, Dale, your competitors with a faster uniquethan logothose design. grow who don’t. Now it’s easy to keep your the ability reach customers 24 let badtoreviews shut you dow LOGO CREATION Say goodbye to spending money onlost multiple website updates. Don’t miss out on business. Today’s customers take E-Commerce. WithDon’t opinion and the Internet provides t Create the best user experience on a loyal customers updated and gain new ones. Regain lost customer more potential customers, and eliminate missed revenue people really SOCIAL MEDIAtechnology OPTIMIZATION Today, that morefriendly?’” local customers are searching forMake your abusiness and eliminate missed reve This cutting-edge provides one websiteIfthat 70% of consumers trusting online your competitors? searchadjusts engines don’t know you exist,more you potential customers, strong impression. Say goodbye to spending money on multip Don’t lost bus E-COMMERCE opportunities to boost yourmiss bottomout line!on to ignore what’s being said online. are invisible. Ranking higher inGet search results helps customers with their smartphones. Are you losing customers searching for to the size and resolution for every device automatically! Now you can keep in touch and stay relevant to your Hughes’ enthusiasm for career and How many places do and youToday, shine? Help your business become more credible visible to more local customers are searching for your business This cutting-edge technology provides one REPUTATION MONITORING potential access customers professional Logo Creation. Create Manage your store from anywhere. your business on the customers towithfeatures allSocial the you need ontheir one platform. customers throughout their buying decision. media is the new word-of-mouth. It’s no coincidence SEARCH OPTIMIZATION CALL TRACKING Build, manage, andsigns growgo? your online businessany with anywhere with smartphones. Are you losing customers searching for to the size andENGINE resolution for every device Now you can keep in touc RESPONSIVE WEBSITE DESIGN RETARGETING community shows no oftoGive flagging SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION consistent branding across all platforms and stand out from that businesses who engage their customers via social media E-Commerce. With the ability reach customers 24/7, you Know what your customers about you. your website while generating more business for you. your business on the business go? Give customers anywhere access toShine all the features you need on one platform. customers throughout brighter than your competitors. Build, grow your online withare saying Bring your business out ofthe the Create themanage, best userand experience oneasy all devices. Regain lost customers. your competitors with a faster unique logo design. grow than those who don’t. Now it’s to keep your time soon.more potential customers, and eliminate missed revenue your website while generating more business How do you know your marketing With the ability toreviews reach customers 24/7, you for you. Don’t letlost bad shut you down. has an MOBILE WEBSITE DESIGN SayE-Commerce. goodbye to spending money on multiple website updates. Don’t miss outnew on business. Today’s customers take Everyone loyal customers updated and gain ones. DIRECT EMAIL your competitors?Today, If search engines don’tphone know you more than ever, calls Arethat youadjusts losing customers due to incorrect contact info? MOBILE WEBSITE DESIGN Today, more local customers are searching for your business This cutting-edge technology provides one the website opinion and Internet provides the megaphone. With DIRECT EMAIL higher in search results helps sources of quality leads for your bu Get more customers by increasing your online credibility are invisible. Ranking “My goal every time I do a job, whether E-COMMERCE with their smartphones. Are you losing customers searching for size potential to the and resolution every device - automatically! Get to your Now customers, youfor can keep in touch and stay relevant more and eliminate missed revenue shed light on what leads you gain 70% ofright consumers trusting online reviews, you can’tbusiness afford by maintaining up-to-date, consistent and visible your competitors? If search engines don’t know you exist, Reach the at the right time. REPUTATION MONITORING your business on the go? Give customers anywhere access toyou all the features you need on one platform. customers throughout theirpeople buying decision. Reach the right peopl information across top search engines and directories. 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Bringing the

fun home

From shrimp boils to beach volleyball, Ace and Sara Rink enjoy shaping and sharing their Bargersville home’s outdoor entertaining space By Carolyn Doyle / Photography by Jennifer Dummett

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Ace Rink, left, and Ben White make use of the Rinks' grill.

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The Rinks' outdoor living space includes room for entertaining visitors. Pictured, from left, Amy Willis and Sara and Ace Rink.

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When Sara and Ace Rink get the urge to go out, they don’t mean leaving their Bargersville property. Instead, they prefer to entertain friends in their outdoor living space, which includes a pool, fireplace and kitchen, plus a deck with a dining table that seats 14. And if you don’t care to swim, that’s OK; there’s always beach volleyball. “We’ve got a regulation-size volleyball court. It’s a lot of fun,” Sara says of the sand-filled space. The Rinks’ 6,000-square-foot home sits on about 14 acres just west of State Road 135. When they moved in, there was no outdoor entertaining area. “This was one big empty yard,” she says. “Well, it wasn’t empty; it was full of thistles.” But the couple, whose immediate family includes 10-year-old daughter, Ava, knew the land had potential. They envisioned an outdoor space designed for family of all ages, friends and fun. “We like things that are really rustic,” Sara says, “and I like kind of an industri-

al feel. My husband and I just sat down and drew up a bunch of ideas of what we liked.” Their brainstorming helped to shape an outdoor entertaining oasis, starting when Ace and Sara, both 34, had the swimming pool, fireplace and outdoor kitchen installed in 2015. “It all went pretty quick,” she says, with the work being completed in one to two months. They worked with Margarito Mendoza Galindo, owner of Galindo Brothers in Indianapolis, to design the 65-foot-wide rock and earthen mound. It helps to block the wind and screens the pool area from the busy road. “He does the absolute best landscaping work,” Sara says. Landscaped with rocks, evergreen trees and plants, it took 14 truckloads of dirt and eight or nine truckloads of boulders to construct the barrier. “Some days the trucks were just lining up,” she says. “Some of these boulders are 3,000 to 4,000 pounds.” Brad Farmer, owner of Farmer Concrete in Cloverdale, did the stamped concrete around the entire pool, fireplace and SOU T H

