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Community Angels / Ninja Warrior / Corvette Club

SPRING 2016

Indy’s southside magazine

Spring Bounty New southside restaurants, seasonal recipes and a road trip-worthy artisanal eatery

30 S. Water St., Franklin, IN 46131


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So you.


contents John and LuAnne Benson’s home.

ON THE COVER

See recipe on page 26. PHOTOGRAPHY BY HALEY NEALE

Feature Stories

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76 82

Hey, Ladies

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Contemporary Art

98

Head West

Girls Rock Indianapolis prepares tomorrow’s pop stars

American Ninja Warrior One southside plumber overcomes multiple obstacles

LuAnne and John Benson’s bright and beautiful home

National parks offer adventure and unparalleled views

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contents

Departments

15

This & That

Southside News and Views

21 In Style

Shades of Green

25 Taste

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Fettuccine Recipe, New Restaurants

34 Worth the Trip Artisan, Amish Country

42 Authentic Indiana Art Glass

48 Arts & Lifestyles National Corvette Restorers Society

Kumo Japanese Steakhouse

54 Community Indianapolis 500

60 Goodwill 64 Profile

Community Angels

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Lisa Carter

70 Home Trends Mudrooms, Sunrooms

In Every Issue

8 Welcome 106 Weddings 110 Our side of town 116 Calendar of events 122 A look back


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» Read and share SOUTH online at indysouthmag.com

welcome

R

Father Time RETIRED MAJ. GEN. MARTIN UMBARGER made me teary. It wasn’t something I expected. Nor did I anticipate writing about a speech he gave, which I recently heard at a Farming & Agribusiness Breakfast in Hancock County, in my South magazine editor’s note. But what Umbarger said that early winter morning resonated with me in a multitude of ways. A much-celebrated Bargersville resident and business owner whom we previously profiled in our magazine’s pages, Umbarger co-owns Umbarger Show Feeds with his son, Jackson. The company is now a fourth-generation family business that got its start back in Johnson County in 1939, thanks to Martin Umbarger’s grandfather, Roy Umbarger. Umbarger’s speech was part history lesson. He discussed his time spent in the Indiana Army National Guard and, later, as an adjutant general for Indiana, and spoke about our country’s Constitution and a bit about the formation of our state. It was also a lesson in his family’s genealogy; we heard about how the Umbarger business began and the changes in ownership that have taken place over the years. We also received advice about business ownership, and it was when Umbarger began to discuss the occupational lessons he had learned from his father, the late Walter Umbarger, that he broke into tears. It was also at this point that I found myself welling up over my breakfast plate. Walter Umbarger passed away a couple of years ago. The sense of loss that Umbarger showed over the passing of his father could be felt throughout the room. It was a loss to which I, now dealing with the failing health of my own father, could painfully relate. Umbarger spoke with great pride for his father. He also told about the many things he had learned from his dad. I want to share some of those lessons with you here. »Put everything you can back into your business. “If you’ve got your own business, if it’s a farm, if it’s an agribusiness, I don’t care what you’re doing, try to always take care of it first and it will take care of you later.”

»Don’t ask anything of your employees that you wouldn’t do yourself. “Always let them be part of the process. Listen to them. You would be surprised by what you can learn from those who are on the front lines.” »Lead by example and give great service. “Listen to your customers. Find out what they want and build your business not from the top down, but from the ground up.” »Don’t be afraid of change. “Be as adaptable and flexible as you can be.” The Umbargers exemplify so many families throughout Marion and Johnson counties who have built successful multigenerational businesses here. They are respected community members who continue to give back to their neighborhoods as much as they get. And they teach us large lessons about life through the small details of the everyday. Umbarger’s speech offered me an opportunity to reflect on what’s important, on the consequence of embracing change, on the necessity of supporting our local families and businesses, and on our need to celebrate and honor the growth of our cities and state. Now, at a time when our leaders report the rapid growth of our neighborhoods and downtown centers, and as we embark on the celebration of the state’s bicentennial anniversary, we should take a moment to remember just how much we’ve grown — and exactly who helped us to get here. If nothing else, Umbarger reminded me to say thanks, for what may someday soon be a final time, to dear old Dad.

sdugger@indysouthmag.com

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SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

SPRING 2016 | VOL. 11 | NO. 4

PUBLISHER AIM Media Indiana Chuck Wells

EDITORIAL EDITOR

Sherri Dugger COPY EDITOR

Katharine Smith CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Alisa Advani Katherine Coplen Teresa Nicodemus Amy Norman Julie Cope Saetre Rick Shaffer Jon Shoulders Madeline Szrom Jennifer Uhl Catherine Whittier CJ Woodring

ART SENIOR GRAPHIC ARTIST

Margo Wininger CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Angie Johnson Josh Marshall Haley Neale Scott Roberson Stock images provided by ©istockphoto

IMAGE TECHNICIAN

Matt Quebe

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Christina Cosner

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SOUTH In a world of change, our focus is steadfast.

Indy’s Southside Magazine

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Please send any address changes to the address or e-mail address listed above.

BACK ISSUES

To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone. ©2016 by AIM Media Indiana All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.


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this & that

COMPILED BY JULIE COPE SAETRE

»

Current Events DURING ITS 10-PLUS YEARS in Johnson County, Mallow Run Winery has played host to hundreds of private events, from weddings and showers to corporate fundraisers. So it seems only natural for the popular destination to expand its party profile. This summer, the Sycamore at Mallow Run will open on former farmland only one-quarter mile from the winery’s 6964 W. Whiteland Road home base in Bargersville. Described by Mallow Run staff as “modern, yet rustic,” the Sycamore will offer three event spaces. The largest,

the Estate Room, will allow 250 to 300 guests to spread out over more than 4,700 square feet of open floor space enhanced by timber beams, stone columns and fireplaces. The more intimate Homestead Room will accommodate smaller celebrations of 75 to 100. The main entrance and lobby area form the Gallery, which will spotlight works by local artists while accommodating cocktail hours, after-hours business events and other similar gatherings. By the end of 2015, more than a dozen weddings and events already

had been booked into the Sycamore, starting in mid-to-late July, said Sarah Shadday, marketing and wholesale coordinator for Mallow Run Winery. “Saturdays in October and September are almost full, and we’ve even been meeting with folks who are interested in 2017 weddings and events.” All beverages — including a full bar, non-alcoholic drinks, coffee service and, of course, wine — are catered through the Sycamore, which also provides meal catering through three preferred vendors. Guests can use a different caterer of their choosing for a fee, “as long as that caterer is licensed in the state of Indiana,” Shadday said. SOU T H|INDYSOUTHMAG .COM

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this & that

Q&A Lisa Lintner joined the Johnson County Public Library as its new director this past October. A transplant from Kentucky, Lintner spent 17 years with the Louisville Free Public Library, where she did “pretty much everything you can imagine in public libraries.” Her three most recent positions were head of branches, during which she oversaw 17 locations, and served as assistant director of public services and interim director. When she decided to seek a full-time position as a library director, she originally began looking at opportunities on the East Coast. But with family in Fishers and Rensselaer, Lintner found the opening with Johnson County to be intriguing. After three interviews that included the library system’s Board of Trustees (“They are incredibly intelligent and passionate folks about education”) and Johnson County Public Library staff, “I really wanted to move to Johnson County,” she says. “I thought, ‘This could be home.’

English-speaking world. Our library Web page itself is such a useful tool that’s accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Through our website, there’s a dedicated effort to provide resource tools for businesses of any size, as well as for moms. And we’re developing information for seniors and teens that can be accessible through our website as well. We also are going to be launching an Apple and an Android app that will keep people connected to the library.

What have you learned so far about the Johnson County Public Library system? We have incredibly hard-working staff who truly love working with the public. In this field, that is absolutely essential. We are all about getting our products in the hands of the people who need them and want them. I was also really impressed because of the focus we have on developing the digital content at the library. ... The staff here are very progressive at looking for opportunities to include those users who don’t normally walk in our doors. And they’re also very innovative staff who respond really well to programming needs in the community.

What’s your vision for the library system going forward? My vision for this library system is to first be immersed in this community and to find out what this county wants and needs in library services. I’m not the kind of person who’s going to spend a bunch of money on something really flashy because other libraries are doing it. I really think that, in order to be a successful, responsible organization, you need to be connected to the people in the community. So these first months, I’m outside the office almost more than I’m in the office. I’m reaching out and talking to educational leaders, business leaders, political leaders and anyone who wants to talk to me about what the library means to them and what we can do for them. And I’m also learning about this county and community. ... I’ve never met such a bunch of honest and enthusiastic folks in my life. I really, really am glad I made the choice to come to Johnson County.

