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Indy’s southside magazine

Court Dismissed Mark Loyd set benchmark for judges

Also inside

Marching Bands Katy Trail Noodle Dishes

Fall 2018


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contents

84 on the cover

Feature Stories

76 Judge Mark Loyd A look at decisive career.

84 Home, Revisited

The Batchelor house gets an overhaul, with beautiful results.

Judge Mark Loyd photographed by Angela Jackson

92 OK with Katy

Missouri’s famous trail offers a gorgeous fall journey.

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contents Walt Spaulding

Departments

15 This & That

Southside News and Views

22 Five Questions For ... 25 Taste Walt Spaulding

Noodles

22

32 Recipe

Stuffed Acorn Squash

34 Goodwill 40 Home Trends Be Your Own Hero

Shades of Blue

46 Arts & Lifestyles 56 Community High School Marching Bands

Welcome

60 Health

8 98 102

66 Worth the Trip

110

Calendar of Events

72 Indiana Made

114

A Look Back

JCCF Scholarships

Breast Cancer Centers

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Metamora

Shallos Antique Restaurant & Brewhaus

indysouthmag .com

In Every Issue

Sauces and Syrups

Weddings Our Side of Town


welcome

Don’t Postpone Joy

Y

You might not get this impression from these editor’s notes, but I am not big on talking about myself. Forming these missives involves a lot of thinking, a lot of flailing about for the right sentiment. As the countdown to our print date looms ever closer, I start looking for inspiration everywhere. Oh, I think, my cat! Can I write about her? No. Well, that apple I ate, maybe that would work? Again, pass. How about …? In short, I struggled. This morning, as I do on most mornings, I distractedly scrolled through my Instagram feed; for those of you who don’t use Instagram, it’s a photo-sharing app that I truly adore. Today, with three days until print, I came to one post that I lingered on. This was it, this was what I wanted to impart for South’s fall issue. It was an elegant and simple photo posted by a pal in Brooklyn; it featured a white sign on a Miami pastel pink wall. In green screaming caps, the sign read, “Don’t Postpone Joy.” Ah. Despite the photo’s summery hues, I thought about how it applies to my standard fall experience. I typically head into each fall with a list of activities I want to do and foods I want to chow down on. Indiana, a state with a history firmly rooted in agriculture, is rife with brilliant fall harvest festivals. The activities and foods will, in

» Read and share SOUTH online at indysouthmag.com

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theory, bring me joy. In practice, I’m afraid to say, they just don’t happen for me. More often than not, the autumn trips get pushed aside in favor of my work schedule. The fall festivals are marked on my calendar and forgotten. And the food, well, that should not happen until I have peeled off 5 pounds. I suppose that’s part of being an adult, and an only recently responsible one. There’s a consistent delay of joy in favor of the pragmatic, ordinary, everyday experience. Being sensible has me staying home and raking leaves in the front yard and tapping out editor’s notes instead of — and this one has been on my list for years — going to Center Point’s Exotic Feline Rescue Center to see the rescued tigers play with pumpkins or making a day trip to Trafalgar’s The Apple Works or visiting Metamora, as we do in this issue’s Worth the Trip. But back to those bold words: Don’t postpone joy. If the autumn season teaches us nothing, it’s that we should seize opportunities when we can because happiness and the experiences that yield it can wither like the vines in a garden. Fall is a time to celebrate the fruits of your labor and batten down the hatches in anticipation of the harsh months to come. It’s time to make memories to tuck away and revisit, time and time again.

Jenny Elig

jelig@aimmediaindiana.com


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SOUTH

Organic Outdoor Living

Indy’s Southside Magazine

Fall 2018 | Vol. 14 | No. 2

Publisher AIM Media Indiana Chuck Wells

Editorial Editor

Jenny Elig Copy Editor

Katharine Smith

Let us create paradise...

in your

backyard Water Features, Landscape Plantings, Paver and Natural Stone Patios, Shade Structures, Water Feature Maintenance, Water Garden Retail Store

Contributing Writers

Rebecca Berfanger Katie MacDonell Sara McAninch Julie Cope Saetre Greg Seiter Jon Shoulders Twinkle VanWinkle Glenda Winders CJ Woodring

Art Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger Contributing Photographers

Stacy Able Angela Jackson April Knox Twinkle VanWinkle Stock images provided by Adobe Stock

Advertising Advertising Director

Christina Cosner Advertising executive

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Advertising art director

Amanda Waltz


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Copies of South magazine are available at southside Kroger and Barnes and Noble locations. Subscriptions

To subscribe to SOUTH magazine, please send $12 for 4 issues, or $24 for 8 issues to the mailing address above. Call (800) 4355601 to subscribe by phone or place your subscription request online at indysouthmag.com. Address Change

Please send any address changes to the address or email address listed above. Back issues

To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone. ©2018 by AIM Media Indiana All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.


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this & that Ashley Newsom and her daughter during last year's event.

Pink Ribbon Connection Tie a pink ribbon around your finger if it will help you remember: The Pink Ribbon Connection’s “Stars of Pink” Breast Cancer Survivor Fashion show happens 10 a.m. Oct. 13 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, 350 W. Maryland St. The show benefits the nonprofit Pink Ribbon Connection, a Fountain Squarebased organization that links people with breast cancer with the resources they need to battle this insidious disease. The fashion show features runway struts by breast cancer survivors as well as a reception and lunch. Information and tickets: pinkribbonconnection.org.

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this & that

»

Roncalli’s baseball

star

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Nick Schnell spent his summer on the sunny Gulf Coast of Florida. But the 2018 Roncalli High School graduate wasn’t lounging on the beach. He was hard at work at his new job playing baseball for the Gulf Coast Rays, the Port Charlotte-based rookie-level team for Major League Baseball’s Tampa Bay Rays. “Nick was selected with the 32nd pick — first round — in June’s baseball draft,” says Rob Brown, Roncalli’s sports information director. Schnell is the first Roncalli player selected in the Major League Baseball draft’s 54-year history and only the 15th Indiana player to be selected in the first round straight out of high school. For anyone who knows Schnell, that doesn’t come as a surprise. In May, the 6-foot-3-inch senior centerfielder for the Roncalli Rebels was named Gatorade’s Indiana Baseball Player of the Year — the

first baseball player from the school to receive the honor. Schnell’s list of accomplishments on the field is impressive. Over his 112-game varsity career at Roncalli, he earned a .473 batting average, having racked up 25 home runs, 109 RBIs and 155 hits – all career school records. Upon hearing about the Gatorade designation, Roncalli baseball head coach Aaron Kroll noted that Schnell “has put up numbers in his Roncalli career that we may never see again.” But just excelling at his sport wasn’t enough to earn him the Gatorade title. The company also wants recipients who shine in the classroom and show “exemplary character.” The student checked those boxes as well. He maintained a 3.35 GPA in high school and also made time to volunteer with the Catholic Youth Organization through St. Roch Catholic Church. Come Thanksgiving, you would find him providing meals for the homeless. As the holiday season progressed, he helped ensure that children from economically challenged households received gifts, thanks to his work with the Giving Tree program. “Nick’s 2018 season, combined with his tremendous talent and work ethic, vaulted him into the first round of the draft,” Kroll says. “He deserves it, and I’m really happy for him and his family. I can’t wait to see how his baseball future unfolds.” — Julie Cope Saetre


this & that

Monster Mash » Franklin native and southside resident Kris Mobley fell in love with comic books through visits to Erdman’s Pharmacy and horror movies he would watch on TV. Those comic books and movies that captured his imagination, including the corresponding action figures, continue to influence his fine art images as an adult, now with a degree in graphic design and art history from Herron. Mobley particularly enjoyed the works of Georges Rouault and Franz Marc for their spirituality, John Byrne and George Perez for their early influence, and Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres and Richard Tweedy for their figure drawing. His latest work features limited edition, collectible prints inspired by the now difficult-to-find Universal Monsters by Remco, 9-inch action figures from the late 1970s and early 1980s featuring the classic horror characters that spooked and delighted him and generations of people before and after: the Wolf Man, the Creature from the Black Lagoon, Frankenstein’s monster, Dracula, the Mummy and the Phantom of the Opera. So far, drawings inspired by the Creature and Dracula are available to buy on his website. Mobley’s images of the toys have an almost ethereal quality, not unlike watching the old black-and-white movies where the monsters would come in and out of the shadows. The idea is to invoke the old comic book portfolios of the 1970s and ’80s, which came with several pieces of art from the artist. To help promote his art and the works of other artists, Mobley founded Gray White

Graphite Art a few years ago. He compares it to an independent record label, so that any artist who chooses to come on board — or whom he can successfully recruit — will have a home for their work. For instance, he was able to connect with one of his art heroes, Sandy Plunkett, by simply looking him up in the phone book and making the call to collaborate on a project involving a vampire detective Plunkett drew for one of the major comic book publishers. Mobley expects that project to be available this fall. Mobley says he also does commissioned work, including other monsters. A video review of the Dracula design is available on YouTube, and his work is for sale on his website, graywhitegraphite.com. — Rebecca Berfanger SOU T H

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this & that

BEFORE

Dan Hickey and Dave Apple

After

Get your motor runnin’ (again) The 1970 Pontiac GTO sat abandoned in a barn. It had been there awhile. A long while, actually: around 24 years. Its once shiny, sporty wheels had sunk six inches into the barn’s muddy dirt floor. Raccoons had established a boarding house that welcomed countless residents over the decades. Cornstalks and straw had found their way inside, too. “It was,” says Dan Hickey, owner of Natural Stone Creations in Franklin, “very rough.” The GTO, however, was about to have a Cinderella moment. It belongs to Hickey’s father, Dave Apple. And Hickey was planning a complete restoration of the GTO as a surprise gift for his dad. 18

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Last year, shortly before Hickey’s parents embarked on a European river cruise, the couple revealed that Apple had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. “Don’t panic,” they told their son. “It’s been caught early, and we have a plan.” “That was it,” explains Hickey. “I decided that night that I was going to have (the GTO) restored. It was the least I could do after all he has done for me.” Apple, now 73, owned the GTO when he married Hickey’s mother. It was the first new car he had ever bought. “We took many trips in the car,” Hickey says. “Many hot rides in the car that had no air-conditioning. It was the first car that I drove. It was the car I

watched my dad work on (and) that got me interested in cars. After a few fender benders, I always dreamed of restoring it back to original. Dave drove the car back and forth to work at Cummins Engine until my mom told him to park the car. It looked horrible.” His parents’ overseas trip gave Hickey the leeway to jumpstart the long-desired restoration. He freed the GTO from its barn accommodations, parked it inside Natural Stone Creations and began researching shops that specialize in car restoration. On his frequent trips to see a certain client, he always passed Riley Customs in Martinsville. One day, he swung left into the shop’s parking lot.


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WE CAN HELP! “I met with Phil (Riley, the shop’s owner), was impressed by his shop and decided he was the man for the job,” Hickey says. Riley had a waiting list of five months. After that, it took another four months to restore the GTO. But restore it he did, although it was no simple job. “It sat there in the dirt so long that it just sank into the ground and the back end of the car just got eaten up,” Riley says. “The frame was actually in the ground, and it deteriorated the frame so badly that it was broken in a couple of places and was so rusty that we couldn’t fix it. So we had to buy a new frame. We had to put a lot of new sheet metal in. It was a trunk floor and the whole tail light panel and the corner panels and the wheel wells.” Everything in the front, however, could be restored. Even the original transmission, rear axle, radiator and engine could be salvaged, despite the large raccoon nest prominently positioned over the latter. The wiring, however, had been chewed through and needed to be replaced. Jamie Edgerton with Reliant Automotive and Machine restored the engine, while Jon Travers of Coverall Custom Upholstery brought the interior back to life. “It was really special,” Riley says of the project. “I love doing Pontiacs, period. My car is a Pontiac, a 1963 Tempest. I’ve had it for a number of years. I’ve always had a Pontiac in my garage.” In late July, after wrapping up 672 hours of manual labor on the GTO, Riley drove the pristine, gleaming, transformed vehicle to Greenwood’s The Suds drive-in restaurant, where crowds gather on summer Saturdays to see classic and muscle cars proudly displayed by owners. There, Hickey revealed his surprise to Apple. A video made for Riley Customs captures the moment, including Apple sliding into the driver’s seat of his GTO for the first time in 25 years, wiping tears from his eyes as he says, “This is unbelievable. I got a car back that I bought in September of ’69.” “It was amazing,” Hickey says. “It was well worth the wait.” — Julie Cope Saetre

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this & that

book nook

“The High Tide Club” By Mary Kay Andrews

After devouring Karen White’s “The House on Tradd Street” series, I was desperately looking for my next favorite Southern fiction read when I stumbled upon “The High Tide Club.” It did not disappoint. The story is set in modern-day Georgia, where lawyer Brooke Trappnell is working to uncover long hidden mysteries of Talisa Island in an attempt to secure the estate of the ailing millionaire, Josephine Bettendorf Warrick.  She is desperate to make amends with the heirs of her closest friends and to keep her family home from falling into the hands of those who would want to see the beautiful island developed.  As the story unfolds, you come to love the women of Talisa Island and admire the friendships, though fractured, that changed their lives forever. Fast-paced and filled with mystery, “The High Tide Club” is a perfect weekend read.  The sweeping story bounces seamlessly from past to present, ending with a satisfying conclusion.  As much as I loved learning about Josephine and her friends, I especially enjoyed watching the relationships grow between their descendants in modern times.  — Reviewed by Emily Ellis, assistant director, Greenwood Public Library

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“I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer” By Michelle McNamara Impeccably researched and written, the book does an impressive job piecing together what exists of America’s most notorious and least-known serial killer, the Golden State Killer. Obsessive and determined, the author spent years tracking down leads, reading old police files, newspapers, interviewing victims and more to create a profile to understand more about the sadistic man who killed more than a dozen people, raped over 50 women and burglarized over 100 homes in California during the 1970s and ’80s. Unfortunately, she never got to see the man responsible caught and found, as she died in 2016. Her husband, comedian Patton Oswalt, and a research assistant finished the book for her. Shortly after its release, the Golden State Killer was found, caught by DNA evidence. Compelling and dark, this true crime story will keep you up at night. — Reviewed by Erin Cataldi, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