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outdoor kitchen area. Sara especially likes the wide wood plank stamped concrete pattern he installed in the outdoor kitchen area. It echoes the style of the reclaimed North Carolina barn wood flooring featured inside their home; some of those boards are more than a hundred years old, with unique textures and patterns. Originally the Rinks wanted a complicated pool; Sara says she visualized something kidney-shaped and featuring a lazy river and a grotto. But, she says, “I’ve got to remember we live in Indiana, and you have to winterize things.” So they opted for a larger rectangular pool and built up the landscaping around it instead. Joe Hughes, owner of Elegant Pools in Franklin, installed the 20-by-40-foot swimming pool. “It was quite a project,” Sara says. “Joe Hughes did a good job; he only took two weeks to get the pool in.” It includes a curved slide. “The slide is fast,” she says. “It shoots you out like a rocket.” The pool is cleaned regularly with a robotic pool cleaner that has treads like a miniature Army tank and works by scooting along the bottom and sides of the pool like an aquatic Roomba, filtering out debris. “It’s a lifesaver,” she says.

Beach play

And then there’s the volleyball court, the first outdoor feature the couple added to the property after they purchased it in 2011. “We threw a big housewarming party the year we moved in, and that was a big hit,” she says. “We just decided we wanted a sand volleyball court, something fun when we have our friends over,” says Sara, who grew up playing softball and volleyball. So they had the land flattened and filled it with sand. They’ve gotten a lot of use out of it. Ace, who served in the Marines and played football in high school, says his favorite part of the family’s outdoor space is “just being able to see my daughter enjoy herself outside.” “ I never grew up with a pool,” he says. “She’ll never outgrow the pool, she’ll never outgrow the volleyball, so I know that for many years to come, I’ll be able to see my daughter still playing at the house.” “Even when she’s a teenager, maybe she’ll still want to hang out at home,” laughs Sara.

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From left, Andrea White, Sara Rink and Amy Willis enjoy lounging by the outdoor fireplace.

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One weekend for big kids

Ace and Sara, who have been married for 13 years, hail from Elkhart. “We still do have a lot of close friends up in the South Bend area,” she says. “They’ll come down and visit us on a regular basis.” When friends gather at the Rinks’ house, there are plenty of kids running around … except one weekend a year. Come Labor Day, the Rinks hold a sleepover for grown-ups. “All our friends, they get baby sitters, and it’s the one chance for our friends to get together and we don’t have to worry about watching the kids,” Sara says. “We end up sometimes with 25 or 30 people staying here.” They have a small guest house on the property, and “sometimes we’ve actually

had them pitch tents,” she says. “It makes for a nice weekend. We do pool volleyball. Sometimes we set up a paintball course in the back, with our bunkers and all that kind of stuff. We did dodgeball last year.”

A versatile space

Whether it’s Labor Day weekend or any time of year, the Rinks enjoy being able to extend their living and entertaining space outdoors. “We have a nice property for it; we really do,” Sara says. “We have a good time with it. We’re constantly adding things and coming up with new things to do with it. A lot of my daughter’s school friends come here to hang out.” The Rinks added an elevated deck


last year, over the course of several months, which leads from the house to the pool. “My husband and I built the entire deck ourselves,” she says. “The table up there that my husband built is the perfect size. It accommodates 14 people.” Despite his wife’s endorsement, Ace — an executive with a national furniture store chain — is quick to deny master furniture craftsman status. “I sell it better than I make it,” he says. “It’s a hobby.” The deck is the perfect dining spot when they have shrimp boils. Ace and Sara enjoy throwing these parties for friends, using an outdoor turkey fryer to heat water that cooks the whole meal: potatoes, corn, crab legs and shrimp. “We throw some newspapers in the middle and dump our shrimp bowl out” on the table, she says, “and everybody just crowds around, and you can talk with everybody.” The Rinks prefer entertaining at home. “We like to have our friends over quite a bit,” she says. The pergola-sheltered outdoor kitchen, complete with wine cooler, fridge and extensive counter space, makes it convenient to toss some burgers or hot dogs on the grill for poolside dining. “We have LED lights on the pool,” Sara says, “so when we have our gatherings, we just flip the lights on, and people can swim; they can sit by the fireplace. It’s a nice little entertaining area,” and a space where the family enjoys grilling and hanging out even when there’s no company. But as pleasant as their outdoor space is,

they have plans for a couple of additions. Ace says he’s looking forward to having a greenhouse. Sara has her own wish list as well. “I want a small pool house with a little bathroom and a changing area,” she says. “It’ll have an outdoor shower, so when we’re done with the volleyball court, everyone’s not jumping in [the pool] covered in sand.” And speaking of volleyball, Sara envisions a set of younger players taking over the court one day: Their daughter is going to her first volleyball camp this summer. SOU T H

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W i t h a song in their hearts

The Chordlighters find harmony in performance By Jenny Elig, with reporting by Shelby Rizzi Photography by Renee Knight

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The Chordlighters are the Columbus-Greenwood chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. The group in its current incarnation was formed 30 years ago when the Columbus Chordsmen and the Greenwood Gaslighters joined forces. “Both chapters were kind of struggling with membership, and we decided to get together and merge into one chapter,” says member Tom Fricke, who has been singing barbershop-style music for 49 years. Fricke has been with The Chordlighters for the entirety of the group’s existence. The name was a portmanteau of the original names; today, members are scattered about the southside, including Franklin, Beech Grove and Greenwood.