Libraries really have evolved with available technology. Absolutely. We like to say we go beyond the walls of the library. ... The Internet has changed so many things for people, but every day when I walk into the library I see people needing assistance so they can file unemployment or get their Social Security information. So our staff has evolved, too, by becoming connected with what the patrons need and assisting them where they are. There’s no judgment when you come to the 16

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library, so if you don’t know how to use a mouse, no problem. We’re going to help you out. You can even book a librarian, where you can get one-on-one scheduled appointment time with someone. So if you’re uncomfortable learning about the computer, we’ll take you along at your speed. Libraries continually evolve and adapt. ... It’s a really exciting time to work in libraries. What are some other library services that residents might not know about? We have an amazing Adult Learning Center (with) programs focusing on adults using English as their second language and adult basic education. Baby Talk is a program led by this team and volunteers who bring to babies born at Johnson Memorial Hospital their first book and who provide early childhood literacy information for parents. We have a staff person who meets with newly arrived immigrants and helps them get acclimated to Johnson County and acclimated to living in an


this & that

»

TALK OF THE TOWN Johnson County residents had reason to celebrate last fall when Gershman Partners, the Indianapolisbased developers responsible for Hamilton Town Center in Noblesville and the Market District at the Bridges in Carmel, announced a major southside project. By fall of 2017, a $90 million, 700,000-squarefoot Greenwood Town Center is expected to open at the I-65/County Line Road interchange. The timing, said Ryan Gershman, principal of Gershman Partners, couldn’t be better, thanks to a combination of the economy, centralized location of the “south side in general” and “the tremendous visibility” of the interchange, he says. Also important:

the state of the retail market on the south side. “There are many tenants who have been looking at the south side that haven’t gotten into the market.” Since the project was announced, Gershman Partners has been in negotiations with a variety of potential tenants. While Greenwood Town Center will have a heavy retail presence, expect to see medical, hospitality and multifamily components as well. And foodies rejoice: Gershman said interest from the restaurant world is intense, including names new to the Greenwood area.

New Digs

Fans of Dizzying Intellect, Heliotropic, Planetarian Bavarian and the other creative craft beers at Planetary Brewing Co. can sip in style this spring when a new Old Town Greenwood tap room is scheduled to debut. Located at 188 S. Madison Ave., the 2,200-square-foot space maintains the postmodern, space-age feel of the original 500 Polk St. location, while adding such amenities as a loft with family seating. But the best part for brew lovers: The tap room features 24 tap lines (eight to 12 are dedicated to Planetary brews), as well as select craft beers from other Indiana breweries. Not a yeast and hops fan? A premium wine selection is available as well. “We are very excited to bring our bold and eclectic style of brewing to a wider audience, after spending the last few years hidden away in an obscure industrial space honing our craft,” said Planetary Brewing Co. owner/brewer Andrew Groves. “We are also excited to be part of the beginning stages of the revitalization of Old Town Greenwood.”

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BOOK NOOK

“Etta and Otto and Russell and James” By Emma Hooper  Emma Hooper’s debut novel brings to vivid life the story of Etta, Otto and Russell, who are all in their 80s. The story starts with Etta, who is starting to lose her memory and decides to walk eastward some 3,200 kilometers from her Saskatchewan farm to finally see the ocean. James, a talking coyote, is her magical companion throughout the journey The story bounces back and forth between the past and the present, taking the reader throughout the lives of the main characters. The tale covers Etta’s teaching days, farm life, the Great Depression, World War II, passion and all the letters written between characters. This is a wonderful novel about the human spirit and about the meaning of life. Reviewed by Sheila Harmon, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

“Vengeance Road” By Erin Bowman

By Ruta Sepetys

Marketed as “True Grit” for teens, this book definitely stands out as a rare Western in the young adult genre. In this story, Kate Thompson lives with her father at a ranch on the harsh Arizona landscape. One day she comes home to find her father murdered and her home burned down. Knowing it is dangerous for a girl to travel alone in the Wild West, Thompson disguises herself as a boy and sets out after the murderous band known as the Red Rose Gang. Along the way she discovers some heartbreaking family secrets, meets someone who can tame her wild heart and makes an unexpected friend. There were a few twists and turns that I didn’t see coming, and I loved the language and tone of the story. There’s adventure. There are shootouts. There’s hidden gold. There’s a bit of romance. And there’s a female protagonist you’re cheering for from page one.

Ruta Sepetys excels at shining a light on little known historical events in a beautiful and accessible way. “Salt to the Sea,” which focuses on the mostly unknown tragedy of the sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff German military ship, is no exception. During World War II, Joana, Emilia and Florian are all trying to escape the invasion of the Russians by making their way to the ship carrying refugees away from East Prussia. Having been brutally affected by the war in her own way, each has secrets that are slowly revealed as they make their way to the Wilhelm Gustloff. This book is marketed as a young adult novel, but like all of the author’s books, it will appeal to a much wider audience.

Reviewed by Emily Ellis, head of reference and teen services, Greenwood Public Library

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“Salt to the Sea”

Reviewed by Valerie Moore, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library


“See Me”

“Icarus”

By Nicholas Sparks

By Deon Meyer

A chance encounter on a rainy highway just outside Wilmington, North Carolina, brings Colin and Maria together. They are complete opposites of each other. He is an MMA fighter with a violent past, and she’s a hard-working lawyer. Yet, somehow, they click. Just as love is starting to blossom, an unexpected threat from Maria’s past resurfaces, and a series of terrifying events puts both Maria’s and Colin’s lives in danger. Will their newfound relationship be able to survive the unfolding horror? Like many of his previous novels, Nicholas Sparks has created a complicated love story/ thriller combination.

In his latest book, Deon Meyer tosses his main character, South African detective Benny Griessel, off the wagon after years of sobriety when a colleague commits suicide. Guilt-ridden and still healing from previous gunshot wounds, Benny struggles to hold it together and solve the murder of an Internet entrepreneur. Besides writing compelling mysteries, Meyer’s books offer fascinating looks into South Africa’s country and culture. His website, deonmeyer.com, has photos and more information about the locations of the mysteries.

Reviewed by Kelly Staten, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

Reviewed by Amy Dalton, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

“Drinking in America: Our Secret History” By Susan Cheever This micro-history will have readers enthralled. Susan Cheever does a brilliant job of cataloging many of the incidents that helped make America great and then explores how alcohol played a part in each event. Why did the Pilgrims land at Plymouth? Because their ship was running out of beer. Why did everyone really love Johnny Appleseed? Because the trees he planted produced apples to be made into cider. How did alcohol play a part in President Kennedy’s assassination? His security detail had drunk too much the night before and were too hungover to react quickly. Readers’ views of American history will be forever altered. A fascinating book. Reviewed by Erin Cataldi, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

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AFTER

AFTER

AFTER


style

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HALEY NEALE

The Aura of Flora

There may be nothing more representative of spring’s arrival than the luscious greens that return to embellish our state’s landscapes each year. As the first sprouts of the season appear, we invite you to celebrate. Add to your book collection, your gardening selection or your home décor with these cute local finds, all in shades of lime, sage, jade, olive and emerald.

Pitcher: $20; “Scott’s Poems”: $9; “Landscaping and the Small Garden”: $8; “Homeowner’s Complete Garden Handbook,” $5, Madison Street Salvage, 350 E. Madison St., Franklin, (317) 736-6823. Floral Scarf, $20, Simplify, 44 N. Jackson St., Franklin, (317) 346-0320. Mug: $3.99; Topiary: $14.98, Stein Mart, 1011 State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 882-2252

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Necklace, $27.50 (set with earrings), Brick Street Boutique, 34 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 739-0525 2 Bangle Bracelet Set, $10.94, Stein Mart, 1011 State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 882-2252 3 Reading Glasses, $14.99, Stein Mart 4 Wooden “Follow That Dream” Sign, $32, Simplify, 44 N. Jackson St., Franklin, (317) 346-0320 5 Clutch, $24.99 Stein Mart

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Roncalli Salutes Our Marion County Swimming Champions

Row 1: Nick Carpenter, Ryan Armstrong, Blake Ludge Row 2: Manager Emily Hall, Jack Bauer, Adam Pongracz, Jason Croddy, Eddie Huck, Coach Kevin Haltom Row 3: Coach Sara McClain, Elliot Nail, Noah Buening, Gabe Buening, Coach Ed Merkling

Congratulations to Roncalli Swimming Coach, Ed Merkling, who was named the Marion County Swimming Coach of the Year by his peers. Congratulations also to Roncalli Swimming 2015 Marion County Champions: Eddie Huck, Jack Bauer, Adam Pongracz and Nick Carpenter who won the 200 Medley Relay. Adam Pongracz also won the 100 Yard Butterfly. For the first time since Roncalli started competing in the county championships, swimmers Adam Pongracz and Eddie Huck finished first and second respectively in the 100 Yard Butterfly. We salute these student athletes and their coach!