“Watch Me Disappear” By Janelle Brown

“Watch Me Disappear” was GPL’s Well Red book club’s pick for June. Mystery/thrillers are my favorite genre, so I was excited to read this and have a chance to discuss it. The plot centers on wife and mother, Billie Flanagan, who one day goes for a hike and disappears. A hiking boot is found, and nearly everyone assumes Billie is dead. A year later, her 15-yearold daughter, Olive, begins to have visions that her mother is alive and begs her father to help her search for Billie. Jonathan is in the process of writing a loving memoir about his life with Billie when he finds some information on her computer. As the story continues, revelations about Billie’s past and present are revealed. Where is Billie and was her disappearance something that she orchestrated? Or was she kidnapped? Or did she fall and was killed, as everyone originally believed? Brown does an excellent job moving the plot along and writing some great twists. — Reviewed by Carissa Simpson, customer service associate, Greenwood Public Library


“Gun Love”

By Jennifer Clement

This novel is short and sweet with a little bitter on the side. Pearl, our heroine, is a teenager who’s spent her life living in a 1994 Mercury Topaz with her mom in the visitor parking lot of a small trailer park in nowhere Florida. Pearl is just fine with the close and loving relationship she has with her mom, a woman who spins tales about their lives and the world beyond. Pearl does not want for anything. But her mother does. Eli is a stranger who comes to the trailer park to help run guns. He takes over Pearl’s mom’s thoughts and actions. Eli’s “gun love” leads to Pearl’s mom’s downfall, and Pearl finds herself alone in a world that revolves around guns. Clement’s writing style is beautiful and lyrical, perfect for this coming of age story. — Reviewed by Susan Jerger, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

“Strays: A Lost Cat, A Homeless Man and Their Journey Across America” By Britt Collins

Michael King lives on the streets by a UPS loading dock in Portland, Oregon. He’s had a bad run of luck, suffers from depression and often turns to alcohol to help with the suffering. One evening after dinner, he finds a hurt cat and against his better judgment, names her Tabor, gives her a home in his sleeping bag and nurses her back to health. Before winter, the pair set off on a road trip, making their way to California and then to Montana when spring comes. Tabor helps Michael quit drinking, and the pair have some big adventures involving bears and torrential rain storms. While in Montana, he’s faced with a hard decision when a visit to the vet reveals the cat is microchipped and her owner is still frantically searching for her. In the same vein as “Marley & Me” or “Homer the Blind Wonder Cat,” this heartwarming tale will appeal to animal lovers everywhere and shows just how deeply connected the human spirit is to our furry friends. — Reviewed by Kelly Staten, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

“Dumplin’” By Julie Murphy Not all important books have to be serious; simply showing a protagonist who doesn’t fit in having everyday experiences can be empowering. Willowdean Dickson is fat and fine with that. She loves Dolly Parton, her recently deceased overweight Aunt Lucy and her thin and pretty best friend Ellen. But lately, she and Ellen have been growing apart, and Bo, the cute boy at work, kissed her. Even though she knows her body doesn’t define her and it shouldn’t make her “less than,” Will starts becoming insecure about her weight. When she finds a pageant application in her Aunt Lucy’s stuff, she decides to enter. Will is clever and truly funny, but she doesn’t have any secret talents or hobbies that make her rise above her weight, and she doesn’t go on a diet and have a makeover and emerge a butterfly from a cocoon. This book provides a mirror for overweight girls, showing them that their lives are equal to others. It also shows all readers that everyone has their insecurities, and that we are all trying to find our paths to happiness and confidence however we can. — Reviewed by Amy Dalton, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

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five questions for...

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by Julie Cope Saetre // Photography by april knox

Walt Spaulding As lead bartender at Bonefish Grill in Greenwood, Walt Spaulding meets plenty of people as he crafts cocktails. While the southside setting certainly differs from his previous home base of Las Vegas, some universal elements come with the territory, wherever it may be. Here, Spaulding chats with South about life behind the bar.

1

You moved to the Indianapolis area from Las Vegas. Why the change, and how does Indy compare to the City of Lights?

4

I had been living in Las Vegas for 11 years when I first visited Indianapolis and was charmed by its Midwest character and values. My wife is originally from the south side of Indianapolis, and I was ready for a change. I grew up visiting my grandparents in Wisconsin each summer and loved the fishing in the Midwest. Indianapolis is much more relaxed and laid-back than Las Vegas.

2

3

There are many stories that come to mind. One that stands out is a very earnest gentleman who came in with his wife. They both seemed to be rational and productive members of the community. He told me he had been at a drive-in movie theater in the Indianapolis area in the early ’90s where a large spacecraft and a smaller spacecraft flew at a low level over the drivein before departing at a high rate of speed. So, now you know extraterrestrials love Indianapolis, too.

What are your favorite drinks to mix, and why?

My favorite drinks to mix are our handcrafted martinis, because it means so much more than a shake and a stir. I approach each cocktail as a work of art, fine-tuning the perfect flavors to make every cocktail unique and memorable for guests. How does “the neighborhood bartender” play an integral role in his community?

The experience we give is based on the premise of simplicity, consistency and a strong commitment to escaping the ordinary.

People are known to talk to their favorite bartenders. What’s the most unusual story you’ve heard from a guest (anywhere, not just at Bonefish Grill)?

5

What are a few key do’s and don’ts for being a good bar guest?

Do’s: »Do come in, have a great time, relax and enjoy a drink and a bite to eat. »Do visit us and spend a few minutes getting to know your fellow bar guests and our staff as you enjoy your evening. You may make a new friend. Don’ts »Don’t be disrespectful or rude to the people around you. They are trying to enjoy themselves. »Please do not express political views in an overly vocal fashion. Some people around you may have different views or be trying to avoid politics and relax.

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THE MILTO PICKUP ARTIST

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taste

Noodling Around

Whatever the format, they’re tasty for fall

Whether they’re stir-fried, deep fried or boiled, there’s something about noodles that always delights us. Although the traditional flour-and-egg pasta might be the first noodle to pop into your noodle, remember that noodles can also be made from rice flour or mung bean starch. A versatile food, they are used in a variety of ways: cold, hot, in salads, soups, as main or side dishes. Here, four noodle dishes from in and around the southside of Indianapolis. By Sara McAninch Photography by stacy able

Yum Wun Sen with Shrimp at House of Thai

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Vito Provolone’s Italian Restaurant

linguine and clam sauce 8031 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis, (317) 888-1112, vitoprovolone.com » Starting its life as a Pasquale’s Pizza, Vito Provolone’s slowly evolved from a gourmet pizza shop to what it is today: a fine dining Italian restaurant complete with white tablecloths and linen napkins. While both restaurants belong to the same family, Vito’s offers “a potpourri of different Italian dishes,” according to founder and owner Jim DeCamp Jr. Every dish is unique, and several have changed over time based on feedback from customers, but one of the classics is the linguine and clam sauce. It starts with a generous portion of linguine noodles. Next is the clam sauce, which is a combination of

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garlic, white wine, clam juice, clam stock, red pepper and sea clams. While the menu touts this as spicy fare, you can ask your server for less red pepper if you prefer a milder meal. With the merger of noodles, clams and sauce you’re looking at just over a pound of food to satisfy your Italian craving. If clams aren’t your thing, then any of the pasta dishes with a red or Alfredo sauce are sure to please. The original red sauce recipe comes from DeCamp’s mom; it has an authentic American-Italian flavor. The Alfredo sauce contains triple the Parmesan cheese than what you’d typically get anywhere else. The extensive wine menu features several options that go great with the menu, including the Riserva Ducale Chianti, DeCamp’s recommended accompaniment to the linguine and clam sauce.


House of Thai

yum wun sen 275 S. State Road 135, Greenwood (317) 889-0886, indyhouseofthai.com » House of Thai offers food with an authentic twist. Sure, it offers the familiar Thai noodle dishes (such as pad thai) that many of us would recognize on a menu, but it prides itself on freshly made food, so customers can make special requests. You need it gluten or allergy free? No problem. You want your dish with no spice or extra spicy? Sure thing. One of the many noodle dishes on the menu is Yum Wun Sen, a salad that begins with silver noodles, which are made from mung bean starch. These clear, thin noodles are boiled first and then given a cold-water bath. The final product is served at room temperature. Once the noodles are prepared, chili paste, chili lime juice sauce, fresh mint and cilantro are added for flavor. According to House of Thai owner Kanlaya Browning, the salad is “going to taste a little bit spicy, sour and hot, which is the most common flavor in Thai food.” It is served meatless, but you can opt for chicken, pork or shrimp; Browning recommends shrimp as a tasty addition.

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Shallos Antique Restaurant & Brewhaus

fettuccine alfredo

8811 Hardegan St., Indianapolis, (317) 882-7997, shallos.com » Shallos Antique Restaurant & Brewhaus has a menu that includes burgers and steak, chicken and pork entrees. You’ll find several items that are “swamp-style,” that is, a protein of your choice piled high with bacon, sautéed mushrooms, honey mustard, Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle, American cheese and a homemade Caribbean marinade. Now imagine what they can do with noodles; the restaurant’s fettuccine Alfredo might exceed your wildest dreams. The dish starts with enriched boiled fettuccine noodles, which are blanketed in a basic Alfredo sauce that’s given a special touch: garlic, a proprietary blend of seasonings and extra Parmesan. The result, according to owner Paul Zoellner, is “cheesy creaminess.” While the dish is served with chicken or shrimp, some customers opt to stir in a side of steamed vegetables (a mix of broccoli, cauliflower and carrots). If you’re a fan of fungus, ask your server for a mushroom addition. All options are served with the restaurant’s warm homemade bread topped with butter and garlic. While the food menu is enough to make anyone pop in for a sit down and eat, Shallos is more widely known for its extensive beer menu. Boasting more than 500 distinct types, the restaurant and brew house has more than 400 bottles that are cold and ready to serve at any time along with its 48 beers on tap.

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Gigi’s Sugar Shack Café

homemade chicken and noodles 377 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 868-8888, gigissugarshack.com » Gigi’s Sugar Shack Café is more than the sweet treats the name implies. Although the restaurant does offer a wide variety of homemade confections — including cheesecakes, doughnuts, cookies, fruit pies and cakes — you’ll also find full meals on the menu. One of the more popular dishes is the scratch-made chicken and noodles. Starting with egg noodles prepared from flour, eggs and water, the dough then sits for a while before it’s rolled out and cut into thick noodles. The chicken is simmered for several hours in a slow cooker before it’s shredded and added, along with the noodles, to a pot with chicken stock, roux, salt, pepper and a whole stick of butter. The result is “really creamy, downhome like your mom used to make,” says Amber Schall, who co-owns the café along with her husband, Greg. One of the first things you’ll notice upon entering Gigi’s Sugar Shack Café is the eclectic décor and dishes. Each table has a different tablecloth. The dishes are a combination of family heirlooms from Schall’s mom and her husband’s grandma (the “Gigi” of the name) and donations from customers. Gigi’s gives back to its community through its Soup for the Soul program. It offers a free warm bowl of homemade soup to anyone who asks for it. Schall says a lot of people rely on it. “We don’t judge anybody who comes in and asks for it. It makes us feel good that they use it.”

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»

Food finds

On the go

From its 100 percent gluten-free kitchen, the folks at 1823 Bakehouse offer doughnuts, sandwiches, quiches, scones and soups. Choose from more than 80 teas and succumb to the lavish cinnamon rolls, icing waiting to seduce you. You’ll find the bakehouse at 25 E. Court St., Franklin. (317) 7390800, on Facebook @1823 Bakehouse.

Out to Lunch

Fallback flavors By Jenny Elig

At some point, pumpkin spice overtook the entirety of the fall flavor catalog, drowning the world in sugar, spice and everything relatively nice. Don’t get us wrong, we dig pumpkin spice, but let’s not overlook the other fall gems: cinnamon (flying solo and divorced from the pumpkin spice name), roasted chiles or apples. You get the point. Fall is about more than pumpkin spice. Here are autumnal palate pleasers you can find on the southside. 30

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Big Woods’ menu is rife with smoky flavors and spicy nuances, but perhaps none is quite so fall appropriate as the restaurant’s Busted Knuckle Chili, featuring marinated beef in fire-roasted tomatoes and accompanied by chiles, onions and green peppers and cloaked in spicy tomato broth. Second runner-up for fall favorite would have to be the poutine — crisp fries topped with white cheddar curds and brown gravy — but only if you have them topped with bacon. You’ll find Big Woods at 1800 E. King St., Franklin. (317) 7390378, bigwoodsrestaurants.com/franklin.

On the town The chicken and apple quesadillas at Pure Eatery in Fountain Square feature a mix of savory and sweet with pulled chicken, cheddar, blue cheese, red onion, apple and balsamic vinaigrette in flour tortillas. Pure Eatery is at 1043 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis. (317) 602-5724, pureeatery.com.


BRINGING YOUR VISION TO LIFE.


taste

Recipe

Falling for Squash 32

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These sweet and savory squashes are the epitome of fall. Better yet, they’re colorful and easy to make. If you’re really feeling the season, find one of your main ingredients, apples, at a nearby orchard. by Twinkle VanWinkle

Apple and Sausage Stuffed Acorn Squash Serves 4

2 acorn squash, halved 3 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper 1 pound ground sausage 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped 2 celery heart stalks, finely chopped 2 Honeycrisp apples, cubed 1/3 cup maple syrup ½ teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon sage 1 cup panko bread crumbs 1 cup shredded Parmesan, divided

» Preheat oven to 400 F. Halve the acorn squash using a sharp knife. Scoop out all the seeds and brush squash liberally with olive oil inside and out, on all surfaces. Place on a lined sheet pan and sprinkle with salt and pepper lightly. Bake for approximately 45 minutes until squash is tender. Squash should hold its shape but be soft when pierced with a fork or knife. Sauté sausage for 5 to 7 minutes, until just cooked. Remove from pan. Add onions and celery and sauté in sausage grease for a few minutes, then add apples, cooking until they just begin to soften. Transfer sausage, apples, onions and celery to a medium bowl and toss with half the Parmesan, cinnamon, sage and half the bread crumbs. Once squash has finished cooking, stuff with sausage and apple mix and sprinkle with remaining bread crumbs and Parmesan. Return stuffed squashes to the oven and bake for additional 15 to 20 minutes. Once finished, cool slightly and serve.