Scientific studies have shown that singing — more specifically, singing in groups — soothes fried nerves and raises levels of elation in the singers. These physical responses serve as something of a reward; think of the phenomenon as an evolutionary pat on the head to the singers for working so well together. Opening refrains Tuesday evenings at Franklin’s Grace It begins with a solitary note, blown on a United Methodist Church are full of rewards. pitch pipe, a short hum of a tone from which Each week at 7 p.m. men’s voices join in fourthe singers find their notes. The 25 active part harmony as The Chordlighters barbersingers find their place in the chord with no shop chorus rehearses. Together other accompaniment. for 30 years, the group performs Barbershop-style music is in and around the southside, made up of four parts: lead, tenor, These pages show The Chordlighters producing a sound that hails baritone and bass. The lead sings at their 30th back more than 100 years. the melody, the tenor harmonizes anniversary show “Barbershop music is deabove the melody, the bass sings at Franklin’s signed to take its audience on the lowest harmonizing notes, and Historic Artcraft an emotional journey,” says the baritone completes the chord, Theatre. chorus director Bob Kendall. usually below the lead. Barbershop “To me, barbershop music has choruses, such as The Chordlightthe power to make the world a better place. ers, follow the same structure as quartets, Our audiences like to hear our message of but with more singers. During performances, hope. They like to be reminded that the world group members sing as a whole or break into is still full of good people.” quartets for select songs.

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districts across the United States and Canada; Indiana is in the Cardinal district. The Chordlighters are open to any man who wants to sing. The admission policy has yielded a diverse group, composed of men of varying ages with careers ranging from farmers to businessmen. “We do have a couple of high school-age guys,” Kendall says. “Our oldest members right now are probably in their mid-80s. It’s economically diverse, too. The guy who picks up your trash is standing next to your doctor.” To join the group, potential members first show up to practice. Along with group practice each Tuesday, members receive CDs of the songs so they can practice on their own. Song selections come from a variety of sources; the group’s repertoire ranges from the 1930s to the 1980s. Fats Waller’s “Lulu’s Back in Town” might be followed by Billy Joel’s “For the Longest Time.” Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline,” sung in four-part harmony, is always a crowd-pleaser. Barbershop-style harmonies go back a little further and were born of the spirituals of the late 19th century, Fricke says. If barbershop quartets seem distinctly American, it’s because they are, he says. Barbershop Harmony Society (aka Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America, that is, SPEBSQSA), of which The Chordlighters are a chapter, was formed in April 1938 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, by friends Owen Clifton Cash and Rupert Hall, two guys who just wanted to get their friends together to sing. The Barbershop Harmony Society, now based in Nashville, Tennessee, is the world’s largest all-male singing society, with 22,000 members across North America. If you count affiliated men’s and women’s organizations in more than a dozen countries, that number rises to 80,000 worldwide. The organization operates with the mission of preserving and encouraging the performance of barbershop music. The Barbershop Harmony Society is arranged in 17

For the sake of song

Chordlighters President Gordon Morrow has been with the group for 10 years; he started in the bass section before switching to “To me, barbershop music has the power baritone. Singing in a barberto make the world shop quartet is his hobby and a better place. Our his preferred form of escapism, audiences like to Morrow says. “It’s the opporhear our message tunity to escape our everyday of hope. They like to be reminded that work-life and get together with the world is still full a bunch of guys and make harof good people.” mony,” he says. The group puts — Bob Kendall on three or four shows a year. In May, they celebrated The Chordlighters’ 30th anniversary with a show of assorted love songs. The Barbershop Harmony Society offers its chapters plenty of opportunities for competition, Morrow says. Competing was one of the factors that brought Kendall into the mix. As he aged out of competitive sports, he found that barbershop quartets fed sever-

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al of his needs: camaraderie, the desire to perform and the drive to compete. Kendall directs the Chordlighters; he also sings with the Late Shift, The Arrangements and Replay. These quartets have all placed in Barbershop Harmony Society’s annual international competition. “On the barbershop quartet circuit, (Indiana is) honestly pretty hot right now,” Kendall says. “The last two international quartet champions have come from Indiana. It’s the best-kept secret.” But competing is not a Chordlighters priority, Morrow says. “We are just more about doing our shows,” he says. “There is the joy of making harmony, singing to audiences and touching lives with the magic of music.” Marc Hagn, a Franklin-based Chordlighter, has been with the group for nine years. “If I have one regret, it would be not joining The Chordlighters sooner,” he says. Being involved with the group transcends perform-

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ing, he says. One of Hagn’s favorite memories with the group was a trip to a hospice center, where the chorus sang for patients. “We ended up being there for hours, going from room to room, and people were just crying, in a good way,” he says. Another group favorite is the Singing Valentines. During the month of February, members deliver valentines in song format, Kendall says. It’s the group’s biggest fundraiser and also a chance to see just how much of an emotional impact four-part harmonies can have. One Valentine’s Day saw a quartet singing a valentine to a burly, intimidating firefighter, he says; the recipient burst into happy tears as the quartet sang. “Barbershop is about amateurs performing live music for live, and usually small, local audiences,” Morrow says. “This is about enriching lives of the performers and the audience through an experience that can’t be had watching TV.”