Applications For Registration Now Being Accepted Call 787-8277, ext. 243 or visit www.roncalli.org


PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

Ask a Doc –

Q:

I am about to celebrate my 40th birthday and was thinking about treating myself to a Botox injection. How does it work and what results should I expect?

A: Botox is the brand name of a neurotoxin that is commonly injected into facial muscles to prevent the muscles from contracting. Botox is commonly used on forehead lines, glabellar lines (the famous “11” sometimes seen between one’s eyebrows) and crow’s feet (wrinkles seen at the edge of your eyes when you smile). Botox can cause wrinkles to soften, and prevents wrinkles from deepening over time. The procedure takes just a few minutes and does not require anesthesia. Botox is injected with a fine needle into specific muscles with very little discomfort. It usually takes three to seven days to for the full effect to take place, and when it does, these effects will last three to six months. As muscle action gradually returns, the lines and wrinkles begin to reappear and need to be treated again. However, the lines and wrinkles often appear less severe with time because the muscles are being trained to relax.

A NOTE ABOUT OUR DOCTORS Jessica N. Gillespie, MD, and Jaime M. Ranieri, MD, of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons, a Franciscan Physician Network practice, perform cosmetic surgeries and procedures that treat the results of trauma, birth defects and disease. Dr. Gillespie and Dr. Ranieri are board certified in plastic and reconstructive surgery. From tummy tucks and mommy makeovers to facial vein reduction and skin rejuvenation, the doctors and staff at Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons offer an array of life-enhancing treatments.

To meet with Dr. Gillespie or Dr. Ranieri for a consult or appointment please call (317) 528-7650. For more information visit IndyCosmeticSurgery.com or FranciscanDocs.org.

Jessica N. Gillespie, MD Jaime M. Ranieri, MD


taste

More to Love

Goat cheese … asparagus … morel mushrooms. We can’t think of a better combination to represent the glorious (and good-tasting) arrival of spring. PHOTOGRAPHY BY HALEY NEALE

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RECIPE

Fettuccine with Morels, Asparagus and Goat Cheese

½ cup minced shallot 2 tablespoons unsalted butter ½ cup dry white wine ½ cup chicken broth ½ pound fresh morels, washed well, patted dry and trimmed ½ cup heavy cream 6 ounces mild goat cheese such as Montrachet, crumbled (about 1½ cups) ¾ pound asparagus, trimmed, cut into ½-inch pieces and cooked in boiling salted water for 2 to 3 minutes, or until tender ¼ cup minced fresh chives ¾ pound fettuccine

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»In a heavy skillet, cook the minced shallot in the butter over moderately low heat, stirring until it is softened. »Add wine and allow mixture to simmer until the wine is reduced by half. Add the broth and the morels, sliced crosswise, and simmer the mixture, covered, for 10 minutes, or until the morels are tender. »Add the cream and the goat cheese and cook the mixture over low heat, stirring, until the cheese is melted. »Stir in the asparagus, the chives, and salt and pepper to taste and keep the sauce warm. »In a kettle of boiling salted water cook the fettuccine until it is al dente, drain it well, and toss the pasta with the sauce.


SHOP LOCAL

Wine and goat cheese available at Vino Villa, 200 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-9463

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RESTAURANT ROUNDUP

BY JENNIFER UHL

new

IN TOWN

»

Pulled pork nachos at Hops & Fire Craft Tap House

We all have our favorite restaurants, and the south side serves up plenty of dining options, ranging from to-go lunch spots to date night. But it’s spring, the perfect time of year to shake up old routines. Here, four new places to take the kids, watch the game or add to your girls night out rotation.

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BY JENNIFER UHL // PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSH MARSHALL


Mucky Duck Grill & Bar 2800 S. State Road 135, Greenwood

Hops & Fire Craft Tap House 1259 N. State Road 135, Greenwood, hopsandfire.com Just when we thought the popularity of craft beer and brewpubs had plateaued, another too-good southside tap house opened right before the new year. Independently owned Hops & Fire has earned rave reviews, not only for its 44 lines of craft beer (most of them Indiana-made), but for an exceptionally accommodating menu as well. It’s no secret that the meat-and-potatoes Midwest isn’t the easiest place to grab a beef-less bite, but here you’ll find vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free menus, with honest-to-goodness, stick-to-your ribs options. (Southwest nachos! A charcuterie plate! A tofu melt!) The kids menu alone has nine entrees and a separate selection of appetizers. Such a menu attracts a lot of different diners, says Rebecca Smith, general manager. “We have a really good variety of people who come in. We have an amazing beer selection; that’s probably our biggest draw, and a lot of the regular menu items have been changed to accommodate our vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free menus. Everything is made in-house.” The restaurant’s strip mall location on the corner of County Line Road and State Road 135 is easy to miss if you’re not paying attention, but savvy foodies haven’t minded having to enter the address into their phone’s maps app, especially with the promise of the popular pulled pork nachos at the end or the stout pork belly BLT — a choice Smith touts as “absolutely amazing.”

When the spring soccer season begins, families who used to celebrate goals at now-defunct Louie’s will have a new postgame lunch hangout in the Mucky Duck Grill & Bar. The independently owned restaurant, which opened in mid-October, is much more family-friendly than its Southport Road location — even going so far as to feature a kids room complete with a play mat and blocks. “Mom and dad can hang out and watch the Indiana game while the kids play,” says Dylan James, assistant general manager. And there are plenty of places to watch the big game: large flat screens fill the restaurant, including the newly extended bar, a banquet room and the outdoor patio. The food is family-oriented, too, with pizzas James dubs “killer,” and a large selection of “smashburgers” that bring to mind a certain famous milkshake chain’s griddle-top flat burgers. Wine and beer dinners are in the works, as is a menu revamp. “We’ve got all your American food — chicken tenders, wings, flatbreads,” James says, “but the people in our kitchen really want to step it up,” adding that steaks and pasta dishes will soon be available.

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taste

RESTAURANT ROUNDUP

Kumo Japanese Steakhouse 1251 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood First things first: This Greenwood Park Mall newcomer isn’t kin — not even so much as a third cousin twice removed — to the Franklin restaurant of the same name. Both serve traditional Japanese fare — sashimi, hibachi, sake — but that’s where the similarities end. While most stateside Japanese restaurants feature Far East-themed decor, Kumo lives up to its New York City-based roots with a contemporary vibe. A sea green bubbling water fixture backs the hostess stand; inside, soaring ceilings and stripes of hot pink neon hover above the long bar. Its arrival was a long time in coming (the space formerly occupied by Stir Crazy was vacant for almost three years), but southside sushi lovers are sure to make up for lost time. Kumo’s extensive menu is especially friendly to those who’d prefer that their entree wasn’t swimming fat and sassy the day before, with more than 20 cooked sushi options and enough hibachi combinations — including filet mignon — to ensure there’s something for everyone. And best of all, the flashy surroundings don’t translate to higher prices: A simple avocado cucumber roll (one of our personal quickie lunch favorites) is just as inexpensive ($3.75) as those we’ve enjoyed at smaller sushi spots around town.

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Bar Louie 1251 U.S. 31, Greenwood, barlouie.com

Another newcomer to the stretch of lifestyle shops outside Greenwood Park Mall, Bar Louie follows the adage about books: Don’t judge the inside by the cover, or in this case, the large neon martini glass above the restaurant’s entrance. Bar Louie, which opened in a whirl just a week before Christmas, does have an extensive drink menu consisting of the four M’s (margaritas, mojitos, martinis and mixed drinks), a wine list and even a few non-alcoholic cocktails. The interior features mosaic-tiled walls and plush round booths, an upscale setting but with a casual atmosphere. Louie is most definitely

family-friendly, with a kids menu and all-ages seating until 10 p.m. every night. Menu offerings include burgers, flatbreads, large signature salads, pasta and more, and many of the $10 to $15 entrees are customizable. Not into colorful drinks with fancy monikers? Bar Louie also carries 35 draft beers, including a few from local breweries like Bargersville’s Taxman. Though the restaurant has 108 locations nationwide, this is only Indiana’s second franchise (the other is in Mishawaka). But look for the Circle City to hear more from Louie soon; three more locations are slated to launch in Indy over the next three years.