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Goodwill

A Heroes Welcome

Nonprofit provides kids with exercise, entertainment and a little empowerment By Jon Shoulders

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As a youngster growing up in Arkansas, Quinton Moore didn’t have many opportunities to participate in the extracurricular activities that a lot of his peers enjoyed. His parents worked hard but often couldn’t afford the registration and equipment fees that are part and parcel of youth sports and clubs. This left Moore, a lifelong sports fan, frustrated and wishing there were other options for some fun, organized community activities. “My parents did the best they could, but there were a lot of things that I just missed out on because of the expenses involved,” he recalls. “After I moved to Indiana, I started coaching basketball and tutoring kids. I thought that if I could ever create my own organization so kids wouldn’t have to feel what I felt — which was being left out — then that’s exactly what I would do.” Two years ago, Moore, now a Greenwood resident, turned that strong conviction into a reality by founding Be Your Own Hero Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides local youths with free activities approximately once per month. Moore noticed a lack of free opportunities for youth-based activities in Johnson County and promptly set to work gathering volunteers, posting fliers and spreading the word via social media for what would become his inaugural BYOH event: a day of outdoor games and complimentary snacks at a park in his neighborhood. “I decided to just organize the kids in my neighborhood and play games with them on a Saturday, and see what it would look like,” Moore says. “We had a blast


Goodwill

Above from left, board members Haley Wade, David Stater, Sean Wall and founder, Quinton Moore

doing it, and one Saturday turned into two Saturdays and then three. The next thing you know, some of my friends said we should just start our own organization since there’s evidently a need in the community for something like this.” As a basketball coach, Moore says he came to notice that many kids simply get left out. It’s a feeling he knows well from his own younger years. “They’re maybe not the most athletic or not the most academic or don’t have a ton of confidence. Where do those kids go?” he says. “There are programs around the state that offer activities, but there are families who can’t afford to get their kids involved.” Moore and his three fellow board members typically meet quarterly to plan the following quarter’s BYOH events, which have included flag football, face painting, skating parties, outdoor movie nights, and outdoor game days with classics like ring toss and duck-duck-goose. True to Moore’s vision, all events are free of charge, with treats included. “We’ve gotten some great volunteers for our activities, and we’re consistently looking for more,” says BYOH board 36

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member and Greenwood resident David Stater. “You don’t have to be a certain age to volunteer, and the age range of the kids who show up is loose, too. We’ve had 3and 4-year-olds and teenagers.” Wendy Cagle, a Greenwood resident who got wind of BYOH from a friend via Facebook, realized the organization’s skating party at Franklin Skate Club fell on her daughter Tabi’s 12th birthday. She gathered a group of Tabi’s friends, and they headed for the event. Cagle was pleasantly surprised by what she found.

“It was perfect for my daughter’s birthday, and they had cookies and cupcakes,” Cagle says. “Everybody was really nice, and the organizers had their Be Your Own Hero shirts, and that livened it up. Everyone gets some positive interaction with other people, and the kids can make friends and even have some good role models with the organizers there.” By offering a diverse range of activities each month at no charge to participants, Cagle feels BYOH provides a much-needed filler of a community gap.


“We don’t have anything like it around here, where it’s free for the families and you can really have fun,” she says. “Up in Indy they have the Boys and Girls Club, but you might not be able to go all the way up there. We have the Community Center in Greenwood, and it has a lot going on, which is great, but again it can get expensive.” Each BYOH event lasts between two and three hours. Moore typically chooses a one-word theme for each event. He makes sure to speak to the group about that word at some point throughout the day. “It might be a word like ‘respect’ or ‘responsibility’ or ‘character.’ I talk to them about how we apply the word in our lives,” says Moore who, in addition to running BYOH, works full time at Church Brothers Collision Repair in Greenwood. While the majority of monthly events have been largely funded by Moore and his board members, the group accepts donations through the official BYOH —Quinton Moore website and has managed to bring a few sponsors on board, including Coffey Connection on South Morgantown Road, which provided T-shirts for a recent event as well as a sponsorship sign. Last year the Sertoma Club of Greenwood donated funds that helped Moore continue another important BYOH mission, that is, to provide underprivileged families with meals and groceries around Thanksgiving and toys at Christmas time. “We hope to expand on the meal and toy donations and do that every year,” Stater says. “We also want to have our own permanent building eventually, so we can have a safe place where kids can go and have fun at our functions. It’s been a struggle getting funds together, but that’s something we’re definitely looking into.”

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Goodwill

The concept of being your own hero isn’t directed solely at kids attending the events; Moore feels every person, regardless of age or circumstance, can take control of their own life. He hopes the message spreads to parents, teachers,

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coaches and local leaders throughout central Indiana. “Everyone gets to make a choice of how they live their life,” he says. “Set your own goals because you get to dictate what you do; your mom or dad can direct you, but

they can’t live your life out for you. So we try to impart responsibility for your own actions.” Moore says the name of his organization also serves as a reminder to himself, his board members and the volunteers who help run each event to avoid complacency in the face of ongoing challenges. “If we want to see a change in our neighborhoods, then we need to do it,” he says. “We need to be our own heroes to our city and our communities. The name also goes with the people who created this, not just the people we come in contact with.” For more information on Be Your Own Hero Inc., including an events page and sponsorship details, visit beyourownheroinc.com.


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Home Trends

Blues Cues

W

Azure, navy or indigo: This hue has us singing

By CJ Woodring

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What is your favorite color? Calming, yet refreshing, green? Purple, the color of royalty? Pale yellow, a sliver of moon on a summer night? Chrome “Here I am!” red? If you’re like many Americans, chances are your answer is blue. A perennial favorite in fashion and home interiors, blue resonates at all levels and with all ages, and is most often the choice of men. And in 2018, it’s the choice of fashion and design experts as one of the year’s trending colors. Because blue is the color of sky and water, nature’s major elements, it is the color most seen on a daily basis.

Blue is considered peaceful and orderly, conservative and traditional, and is believed to treat pain and soothe illnesses. Thus, having the blues can be a good thing: a calming influence that keeps us grounded in a turbulent world, lowering our pulse rate and body temperature. Learnin’ the blues Blue’s popularity is based on its versatility, seemingly endless range of shades and hues, and adaptability to any room or decor. In its many guises, blue integrates with Americana, nautical, French Country, modern, country or traditional furnishings.


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Pair a blue-and-white gingham comforter with white, ruffled bed linens, creating a comforting night-time oasis. Introduce robin’s egg blue in the kitchen, grounded by cinnamon or chocolate, or try baby blue as a quiet foil for a splash of raspberry. Consider a whisper of orange with a shout of dark blue, and your little girl’s room will come alive with a peachy, perky palette. The traditional color wheel defines colors as either warm or cool. But Susie Bibler, design consultant and owner of HomeReVisions in downtown Indianapolis, says color is all in the sensory perception of the beholder. “A lot of people think cool means cold, but that’s not the case,” she says. “In a bathroom or spa, for instance, blue has a soothing effect, and people feel warm. But blue actually is considered a cool color.”

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Additionally, personal reaction to a specific color relates to memories and the color’s role in those memories. “While I love working with all colors, a lot of my clients want to incorporate blue into their homes,” Bibler says. “Blue is always around, in so many different tones, and people love it. But I like to find out why clients relate to a specific color so I can work with them in expressing their moods and attitudes, and defining the purpose of their home. Color goes well beyond the trend,” she says. Several shades of blue are included in Pantone’s 2018 Colors Chart, including Sailor Blue, Little Boy Blue and Turkish Sea. Ultra Violet, Pantone’s Color of the Year, “can easily be mixed with blues, rather than sticking with just one tone of blue,” “Accenting Bibler says. a navy wall When incorporating with white woodwork will a much-loved color into an make navy interior decor pop, creating palette, the a dramatic consultant says, interior effect.” it doesn’t have — Dale Hughes to be applied to the wall. “Some homeowners want their walls to have more color, especially in the dining room, where there’s a lot of wood. In the living room, they can use a neutral on walls, adding pops of color in accents such as throw pillows or in a favorite watercolor,” she says. At the end of the day, interior elements should “rest a homeowner’s mind and replenish their spirit,” Bibler says.

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True blue Dale Hughes, principal of Dale Hughes Interior Design, says he believes the current blue trend will replace black with dark blue or navy in many applications. A Franklin-based interior designer and licensed contractor, Hughes has assisted clientele throughout central Indiana since 2006. “Black has been a secondary color,” he says. “But I believe people will want

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Home Trends

to consider navy for their darker color because it marries nicely with nearly all other colors. In fact, several experts have named dark blue the neutral color for 2018,” he says. “Accenting a navy wall with white woodwork will make navy pop, creating a dramatic interior effect,” Hughes says. “You’ll find navy will work in a classic or very modern home, harmonizing with contemporary straight lines and edges or in more ornate, formal rooms. And you can use the color in rugs, wall color, accent colors, artwork and all different areas as a contrasting color.” Navy can also be used to accent existing neutral exteriors, he says. “If people have a neutral color exterior — gray, beige, tan, taupe — and don’t want to repaint or can’t afford to repaint, they can bring in navy accents to add new elegance to existing colors and update the look.” Considering its universal appeal, Hughes says he expects classic navy to be around for a long time. “Don’t be surprised if you see this elegant hue as a featured trend color for fall and winter this year,” he says. “And to be fair, it’s a 44

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timeless color: It goes away, comes back, but is always there. I think it’s just making a reappearance.” Balancing the blues Along with color, the ancient Chinese art of feng shui can add a calming element in which blue takes center stage. “Feng shui is about feeling peaceful, secure and balanced, which describes blue,” says Indianapolis-based decorator Mary Abella, operating since 2005 as A Little Bit of Red Interior RE-design. A Detroit native and former Fort Wayne high school teacher, Abella is a feng shui practitioner not only in clients’ homes, but in staging those on the market. Feng shui is considered to balance energies within a space to improve happiness and health and promote a successful life. Experts say this balance and unity affect everything from our relationships to knowledge, creativity, career and wealth. At feng shui’s most basic level, each color in the spectrum represents one of five elements: earth, fire, water, wood and metal. Because blue represents water, it is a natural for use in feng shui, its gamut of

tones ranging from sky blue to the blue-green of the ocean and serenity of deep indigo. While blue can be used throughout a home, there can be a financial incentive for showcasing the color in specific rooms: “Studies show if you’re planning to sell your home, you can get several thousand dollars more if your kitchen and/or bath are blue,” Abella says. Regarding feng shui, blue is ideal for either room, she explains, because the color’s water element balances each room’s primary element: fire in the kitchen and water in the bathroom, where water should be balanced by another element, such as wood. Unless homeowners are crazy about blue (or any preferred color) and plan to stay in their home for many years, Abella suggests limiting it to small doses. “Use it for items and accessories that can be changed out later when you get tired of it, or when another color trend comes along,” she says. “Cabinets can be painted, but countertops are expensive to replace. Instead of a blue tile floor, consider an area or throw rug.” Homeowners planning to sell their residence might keep in mind that while sales are about location, they’re also about curb appeal. A blue door can be a visual attraction to potential buyers, Abella says. “It leads buyers’ eyes directly to the door.” Coloring your world depends on personal preferences. And if your preferred color is blue, keep in mind that blue isn’t just a color: It’s a mood. Steady and safe, serene or sensational. But always true blue.


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Arts & Lifestyles

n I t e G Formation 46

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Greenwood HIgh School

Southside marching bands set to defend their rankings this fall By Rebecca Berfanger SOU T H

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Arts & Lifestyles

Center Grove High School

F

Fall is a time to awaken all of the senses: the sight of the colors on the leaves, the smell of a crisp bonfire, the taste of fresh apple cider, the touch of the cool breeze, and the sound of high school marching bands ramping up for their competitive seasons at Friday night football games and weekend competitions around the country. While these hard-working students and their instructors have been practicing since their band camps in the weeks and months before the start of the school year, they will continue to perfect their performances throughout the semester leading up to the Indiana State School Music Association and national finals in

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November at Lucas Oil Stadium. Depending on where you or your kids or your friends’ kids went to school, you might already be aware of these three southside marching band powerhouses: Center Grove High School, Greenwood High School and Beech Grove High School. They each have marching bands that, for several years of the last decade or longer in statewide competition, consistently place in the top 10 of their classes, and that’s not to mention the national accolades they’ve racked up. The band directors at these three schools know they are never guaranteed a spot in the top 10 just because they made it the year before; they all share a


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Arts & Lifestyles

Greenwood High School drive and a work ethic with their student musicians and are looking forward to the fall semester. They also shared with South their plans for their ISSMA routines. Read on. Good sports on and off the field Although they might not get the same recognition as the sports teams, marching band musicians must be as physically fit as the athletes they support. Consider first the stamina it takes to perform; they can’t take timeouts. Marching band members must carry and play an instrument or wave a flag, keep up with the formation, not run into anyone, all while wearing heavy uniforms. 50

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“[Marching band] teaches students about leadership, teamwork, hard work, working toward successes and setting goals. We make our kids show up on time, plus they have to be organized and prepared.” — Cory Wynn

“We do strength and cardio training … and fundamentals at the beginning of each rehearsal. This type of program will progress and taper as needed for the students to perform at their maximum,” says Kevin Schuessler, director of bands and Center Grove’s music department chairman. He is in his 25th year with the marching band. “Students learn marching and movement techniques in addition to their musical skills. The color guard learns dance and also develops skills on flag, rifle and saber,” says Greenwood director of bands John Morse, who is starting his 11th year with the program. “Marching band is physically demanding, and students build


strength through practicing their skills.” Marching band also gives students skills that will stick with them long after graduation, says Beech Grove band director Cory Wynn, an alumnus of Beech Grove who’s now in his 15th year at the school as a teacher “[Marching band] teaches students about leadership, teamwork, hard work, working toward successes and setting goals. We make our kids show up on time, plus they have to be organized and prepared,” Wynn says. “They have to listen and respond to demands and directions. I think a lot of people realize when they finish marching band, the benefits they gained from it make them more appreciative and lifelong fans of the activity.” Although there are tryouts to determine which position a band member might have, and leadership roles are competitive, all three band directors explain that they try to be inclusive to all students who have an interest in participating and the musical ability. Band directors also credit their teams who work with them and the students to ensure everyone is on the same page. Plus, the students understand their part in keeping up with previous bands that have done well. “We are in constant competition against ourselves and our standards. There are no cuts from band. Everyone has a role,” says Morse. Plans for the year Each of the schools unveiled their performance plans. Beech Grove, which had a little more than 100 students in the band right before the start of the school year, will perform a compilation called “Apples to Oranges.” The medley goes from the dark and brooding music of Modest Mussorgsky’s classical piece, “The Hut of the Baba Yaga,” leading into the ballad of “One Day I’ll Fly Away” from the musical “Moulin Rouge,” ending with closer