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Worth the Trip

Linking the Courses The Triple Play package combines three golf hot spots By Glenda Winders

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Photos submitted


Sultan’s Run Golf Club Jasp e r

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Most golfers have a bucket list of courses they’d like to play, but sometimes the price tag is just too steep to be able to check them off. Among those dream courses are three in southern Indiana — that is, the Donald Ross in French Lick, the Pete Dye in West Baden and Sultan’s Run in Jasper — and the good news is that now even the thriftiest golfer can play them all. The French Lick Resort has put together several packages to make golfing more affordable. One of their most popular, the Triple Play (frenchlick.com/golf/packages), allows players to spend two nights at either the historic French Lick Springs Hotel or West Baden Springs Hotel and get to play all three. With the package comes unlimited access to the course you’re playing that day. Finished your 18 holes by lunchtime and want to go again? Have at it.

Above par

“These are courses that any golfer would want to play,” says Dave Harner, golf pro at the French Lick hotel. “The condition is second to none, and the hospitality displayed by the staff here is absolutely premium — true Hoosier hospitality from the time you drive in until you drive out. Couple that with two world-class hotels and a plethora of other activities and dining options, and you have a true experi-

ence, not just a round or two of golf.” But beyond saving money and playing on well-cared-for links, what makes these courses so special? “The great thing about our golf experience is that we have three distinct types of courses involved here,” Harner says. “The Ross is by the best classic (pre-1960) course architect, and we have a course by arguably the best modern course architect, Pete Dye. We are the only property in the world with courses by two World Golf Hall of Fame architects.” Sultan’s Run, one of the most scenic courses in the Midwest with a waterfall at the 18th hole, was designed by Tim Liddy, a protégé of Dye. The courses have won myriad awards, but suffice it to say that Golfweek magazine has named the Dye and Ross courses No. 1 and No. 2 that people can play in Indiana for the seventh consecutive year. “We have all the golf you would want and a great variety right here within 20 miles of one another,” Harner says. “It’s championship golf available for the everyday player.”

Unusual encounters

But what if you’re a non-golfer who’s traveling with a group of golf-playing friends or a golfer who’s ready to do something else once the clubs have been stowed for the day? You could just stay at the hotel spa and soak up the mineral water as guests have since the French Lick Springs Spa mid-1800s, or you could try your luck at the casino. But there’s plenty else to do in French Lick, West Baden and Jasper that you might not find anywhere else, such as giving an elephant a bath and trimming its nails, for starters. Visitors to Wilstem Ranch (wilstemranch. com) can take part in the “spa experience” for three African elephants that is followed by an hour-long educational seminar and topped off with a chance

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to take pictures with the animals. New this year is the giraffe encounter, where visitors will be transported to where two giraffes are housed for a chance to feed them and snap more photos. And if that’s not exciting enough, Wilstem also offers zip-lining, horseback riding and a guided ATV tour. It’s for sure that however you choose to spend your day, you’ll be hungry at the end of it, and the area offers some excellent dining spots and watering holes. West Baden was named for Baden-Baden, the spa town in Germany, so why not feast on German food at the German Café (ger-


Donald Ross Course F r e nch L ick

mancafefrenchlick.com)? Every dish on the menu is made from scratch and served family style. For pub food and a more casual dining experience, head for 33 Brick Street (33brickstreet.com). French Lick is the hometown of basketball great Larry Bird, and here you’ll get to check out some of his trophies and other memorabilia. “The area truly is a hidden gem,” says Misty Weisensteiner, executive director of Visit French Lick/West Baden. “The area is beautiful, and it touts such a rich, intriguing history. It’s a destination where you can choose your adventure and create your own memories.”

Riding the rails

On some days you can hop on the antique cars of the French Lick Scenic Railway for a 1¾-hour round-trip ride that takes you into the scenic Hoosier National Forest, through the 2,200-foot Burton Tunnel and past limestone outcroppings. While you’re waiting for the train, peek in at the Indiana Railway Museum. Be sure to check the website (frenchlickscenicrailway.org) since the train’s schedule varies. There’s a special train in Jasper, too, that has been lovingly restored with exotic woods and high-end leather. Evenings you can hop aboard for a “ride and dine” ex-

cursion with food provided by Jasper’s premier German restaurant, Schnitzelbank. Autumn visitors can enjoy a leaf-peeping excursion. Daily tours go to French Lick, leaving guests for five hours to enjoy the delights to be found there (spiritofjasper. com). Not to be missed in Jasper is the Jasper City Mill, a recently constructed working mill made to resemble one that used to stand near the Patoka River, the newest addition to Old Jasper. Here you can watch as water makes the grist stone turn to make cornmeal and then purchase pancake and cornbread mix, along with other SOU T H