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taste

FOOD FINDS

BY JENNIFER UHL

We’ve searched the south side to locate delicious spring drinks at a variety of price points.

ON THE

OUT TO

ON THE

GO

LUNCH

TOWN

Fountain Square has gained a reputation for being something of an artists’ haven, and one of the best places in town to check out local art and listen to live music is … a coffee shop? Surprisingly, yes. Funkyard Coffee Shop & Art Gallery looks more art gallery than coffee shop. The cozy space is filled to the brim with sculptures, paintings, handmade jewelry and more, all for sale. The shop opens a little late for a coffee establishment — 10:30 a.m. Tuesday to Saturday and noon on Sundays (closed Mondays) — but the $4.25, 16-ounce mango smoothie will tide you over until lunch. You can order one to go, but if you’ve got half an hour to spare, grab a seat (and something from the bakery case) and relax on the sunny back patio. 1114 Prospect St., Indianapolis, (317) 822-3865, funkyardindy.com

It may not be entirely English to take your tea with ice, but even “Downton Abbey’s” sharptongued Dowager Countess of Grantham would concede that this blueberry-strawberry iced tea is definitely upper class. Available at Greenwood’s Sassafras Tea Room, it’s pretty straight-forward: Take herbal, decaf iced tea, add blueberries and strawberries. But the resulting $2.50 glass is a nottoo-sweet refresher that perfectly pairs with the tea room’s dainty decorations and even better with owner Cheryl Domi’s housemade chicken salad and scones. 229 N Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 888-8449, sassafrastearoom.com

The cocktail menu at Bar Louie isn’t for the indecisive: With 36 options, choosing a happy hour drink is almost as tough as a Monday morning commute to the northside. But bar manager Aubrey Fischer takes some of the guesswork out of ordering by suggesting The Diva, which wins the restaurant’s popularity contest hands down. The Diva gets its red hue by way of pomegranate syrup, which is mixed with PAMA liqueur, SKYY pineapple vodka and pineapple juice, and topped with (what else?) a pineapple wedge. Though the drink is girlish in name, Fischer says guys order The Diva as well, but usually on the rocks, to “make it a little more manly.” Starting your bar tab with one will normally run $8, but you can begin the weekend early with $5.25 martinis on Thursdays. 1251 US 31, Greenwood, (317) 215-5400, barlouie.com

PREP TIP

Stock Up

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How many times have you opened a 32-ounce box of stock, used a few tablespoons to deglaze a pan or thin a soup, and then watched the rest waste away in the fridge past the seven-day mark? Next time, put your freezer to work. Divide leftover stock into snack-sized freezer bags (squeeze out as much air as possible) and lay flat; for even smaller amounts, purchase a couple of ice cube trays and pour in the stock. Once it’s frozen, pop out the cubes and store them in a large freezer bag. They’ll be there whenever you need a tablespoon or two. You can also do the same with fresh herbs — a good idea, especially if you purchase or grow large bunches. Finely chop rosemary, thyme, parsley or other herbs, place in ice cube trays and cover with chicken, vegetable or even beef stock. The next time you need to add a little flavor to a stove-top meal, you’ve already done the work, making this cooking tip a money- and time-saver.


RECIPE

Dressed to Impress

SLAW DRESSING

Franklin’s Triple Play BBQ has only been open since early January, but pitmaster Jimmy Tindell already has a loyal customer base, thanks to menu items like the pulled pork sandwich topped with this sweet-and-sour slaw in a housemade dressing. Save your white vinegar and mayonnaise for something else; this dressing requires neither, which makes it a perfect picnic accompaniment. Halve the recipe to make more than enough to top your favorite sandwich (with plenty leftover), or take the full 6-pound batch to a church potluck or family reunion.

Color County

3 cups sugar 3 cups apple cider vinegar 2 cups vegetable oil 6 teaspoons dry mustard 4½ teaspoons salt 4½ teaspoons pepper Whisk all ingredients together. If making the full amount, finely shred 6 pounds of red cabbage or purchase bagged coleslaw mix. Allow one half-cup of dressing per pound of cabbage or coleslaw mix and toss.

Join us in COLORING THE COUNTY for our 25th anniversary. We have planned three outdoor mural paintings for Franklin, Greenwood and Bargersville. We need you, local artists and community members, to create the mural designs for consideration. Connect with a cause that matters and beautify our streetscapes with a splash of paint!

LEARN HOW TO PARTICIPATE AT JCCF.ORG

317.738.2213 | jccf.org | #jccf25

Connecting people who care with

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Worth the Trip

EAT, PLAY, LOVE, in Amish Country

Artisan Restaurant brings ‘something special’ to Elkhart BY CJ WOODRING

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PHOTOS PROVIDED


Distinctive Kitchen & Bath


Worth the Trip

“Live,

Work. Play” is the slogan of SoMa (Supporting our Main assets), a community-driven initiative for renewal and revitalization of Elkhart’s downtown South Main Street area that enables entrepreneurs and businesses to invest in the historic downtown. Make that “Live. Work. Play. Eat,” if you throw in the work of Kurt Janowsky, one such entrepreneur and a restaurateur whose name is synonymous with excellent cuisine throughout St. Joseph and Elkhart counties. A South Bend native and resident, Janowsky owns or partners in a host of regional restaurants. The 52-year-old’s most recent addition to the Navarre Hospitality Group (navarrehospitalitygroup.com) and to the north-central Indiana culinary scene is Artisan Restaurant, which opened in January 2015 in the heart of Elkhart’s Arts & Entertainment District.

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Located in a historic building — Janowsky is an ardent supporter of adaptive reuse — the contemporary restaurant offers upscale ambience and service. The venue has already garnered the prestigious AAA Four Diamond Award for 2016, one of fewer than a half-dozen Indiana restaurants to do so. Janowsky says it’s the restaurant he has long wanted to open. “We always wanted to go up a notch,” he explains. “My background was in fine dining at country clubs and resorts, and you always want to know if you have it in you to do the best, to know if you could pull it out. “We wanted to open something special and not offered elsewhere — small, intimate, fine dining — that would bring people in from out of town,” he adds. “I think we did that.” And why was Elkhart the selected site? “Because the city has been really good to our company over the years,” he says. “So it’s kind of a payback, a ‘thanks for supporting us,’ to open the restaurant here. “Plus, people from Elkhart have always gone to South Bend. It’s been pretty much a one-way street. So we thought if it was nice South Bend enough, peonative Kurt ple in South Janowsky Bend would at Artisan bless us with Restaurant. their patronage, and it would also bring people in from other towns.” Janowsky says he often hears people are surprised that the region, crippled when the RV industry collapsed in 2008, is supporting an upscale level of dining, despite the fact manufacturing is on the upswing.


“But why wouldn’t it support us?” he asks. “There are about 200,000 residents in Elkhart County, and including nearby markets, a million people within a halfhour of us.” “I just direct traffic” To say he has a lot on his plate would be an understatement: With a combined staff of 250, including his two sons and daughter, Janowsky sets the standard for what appears on thousands of guests’ plates. And

with more than 30 years in the industry, he has found his calling. Janowsky became executive chef at Knollwood Country Club, Granger, at the age of 18. At 20 he purchased the Loft Restaurant, a former South Bend venue. He also served as co-owner of the Ice House in Mishawaka; the Emporium, South Bend; Baxter’s Food and Spirits, Elkhart; and the Matterhorn. Yet the South Bend native nearly attended MIT to become an engineer.

“I’m a math guy. I was a good student and had options coming out of high school,” he says. “But I’d been a cook throughout high school, and the bug had bitten me by then. That’s what I wanted to do. “Now I’m watching my younger son, a high school senior, doing the same thing: He’s also a good student, but says he wants to be a chef.” The industry veteran currently owns Café Navarre and The Exchange Whiskey Bar in South Bend, while also operating with partners at O’Rourke’s Public House, South Bend and Rocky River Tap and Table, Granger. They are among the most popular dining destinations in the region, each offering a unique and distinct experience. Janowsky also owns the Elkhartbased Matterhorn Conference Center/Banquet & Catering, the region’s premier catering service, and provides food services for the Crystal Ballroom in Elkhart’s historic Lerner Theatre, just a block from the Artisan. In 2012 he received the Lewis S. Armstrong Award from Indiana University South Bend’s Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics. The award is presented annually for leadership, distinguished achievement and contributions to the Michiana area’s business and quality of life. Janowsky enjoys the work, he says, although it involves many hours and making many sacrifices. “It’s what we do, and we’ve been able to assemble a really good team,” he says. “You don’t do all this by yourself. I have great people who do the heavy lifting for me now. I just kind of direct traffic.” Though the restaurant isn’t for everyone, he says, “we’re trying to keep the price point modest. We’re also going to try to keep it approachable. We don’t want anyone too intimidated to go in. Diners don’t need a jacket and tie, so it’s comfortable, and we want people to just SOU T H

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Worth the Trip

“We wanted to open something special and not offered elsewhere — small, intimate, fine dining — that would bring people in from out of town. I think we did that.” — KURT JANOWSKY

Chef Matt Jay in Artisan’s kitchen.