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Arts & Lifestyles

Beech Grove HIgh School

“(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher,” the 1967 R&B groove by Jackie Wilson. During the performance, even the colors will change with the music, says Wynn. “We start with deep dark red colors and transition to neon orange. We’ll have trees on the field that will glow. Everything will transition from dark to light, from angular to toe-tappy and upbeat music that’s light and fun.” About 160 Greenwood students will act along with playing music from the Charlie Chaplin movie, “Modern Times,” with some Scott Joplin sprinkled in, says Morse. “Our show is very character-driven. Students will be taking on acting roles

“The performance experience they get is hard to describe, but it is powerful and life-changing. Also, the leadership and people skills they get are second to none.” — John Morse

in addition to their marching, music and movement. They are very excited about this new layer of responsibility.” Center Grove’s 135 marchers will start with “One Day I’ll Fly Away” from “Moulin Rouge,” followed by “You Are Wherever Your Thoughts Are,” by Steve Reich, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” from “The Wizard of Oz,” and “No One to Know One” by Andy Akhio. “We will be using a similar tarp and backdrop setup as last year. The staged production will be exploring different ways to represent direction,” says Schuessler. Even after the finals in November, the students will continue to play into SOU T H

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Beech Grove High School

the spring semester, Morse says; once marching band ends, the focus switches to concert band, solo and ensemble work, winter guard and winter percussion. “It is a year-round effort to improve musical and visual performance skills,” he says. The process of orchestrating the next fall competition performance piece starts almost immediately after finals, Schuessler explains. “Design for the show starts in December, and the program starts to be written in March or April. So, it truly is a year-long process for the staff,” he says. Lifelong connections As is the case with other team activities, marching band is a second family for the students. Often, the older students will serve as mentors to the younger ones, and

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Local Neighborhood Family Owned Florist Since 1973 The beat goes on

To check out these or other area bands, you can attend a high school football game or one of the various competitions. Center Grove hosts two contests: Cavalcade of Champions on Oct. 6, and ISSMA Regionals for Classes A and B on Oct. 13. Other competitions can be found at inbands.com, issma.net and musicforall.org, or by checking the individual school bands’ calendars and social media pages: Center Grove: centergrovebands. com, Beech Grove: facebook. com/BGBandBoosters and Greenwood: ghsband.org.

See the difference, Steve’s the difference!

A full list of all top-10 ISSMA state finalists by class, determined by the population of the school system, is available at issma.net/ mbhistory.php.

the experiences will stick with all marchers for a long time. “The performance experience they get is hard to describe, but it is powerful and life-changing. Also, the leadership and people skills they get are second to none,” says Morse. “Finally, the camaraderie that is created through the activity is very impactful for most people and creates strong, positive memories and lifelong connections.” The time and emotion invested drive close bonds and friendships, Wynn says. “I’m still friends with the people I was in marching band with when I was in high school,” he says. “Those experiences of working together, the experiences of successes and failures, you develop a bond and friendship deeper than other social relationships.” In marching band, students and their parents are likely to find a community that supports their talents and interests, even while navigating the potentially rocky high school terrain. “Those that are still excited about it generally have had great experiences when they were in it,” Schuessler says. “As a parent, many have seen huge growth in responsibility, discipline and maturity during their time in marching band.”

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Community

The 2018 JCCF scholarship winners at the annual Celebration of Giving

Making the Grade Johnson County Community Foundation manages gifts for the mind, from the heart By Greg Seiter

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Studies have indicated that college graduates tend to achieve higher salaries in their careers than those who enter the workforce with only a high school diploma. Yet the sticker shock associated with earning a college degree can be overwhelming for students and family members alike. According to recent reports from the College Board, a nonprofit organization that specializes in expanding access to higher education, the average cost of tuition and fees for the 2017-2018 school year was $34,740 at private colleges, $9,970 for state residents at public colleges and $25,620 for out-of-state residents attending public universities.


So where can Hoosier students turn to fill the gaps so they, too, can cover their tuition? Fortunately, nearly all Indiana residents have access to local organizations that provide scholarships and other types of resources for those needing budgetary-related assistance while preparing for college. Enter the Johnson County Community Foundation, which was established in 1991, an endowment organization that provides leadership on key community issues and addresses needs through grant-making, including scholarships. On the latter point, the JCCF manages and provides access to more than 80 scholarship funds that are available to students who attend Whiteland Community High School, Indian Creek High School, Greenwood Community High School, Franklin Community High School, Edinburgh Community High School, Center Grove High School, Greenwood Christian Academy and Roncalli High School. “We typically add one or two new scholarships each year,” says Stephanie Fox, a 2012 Franklin College graduate who works as program officer of grants and scholarships for the JCCF. She oversees the establishment of new funds, qualification criteria updates for existing funds, the creation of scholarship application forms and the processing of those received. Last year, JCCF received more than 750 applications. “This past year, we had probably 100 individual scholarship winners,” she says. Let’s go back to the numbers, briefly: According to the College Board, in-state tuition and associated fees at public four-year institutions increased at an average rate of 3.2 percent per year, beyond inflation, between the 2007-08 and 2017-18 academic years. In recognition of that trend, the JCCF, which awarded 182 scholarships totaling $458,000 in 2017, ultimately strives to help families prepare for college-related expenses in a variety of ways.

“We have students who would rather go to a private school, and the scholarships allow that to happen,” says board member Marcia Grossnickle, a career educator who serves as chairwoman of the organization’s 14-member Scholarships Committee. “Some students just don’t have the money, and as we all know, college costs keep getting more expensive.” A good portion of JCCF’s scholarship work is about sharing information, getting the word out to the students who need to hear it through a communication with high school guidance The JCCF manages and provides departments. Each year, the foundation access to more than 80 scholarship produces a brochure funds that are available to students available to schools who attend these high schools: and individuals about Whiteland Community High School specific requirements associated with each Indian Creek High School scholarship. JCCF repGreenwood Community High School resentatives have held information sessions Franklin Community High School about the Free ApplicaEdinburgh Community High School tion for Federal Student Aid and calculating Center Grove High School college costs. Greenwood Christian Academy “We also offer to speak to any group who Roncalli High School will have us about our programs and processes,” Fox says. “If individuals reach out to us, we try to help them find financial assistance in every way we possibly can.” Fox is also responsible for the other side of the coin, that is, donor relations. Regardless of the scholarship size, the JCCF plays a role in the selection, communication and/or disbursement process associated with each of the scholarships it manages. “We chose to work with the community foundation because it has an awesome SOU T H

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reputation of being a good steward of funds,” says Endress+Hauser Scholarship steward Don Cummings. “We like working with them. They’re good people, and they’re helping us do good things. They make it easier for us to do what we want to do.” Scholarships available through the JCCF vary, not only in dollar amount but in purpose and qualifying criteria. For example, students interested in applying for the Endress+Hauser Scholarship must have a 3.0 grade point average and plan to pursue a college degree in fields related to science, technology, engineering and math. “We realize that technical industries around the country are not finding enough technically educated candidates. To that extent, we can assist by helping people fund their education,” Cummings

“The degree they want to pursue doesn’t matter, and they must be an average student. We don’t want the top of the class. We’re looking for somebody who works hard but needs some help.” — Diana Ruschhaupt

says. “The dollar amount is $2,500 each, and this past year, we gave three away.” The $1,000 Molly K. Gibson Memorial Scholarship is only made available to graduating Franklin Community High School seniors who are members of the school’s varsity swimming and diving team and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. The fund was established by Molly Gibson’s family in memory of the former Franklin Community High School swimmer who died in 1998 in an automobile accident during her senior year. “Molly was a passionate person, and her passion rubbed off on other people. Her coach said she swam every practice like it was a meet,” says Pam Gibson, her mother. For many years before Molly died, Gibson and Molly’s coach lamented the

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lack of a swimming scholarship for Franklin students. “All three of my kids were swimmers, so almost immediately after Molly’s death, some of our friends suggested they wanted to help establish a scholarship in her memory,” Gibson says. “Applicants have to write an essay about how swimming has affected their lives. That’s a very important part of the process.” The Hamann Family Memorial Scholarship, which saw its 23rd recipient in 2018, was created in the memory of H. Paul Hamann and his brother, Robert. Its specific purpose is to assist those who demonstrate financial need. It requires a letter of recommendation from a non-family member as part of the application process and awards $1,000. It is open to all students, no matter their location or academic pursuit. “The degree they want to pursue doesn’t matter, and they must be an average student. We don’t want the top of the class,” says Diana Ruschhaupt, Hamann Family Memorial Scholarship representative. “We’re looking for somebody who works hard but needs some help.” The JCCF scholarship review process varies from one fund to the next. For the Molly K. Gibson Memorial Scholarship, a committee composed of friends, family members, Molly’s former swim coach and even her high school best friend review each applicant’s form and submitted essay before selecting a recipient. The Hamann Family Memorial Scholarship screening process includes family members, current and former award recipients and fund donors, who discuss each applicant via conference call before moving on to the interview process. “We’ll choose as many as six to interview,” Ruschhaupt says. “When that process is finished, we have a group lunch and select a winner.” Those interested in learning more about scholarships available through the JCCF can visit jccf.org/scholarships.

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Treating the whole person Breast cancer centers look at the big picture By Rebecca Berfanger

A Google search for “breast cancer” in the news for the past year turned up 1.7 million results when it comes to screenings, treatments and profiles of patients and survivors. It’s no wonder. The American Cancer Society predicts that one in eight women, 12 percent, will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in her lifetime. When compared with other cancers, lung cancer in women is the only cancer with a higher death rate. There are about 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the United States, including those who are still being treated and those who have completed treatment. Don’t forget: Men can be diagnosed with breast cancer, too. Although the chances of a man getting breast cancer is 1 in 833, the American Cancer Society estimates that about 2,550 men will be diagnosed with a new case of invasive breast cancer. An estimated 480 men in the United States will die of the disease in 2018. Center yourself Technology and understanding of cancer continue to improve and include recent advances in genetic testing and diagnostic tools. Three options for breast health on the southside, that is,

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Health

Community Breast Care at Community Hospital South, Franciscan Health Breast Center Indianapolis and Johnson Memorial Health Breast Care Center, continue to keep up with the latest news about the disease, how to screen it and how to treat it. All three hospitals offer 3-D mammography, breast ultrasounds and other advanced diagnostic tools; all three can also refer patients to providers who offer tools they don’t have on site. However, their numbers vary: Community Breast Care staff performs about 1,000 mammograms a month; Franciscan tallies about 1,280 mammograms per month. Both centers offer walk-ins. Staff at the JMH Breast Care Center performs 325 mammograms per month. Unlike Community and Franciscan centers, JMH requires a physician to order mammograms. The reason, says Randy Collins, JMH’s director of radiology, is to

“I think being small town and personal to patients sets us apart. We’re not as busy as other imaging centers. We have a little time to take with the patient. We have very short wait times, assuming all of the patients are arriving on time that day.” — Randy Collins

ensure there is someone who can follow up with the patient and guarantee that the general care provider will be aware of the results. If a patient needs additional testing or treatment, she may be referred to the JMH Cancer Center to work with a cancer patient navigator. Comfort is key If you had a list of fun things to do, a mammogram likely would not top it. JMH, Community and Franciscan strive to offer a calming experience to patients. At JMH, all patients are offered a foam-cushioned pad to make the procedure more comfortable, says Collins. Sometimes, he adds, patients will request a specific technician based on past experiences. “I think being small town and personal to patients sets us apart,” Collins says. “We’re not as busy as other imaging centers. We have a little time to take with

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Glass Designed Around You the patient. We have very short wait times, assuming all of the patients are arriving on time that day.” JMH mammographer Stacy Winget notes that when she first meets a patient for a mammogram, she wants to know her background and if she has concerns. “We always take the time to answer questions,” says Winget. “I can also give them brochures. Anybody that comes is usually nervous and scared and presents themselves differently. I can understand that. If a first-timer is nervous, I will tell them that as soon as it’s over, every first-timer I’ve seen will say, ‘Is that it?’” The hospital is undergoing renovations. By fall 2019, there will be a new women’s care center with a different look and feel, says Rick Kester, chief clinical services officer. Meanwhile, Franciscan offers a holistic approach to breast cancer patients. “We consider the mind, body and spirit,” says Lisa Davey, who serves as a nurse navigator. “You can’t separate the person from the disease. Each patient still has a life going on.” For instance, it offers a supportive care clinic where all cancer patients can be referred for pain management, to see the counselor from cancer care for emotional support, to get advice from a dietitian and to visit with a social worker. The dietitian and social worker are resources added in the past few years. With a slightly different approach, Community considers the entire person for each diagnosis, says nurse navigator Beth Staker. “We look more at the biology of the tumor. The cancer treatment is very specific to each type of breast cancer according to the biology.” Doctors look beyond the disease and into factors including patients’ lifestyles, support system and other health concerns to get them the best treatment, Staker says. “We have some patients who are elderly with other serious medical problems like heart issues who might not be a good candidate for surgery,” she says. “Or if cancer is sensitive to hormones, there might be options for hormonal manipulation to help treat the cancer, to help shrink the

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tumor and help prevent it from spreading while not having an impact on the life they already have.”

“We consider the mind, body and spirit. You can’t separate the person from the disease. Each patient still has a life going on.”

Navigating the waters When a patient knows someone who has been diagnosed with breast cancer, she might have a better understanding of the often-confusing subject. For example, she likely knows that not all cancers are alike and, therefore, not all treatments are alike. Davey says that sometimes people have done research before speaking with her, so they come in with preconceived notions. “We all have life experiences, and we bring that to the situation. Patients have friends or family members telling them all kinds of different stories. They don’t understand there are [different stages] and other factors at play,” Davey says. “Treatment is not cookie cutter; it’s not apples to apples.” Sometimes, Davey says, it’s not even an experience with breast cancer that worries patients but a bad experience with

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chemotherapy or radiation with a different kind of cancer. However, that is part of the nurse navigator’s role: to answer questions, explain what happens next and get patients to the next steps of their journeys. As for the one message they want everyone to know, representatives of all three health care systems emphasized that early detection is crucial. “We still recommend doing breast self-exam. So if you notice a change, get it addressed, don’t ignore it,” Staker says. “If we can get things early, it is much more curable and treatable. When someone has advanced cancer, we will still treat and care for them as best we can.” “If there is anything unusual, see us early, early, early, come in, come in, come in,” says Davey. “Do the screening and investigating. Don’t wait. Whether you have insurance or if you don’t, there are many ways to get it covered. The earlier we find it, the less treatment will be needed, and there will be a better chance of getting cured.”