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Pete Dye Course W e st B ad e n

artisan gifts from the local area, in the mill’s gift shop (visitduboiscounty.com). If you have an extra five minutes between everything else there is to do, opt for a short, peaceful walk through the Grotto at the Cathedral Health Care Center. It might not sound like something to do on a holiday, but you will be glad you took the time to do it. This garden of shrines was the labor of one priest who collected geodes from throughout Indiana and Kentucky and formed them 96

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into grottos where pilgrims of all kinds can come to meditate and pray or just enjoy what he created. If you don’t have a dinner ride on the train, be sure to make a visit to the Schnitzelbank restaurant (schnitzelbank.com). The cuisine is authentic and bountiful German that, if you happen to come on a weekend, is brought to your table by costumed servers. Whatever else you have, be sure to try the dumplings. For more casual dining from a varied


Sultan's Run

menu, try the Mill House Restaurant (themillhouserestaurant.com), which is also home to the Basket Case Brewing Co., or the Schnitz Brewery and Pub (schnitzbrewery.com). If you’re feeling especially adventuresome, stop in at Snaps, the oldest saloon in the area. Here you can feast on Cajun food and alligator bites (snapsinjasper.com). But don’t stay out too late or party too hearty. You have another day of golf to look forward to tomorrow.

West Baden Springs Hotel

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weddings

Jordan Paris and Miranda Vogel Oct. 8, 2016 Ceremony and reception at Hillview Country Club in Franklin Jordan Paris and Miranda Vogel met on Match. com, a popular dating website. “He emailed me first, but I was the one who eventually asked him out,” Miranda says. She asked him to watch an Indiana University basketball game. Jordan proposed to Miranda during a vacation with his family in Fort Myers Beach, Florida. “We were walking on the beach one evening, and he pretended to find a cool-looking shell. We like to look for shells on the beach,” Miranda says. “When I turned around, he was on one knee with the ring inside a seashell.” They toasted the occasion with champagne. The couple opted for lilac and gray with hints of orange for their wedding colors. The newlyweds honeymooned in Cancun. Photography by Jackie Santana.

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weddings

Ashley Shinnamon and Spencer Rodimel Oct. 1, 2016 Wedding ceremony and reception at The Barn at Bay Horse Inn Spencer Rodimel and Ashley Shinnamon met in their freshman biology class at Center Grove High School. They started dating their junior year, brought together by a large group of mutual friends and mutual crushes on each other. They began dating in 2009. Spencer proposed on Nov. 14, 2015. “I’ll be honest. We had been together for almost seven years before he popped the question, so I knew him quite well,” Ashley says. “I totally saw it coming. I could feel his nervousness, but it was adorable, and I, of course, played along.” Spencer took Ashley on a dinner date at Revery in Greenwood. Afterward, the couple embarked on a ride in a horse-drawn carriage with purple lights — Ashley’s favorite color. In the carriage, Spencer proposed. “I don’t even remember saying ‘Yes,’” Ashley says. “I was just so excited and nervous all at the same time.” Ashley decided on light and airy colors for her wedding palette, opting for neutrals with touches of mauve. The couple honeymooned in Cancun, Mexico, where they zip lined through Mayan ruins, rappelled off rock walls and swam in an underground cave. Photography by Complete Indy

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Leadership Johnson County Wine Event March 11 // Barn at Bay Horse Inn

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1. Cheryl and Tim Garner 2. Bonnie and Bob Pribush 3. Jim Girdley 4. Kurt Schletzer and Sheila Mathes 5. Dawn Walsh and Bonnie Wohlford 6. Stephanie Wagner 7. Tara Payne 4

8. Mike Jarvis 9. Emily Gettum and Lisa Kitchens

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10. Pam and Pat Sherman 11. Rebecca Lund 12. Matt and Heather Smarelli, Lora and Jeremy Peters, Natalie and Lloyd Stephen 13. Pete and Dana Grimmer 14. Brad Coy, Chris and Megan Shaff

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Franklin Chamber of Commerce Cash Bash Feb. 25 // Indiana Grand Racing & Casino 3

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1. Mike and Diana Jackson 2. Dale Hughes 3. Sean McAuliffe and Qaia Fitzpatrick 4. Mayor Steve Barnett 5. Mindy Mitchell, Eric Scott, Mandy Mitchell and Kristen Young 6. Greg Leugers, Kristen Loy, Troy Tumey, Cindy Grant and Bryan Epperson 7. Heather Sewell, Natalie Campbell, Celeste Hook 8. Thaydra Cyr and Nichole Garner

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9. Kathy and Rex Baumgart 10. Mark Richards, Gail Richards, Deb Turrel and Dana Burns

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Photos by Grace Schafstall Photography.


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Rebelation 2017: Camp Roncalli April 29 Roncalli High School

1. Suzanne Smock, Dan Parker and Liza Holtkamp check their bids.

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2. Freshman Tyce Freije assisted his dad, T.J. Freije, a professional auctioneer, during the event. 3. Doug Schrader enjoys some time around the campfire. 4 . Tamara Gervasio, Penny Barrett and Denise Cook 5. Chuck Weisenbach introduces senior Morgan O’Brien who spoke to the guests about how she has benefited from tuition assistance.