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enjoy the food and ambience and have fun. Fun is what makes a memorable dining experience.” Fresh, seasonal, locally sourced food A great portion of that dining experience is, of course, the restaurant’s ever-changing menu, a presentation of chef Matt Jay. An Elkhart native and honors graduate of the prestigious Culinary Institute of America in New York, Jay worked at renowned restaurants that include the MK in Chicago (mkchicago.com) and the Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (grandhotel.com), before returning to his hometown. Menus focus on small portions and multiple courses featuring locally

sourced ingredients and specialty products. Guests may order a la carte or select from seven-course tasting menus. Jay, 37, says it’s the kind of food he’s always wanted to serve. “With 40 to 50 customers an evening, rather than 300, it allows me more time to focus on the food, making sure techniques are correct, and to perfect it so guests have the best experience they could possibly have.”


AMISH COUNTRY TOURS & TRAILS Menu selections throughout the year include seafood and game, as well as prime beef and free-range poultry raised in Indiana. “They’re organic, no antibiotics or hormones,” Jay says. “We’re really serious about that.” The Artisan also serves Rolling Meadows pork belly, Kruse Farm baby spinach, Strauss Farms rack of lamb and Cook’s Bison short ribs, a guest favorite that Jay says is “really simple and like the best pot roast you’ll ever have.” As for spring tastings, he says halibut and spring lamb will definitely be on the menu, along with a bison dish and morels. “We’ll transition into cooking lighter dishes ... more vegetable forward ... more of the local spring greens such as ramps (wild leeks) and fiddlehead ferns, and using a lot of pesto oils with them.” A wine list offers 300 selections and, Janowsky says, stocks about 10,000 bottles. Although Indiana wineries aren’t currently represented, he says the restaurant will soon offer selections from South Bend’s winery. Janowsky suggests prospective guests from the metro Indianapolis region make it a weekend getaway, stopping along the way in Roanoke (Huntington County) to dine at Joseph Decuis (josephdecuis.com), also a AAA Four Star Award restaurant. He notes that improvements have been made to U.S. 31, expediting travel time to the Elkhart region. “When there’s something in your own state, you hope people will support it,” he says. “Our region’s blessed with a myriad of travel destination options and a wonderful selection of dining places from casual to fine dining. “Three of the state’s five 2015 AAA Four Star restaurants are in north-central Indiana, plus a dozen microbreweries and great chef-driven restaurants with outstanding food. So it’s really a vibrant food scene. Better than people think, and you don’t have to leave the state.” Artisan Restaurant is located at 505 S. Main St., Elkhart. Call (574) 355-3355 for reservations, or log onto Yelp on the restaurant’s website (artisanelkhart.com). The bar opens at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; dining room opens at 5 p.m. Private dining is available for eight to 100 guests.

History, art and cultural heritage are combined in Amish Country’s tours and trails. Most are free and self-guided; a few are seasonal. Whether you walk or drive, the outings offer countless opportunities to explore the unique northern Indiana region and its many offerings. ELKHART COUNTY

LAGRANGE COUNTY

ArtWalk

Quilt Gardens Tour

Free, self-guided tour through downtown Elkhart showcases regional artists’ works in all mediums against a background of musical entertainment. Wednesdays in May, July, September and November.

Gateway Mile’s RiverWalk Culture Trail

Nearly two dozen historic sites and structures are featured along the downtown Elkhart trail. Highlights include Wellfield Botanic Gardens, the Havilah Beardsley House, Ruthmere Mansion and the 1917 Memorial Bridge, which honors the city’s war veterans.

Nappanee 16-mile Locke Town Loop Driving Tour Travel past Amish and English farmsteads in a bucolic tour featuring the Village of Locke, Borkholder Dutch Village, Continental Divide, historic downtown Nappanee, Amish Acres and more.

Quilt Gardens Tour

Nineteen gardens (more than 1 million blooms) planted in quilt patterns and more than 20 gigantic murals reflecting quilt patterns are featured in this colorful tour. Showcased May 30 through Oct. 1 in seven Amish country communities along the Heritage Trail. VARIOUS COUNTIES

Indiana Heritage Trail

Ninety-mile audio driving tour wends through northern Indiana’s Amish country communities of Bristol, Elkhart, Goshen, Middlebury, Nappanee, Shipshewana and Wakarusa. Download free, self-guided map and pick up free audio CD from the Elkhart County CVB, B&Bs and other locations.

Northern Indiana Art and Earth Trail

Spanning seven counties, northern Indiana’s seven artisan trails introduce more than 150 artists, venues and new works, while providing an opportunity to visit studios, workshops, galleries, shops, restaurants and inns. Trails are always changing and can be picked up at any point or combined with parts of another.

Northern Indiana Foodie Trail

Trail spans counties from Porter to LaGrange. Amish Country venues include Das Dutchman Essenhaus and Antonio’s in Elkhart County; Blue Gate Restaurant, JoJo’s Pretzels and Foltz Bakery in LaGrange County.

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Worth the Trip

WHILE YOU’RE THERE … Spring in the heartland is Mother Nature’s first showcase of the year. And in north-central Indiana Amish country, that equates to fun, food and a maple syrup festival. The following are a select group of attractions that will appeal to all ages. Visit amishcountry.org for a full listing of the region’s destinations and events.

Bristol STOP at the 1830s working Bonneyville Mill and its 223-acre namesake county park. Hike, bike, picnic or cast your line in the nearby Elkhart River for the catch of the day. (elkhartcountyparks.org) SHOP at Camille’s Floral (camillesfloral. com) for South Bend Chocolate treats, Century Farmhouse handmade soaps and Lakeshore soy candles; Lavender Patch Fabric & Quilts (lavenderpatchquilts.com) for fabric, quilts and related accessories. SAVOR breakfast, brunch or munch at Evans Sidewalk Café (574-848-7110); a 12-inch deep dish Kitchen Sink pizza at Chicago’s Downtown Eatery (574-848-5800); or a Quinoa Burger at Red Bird Café (redbirdcafe.com).

Elkhart STOP in Elkhart’s downtown Arts & Entertainment District and visit the renovated 1924 Lerner Theatre (thelerner.com), the 36-acre Wellfield Botanic Gardens (wellfieldgardens. wordpress.com), the Midwest Museum of American Art (midwestmuseum. us) and view more than 6,000 works, and in the Garden District to visit Ruthmere Mansion, a 1910 Beaux Arts mansion now a house museum (ruthmere.org). Hop on board the

Wellfield Botanic Gardens in Elkhart

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National New York Central Railroad Museum (574-294-3001) or visit the Hall of Heroes Museum (hallofheroesmuseum. com), the world’s only super hero and comic book museum. SHOP at Stephenson’s for fine fashions and accessories (stephensonsofelkhart. com); The Black Crow on Main for antiques, collectibles, new and restyled furniture and an on-site coffee café and gourmet shop (theblackcrowonmain.com); recently opened Dwellings (facebook. com/dwellingsinelkhart) for eclectic home furnishings, custom painting and decorating advice by former owners of The Black Crow on Main. SAVOR a SugaRush Dessert at b on the River (b-ontheriver.com), a bakery, café and gift shop; pepper-crusted bleu sirloin steak and a view of the Elkhart River at McCarthy’s on the Riverwalk (mccarthysontheriverwalk. com); hand-crafted ales, lagers and pizzas at Iechyd Da Brewing Co. (iechyddabrewingcompany.com); Octopus Churrasco, the Elk Burger or Rib Night (the fourth Wednesday each month) at 523 Tap & Grill (523tapandgrill.com).