Franciscan Health Cancer Center Indianapolis

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Worth the Trip

making Metamora memories Take a walk in the past lane By CJ Woodring

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Metamora, home to about 250 residents, is roughly 70 miles southeast of Indianapolis. Platted in 1838, the unincorporated town once was a stop along the Whitewater Canal, which continues to define and shape the community. Throughout the years, Metamora emerged as a major tourist destination for history buffs, artists, musicians and visitors seeking a relaxed vibe and nostalgic

walk. Whatever your reason for visiting, your timing will be spot-on: The town and long-running Canal Days festival are experiencing a Metamora metamorphosis, if you will. Although much has changed since the railroad replaced the canal, ambience has not. The Whitewater Canal, a town centerpiece, remains a viable, valuable attraction. The canal, along with the Metamora Grist SOU T H

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Mill, operates under the umbrella of the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites Corp. Jay Dishman, now in his 30th year as historic site manager, oversees daily, yearround operations. Along with administrative duties and employee supervision, Dishman ensures canal water is running and the two-story, water-powered grist mill is working. On occasion, he serves as miller for the current structure, which replaced an earlier mill sometime before 1900. The current grist mill continues to grind corn meal and flour available for purchase. The most recent site project, completed this spring, focused on reconstruction of the Duck Creek Aqueduct, which carries canal water over Duck Creek. “This was the largest alteration on the aqueduct for the past dozen or so years,” Dishman says. “Among other things, it 68

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Getting there is half the fun From Indianapolis, the trip to Metamora takes about an hour and 15 minutes. Visitors with children, and/or those who prefer not to drive, can travel via the Whitewater Valley Railroad. The railway offers several schedule options for the festival weekend, in addition to special excursions throughout the season. Trains depart from the Connersville depot and provide travelers a two- or four-hour layover in Metamora, depending upon the excursion. Round-trip and one-way fares are offered; caboose tickets are priced separately. Visit whitewatervalleyrr. org for details and online ticket reservations.


involved an application that extends the life of the wood, which we’d like to get at least two more decades out of.” Originally constructed in 1843 and the only wood aqueduct still in service in the United States, the 75-foot structure was partially destroyed by a flood in 1846. Rebuilt shortly thereafter, it was designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1992 and a National Historic Landmark in 2014.

Canal Days Autumn Festival

Any season in Indiana yields plenty of adventures; one of those adventures is the Metamora Canal Days Autumn Festival, held the first full October weekend. Now in its 50th year, this year’s event is slated for Oct. 5 to 7. First held in September 1969, Canal Days Autumn Festival initially was celebrated for just two days. An extension to three days helped ease traffic during busy and crowded weekends, which last year drew more than 120,000 visitors. The annual event is Historic Metamora’s primary source of income, derived from sales of art, antiques and quality handcrafts booths set up along the canal, across from the mill and in Tow Path Park. While these Canal Days vendors are juried, goods sold

throughout town include flea market items, carnival food, plants, natural food products and more. Hence, the festival is promoted as offering “something for everybody.” Local business owners, many of them natives, roll out the welcome mat at restaurants, retail stores and overnight accommodations. Innkeeper Cassie Garrett will be one of the Metamora residents welcoming guests. She was 5 when her family moved to Metamora. As a child, she began accompanying her mother to work in the 1880 building Garrett and husband Nate now operate as The Farmhouse, a bed-and-breakfast. “The house has a long-running history as a bed-and-breakfast, and my mother

worked for a former owner. So I spent quite a bit of time there,” she says. After more than a decade out of state, Garrett returned to Metamora in 2015, working alongside her husband to refurbish the iconic building. Operating year-round, the inn also features a restaurant open to the public. It’s a comfortable home for the couple and their daughters, Sophia and Savannah, soon to be joined by daughter Scarlett, due in October. Cassie Garrett says when she left, the town was thriving, drawing tourists from throughout the region. By the time she returned, “a lot of shops had closed down. Things I’d remembered were gone. So it was kind of a risk. But I had such good, fond SOU T H

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memories of what it had been and knew it could rebound.” The couple’s faith wasn’t misplaced: The inn draws guests from beyond the tristate area, also hosting nationwide visitors seeking off-the-beaten-path eateries. “We’re steadily seeing a lot of artists coming for the festival,” Garrett says. “There are less and less empty buildings and an increase in original, handmade items. We’re definitely on an upswing.”

Exploring Metamora

Metamora’s star attractions include a halfhour canal excursion on the horse-drawn, 75-foot canal boat, and a visit to the mill. Visitors also hop aboard a horse-drawn carriage, the perfect way to explore this historic town. Other fun sights include the canal boat horse stable; historic Odd Fellows

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Hall, home to the Metamora Museum of Oddities/The Dark Shadow; and Metamora Gem Mine & Luna’s Garden Gift Shop, where families pan for fossils and semi-precious gems. Metamora Performing Arts features a variety of musicians — Bluegrass Night is held at the Opry Barn the third Saturday of the month — selling out for nearly every performance. Visitors can set out on a 2.6-mile hiking and biking trail along the historic Whitewater Canal or visit privately owned Salt Creek Ranch, one mile west of Metamora in Laurel. The venue offers horseback riding, canoeing, camping and cabin rental. Whitewater State Park, in nearby Liberty, showcases 200-acre Whitewater Lake, a fun family getaway offering recreational opportunities and camping.

Shop, eat and stay

Dozens of businesses line downtown streets in Metamora and adjacent Duck Creek Crossing. Most are closed mid-December through mid-April. A majority of retail owners maintain full-time jobs elsewhere, also working long weekend and night hours to provide quality merchandise. Eclectic shops include The Wood Shack for handcrafted wood items; Words and Images/The Train Place, which combines the owners’ love for books and railroad memorabilia; and Mr. Fudge’s Confectionery, a Metamora landmark for more than 40 years. In nearby Duck Creek Crossing, businesses are housed in relocated historic structures. Among them is Buttons ’n’ Bows, where owners Jenny Moster and Jackie Beneker hold down the fort, assist-


FALL BEGINS AT THE APPLE WORKS! FALL EVENTS: ed by Moster’s sister-in-law, Mary Moster. The women set up shop in 1986, purveying merchandise that showcases miniature items for display in shadow and printer’s boxes. Frogs and turtles are the biggest sellers, Jenny Moster says, adding that a children’s area features tiny unbreakable items, perfect for little hands. Moster notes that new businesses continue to open, replacing those that have left. This spring, eight new shops opened downtown, along with three in Duck Creek Crossing. “Our business has gone steadily upward in the last two to three years, and we get to meet so many wonderful people who are just here to have a good time,” she says. Although small in size, Metamora is large on good taste, including good-tasting food. Try Scooty’s Grill for barbecued ribs; The Smelly Gourmet European Coffee Bar and Gift Shop, which offers the adjoining luxury Banes Suite; Gold Diggers Family Diner, a themed restaurant where patrons dine in a gold mine; and Grannie’s Cookie Jars and Ice Cream Parlor, where customers enjoy homemade cones and view a collection of more than 2,600 cookie jars. Spending the night? Along with The Farmhouse, consider the Grapevine Inn, Robin’s Nest, Cat and the Fiddle and the 1850s Metamora Inn. Fifteen minutes from town, Dreams End Log Cabin Vacation Rentals, a year-round Connersville getaway, offers five cozy cabins that can accommodate up to 10 people. According to Jay Dishman, the future of Metamora and the Canal Days Autumn Festival appears rosy. “The town continues to grow, and we have some new ideas coming up for the mill site,” he says. “Hopefully, we’re educating folks, and they can also shop to their hearts’ content. We’re looking up.” Moster echoes the sentiment. “The historic atmosphere remains,” she says, “and Metamora is still a wonderful and fun place to visit. Older people might remember what is was, but the younger ones are thinking of what it can be.”

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Indiana Made

Elixirs and Mixers and Sauces — Oh My! The Hoosier state is source for flavorful concoctions By Katie MacDonell

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Sometimes food and beverages need an extra kick; chefs and home gourmands alike turn to sauces, seasonings and syrups to elevate their food and, in doing so, their moods. Of course, dressing up a dish is nothing new; long gone are the caveman days of unadorned food. Cooking with herbs, condiments and spices dates back thousands of years in cultures all over the globe, and some of the greatest explora-

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tion was done in search of fine spices. People have continuously found opportunities to play with tastes and ingredients, using nature’s gifts to create sauces and blend concoctions for different effects. Today it is easier than ever to add bells and whistles to your glass or plate; here are some Hoosier companies helping folks across the state and around the country add a little flavor to their lives.


Wilks & Wilson With little credit, Indianapolis-based Wilks & Wilson has helped bartenders around North America craft fine cocktails, but they’re not bitter about it. In fact, their bitters, mixers and syrups — all handcrafted and natural — are the quiet heroes of many an aperitif. All Wilks & Wilson bitters, mixers and syrups are inspired by the late Victorian and Edwardian eras (think: pre-Prohibition). Bottles bear Gibson girl-esque illustrations, and names such as Adelaide’s Orgeat (an almond-infused elixir flavored with rose water) and Genevieve’s Grenadine (a pomegranate-based elixir). Before Wilks & Wilson, Zachari Wilks opened and co-owned Mass Ave.’s hub for craft cocktails, The Ball & Biscuit; there, he saw and fostered a growing appreciation for finer, hand-crafted cocktails of yesteryear. At the time, Gregory Wilson worked under Vince Freeman at a marketing agency. A home beer brewer, Wilson began hand-crafting syrups and mixers for use in the bar and cocktail industry, blending botanical extracts into elixirs, which Wilks transformed into drinks. Their collaborations went viral among local bartenders, created a demand and prompted them to launch a line of products. Wilks and Wilson established Wilks & Wilson in 2012; Freeman stepped in as CEO three and a half years ago. The company now has distributors throughout the United States, as well as some in Canada, Australia and Italy. Although they’re primarily used to enhance cocktails and non-alcoholic drinks, Wilks & Wilson’s mixers and elixirs can also be used in cooking. “Our ginger syrup is great for Asian cuisine,” says Freeman. “My wife loves to cook with our bloody mary mix to make slow-braised short ribs.”

Scoville Brothers Hot Sauce A decade ago, avid chili gardener Doug Lins needed a way to preserve the many peppers he harvested from his garden. “Making hot sauce was a natural,” he says. “I shared my homemade hot sauces with friends and family, and everyone encouraged me to keep making them.” In 2009, Lins incorporated Scoville Brothers Hot Sauces, a gourmet hot sauce business he runs with his wife, Karen, out of Kouts, a small town in northwest Indiana. You can find their hot sauces in 60 stores and restaurants statewide. In addition to selling wholesale and online, the couple also sells Scoville Brothers Hot Sauces in their gourmet gift and art shop “Peck O’Peppers Gallery,” located at their manufacturing site.

Scoville Brothers Hot Sauces offers heat for a variety of preferences, from the Heavy Metal Heat ghost pepper sauce, to the Cowboy Crooner, a mild sauce made with agave syrup and spices. Cayenne, smoked jalapeno and red habanero are just a few of the flavors these sauces add to food. Lins says it only takes a few drops to add flavor to a sandwich, soup or pasta dish. “You can use it in cooking to wake up a recipe without adding so much salt or other seasoning,” he says. The Lins combine their love of peppers with their love for music: The brand’s hot sauce names and labels all relate to music, and the couple performs locally as an acoustic duet called Hot Sauce.

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Indiana Made

Best Boy & Co Indianapolis-based Best Boy & Co. creates and distributes hand-crafted savory sauces, spice blends and dessert sauces. “We have really unique flavor profiles that people crave,” says Best Boy president and owner Kathy Pedrotti Hays, who purchased the company in January. “Customers also believe in the quality of the brand and the fact that we use all-natural ingredients.” The company was founded in 2008 by food enthusiast Wayne Shive, who, upon retiring from a successful business career, headed toward the kitchen, where he began developing his artisan condiment recipes. Shive adjusted the flavors of his barbecue and hot sauces until they reached perfection; his friends loved what they tasted and encouraged him to turn his hobby into a business endeavor. Best Boy & Co.’s products now sell across the country to retailers and consumers through online sales and shows. But Shive wasn’t interested in personal gain. He started to sell the official line of Best Boy & Co. products with the intention of helping people in need. These artisan condiments, e.g., Heirloom Apple Mustard, Java-Nib Spice Rub and Ginger-Infused Caramel, not only add flair to meals, but also make a positive difference in people’s lives. Best Boy & Co. gives 100 percent of its net profits to carefully chosen charities, including Doctors of the World, the Children’s Wish Fund and Share Our Strength.

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Burton’s Maplewood Farm Who doesn’t love a good drizzle of syrup on their French toast, pancakes and waffles? Medora-based Burton’s Maplewood Farm doesn’t sell your typical maple syrup; for starters, these are 100-percent pure, Grade-A and Grade-B preservative-free maple syrups. They’re then aged in barrels at distilleries near and far to produce Jamaican Rum Barrel Aged Maple Syrup, Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple Syrup and Peach Street Brandy Barrel Aged Maple Syrup. Tim Burton started his business in 2008, when a friend invited him along


“The Company with the Boss on the Job”

to harvest maple tree sap. Impressed by the process, Burton returned to his farm, counted the maple trees there and picked up the craft himself. These gourmet maple syrups are the perfect additions to your breakfast plate, but there’s no need to limit their use to just one meal. Maple syrup, Burton says, is “not just for pancakes anymore.” These syrups can be used for glazing salmon, trout, steak, pork and chicken; flavoring sweet potatoes; and caramelizing onions or mushrooms. Don’t forget dessert: Burton’s favorite sweet treat is to cut peaches in half, grill them, pour his maple syrup in the middle, and let them grill a little longer. The grilled peaches then go in a bowl with vanilla ice cream and crushed pecans or walnuts on top.