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6. St. Jude Parish pastor Fr. Steve Banet says the prayer before dinner. 7. Jordyn Mattingly, right, takes a break from serving to get a picture with her mom, Tammy. 8. Rachel and Brian Adika 9. Roncalli student volunteers Olivia Lauck and Nick Johnson serve s’mores lava cake. 10. Greg and Julie Streicher

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Soup Bowl benefiting Habitat for Humanity Feb. 26 // Scott Hall 1. Franklin College junior Abby Stayer serves soup to a guest. 2. Carol Johnson serves a cheddar biscuit. 3. 2017 Soup Bowl committee members: Front row, from left: Sandy Peterson, Laura DeLoach, Jennifer McCarty, Angela DeWitt. Second row: Haley Peterson, Carol Johnson, Carolyn Clow, Sandy Johnson, Denise Matlock, Becky Maslowski. Back row: Andrew Meier and Doug Grant. 4. Hannah McIntosh. 5. Magician Ryan Siebert and Barbara Pierse of Edinburgh. 6. Silent auction pottery pieces. 7. Tara Ricke. Submitted by Doug Grant

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Calendar of Events

»

june, july, august

The Freedom Festival

Ongoing

A collection of great historical exhibits awaits you at the Johnson County Museum of History. Get a look at how Johnson County residents lived in the olden days with the “Early Inhabitants and Pioneer Settlers” exhibit. Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Price: Free. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin.

“Dogs: Faithful and True,” an ongoing exhibit of dogs throughout history. Workshops, lectures and other activities will help you learn more about the history of dogs in art and of dog breeds, as well as special events throughout the summer. You can also adopt a dog from the Indy Humane’s Pet Adoption Wagon. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Price: $13 adults, $7 children. Location: 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: eiteljorg.org.

Through Sept. 6

Yarn lovers, bring your needles and hooks and join Mallow Run Winery for Sip & Stitch the first Wednesday of the month through Sept. 6. An open group for crafty wine lovers; stitchers of all experience levels can participate. Though there is no formal instruction, experienced stitchers are happy to offer help to beginners. Time: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

JUNE

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Established in 2008, the Greenwood Farmers Market offers a variety of locally grown fruits and vegetables, arts and crafts, flowers and more. Hours: 8 a.m. to noon, Location: Greenwood United Methodist Church parking lot, 525 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood. Information: On Facebook @Greenwood Farmers Market.

Through Nov. 11

Learn about the role the Hoosier State played in world events during the exhibit Check out baseball’s stars of tomorrow at “100 Years Later: Indiana in the First World Victory Field with the War.” See artifacts and Indianapolis Indians. art displays that chronicle Tickets: $11 to $17, $10 to Indiana’s contributions $16 children. Location: to the war effort, Victory Field, 501 W. including the personal The Ray Skillman Maryland St., Indianapolis. and political sacrifices Summer Concert Series returns for its ninth Information: (317) 269during this harrowing year. All performances 2542 or indyindians.com. period of American start at 6:30 p.m. at the history. Location: Greenwood Park Mall Indy’s women of the Indiana State Museum, by the outdoor fountain hardwood rock the rims at 650 W. Washington St., on the mall’s north side. Bankers Life Fieldhouse. Indianapolis. Information: Cost: Free. Information: Take in a game with the (317) 232-1637 or shopgreenwoodparkmall.com. Indiana Fever. Tickets: indianamuseum.org. June 22: Mike and Joe $13 to $65. Location: June 29: Henry Lee Bankers Life Fieldhouse, July 6: Corey Cox 125 S. Pennsylvania St., July 13: The Stranger Indianapolis. Information: July 20: The Blind Side bankerslifefieldhouse.com. June 16-17 Franklin’s Smoke on the Square barbecue competition is Through Aug. 6 sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbecue Celebrating the contributions of dogs as Society and brings professional grillers from companions and workers in service of all over the Midwest. Even if you aren’t a humanity, the Eiteljorg Museum presents 108

Every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon, the Franklin Farmers Market offers fruits and vegetables, arts and crafts, and much more from a host of local vendors. Location: Corner of Jefferson and Jackson streets in downtown Franklin. Information: (317) 346-1258 or discoverdowntownfranklin.com.

pro, you can still compete in the Pros vs. Joes BBQ and Dessert competition, or you can just come to enjoy some food. Music by the Blue River Band and Toy Factory will give an audio accompaniment to your taste buds. Time: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Information: (317) 3461258 or discoverdowntownfranklin.com.

June 16

Join other fans at the Greenwood Public Library for Family Fun Harry Potter Day. Head back to Hogwarts with crafts, games, movies and more. Time: Noon to 2 p.m. Location: Greenwood Public Library. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us.

June 17

Explore Garfield Park for a scavenger hunt. Those who complete the hunt win a prize. Time: Noon to 3 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Garfield Park Conservatory, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 3277275 or garfieldgardensconservatory.org.


By Joe Shearer

Join Mallow Run for the Eats & Beats Night. Enjoy food trucks, wine and live music from Royalty, a Prince tribute band. Time: 5 to 9 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

June 18

Get your feet moving with the Summer Solstice 5K Run/Walk and 1-Mile Family Fun Walk. Pool party to follow the race. Time: 6 p.m. Price: $5 all ages 1-Mile Family Fun Walk, $20 5K adults, $5 5K age 6-14, under 5 free. $5 pool party. Location: Franklin Family Aquatic Center, 396 Branigin Blvd., Franklin. Information: summersolstice5k.weebly.com. The Franklin Family Aquatics Center is holding an “Evening of Play,” inviting guests to a free pool party and “dive-in” movie presentation of “Free Willy” at dusk. Time: 7 p.m. Price: Free. Location: 390 Branigin Blvd, Franklin. Information: franklin.in.gov.