Middlebury STOP and check out the Essenhaus Classic Car Cruise-in on Thursday nights May through September (essenhaus.com); to ride the Pumpkinvine Nature Trail or watch the 17th annual bike ride June 18 (pumpkinvine.org). SHOP at Cinnamon Stick Boutique (mycinnamonstick.com) for apparel and accessories; Old Creamery Antiques (574-358-0188) for antiques and collectibles; the Market Place of Middlebury for unique items from more than 50 vendors (themarketplaceofmiddlebury. com); Dutch Country Market for Amish and other homemade jams, jellies, noodles and honey, and watch the bees in their hive.

Downtown Nappanee

SAVOR Amish comfort food at Das Dutchman Essenhaus, Indiana’s largest restaurant. Complex incorporates a restaurant, bakery, specialty shops and an inn (essenhaus.com); daily specials, fresh bread and scrumptious seasonal baked goods at Aunt Karen’s Café (facebook.com/auntkarenscafe); eats, sweets and sides at the Pumpkin Vine Café Coffee Bar & Tea Room (themarketplaceofmiddlebury.com).

Nappanee STOP at Amish Acres Historic Farm & Heritage Resort (amishacres. com), home to the 1911 Round Barn Theatre, northern Indiana’s premier repertory theater, as well as the Restaurant Barn, The Inn at Amish Acres and a host of specialty shops. SHOP at Coppes Commons’ (coppescommons.com), home to 10 retail shops and the Hoosier Cabinet museum; Dutch Village Market (dvillagemarket.com) for antiques, crafts and food; the Shingle Shoppes, small, home-based Amish cottage industries located along the back roads; Annalea’s Boutique (annaleasboutique.com) for cool clothing and accessories. SAVOR peaches and marshmallow cream ice cream at Rocket Science (facebook.com/RSIceCream); Angry Orchard Hard Cider at Hunters Hideaway Bar and Grill (574773-7121); and bacon-wrapped chicken thighs at the Culinary Mill Market & Deli (culinarymill.com).


Shipshewana STOP at Hostetler’s Hudson Auto Museum (hostetlershudsons.com) to view vintage classic cars; at Davis Mercantile (davismercantile.com) and catch a ride on the 1906 Dentzel Carousel; at the Blue Gate Theatre (riegsecker.com) and catch a show. SHOP at Shipshewana Auction & Flea Market (tradingplaceamerica.com), the Midwest’s largest flea market. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, May 3 through Oct. 1. Extended market weeks Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day and Fall Extravaganza. Antique Mall, featuring more than 100 dealers, open May through September. On-site Auction Restaurant serves Amish home-style cooking; Yoder’s Shopping Center, three stores in one (yoderdepartmentstore.com). SAVOR food and fun May 6 and 7 at the 2016 MayFest (Shipshewana. com); JoJo’s hand-rolled soft pretzels at Shipshewana Shops (shipshewanashops.com); Amish-style cooking (more than 25 kinds of pie) at the Blue Gate Restaurant & Bakery (bluegaterestaurant.com); yummy cinnamon rolls at Bread Box Bakery & Café (shipshewanabakery.com).

Wakarusa STOP for the 47th annual Wakarusa Maple Syrup Festival (wakarusamaplesyrupfestival.com) April 22 to 24; for the 12th annual Wakarusa Bluegrass Festival (wakarusabluegrassfestival.com) June 10 to 12, featuring workshops, stage shows and jammin’.

PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO ELECT MATT PRINE

SHOP at Yoder Brothers Antiques (yoderbrothersantiques.com) for eclectic items; for gadgetry at the Wakarusa Pro Hardware Store (wakarusaprohardware.com), where original hardwood floors, pressed tin ceilings and a floor-to-ceiling wall of more than 1,000 wooden drawers make a visit a one-of-a-kind experience. SAVOR Jumbo Jelly Beans (jumbojellybeans.com) at the Wakarusa Dime Store in the former Wolfberg’s Department Store, founded in 1907; pizza and hand-dipped milkshakes at Cook’s Pizza (574-862-4425).

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Authentic Indiana

LOCAL PRODUCERS, MERCHANTS AND ENTREPRENEURS

glass

BUSINESS

T

Indiana’s century-old industry continues to glisten BY CJ WOODRING

Kokomo Opalescent Glass

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THE BASIS FOR INDIANA’S glass-making industry began in 1886 with a boom in Howard County. A natural gas boom. The discovery the following year of the Trenton Gas Field, in east central Indiana, along with resultant gas-fired furnaces, launched statewide manufacturing companies, including many glass-related operations. More than a century later, glass remains a shining example of artistry in the Hoosier State, reflected in leaded and stained glass windows by the likes of Louis Comfort Tiffany, and in the works of established art glass manufacturers and emerging artisans throughout the state. “Indiana has deep histories in several art media, but probably none so long-standing as glass and furniture making,” says Eric Freeman, director of Indiana Artisan and board chairman for Indiana Glass Arts Alliance. “The natural gas found underground in Indiana in the 1880s gave rise to cities like Muncie, Kokomo, Anderson — and, of course, cities like Gas City and Gaston — largely because of the enormous glass manufacturing companies that went in and either created those towns or increased their populations by multiples. “We have been producing both functional and decorative glass for 130 years in Indiana, and very few states can match that.” Early glassware manufactured by Dunkirk-based Beatty-Brady Glass Co., (later called the Indiana Glass Co.) was primarily functional: multifaceted glasses, goblets, pitchers, candy dishes and decorative accessories. Not to mention A&W Root Beer mugs. Today these pieces remain in demand, offered in antique stores and online auctions, enchanting new generations of buyers. Other early companies flourished in Sheridan, Elwood, Richmond, Alexandria and Hartford City, among others, while glass bottling companies emerged at Lawrenceburg and Terre Haute, the latter the birthplace of the iconic Coca-Cola bottle, which was manufactured there into the 1980s. PHOTOS PROVIDED


Kokomo Opalescent Glass is still operating in its original 1889 buildings.

Muncie produced yet another glass product that became globally renowned: the ubiquitous Ball canning jar. Still operational, Ball (ball.com) now operates as a global metal packaging company. Although he doesn’t have a precise figure, James Glass, principal of Indianapolis-based Historic Preservation & Heritage Consulting LLC, says, “I think there were between 35 and 40 window glass factories, three to five plate glass factories, and another 10 to 15 glass factories producing all other kinds of glass products (fruit jars, tableware, art/stained glass, etc.). So altogether, there was somewhere between 50 to 60 glass factories in east central Indiana (eight counties) in operation by the late 1890s. “Also, Indiana was second in glass production in the United States by 1900, and Muncie was the number two city in the country in terms of producing glass that year,” adds Glass, co-author of “The Gas Boom of East Central Indiana” (Arcadia Publishing, 2005). HISTORIC GLASS FACTORIES STILL FLOURISH The Hoosier art glass industry was launched in Kokomo by a New York glass chemist who had heard about central Indiana’s gas boom and decided to pay a visit. Thus, Charles Edward Henry founded Opalescent Glass Works in 1888, with customers that included Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Now operating with 45 employees from its original location, Kokomo Opalescent Glass (kog.com) is America’s oldest art glass company. Direct descendants of early KOG partners remain on board. KOG established its Hot Glass Studio in 1998, producing a wide range of mouthblown and hand-cast glass. The company manufactures colored glass for global art and architecture, also promoting sheet glass art. In addition, it remains the primary source for stained glass restoration work, producing nearly all the original colors Tiffany used in his work. One of the primary components of the operation is public tours. CEO John O’Donnell says the company hosted about 7,000 tours in 2014; the number increased last year to about 8,500. “They love the tours, because they’re going to see hot molten glass being made into sheets of art glass, and they’re going to feel the heat off that,” he says. Younger visitors, O’Donnell says, most often want something already made because they have less time. “To counter that, we offer a lot of classes. We’re finding that once they attend a class, they’ll come back. So in many cases, tours lead to classes and classes lead to customers.” O’Donnell says he believes glass art has a stable future in Indiana. The secret lies in developing new product ideas and a wider range of architectural and construction uses.