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Profile

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Chamber Discussions Judge Loyd hangs up his robes

By Glenda Winders

Photography by Angela Jackson

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Profile

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Judge K. Mark Loyd’s stately chambers on the second floor of the Johnson County Courthouse look pretty much as they did when he arrived there in 1994, but he has made a few changes. The dumbwaiter that used to bring up files from the floors below now serves as a closet for his black robes, and he uses the steps that once led to a private exit for storage. The biggest change of all, however, is that now stacks of paper cover every surface in the room as he sorts through his files and prepares to leave office at the end of this year. Loyd was elected in 1994 after working as the chief deputy prosecutor and a magistrate. Since that election he has run

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unopposed on every ballot, and his career has been one filled with accomplishments, accolades and positive changes to the court system. But it wasn’t the career he set out to pursue. “I didn’t really want to be a judge,” he says. “It was just happenstance.” Loyd had been working as the chief deputy prosecutor and had good relationships with all of the judges at that time. When a new position as a magistrate opened up, they lobbied him to accept it. “I thought it was a good opportunity because it gave me a chance to see if I liked judging before I ran for election,” he says. “It’s a leap of faith as to whether you’re going to fit the robe. Just because you’re a good litigator and advocate doesn’t necessarily translate into a good judge. It’s not a job for everybody.” Before that, he wasn’t even sure he wanted to be an attorney. “I fell into law just like I fell into judging,” he says. His parents wanted him to become a dentist, but one of his interests was wildlife, so after graduating from Franklin College he persuaded them that a master’s degree in biology and natural resources from Ball State University would look good on his application to dental school. There he heard a speaker comment on the need for lawyers with science backgrounds because of cases such as those involving the environment, and he was hooked. He was accepted by the dental school to which he had applied, but instead he headed for the University of Dayton School of Law. “I suppose it was the right thing to do,” he says. “I’ve always enjoyed working with the court officers, and it felt like my staff and I were helping make a differ-


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ence, that we were making positive calls for individuals and families and accomplishing things.” One of the things he accomplished was creating the position of court administrator, that is, a person who could assist with such chores as writing grants, drafting local rules, organizing, purchasing and dealing with changing computer systems that judges don’t have time to do. “The perception is that we spend a lot of time golfing and sitting around reading the Wall Street Journal with our feet up,” he says. “But with the caseloads so high, it takes a lot of stamina to do this job.” 80

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“As a judge, he’s everything most people expect – fair, impartial, diligent, efficient, knowledgeable, honest and confident. He’s a compassionate leader both in and out of the courtroom.” — Cynthia Emkes

New systems Loyd also looks back proudly on his part in making Johnson County a pilot county for the family court system. If a family has multiple cases on the docket, they are all heard by a single judge. In this way, a family has to miss less work and pay fewer baby sitters, and they can count on a more consistent outcome. He is also proud of the growth of the Court Appointed Special Advocate program, a group of 60 to 75 volunteers appointed to advocate for children in cases involving divorce, guardianship or Children in Need of Services.


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“When I came in, it was loose and informal,” he says, “but we made it much more structured and professional so that individuals have the strength to actually advocate for the children in their care.” He partnered with Judge Cynthia Emkes in creating the alternate dispute resolution program, which provides mediation, arbitration and private judging in the hope litigants in civil disputes will solve their own problems and lower the caseload. The pair also created the alcohol and drug program for the county. “Right now, when we have our opiate epidemic going on, what would we do without that program to assist us in triaging these people to a rehabilitative program that makes sense?” he says. Emkes recently retired after being the longest-serving judge and the first female judge in Johnson County. She has known Loyd since 1990, so she has a pretty good idea about how he operates. “He’s a remarkable man, both professionally and personally,” she says, “and I’m thankful and proud to have worked with him and for the opportunities I’ve had to collaborate with him. As a judge, he’s everything most people expect – fair, impartial, diligent, efficient, knowledgeable, honest and confident. He’s a compassionate leader both in and out of the courtroom.” For a couple of years, Loyd was chairman of the Judges Alternative Dispute Resolution Committee, which created the first parenting coordination rules for divorced couples in Indiana. He also supervises adult probation, juvenile probation, the guardian ad litem program, the juvenile court and the juvenile detention center.

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“Johnson County has one of the top juvenile detention facilities in Indiana,” he says. “We can handle anything from minimum security to maximum security for detainees. We have a full school program, so they don’t miss their education, mental health and other treatment providers, and our programming is some of the best.” He says that thanks to the arbitration and mediation programs in place, he hears far fewer jury trials than he did in years past, but he has fond memories of working with jurors. “The vast majority of the jurors over the years have been terrifically satisfying. They get it right,” he says. “It’s not like TV or what they expect, and they try hard to follow the law and do their job.” Other contributions Outside the courtroom Loyd’s accomplishments have included teaching family and criminal law at Franklin College,

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IUPUI and Ivy Tech. He has also served on the board of Adult and Child Mental Health as well as a children’s justice task force committee, the Drug Task Force of Johnson County and a number of judicial committees. He was state chairman of Ducks Unlimited. But he says much of the credit for what he has been able to do goes to his staff. “I’ve been real, real lucky,” he says. “What people see is me sitting on the bench, but the staff is really the internal drive that turns out the product for the public’s consumption, and most of them have been with me forever.” One of those is court reporter Georgenia Rogers, who came with him from the prosecutor’s office. “Judge Loyd is someone I have always looked up to and have been proud to call my employer,” she says. “I can’t imagine that there are very many judges in this state who are more respected than he is,

which is evident by the many judges, lawgot to get up and take care of. My family yers, departments, employees and individhas put up with a lot.” uals who are daily contacting him seeking They’ve also had to deal with occasional counsel, recommendations and advice. He threats, but while he takes these situations has been the go-to person for the Johnson seriously, he hasn’t let them get in the way County Courthouse, and of what he felt he had to do. he will be missed.” “I asked for this job,” he “The staff is really Loyd also credits his says. “And that’s part of it.” the internal drive family for his success. His After he steps down that turns out the wife, Renee, is retired from from the bench he hopes to product for the Women, Infants and Chilpublic’s consumption, pursue more of the pastimes dren, a food and nutrition he enjoys – hunting and and most of them service. Son Harrison and fishing, golfing and taking have been with me his wife have a new baby in some Indy car races. But forever.” —Mark Loyd daughter, and daughter since he is still a couple of Kimber has two sons, one a senior at years shy of being able to retire officially, he Franklin College. also plans to take another full-time job. “Judging’s tough on a family,” Loyd says. “It will be in some capacity of the law: “You hear cases all week long, so the only mediation or other alternate dispute time to do the research and writing the job resolution, private judging or arbitration,” requires is evenings and weekends. And I he says. “Something that involves solving regularly get phone calls requesting search problems and finding solutions. That’s what warrants at 3 or 4 in the morning that I’ve judges do.”

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Refreshing the familiar

Joanna and Miles Batchelor reimagine their Greenwood home By Jon Shoulders | Photography by AngELA Jackson

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More than a decade after building their three bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom residence in Greenwood, Joanna and Miles Batchelor were ready for an aesthetic change to their domestic surroundings. After moving seven times during their professional careers, the prospect of yet another relocation wasn’t terribly palatable, so they decided to stay put, do some brainstorming with an interior designer and undertake, as Joanna puts it, a “simple refresh.” “Now that we’re retired, we realized we like where we are and that we could freshen things up here instead of moving again,” Joanna says. “We looked at condos in downtown Indy for a little while, but we like being in Greenwood, and our three granddaughters are within five

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minutes of us. It seemed to make sense to treat ourselves to some revisions and refreshes here in our familiar surroundings.” Stay in the lines The journey began in 2014 when the Batchelors enlisted design consultant Susie Bibler of Indianapolis-based Home ReVisions to make a few choice changes to the living room of the 3,500-squarefoot home. The couple removed both the carpeting and large entertainment center that dominated the space, choosing instead to mount a flat-screen television for a cleaner, more spacious feel. A midcentury-style Scandinavian sofa, sleek end tables and modern artwork exemplify the couple’s eclectic design tastes.


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“They don’t have a specific style, but they do like clean lines and nothing fussy,” Bibler says. “It was more of a combination of midcentury modern meets modern meets transitional. That’s what I enjoyed: the fact that it wasn’t a design that was clearly defined. It was more of a design that we developed as we went along, based on their likes of certain elements.” In the living room, blackout drapes and a pocket door linking to the dining room help to facilitate a theater-like atmosphere for one of the couple’s favorite pastimes: movie nights. 88

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“When we built the house 15 years ago, we didn’t want an open concept because we have surround sound for the living room and you would lose all the noise,” Joanna explains. “So when we were refreshing the space, we decided that since we’re big on watching movies, why not customize our living space even more?” Next came an update for the dining room, which involved a few creative touches to existing furniture pieces, most of which were wedding gifts from when Miles and Joanna were married 42 years ago. Bibler suggested reupholstering the


chairs, painting the sideboard black to offset the room’s otherwise warm tones and adding a few design pieces to an old tea cart that stands in the corner. Color me in To add visual continuity from room to room, the Batchelors implemented a recurring color scheme that subtly pervades the living, dining and front entryway spaces. “Tones of orange are my favorite; I like coral, orange and rust tones,” Joanna says. “All of our walls except for the kitchen were very neutral because in the back of our minds we’ve always thought about reselling since we’ve moved so many times. But when we talked to Susie she found out that we do like color, so she suggested that we use color in the drapes and other things than just pictures.” Heart and hearth Throughout late 2015 and 2016 the Batchelors embarked on a kitchen redesign with assistance from Compass Design’s Stacy Thompson, who reinvigorated the space with stainless steel appliances, quartz counters and island, a thin subway tile backsplash and dark cabinetry. “The kitchen isn’t a gigantic space, but we were able to apply some updates and give it some modern touches without knocking down walls or doing anything major,” Thompson says. She designed the cabinets, then had an Amish family in southern Indiana build and install them. “It worked really well since the family is local and we could consult directly with them if there were any issues,” Thompson says. SOU T H

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The master bedroom and bathroom both received moderate facelifts last year, including custom-built drapes and bed, as well as new light fixtures and heated tile flooring in the master bath. A light touch-up of the primary guest bedroom followed earlier this year. “Our oldest daughter is in a motorized wheelchair, and now the master bathroom and all the doors and rooms except the powder room on the main level are handicap accessible,” Joanna says, adding that the finished basement level serves as a relaxation spot with a TV and pinball machine. “It’s nice because we’re older, and as we age, if we would need that accessibility aspect of the home, then it’s available. We have a lift in the garage, too. So, we’re ready to stay here forever.” The Batchelors have certainly done their share of traveling, both recreationally and professionally. Miles, an Indy native, met Joanna, who grew up in Greencastle, while both were employed with Indiana Bell. They went through several corporate relocations through the years to Colorado, Illinois and eventually back to central Indiana before retiring. 90

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These days they reserve their travel plans for the winter months, typically heading for warmer climates. For the couple, Greenwood is an ideal spot for the remainder of the year, not least because their granddaughters, Allie, Mandy and Tonia, live close by. “It’s so easy to get around here, and the services we need are close by,” Joanna says. “We’re big Colts fans and have had season tickets for 35 years. You might not have the shopping in Johnson County that the northside does, but for day-today we really like it here.” The Batchelors aren’t finished with their domestic changes just yet. With Bibler’s help they plan to punch up the secondary guest bedroom next, with new paint, furnishings and art. “You’re always thinking about resale and how the house might look when you sell it for other people, and when we had to move so many times during our careers we had to consider that,” Joanna says. “But ultimately if you want to be happy in your own space you have to approach it remembering that you’re the one living there, so be comfortable and make it your own.”


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Show Me the Way Cyclists can pedal across Missouri on the Katy Trail By Glenda Winders

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Photos provided by Missouri Division of Tourism

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Katy Trail, Frontier Park, St. Charles, Missouri

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Barbara Curtis rides her bicycle just about everywhere she goes: around town, across the United States three times and along many of the nation’s “rails-totrails” byways. But perhaps her favorite place to ride is the Katy Trail in her home state of Missouri. “You don’t have to worry about being hit by a car, and it’s a shady, pleasant place to ride a bicycle,” she says. “It makes my heart sing.” The 240-mile trail, one of the longest such projects in the country, is a linear state park that crosses from one side of the state to the other. Much of it follows the Missouri River, and some of it is a part of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail and the American Discovery Trail. Formerly the site of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad, today it is covered with crushed limestone that makes for good riding, walking, running and, in some areas, horseback riding. Because it was once a railroad, the average grade (incline or decline) is 2 percent, so there won’t be any unexpected terrain.

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Curtis is also part of the Warm Showers Community, which offers a place to sleep, a bath and a meal to cyclists passing through. At her home in Warrensburg, Missouri, she has welcomed Katy riders from many states and all over the world, from Scotland to Korea. “I never go on the trail when I don’t meet someone from out of state or out of the country,” she says. But these cyclists don’t come all that way just to ride their bikes on a pretty trail. “The Katy” is also the thoroughfare that provides access to some 30 towns — both small and large — along the way that allow visitors to the Show-Me State to experience local culture and learn some of the state’s rich history. These towns cater to their twowheeled visitors with bicycle storage and repair, hotels, camping facilities, charging poles for electronic devices, shuttle services, escorts across some bridges, and stores where people on the move can stock up. Think you’d like to load up your bike and go? Here is just a sampling of what you’ll find when you do.