June 24

Rock out to the Hairbangers Ball, an ’80s hair rock tribute band. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $15 in advance, $20 day of show. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com. The Freedom Festival draws more than 50,000 people to Craig Park each year for a celebration of American spirit. Enjoy the town’s parade, vendors, local food, beer and a kids zone, all capped off by a spectacular fireworks show. Time: 9 a.m. Price: Free. Location: 10 E. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood. Information: greenwood.in.gov.

June 30

Join the Greenwood Public Library for a fun, family evening under the stars at this summer’s Starlight Movie Night, featuring “Lego Batman.” Activities (including a costume contest, kids craft and games) will start at 7:30 p.m., and the movie will start at dusk. Don’t forget to bring your comfiest lawn chair, a couple of blankets and bug spray. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Old City Park, Greenwood. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us. SOU T H

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Calendar

JUly

At the Artcraft Theatre

July 1-3

Join Mallow Run Winery for the “Red, White and Blueberry Festival,” featuring food, fun and live music from acts like Big ’80s, An Innocent Band, A Billy Joel Tribute and Christine Nicole. Enjoy fireworks Saturday night, as well as the special release of Blueberry Wine. Time: Noon. Price: Free. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

Classic movies are shown on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless otherwise indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 orhistoricartcrafttheatre.org. June 16-17: “The Sandlot” June 27: “Space Jam”

July 3

July 7-8: “Rebel without a Cause”

The Firecracker Festival in Franklin is back on for 2017, held this year in downtown Franklin. Enjoy bounce houses, parade around the Masonic Home Circle and a variety of other events, capped off by the Norman P. Blankenship Jr. Fireworks Celebration at dusk. Time: 6 to 10:30 p.m. Price: Free. Location: 70 E. Monroe St., Franklin. Information: franklin.in.gov.

July 14-15: “The Further Adventures of Ma and Pa Kettle” July 21-22: “The Apple Dumpling Gang” Aug. 11-12:

“Twelve Angry Men”

Aug. 25-26: Retro Rewind ’80s Film Fest: “Big,” “Raising Arizona,” “Adventures in Babysitting,” “Stand By Me,” “The Karate Kid,” “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” Sept. 8-9: “North by Northwest”

July 4

Celebrate Independence Day the biggest way at the Donatos Downtown Freedom Blast in downtown Indianapolis. Fireworks rocket off the Regions Bank Tower; tune into B105.7, 97.1 HANK-FM, or 93.1 WIBC to hear the official fireworks soundtrack. Time: 10 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Downtown. Information: downtownindy.org. Enjoy a show before the fireworks with the Indianapolis Municipal Band playing a bevy of patriotic tunes to get you in the Independence Day spirit at the Kruse Family Stardust Terrace at the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center. Part of the Concerts on the Canal series, free seating is available on the grassy area on the Canal Walk, or buy single seats at a community table for $10 ($8 members), or buy entire tables for 8 for $50 ($40 for members). A cash bar and outdoor grill are available, and guests may bring their own food and nonalcoholic beverages to the concert. Please note that the Terrace will be closing shortly after the conclusion of the concert; fireworks are not visible from this location. Time: 6 to 8 110

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p.m. Location: 450 W. Ohio St., Indianapolis. Information: indianahistory.org.

July 8

Cedar Creek will hold the grand opening for its new distillery, offering free tastings of its new moonshine, white brandy and white rum. Local band Big Country will perform, and food, shirts and glassware will be available for sale. Upon opening, Cedar Creek will become the only operation in the state of Indiana to have an on-site winery, brewery and distillery. Time: Noon to 8 p.m. Location: 3820 Leonard Road, Martinsville. Information: cedarcreekwine.com. Come out to Mallow Run Winery for Pizza and Wine Night, featuring pizza by the slice, wine and live music by My Yellow Rickshaw. Time: 5 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

July 9

Enjoy an afternoon on the patio with

summer snacks and laid-back music from The Sax Guy at Mallow Run Winery. Time: 2 to 5 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

July 13

Have a swinging good time at the Indianapolis Zoo for the “Animals & All That Jazz” summer concert series. With evening concerts featuring all genres of jazz, you’re invited to come to the zoo early, then stay late for music performed live from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Participants are invited to dance the day away, walk around the zoo while listening to the music, or simply sit back and relax. Featuring food and beverages (including an open bar), with animal exhibits and rides staying open until 7. Price: Free with admission. Information: indianapoliszoo.com.

July 14

The Greater Greenwood Community Band will hold its annual concert in Garfield Park. Come experience great live music at


the comfortable confines of Garfield Park’s outdoor amphitheater in what is one of the band’s most anticipated concerts of the year. Time: 7 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Garfield Park, 2432 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: greenwoodband.com.