“One of the things we’re looking to do is find other uses for glass; for example, we make trophies and awards and use glass strips for beads. Another market potential is the funeral urn business. So I think the potential is there for many other new uses.” Kerry Zimmerman, principal of Zimmerman Art Glass LLC (facebook.com/ zimmermanartglassbusiness), Corydon, is a fourth-generation glassmaker. It’s a legacy handed down from father to son since Zimmerman’s great-grandfather, Frederick, emigrated from Alsace-Lorraine, France, in the 1800s, settling in Pennsylvania. Zimmerman’s grandfather, Victor, opened Corydon Crystal in 1942; his father, Joseph, founded Zimmerman Art Glass in 1961. When a 1983 fire destroyed his factory, Joseph Zimmerman rebuilt on the same site, also bringing sons Kerry and Barton on board and changing the name to Zimmerman Glass Co. Following separate tragedies that claimed his father’s and brother’s lives, Kerry Zimmerman took over operations and responsibilities, while continuing as a craftsman and offering glass-blowing demonstrations to enthralled visitors. “We’re very viewer friendly,” says Zimmerman, a former high school track and field coach. “You can watch and ask questions, unlike at most places. We’ve given tours for fourth-graders since the 1970s, and last year had 97 busloads in six weeks from as far as Fort Wayne.” A grand reopening was held in October to commemorate the company’s move to a

Tiffany ledger from KOG.

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Authentic Indiana

Zimmerman Art Glass

remodeled gas station in downtown Corydon. The setting boasts a gallery as well as a museum that showcases works by Zimmerman’s father and grandfather. Zimmerman and his sister-in-law, Melanie Uhl, are sole employees. A one-time intern for Zimmerman, Uhl designs and creates seasonal jewelry and ornaments. Zimmerman continues to expand a line of glass fruit items begun by his grandfather. Citing Ball State University’s new glass arts program, Kokomo Opalescent Glass’s ongoing work and a resurgence in awareness of the art, driven by sculptor Dale Chihuly’s flamboyant works — the first such movement since the 1960s — Zimmerman says he believes art glass’s future in the Hoosier State is very strong. “My new factory may be a great addition to downtown, but it may also allow this business to continue,” he says. “I don’t expect (future owners) to put up with what we did over the years, because that’s what we were used to. I think this is going to give it a good fighting chance.” He says Zimmerman Art Glass will continue to blend new technology “with old stuff our father taught us. You can’t just sit there and do the same thing over and over and think it’s going to survive. It’s not going to happen.” Founded in 1911, Warsaw Cut Glass (warsaw-cutglass.com) remains as the only art glass-related company still operational in northern Indiana. 44

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In the mid-1980s the building was named a National Historic Landmark, one of just over 2,500 historic places nationwide that have earned the distinction. At that time, says Randy Kirkendall, who, along with his wife, Linda, bought the company in 1980, they were told theirs is the last original cut glass shop in the United States. “And there used to be 14 just between Chicago and Cincinnati,” he says. The company does not make glass; rather, it is a cutting house that produces lead crystal items: stemware, barware and bowls; coffee mugs, cookie and candy jars; pitchers, vases, serving pieces and specialty items. Major production is in tableware and trophies, Randy Kirkendall says. He is the sole glass cutter, sitting in front of a revolving stone wheel operated by a turn-of-the-last-century line shaft, meticulously grinding or cutting delicate floral or geometric patterns into each piece of crystal. In addition to special occasion gifts, he is also called upon for custom orders, such as replacement stemware for the Indiana governor’s mansion. “We custom designed the original pattern, which we took from the state flag, using the torch and stars. For this year’s state bicentennial, we’re putting that design on ornaments,” he says. Regarding art glass and its Indiana presence, Kirkendall says he’s encouraged about the industry, in general. “We have friends in this area who do a lot of stained glass, and, of course, Kokomo Opalescent Glass is a huge operation. And Ball State has a new glass program (the Marilyn K. Glick Center for Glass), so one can only hope it carries on. And we’re going to keep doing our bit for as long as we can.” “It is doubtful we will pass the business down to a family member at this time,” his wife adds. “We don’t have a child interested in learning the craft.” Although Indiana’s glass industry has dwindled throughout the years, companies bought out by larger, often global, conglomerates, or shuttered through recession and industry decline, many continue to operate within the state. They include Anchor Glass Container Corp., Lawrenceburg (anchorglass.com); Ardagh Group/Verallia North America, Dunkirk (ardaghgroup.com); and The

House of Glass Inc., Elwood (thehouseof glassinc.com). Among more recent additions are GRT Glass Design, Indianapolis (grtglassdesign. com) and Prestige Crystal, Elwood (prestigeartglass.net/home.html), founded in 1987 and 1990, respectively. CELEBRATING ART GLASS To honor the art glass industry and preserve and display past artisans’ works, Dunkirk and Greentown have established glass museums. The Dunkirk Public Library houses The Glass Museum (dunkirk.lib.in.us/ the-glass-museum.php), which museum staff and volunteers operate May 1 through October. The collection showcases more than 8,000 pieces of glassware from more than 100 global factories, including glass produced in Dunkirk and regionally. Related tools are included in the collection. Greentown City Hall is home to the Greentown Glass Museum (greentownglass. org/museum_news.php), which features more than 2,000 pieces of glass and related historical items from the former Indiana Tumbler & Goblet Co. The company was operational in Greentown from 1894 to 1903, when fire destroyed the factory. The National Greentown Glass Association (greentownglass. org) oversees the museum, founded in 1970. Supported by Indiana Artisan and the Indiana Glass Arts Alliance, along with promotional efforts that include the Indiana Glass Trail and related local events, art glass is destined to remain a bright and enduring Hoosier industry and a sparkling testament to the creativity and passion of its artists. “We have truly exceptional glass artists in this state,” Freeman says. “One reason for Indiana Artisan, the Indiana Glass Trail and the IGAA to exist is to be the proud ‘spokesorganizations’ for the beautiful handcrafted work coming from Indiana today. “The state always has had a very strong culture in making fine craft and art. What we’re doing is attempting to define Indiana a little more by that culture. We owe that to ourselves and to those who carry on the traditions of that culture.”


Glass Trail INDIANA

Eric Freeman, chairman of the Indiana Glass Arts Alliance board, worked with four state agencies to assist in forming Indiana Artisan, an economic development program created by then-Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman and the Indiana Legislature. Launched in 2008, Indiana Artisan (indianaartisan. org) identifies, recognizes, supports and promotes Hoosier entrepreneurs who create the highest-quality art, fine crafts and food while also establishing a brand for Indiana-made goods. The organization currently represents 320 artisans in 63 of Indiana’s 92 counties, the greatest numbers hailing from Marion, Hamilton and Monroe counties. In 2009 Indiana Artisan granted $100,000 to help local organizers create or expand artisan trails. “The Indiana Glass Trail was one of those,” Freeman says. “Designed to help travelers visit studios, galleries, workshops and kitchens of Indiana Artisans, the 10 trails (indianaartisan.org/marketplace/ artisan-trails) now involve 44 counties, with the Indiana Glass Trail (indianaglasstrail.com) being the largest.” In 2016 the trail will connect 13 counties, from Allen to Wayne, highlighting studios, galleries and museums, as well as glassspecific festivals and workshops located throughout communities along the way. A showcase for talented artists, the Indiana Glass Trail is also a significant component of Indiana tourism. Freeman says the trail’s origins are in the KokomoHoward County Convention and Visitors Bureau. It was established in 2009 with a $10,000 grant from Indiana Artisan. County involvement is

Trilogy-River Terrace in Madison. Below, Tiffany window in First Presbyterian Church in Richmond.

fluid, Freeman says, noting that convention and visitors bureaus join when they believe their “glass assets,” as he calls them, are significant enough to make a glass-related visit there worthwhile.  “It’s an annual thing,” he says. “The Glass Trail invests maybe $15,000 a year promoting glassrelated events, venues, artists and workshops along it. The budget comes from the visitors bureaus in counties participating in the trail in any given year. “There’s always a nucleus of about eight east central Indiana counties, the primary location of Indiana’s glass history. Other counties come and go, depending upon presentday glassmaking: how many glass artists there are in that county, exhibits planned that year, or galleries or stores selling Indiana glass. Participation in the trail is based on what CVBs (convention and visitors bureaus) want to focus on at the time.” Wayne County’s Tiffany Stained Glass Trail (visitrichmond.org/ listing/tiffany-stained-glass-trail) — four Richmond sites, within a five-block area, each featuring works by Louis Comfort Tiffany — is one of two city glass trails that enable visitors to view the world in a new light. Reid Memorial Presbyterian Church is, perhaps, the centerpiece, one of few churches in the world to boast only Tiffany windows. The 62 windows are original to the church, which was dedicated in 1906. “You can actually go up into the balcony, and on the north side, down at the bottom, the window is signed by Tiffany,” says Nancy Sartain, director of

leisure marketing and sales for the Richmond Convention & Visitors Bureau (visitrichmond. org). “People get excited because it really validates that, yes, the window is his.” The second tour showcasing stained glass windows, and the most recent addition to the Indiana Glass Trail, is the Madison Stained Glass Walking Tour (visitmadison.org/wp-content/ uploads/2015/03/Stained-GlassWalking-Tour-Brochure-FIXED. pdf). Introduced this January, the tour features stained glass windows in 11 churches, along with a variety of art and leaded glass windows in homes and businesses throughout the city’s National Historic Landmark District. “Madison is a great town to walk around in, period,” says Linda Lytle, executive director of Visit Madison. “But if you’re interested in stained glass, it’s a great opportunity. I particularly like the fact that we have historic glass in buildings and homes, and you can walk through the alleys to see it.” Rhonda Deeg, owner of RLD Glass Art & Restoration, serves as director of programs for Historic Madison Inc. (historicmadison. com). The Kokomo native is a vocational high school instructor and author, and served as historic maintenance coordinator for Taliesin Preservation, Inc. (taliesinpreservation.org). But Deeg’s heart belongs to the multifaceted pieces of stained glass she uses to restore historic panels and create new ones for residential and commercial applications. The artisan has accrued more than 20 years’ experience in art and stained glass repair and restoration, and is commissioned to create new panels for residential and commercial projects. Continues on following page. SOU T H