Missouri Governor's Mansion, Jefferson City

Central Dairy, Jefferson City

Meriwether Cafe and Bike Shop, Rocheport

Eastern beginnings Traveling east to west, the trip begins at Machens (Mile 26.9), which doesn’t offer many services. But at Mile 39.5 you’ll come to St. Charles, with a population of more than 60,000 and plenty to do and see. The city was founded by French fur traders in 1769, so make sure to stop at the 16-block historic district, where you’ll find the First Capitol of Missouri, the Frenchtown Heritage Museum, and the Lewis and Clark Nature Center. Then have a hearty breakfast or lunch at Lady Di’s Diner and get back on your bike. Next stop: Defiance (Mile 59.1) is an unincorporated community that is the gateway to Missouri wine country. Defiance Ridge Vineyards would be one good place to start your tour, but there are many other possibilities, too. You’ll also want to look into the rich history of American Indian, river and railroad lore here as well as make a visit to Daniel Boone’s final home. Want to stick around a little longer? Book a canoe or kayak adventure with Missouri River Excursions. The midpoint At Mile 100.8 you can take a three-mile side trip to Hermann, a German settlement that is full of wineries, breweries, restaurants and inns, making it a great place to overnight. They also put on an authentic Oktoberfest each year, and visitors can explore the town’s heritage at the Deutschheim State Historic Site. You’ll have to cross the river to get here, but the bridge has bike lanes and affords great views. In Jefferson City (Mile 143.2), the state’s capital, the parks and recreation department built and maintains a spur from the Katy so that riders can easily come into town. The river crossing is safe and beautiful, and once there you’ll be able to steep yourself in state history at the Missouri State Capitol and Museum, the Governor’s Mansion, and the Lewis and Clark Monument. You can even tour the state penitentiary, if you are so inclined, and lunch at nearby Prison Brews. Places to stay range SOU T H

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Les Bourgeois Winery, Rocheport

from hotels to B&Bs, and eating possibilities abound. For tuning up, whether it’s your body or your bicycle, there are bike shops and a regional hospital. Hartsburg (Mile 153.6) has a population of just over 100 and not many services, but the Globe Hotel Bed and Breakfast has been hosting Katy riders since the trail began. Owned by Mark and Leaia Clervi since 2015, the inn opened as a hotel for the railroad in 1893. Today the Clervis say cyclists and hikers from all over the world make up about 92 percent of their clientele. Mark, himself a cyclist, traveled through Europe and stayed at hostels as a young man, so he understands the passion that drives the people who come to stay, and he loves the camaraderie that draws them together. “Now I’m the hostel, and it’s exciting for me,” he says. “I enjoy chatting with the guests about their experiences and new equipment and new bike designs, but the other — more important — component is that the people are intelligent and interesting. The level of the conversations we have here is a gift.” 96

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Since there aren’t many places to eat here, the Clervis offer to provide dinner. If you pass by on a weekend, they’ll recommend the Claysville Store restaurant, and if you come through in October, plan to catch the annual pumpkin festival, when the number of people in town swells to more than 60,000. Scholarly ride Columbia is connected to the trail at Mile 169.9 by the 8.9-mile MKT spur, which takes bikers weaving through wooded areas, open spaces and local neighborhoods. “The ease of access to downtown Columbia, ‘The District,’ makes for the perfect day trip off the Katy Trail,” says Megan McConachie, strategic communications manager for the Columbia Convention and Visitors Bureau. “There’s plenty of bike parking, and then you’re free to roam through the many shops, galleries and restaurants in the area.” The home of the University of Missouri, this area also boasts the North Village Arts District and musical venues such as the Blue Note, Rose Music Hall and the Missouri

Theatre. If there’s room in the panier to take some mementos home, stop at Bluestem Missouri Crafts, explore the shelves at Yellow Dog Bookstore, shop the collection of one-of-a-kind items at Poppy or create your own signature perfume at Makes Scents. Then dine casually at Flat Branch Pub and Brewing or one of the many other restaurants that feature outdoor dining and seasonal ingredients. Finish off with a treat from Sparky’s Homemade Ice Cream – alcohol-infused or a flavorful cone. Located high on the bluffs overlooking the river, Boonville (Mile 191.8) is filled with some 450 historic sites and structures that date back to the 1800s, and a self-guided walking tour will get you to 23 of them. Visit mansions and the Mitchell Antique Motorcar Museum, check in with the Friends of Historic Boonville at the Old Cooper County Jail or stop at the restored Katy Depot, which now houses the Chamber of Commerce and a bicycle shop. For more contemporary entertainment, try your luck at the Isle of Capri Casino or make your own pot at the Boonville Clay Co.


Katy Bike Rental, Defiance

Last leg For a cultural infusion, be sure to make Sedalia (Mile 229) one of your stops. Here you’ll find the extraordinary Daum Museum of Contemporary Art, located on the campus of State Fair Community College. And if you come through at the right time of year, you can actually attend Missouri’s state fair. Need to catch up on email or write the folks back home? The library here offers one-hour-per-day guest-user passes for $1. Try the Brick Front Grill for Mediterranean food, El Espolon for Mexican food or Kehde’s Barbeque. A number of low-cost hotels will come in handy if you decide to spend the night.

The trail ends in Clinton (Mile 264.6), a town of more than 9,000 people where you’ll find bike repair, a hospital and other services. Plan to spend your last night at the Haysler House Bed and Breakfast Inn, right on the trail, and take advantage of their homecooked breakfast the next morning before heading home. While you’re munching on locally sourced pastries and sipping your coffee, you might want to start planning your next trip. The Rock Island Trail, which follows what was formerly that railroad, will just about double Missouri’s rails-to-trails offerings on a more southerly route. Some parts of it are already open, in case you’re not ready to get off your bike just yet. SOU T H

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weddings

Erica McGraw & Alex Aukerman The Grand Hall at Historic Union Station June 8, 2018 Erica McGraw and Alex Aukerman first met as 6-year-olds when they played on the same soccer team. Their paths crossed again in the sixth grade at Center Grove Middle School North. “We had practically every single class together throughout middle school and quickly became best friends,” Erica says. “We began officially dating in February of our eighth-grade year.” Alex proposed on July 1, 2017. “That morning, he nonchalantly suggested that we go downtown for a ‘date night’ since we didn’t have any other plans,” Erica recalls. The couple went for a canal walk in downtown Indy, complete with a gondola ride. “After the gondola ride, the driver asked if we wanted him to take pictures of us, and I immediately said ‘yes.’ We got out of the gondola, and while we were standing there taking pictures, Alex got down on one knee and asked me to marry him.” The couple went on to their scheduled dinner, where both of their families were waiting for them to celebrate the engagement. Erica and Alex’s wedding took place on a Friday evening; both the ceremony and reception were held at Union Station in downtown Indianapolis. It was a formal wedding, and the decor incorporated a lot of blush and neutral colors along with a hint of gold.  “We both agree that our wedding day was the happiest day of our lives thus far,” Erica says. “Everyone was so happy and excited, and the day went along exactly as planned. Seeing all of our friends and families in one place to celebrate the beginning of our lives together was incredibly special. There was so much love that day, and the reception was the most fun party we have ever attended.” The couple honeymooned in Kauai, Hawaii. Photos by Adams Photography

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Lauren Collins & Erik Rieker Ceremony and reception at the Garment Factory in Franklin June 9, 2018 Lauren Collins and Erik Rieker met at a local restaurant when their mutual friends separately invited them to meet. “We chatted for a few hours and hit it off,” Lauren says. “Like a true gentleman, Erik walked me to my car, and that’s where it all began.” Erik proposed in 2017 on Easter Sunday; in keeping with the holiday, he set up an Easter egg hunt with Lauren’s family. “My sister was in town from Colorado, which was extremely special,” she says. “It meant so much to me that my family was there for such an important moment.” Lauren and Erik chose the Garment Factory for their wedding. “My grandmother lives across the street,” she says. “It’s the home where my mom was raised, and I also grew up playing outside. The other little piece of history is that two of my great-aunts worked at the Garment Factory as teenagers, sewing undergarments. They were 16 at the time.” One of the great-aunts was able to attend the wedding. The wedding featured dusty blue, gray, navy and gold; floral arrangements featured white flowers and plenty of greenery. The couple honeymooned in Jamaica. Photos by Huff Photography

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WAMMFest Aug. 18 // Craig Park

1. Mary Habickt and Cynthia Williams

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2. Chris and Dan Hickey 3. Amanda DeBusk 4. Trish Akers and Kwang Casey 5. Chris Pickett, Sara Atwood, Sarah McNeill and Nina Patterson 6. Darren Reid and Taylor Scott 7. Dena Sheler, Ronni Meyer, Nancy Garsey and Taylor Fulton 8. Will Green, Valorie Green and Sergey Green 9. Rick McClurg, Nicole Youngs, Jason Youngs and Lynn Gray 10. Stevie Lefevers, Jacqueline Settles and Brian Heber 11. Kim Hunt and John Chambers 5

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Johnson County 4-H and Agricultural Fair July 15 - 21 Johnson County Fairgrounds

1. Kelsie Risk-Reyes talks with 10-year-old Ethan Wood 2. Josie Sodrel

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3. Johnson County fair queen Hartlee Chadwell and Kierstin Snyder 4. Sophie Harrell 5. Brittany Porter 6. Caitlin Booe, 2017 Johnson County fair queen 7. Riders on the Fierce Soda Shop float 8. Lauren Peddycord 9. Morgan Hendley and Alyssa Pruitt 4

10. Gail Patrick 11. Cole Shireman

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Johnson County Community Foundation's Mural Painting Days Aug. 7 // Franklin Aug. 11 // Edinburgh

1. Artist Andrea Light 2. Kathy Riesenmey 3. Bill Chittick 4. Callie Johnson

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5. From top, Mia Dodson, Robbin Henderson and Addy Johnson 6. Erin Davis, Dave Windisch, Kevin Walls, Danny Causey, Don Cummings and Rhoni Oliver 7. Sandy Palmeter 8. Kim Walls and Kelsey Kasting 9. Nancy Olsen with grandsons, Brayden and Finley Markham 10. Garnet Vaughn 11. Angela Grayson 12. Vale Bogue 5

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Freedom Festival June 30 // Craig Park in Greenwood 1. Alexa Jo Geary 2. Braylin Donenfeld 3. Kinnley Wilkinson 4. Pastor Steve Sherwood of Grace Assembly of God 5. Heather and Benjamin Adams have their caricature drawn by Brad Rosier

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Southside Business Directory AUCTIONEERS

Findley Auction Service Kevin - (317) 919-2033 Wade - (317) 691-2234 Bruce - (317) 509-7382 findleyauctioneers.com

CHURCH

Mount Pleasant Christian Church 381 N. Bluff Road Greenwood, IN 46142 (317) 881-6727 mpcc.info

FINE JEWELRY

Reis-Nichols Jewelers 789 US 31 North Greenwood, IN 46142 (317) 883-4467 reisnichols.com

INTERIOR DESIGN

Dale Hughes Interior Design, INC.

BREWHOUSE

Tried & True Alehouse 2800 S State Road 135 Greenwood, Indiana 46143 (317) 530-2706

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BUILDER

CATERING

Rick Campbell Builders, Inc.

Archer’s Meats & Catering

1122 W. Stones Crossing Road Greenwood, IN 46143

259 S. Meridian Street Greenwood, IN 46143

triedandtruealehouse.com

(317) 752-5469 rickcampbellbuilder.com

DAY CAMP DAY CAMP

DAY SPA

FARM EQUIPMENT

Transformations Salon & Spa

Dave’s Farm Service, LLC

8083A S. Madison Avenue

50 N. Eisenhower Dr.

Indianapolis, IN 46227

Edinburgh, IN 46124

Baxter YMCA Baxter YMCA

7900 S. Shelby Street 7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN46227 Indianapolis, IN46227 (317) 881-9347 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org indymca.org

FITNESS CENTER FITNESS CENTER

Baxter YMCA Baxter YMCA

7900 S. Shelby Street 7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN46227 Indianapolis, IN46227 (317) 881-9347 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org indymca.org

LAW OFFICE SWIM LESSONS SWIM LESSONS

Schafstall & Baxter YMCA Baxter YMCA Admire, LLP 7900 S. Shelby Street

(317) 881-9300 cateringbyarchers.com

(317) 882-1773

812-526-5504

transformationssalonandspa.com

www.davesfarmservice.com DAY CAMP INSURANCE

HOSPITAL

Baxter YMCA 7900 S. Shelby Street Franklin Indianapolis, IN46227 Insurance

Johnson Memorial Health

(317) 881-9347 359 N. Morton Street indymca.org Franklin, IN 46131

1125 W. Jefferson Street Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-3300 johnsonmemorial.org

(317) 736-8277

MEDIA

FITNESS CENTER MORTGAGE COMPANY

AIM Media IN— Daily Journal

Baxter YMCA Approved 7900 S. Shelby Street Mortgage Indianapolis, IN46227

dalehughesinteriordesign.com

7900 S. Shelby Street Attorneys at Law Indianapolis, IN46227 Indianapolis, IN46227 98 (317) N. Jackson Street 881-9347 (317) 881-9347 Franklin, IN 46131 indymca.org indymca.org (317) 736-7146

PIZZA

PRESCHOOL

REHABILITATION

Arni’s Restaurant

Grace United Methodist Church Preschool

Compass Park Indiana Masonic Home

1300 East Adams Drive Franklin, IN 46131

Franklin, IN 46131

981 W. Jefferson Stree Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 698-3253

1691 W. Curry Road Greenwood, IN 46143 (317) 881-0500 meetyouatarnis.com

schafstalladmire.com

(317) 736-7961 www.franklingrace.org

A Winterwood Mortgage Group

30 S. Water Street, Suite A

(317) 881-9347 107 N State Road 135, Ste. 301 indymca.org Greenwood, IN 46142

Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-2730

(317) 882-2255

dailyjournal.net

ApprovedMortgage.com

SWIM LESSONS

690 State Street

Baxter YMCA 7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN46227 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org

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Calendar of Events

September, October, November

Apple Works

open at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Price: $15 in advance, $20 day of show, free for children 12 and under. Information: mallowrun.com.

Sept. 15-16

The owners of 15 of Franklin’s most historic and architecturally significant buildings will open their doors to the public for the Franklin Heritage Inc. Historic Home Tour. Price: $15, discount for members of Franklin Heritage. Time: Noon to 5 p.m. both days. Location: Various homes are listed at historicartcrafttheatre.org.

» Sept. 8

Food, music, local crafts, blacksmiths, kids activities, model trains and a real train from the Indiana Live Steamers make the Heartnut Community Festival an annual tradition for many Johnson County families. Time: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Location: 2949 North St., Nineveh. Price: Free admission, $3 train rides. Information: jocoparks.com/event/heartnut-festival. Puppy POOLooza is Greenwood’s endof-summer pool party for pups where most chemicals have been removed from the pool at Freedom Springs Aquatic Center. Check the website for the instructions and rules regarding when you can bring your dog. Location: 850 W. Stop 18 Road, Greenwood. Information: greenwood.in.gov/freedomsprings. 110

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Sept. 21-22

Snap your fingers to the Indianapolis Jazz Orchestra presented by the Franklin Symphonic Council. Time: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Price: Free. Information: mallowrun.com.