July 15

Get your grub on at Mallow Run Winery’s Eats & Beats Night. Food trucks, wine and live music by The Doo Band. Time: 5 to 9 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

July 16-22

Come to the Johnson County 4-H and Agricultural Fair. Featuring animals, food, exhibits by 4-H members and fun for the entire family. Festivities begin on July 15 with the Johnson County Fair Parade through the streets of Franklin. Information: johnsoncountyfair.com

101 E. WAYNE ST., FRANKLIN, IN | GARMENTFACTORYEVENTS.COM INQUIRIES: INFO@GARMENTFACTORYEVENTS.COM

July 17

Celebrate the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death with this special presentation when the author herself visits you from the autumn of 1815. Austen visits with you at this, the most vibrant and hopeful time of her life. Drawing from her letters, juvenilia and novels, this 45-minute performance delves into the personal life of one of the most beloved and intriguing novelists of the 19th century. Austen speaks about her childhood, her siblings and her writing. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Greenwood Public Library. Cost: Free. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us.

2017

July 27

JOHNSON COUNTY

4-H & Agricultural Fair

DJ-31970864

Have a swinging good time at the Indianapolis Zoo for the “Animals & All That Jazz” summer concert series. With evening concerts featuring all genres of jazz, you’re invited to come to the zoo early, then stay late for music performed live from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Participants are invited to dance the day away, walk around the zoo while listening to the music, or simply sit back and relax. Featuring food and beverages (including an open bar), with animal exhibits and rides staying

JULY 16-22

www.johnsoncountyfair.com

Fletcher Corporate Sponsor:

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open until 7 p.m. Price: Free with admission. Information: indianapoliszoo.com.

July 28

MIDWAY POWER INC.

7452 W State Road 44 | Shelbyville, IN 46176 Phone: 317.729.5424

“Just five miles east of I65!”

*Price may not reflect mower pictured

Join us at the Greenwood Park Library for a fun-filled day for all during the Family Fun Superhero Day, featuring crafts, games, movies and more. Time: Noon to 2 p.m. Cost: Free. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us.

July 29

The city of Greenwood celebrates the summertime with its Summer Concert series, with bands playing at the Greenwood Amphitheater in Craig Park almost every Saturday night from June into August. This week, The Big ’80s performs. Time: 7 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Craig Park, 10 E. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood. Information: greenwood.in.gov. Grab your captain’s hat and get ready to go sailing with Yacht Rock Revue. Grab a glass of wine and enjoy the smooth

The Franklin Family Aquatic Center is open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. through Aug. 14; noon to 4 p.m. for the zero-depth pool and 4 to 7 p.m. for both pools from Aug. 15 to 19; noon to 7 p.m. Aug. 20 to 21, 27 to 28 and Sept. 3 to 4; noon to 6 p.m. Sept. 5. The facility features an Olympic-sized swimming pool with diving well, a 190-foot water slide, a heated zero-depth pool, water basketball, concessions and sun decks, along with special events throughout the summer. Price: $5 adults; $4 children, military and seniors; $2 infants. Location: Next to the Franklin Cultural Arts & Recreation Center at the corner of South Street and Branigin Boulevard in Franklin. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org.

JC-31951565

Greenwood’s Freedom Springs Aquatic Park offers tube slides, a play zone for kids, a lap pool, lazy river, slides and more. Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. The pool is open from 7 to 10 p.m. with 50 percent admission after 8 p.m. on Thrilling Thursday Nights. Location: 850 W. Stop 18 Road, Greenwood. Information: greenwood.in.gov/freedomsprings.

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INDY A-LIST FINALIST

sounds of the ’70s and ’80s on Mallow Run Winery’s lawn. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $15 advance, $20 day of show. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

AUgust Aug. 1

Franklin’s 13th annual National Night Out celebration encourages citizens to plan activities in their neighborhoods, getting to know their neighbors, and turning on porch lights to create a more welcoming environment. Conducted in association with the Franklin Police Department, there is also a cookout with hot dogs, vendors in Province Park and a free swim at the Franklin Family Aquatic Center. Location: Province Park in Franklin. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org.

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Aug. 3

Have a swinging good time at the Indianapolis Zoo for the “Animals & All That Jazz” summer concert series. With evening concerts featuring all genres of jazz, you’re invited to come to the zoo early, then stay late for music performed live from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Participants are invited to dance the day away, walk around the zoo while listening to the music, or simply sit back and relax. Price: Free with admission. Information: indianapoliszoo.com.

(ASL Interpretation available)

Aug. 5

Enjoy live music from Hoosier country music act Clayton Anderson at Mallow Run Winery. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $15 advance, $20 day of show. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

MPCC LIVE: live.mpcc.info SUNDAY 10AM /ET

Aug. 18

Get ready for WAMMFest. Presented by the Sertoma Club of Greenwood, the day features live entertainment, more than 70 booths of art, wine from local vineyards and beer from area microbreweries. Time: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Location: Craig Park, Greenwood. Information: wammfest.com

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A Look Back

Biker Gang In 1901, a group of bicyclists from Franklin High School posed in front of the Bridges and Lacy Bicycles and Accessories store on West Jefferson Street in Franklin.

Photo courtesy of

Johnson County Museum of History

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Fiat 124 Spider

Drive and Discover...Fiat Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo Giulia TI

1099 N US Highway 31, New Whiteland

(317) 535-0911 | www.rayskillmanfiatsouth.com

SOUTH | Summer 2017  
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