Sept. 14-15

Hoosier Vintage Wheels will once again roar into the Johnson County Fairgrounds giving fairgoers a chance to see historic cars and meet fellow auto enthusiasts, including the Cluster Busters Hot Rod Club. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Location: 250 Fairground St., Franklin. Price: $5. Information: hoosiervintagewheels.com

Sept. 15

Twist and shout to the American English Beatles Tribute on the lawn. Time: Gates

Local celebrities dance at the fifth annual Johnson County Dancing with the Stars to raise money for seven organizations: Dog Tags — Johnson County Extension Homemakers Association, Haven Sanctuary for Women Inc., Human Services Inc., Humane Society of Johnson County, Johnson County Historical Society, KIC-IT Inc., and Rest and Restore Ministries. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Historic Artcraft Theatre. Price: Friday tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for kids 12 and under. Saturday tickets are $30 for adults and $10 for kids 12 and under. The Saturday tickets include one beer or wine, or one soft drink and popcorn. Information: facebook.com/dwtjcs.

Sept. 22-23

Check out Holler on the Hill, part picnic, part music festival and part family reunion on three stages while supporting Indiana Farmers Union, Indiana Forest Alliance, Hoosier Organic Marketing Education, Garfield Park Farmers Market and the Indianapolis Parks Foundation. Time: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Location: Garfield Park, 2349 Pagoda Drive, Indianapolis. Information: holleronthehill.com.

Sept. 22

Rock the Clock in downtown Greenwood. Celebrate all things Greenwood with three live bands, local beer and wine vendors, and food trucks


By Rebecca Berfanger

Ongoing Now in its 26th year, the Johnson County Antique and Vintage Market takes place every second Saturday, featuring antique furniture, jewelry, glass, toys and advertising vendors from Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: 250 Fairground St., Franklin. Price $2 for adults, free for anyone under 18. Information: jcantiquemarket.com. While open daily in September and October, Apple Works will have live music on the weekends through Oct. 28 in addition to apples and apple desserts, the pumpkin patch and activities for kids. Visit during Highlander Festival on Sept. 29 and 30. On the last weekend of October, the fall season wraps up with a bonfire and cookout. Time: Music performed 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays in September and October; open daily 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. September and October, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. November and December. Location: 8157 S. Road 250W, Trafalgar. Price: Free admission. Information: apple-works.com. A collection of local historical exhibits awaits you at the Johnson County Museum of History. An exhibit about ice cream shops and small businesses in the community opened in June. Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Price: Free. Information: co.johnson. in.us/jcmuseum. With multiple branches throughout the county, the Johnson County Public Library hosts a variety of programs and events for people of all ages. Information: pageafterpage.org. Through Sept. 29 Established in 1992, the Greenwood Farmers Market offers a variety of locally grown fruits and vegetables, arts and crafts, flowers and more. Hours: 8 a.m. to noon. Location: Greenwood United Methodist Church parking lot, 525 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood. Information: On Facebook @ Greenwood Farmers Market.

in a block party-like atmosphere. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Downtown Greenwood. Price: Free. Information: greenwood.in.gov. A parade, musical performances by Chicken Bone and The Hiding, a beer and wine garden, craft vendors and a cruisein will round out the annual Harvest Moon Fall Festival. Time: Noon to 10 p.m. Location: Downtown Bargersville. Information: townofbargersville.org. Few things are better than pizza by the slice with wine on a crisp fall night, featuring music by Stella Luna and the Satellites. Time: 5 to 9 p.m. Price: Free. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: mallowrun.com.

Sept. 23

Love dogs? Bring your furry friends to the eighth annual Labapalooza, a celebration and fundraiser for Love of Labs Indiana. Time: Noon to 6 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Price: Free. Information: lolin.org/labapalooza.shtml.

Sept. 28

Visit a world of pure imagination with “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” at the Greenwood Amphitheater. Time: 7 p.m. Location: 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. Price: Free. Information: greenwood.in.gov. Carnival rides, live music, food, beer garden, a petting zoo and booths featuring art and crafts offer something for everyone at the Sts. Francis and Clare of Assisi’s Fall Festival. There will also be the ninth annual Art in the Park, which is indoors and offers a chance to support local artists. Time: 5 to 11 p.m. Friday, noon to 11 p.m. Saturday. Location: Greenwood. Price: Information: ss-fc.org

Sept. 28 through Oct. 7

The Buck Creek Players present “37 Postcards,” a comedy that reminds you that you can go home again, even if that home is slanted at an angle, and you never

know what you’re going to find. Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Price: $18 for adults, $16 for children and students through college, $16 for senior citizens 62 or older. Information: buckcreekplayers.com.

Sept. 28 through Oct. 28

Kelsay Farms celebrates the season over five weekends. Activities include a corn maze, barn filled with corn kernels, hayrides, and a straw bale mountain. Time: 6 to 10 p.m. Fridays, noon to 10 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 6 p.m. Sundays. Location: Kelsay Farms, 6848 N. County Road 250 E, Whiteland. Price: $10, children under 1 are free. Information: kelsayfarms.com.

Sept. 29

The Franklin Fall Festival hosted by Franklin Parks and Recreation returns for an all-day street festival featuring musical entertainment, craft and food vendors, kids games, a baking contest and the Fall Festival Parade. Time: 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Location: Downtown Franklin. Price: Free. Information: franklin.in.gov. Johnson County Museum of History’s Heritage Day will feature pioneer and Civil War re-enactors, plus demonstrations of traditional crafts and hands on activities. Hours: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Price: Free. Information: co.johnson.in.us/jcmuseum. Take a jog to support local Johnson County charities and organizations through the Johnson County Community Foundation at the ninth annual Wine at the Line 5-mile run and 5K run/ walk. Time: Noon to 6 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Price: $40 preregistration, $50 day of event (includes post-race celebration). Information: mallowrun.com/wine-at-the-line. Bring the family to the Greenwood Public Library Carnival featuring games and a screening of “Dumbo.” Time: Games, noon to 2 p.m., movie starts at 2:15 p.m. Location: 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us. SOU T H

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Calendar

The White River Alliance and Indy SurviveOars, a group that honors breast cancer survivors, will host the inaugural White River Dragon Boat Race and Festival, including 46-foot-long dragon boats that each require a team of 22 people, plus food and beer trucks. Registration for teams will be open through Sept. 12. Time: 8 a.m. opening ceremonies. Location: White River State Park, 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: whiteriverdragonboats.org.

Sept. 30

The Greater Greenwood Chamber of Commerce presents the Taste of the Southside, featuring restaurants, bakeries, breweries, wineries, caterers and liquor distributors. Time: 4 to 7 p.m. Location: The Nest Events, 400 Byrd Way, Greenwood. Information: greenwoodchamber. com/events/Taste-of-the-Southside-2930/details.

Oct. 5

The National Abstract Art Exhibition XIV, a juried event sponsored by the Southside Art League, will open with a reception and continue to be on display through Oct. 27. Time: 6 to 8 p.m. Location: Garfield Park Arts Center. Information: southsideartsleague.org.

Oct. 5-27

Every Friday and Saturday night in October, weather permitting, get lost in a haunted corn maze at Mike Kaiser Poor Farm. Time: From dusk to dark is the “non-fright” experience, from dark to 11:30 p.m. prepare for some scares. Location: 1650 N. County Road 800E, Franklin. Price: $10 general admission, $5 non-fright hayride, free for kids 5 and under, military discount with ID. Information: mkpf.com.

Oct. 11

The Johnson County Public Library will celebrate all things “Frankenstein,” including book discussions, monster makeup, magic, stories of real-life grave robberies, electrical experiments, a tribute to Mary Shelley, stop-motion animation and at least three excuses to dress in costume. Location: Various branches. Information: pageafterpage.org.

Dress in your country-chic attire to “Give Abuse the Boot,” a benefit for Beacon of Hope, which helps victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Tastes Like Chicken’s “Chicken Bone” will perform, K-LOVE Morning Show hosts will emcee, plus there will be a dinner, silent auction and live auction. Time: 5:45 to 10 p.m. Location: Barn at Bay Horse Inn, 1468 Stones Crossing Road, Greenwood. Price: $75. Information: beaconofhopeindy.org.

Tuesdays in October

Oct. 12

Throughout October

The Johnson County Public Library is partnering with the Historic Artcraft Theatre for an international film festival with four films representing the cultures of China, Mexico, Japan and India. Time: 7 p.m. Location: 57 N Main St., Franklin. Price: Free. Information: pageafterpage.org.

Oct. 4

“Raise the Roof” to benefit The Social of Greenwood. Enjoy dinner and drinks, comedian Dave Dugan, purse bingo, raffles, a silent auction and much more. Time: 6 to 9 p.m. Location: Barn at Bay Horse Inn, 1468 Stones Crossing Road, Greenwood. Price: $60 per ticket, available at The Social of Greenwood, 550 Polk St., Greenwood. Information: thesocialofgreenwood.org. 112

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See “Scream” for a flashback to the late 1990s at this 21-plus movie screening, while enjoying an adult beverage provided by Mallow Run Winery or Oaken Barrel Brewery. Time: 7 p.m. Location: 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. Price: Free admission. Information: greenwood.in.gov.

Oct. 13

Learn how to trace your family history at the Johnson County Museum of History’s Genealogy Day, including speakers from Indiana-specific resources. Hours: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Price: $10, includes lunch. Information: co.johnson.in.us/jcmuseum.

At the Artcraft Theatre historicartcrafttheatre.org

The Historic Artcraft Theatre will have weekend showings this fall, including Christmas shows starting in mid-November with tickets on sale for those shows starting Oct. 1:

“Gone With The Wind” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 7 and 8 “Ghostbusters" 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 28 and 29 “Psycho” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5 and 6 “A Nightmare on Elm Street” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12 and 13 “Hocus Pocus” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 19 and 20 “Young Frankenstein” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 and 27 “Sleepless In Seattle” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2 (Reel Women/Vintage Wine event, for ages 21 and older) “Cartoons for Cans” 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Nov. 3, an hour of Warner Bros. cartoons with different cartoons at each show; canned goods to be donated to the Interchurch Food Pantry “Die Hard” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 3 (Brew and View event, for ages 21 and older) “All Quiet On The Western Front” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9 and 10 Christmas movies, tickets on sale Oct. 1 to Franklin Heritage Members and Oct. 8 to the public:

“The Muppet Christmas Carol” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 and 17, and 2 p.m. Nov. 18 “Home Alone 2: Lost In New York” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 23 and 24, and 2 and 5:30 p.m. Nov. 25 “A Christmas Story” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, and 2 p.m. Dec. 2 “It’s A Wonderful Life” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 7 and 8, and 2 p.m. Dec. 9 “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” 2 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 14 and 15, and 2 and 5:30 p.m. Dec. 16


Oct. 20

Oct. 31

Support and meet area writers at the Local Author Fair, plus get to know more about different writing groups. Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Location: 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Price: Free. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us.

Nov. 3

Hear about how ghost stories influence history and vice versa from storyteller Rhiannon Cizon at the Johnson County Museum. Time: 1:30 p.m. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Price: Free. Information: co.johnson.in.us/jcmuseum.

Oct. 27

Trick or treat early with your little monsters and ghouls along the Story Walk, while making crafts and playing games at Carni-Fall, co-sponsored by Johnson County Parks and Recreation and the Johnson County Public Library. Time: 4 to 6 p.m. Location: Independence Park, 2100 S. Morgantown Road, Greenwood. Price: Free. Information: jocoparks.com/event/carni-fall. Crafts, games and trick-or-treating await families at the Greenwood Public Library’s Spooktacular. Time: Noon to 3 p.m. Location: 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us. Franklin presents the inaugural Halloween Town, starting with a 5K run/walk and 1-mile family walk in the morning, and food vendors and activities during the day. There will be safe trick or treating from stores and trunks in the evening, and “Young Frankenstein” will be playing at the Artcraft Theatre at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Time: Events all day starting at 7:30 a.m. Location: Downtown Franklin. Information: Franklin.in.gov.

Oct. 28

The Greater Greenwood Community Band will perform a Halloween concert of monster music in costume amidst fog, black lights and the unexpected. There will also be dancers, an after-concert reception with treats, and Halloween goody bags. Time: 2 to 3:30 p.m. Location: Greenwood Community High School, 615 Smith Valley Road, Greenwood. Price: free. Information: greenwoodband.org/events.

Trick-or-treat hours: Greenwood: 6 to 8:30 p.m. Franklin: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bargersville: 6 to 8 p.m. Edinburgh: 6 to 8 p.m. Whiteland: 6 to 9 p.m. Trafalgar: 6 to 9 p.m. Princes Lakes: 5 to 8 p.m. Unincorporated Johnson County: 6 to 8 p.m.

Support local artists at the Johnson County Museum of History’s Artisan Market and get a chance for some early holiday shopping or to decorate your home. Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Price: Free. Information: co.johnson. in.us/jcmuseum.

Small Business Saturday in downtown Franklin

Nov. 8

Nov. 24

Nov. 10

Nov. 30 through Dec. 16

Nov. 17

Dec. 1

See a live radio show-style performance at the Historic Artcraft Theatre, “Pappy Wilson Harvest Frolic,” featuring the New Mercury Theatre players. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: historicartcrafttheatre.org.

Support KIC-IT and help break the cycle of youth homelessness while shopping for holiday gifts at this craft and vendor show. Browse the booths, visit with Santa and enjoy lunch. Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: Franklin Middle School, 625 Grizzly Cub Drive, Franklin. Price: $3, or $2 with two canned goods. Information: kic-it.org or facebook.com/KICIT4youth.

Kick off the holiday season at Greenwood Aglow with carriage rides, crafts and pictures with Santa. Time: 4 to 7 p.m. Location: 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: greenwoodlibrary.us.

Shop local as part of the annual Small Business Saturday and start at the Franklin Chamber of Commerce with a shopping bag, coupons, store incentives, and coffee and doughnuts to get you on your way. Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: 120 E. Jefferson St., Franklin. Information: franklincoc.org.

A Christmas play, “The Unexpected Gift,” is about a grieving widower who tries to escape the outside world at the family cabin, but his daughter and grandchildren remind him of the gift of family. Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Price: $18 for adults, $16 for children and students through college, $16 for senior citizens 62 or older. Information: buckcreekplayers.com.

The holiday courthouse lighting takes place as part of a day-long celebration and winter market in downtown Franklin. Time: Events all day, lighting at 7 p.m. Location: East Court Street, Franklin. Price: Free. Information: discoverdowntownfranklin.com. SOU T H

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A Look Back

Band Day Center Grove High School marching band at the 1960 Indiana State Fair

Photo courtesy of

Johnson County Museum of History

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Profile for SOUTH Magazine

SOUTH Magazine | Fall 2018  

SOUTH Magazine | Fall 2018  

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