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Authentic Indiana

For Deeg, stained glass links the past with the present and, hopefully, the future. She believes it’s that past and its stories that attract today’s generations. “Glass tells a story through colors and textures. It’s an art form I think has become very important in our busy, everyday lives.” But Deeg laments the lack of apprenticeships for glass arts. “I don’t think the younger generation is being exposed to the fact there are still craftspeople working on historic buildings,” she says. “And there are not that many people coming into the field. “We’re trying to get that word across, to educate and really expose younger people to that. I’m teaching kids all the time and am an advocate for vocational education because I work with students of all ages. I see how their eyes

and faces light up when they’re actually doing something with their hands and seeing they can make or repair something.” Promoting glass arts is important, Freeman says. “It’s the only art medium, along with furniture, that Indiana really can claim in terms of a long and rich history in this state.  “So part of the mission is to encourage Hoosiers involved in glassmaking to develop events and venues that will promote the craft, so that Hoosiers understand its significance and its history here. The trail is designed to do that, as well as to reach outside Indiana and encourage visitors to enjoy Indiana’s present-day art glass culture.” Details on each county’s offerings, along with other information, can be found at indianaglasstrail.com.

Indiana Glass Arts Alliance INDIANAPOLIS GLASS collector Judy Wells formed the statewide Indiana Glass Arts Alliance in 2007, incorporating it as a nonprofit and gaining 501(c)(3) status to encourage financial support. “My primary objectives were to help develop Indiana’s own glass artists and support them, and educate the public to the fact glass is a fine art,” she says. IGAA (facebook.com/indianaglass artsalliance) has brought together Indiana collectors to share their love of glass, connected Indiana glass artists with Hoosier collectors, provided artists a market and put the state on the map of the national glass community. Wells says it’s the only organization in the state that supports the growth of art glass. Eric Freeman, director of Indiana Artisan, was recently elected IGAA board

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chairman. The board partners with the Indiana Glass Trail to promote events the IGAA helps create and support, he says. The board also partners with glass artists and organizations in offering annual events that include the Hot Glass Infusion Weekend and “Gathering,” an exhibition of work by Midwest glass artists. The IGAA has boasted more than 250 members throughout the years, Freeman says, while also expanding its focus. “While collectors remain very important, membership now includes glass artists, retailers who carry glasswork, art enthusiasts of all kinds, gallery owners/directors, and people who simply enjoy the art of glass and its history in the Hoosier State.” Wells’ initial interest in glass art was supported and encouraged by the late Marilyn Glick, an Indianapolis-based philanthropist, noted studio glass collector and namesake of Ball State University’s Marilyn K. Glick Center for Glass. “I met Marilyn as a collector,” Wells says. “I didn’t know anything about art glass, and she was an exceedingly kind lady who took me under her wing and mentored me. She was the most unpretentious person you could meet.” The IGAA was founded on Wells’ passion for the art, coupled with increasing exasperation it wasn’t represented or promoted in the Hoosier State. “I’d been interested in art and painting,” she says. “I’d go to lectures, classes, etc., to study about different schools and areas of paintings. One day I discovered glass art, and at that time there was no representation of the art form at our art museum. Not a word about glass. I fell instantly in love with it, and it became a passion.” Wells learned of an international organization, the Glass Art Society, which holds an annual conference with demonstrations and lectures. “The first year I was involved it was held in Seattle,” she says. “I met other collectors and found the only way I could get exposure to this art form was to travel outside Indiana. So about two or three times a year I’d go outside the state, and it was very frustrating. There was interest in art glass in every other state around us, but not in Indiana. I thought, ‘We have to have something here.’” To join the IGAA, call (317) 607-5243 or email to info@indianaglasstrail.com.

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John Waggoner’s 1962 Corvette

A love of vintage cars has driven several locals to join the National Corvette Restorers Society B Y K AT H E R I N E C O P L E N

PHOTOS BY JOSH MARSHALL

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I N 1 9 7 4, Franklin resident John Waggoner saw a small advertisement in the daily newspaper for a National Corvette Restorers Society meet-up in St. Louis. The idea sounded fun, so he and his wife, Jennifer, and daughters, Jennifer and Amanda, climbed into Waggoner’s Corvette — a 1962 Honduras Maroon he had purchased in 1970 — and headed west. Thus began Waggoner’s participation in NCRS, a membership that now has spanned more than 40 years. The NCRS is dedicated to the preservation, restoration and enjoyment of older Corvettes, typically models from 1953 to 2006, Waggoner explains. “Our focus is on restoring the cars back to the way that they were when they came out of the factory.” The group was in its inaugural year when Waggoner joined. A fuller recounting of the club’s history, including its growth out of another organization called the Classic Corvette Club, is available on NCRS.org. The organization has since grown to include 43 chapters from New Zealand to the United Kingdom and all across the United States. Indiana’s chapter boasts approximately 60 members. Individual chapters host yearly judging meets, seven regional meets and a national annual convention. Judging cars is a major focus of the club. “We judge the cars very differently than most organizations do in that we’re looking for them to be as original as absolutely possible,” Waggoner says. “When you judge a Corvette at an NCRS meet, the judging process is from eight to 10 man hours of judging. You have five teams of two judges each. They judge different areas: interior, exterior, mechanical, chassis and operations. It’s very in-depth.” The society’s constant focus on improving judging techniques makes 50

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it unique among car clubs. “The chapters will also hold judging schools, where we’ll all get together and somebody will present some portion of the judging process,” Waggoner says. “Maybe we’ll go through how to find part numbers on cars; maybe we’re going to look at paint. How do you determine if paint is original, or if it looks like a later paint has been applied? Is it an original color; has it been changed?”

John Waggoner is a judge for the National Corvette Restorers Society.


What Waggoner has learned from NCRS, he has integrated back into his own Corvette. “When I found out about NCRS, I got interested in restoring it (his car) back to as original as possible,” he says. “It needed a paint job and an engine refresh. I did those things, cleaned it up. When I had it painted, I took every piece of chrome off the car, sanded it down to bare fiberglass and then had it painted from there. I put a new top on it. Ever since then I just try to keep it up. Whenever anything breaks, I try to put back as original a part as I can possibly find.” Waggoner takes his restored Corvette out on chapter road tours and also participates in road tours to the national convention. “Four years ago, we took the road tour to San Diego,” he says. “It took nine days. We make a lot of stops and visit differ-

ent points of interest along the way. We basically try to stay off the interstates and take state highways and whatever. When they organize these road tours, a tremendous amount of work goes into organizing them, to find all the interesting things to see, then try to map a path so you can get to all of them.” ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT Mooresville’s Fred Neitzel got involved with NCRS in 1982 when he purchased a 1962 Corvette that needed restoration. “I had heard that NCRS was the place to get the information I needed,” he says. Neitzel presently owns three Corvettes: a 1977, a 1990 convertible and a 1999 convertible. He describes membership in the group as fun. But it takes work, too. “NCRS chapters do socialize, but our main purpose is having what we call meets, where

NCRS chapter fall picnic. Inset, NCRS Meet at Auctions America in 2015.

we judge our members’ cars,” he explains. “Social clubs around these parts have car shows where they do wash and shine judging but not to the degree that NCRS does. It can take hours for one NCRS team to judge a Corvette.” Fred Wolfred of Greenwood became involved with NCRS in 1982. He had recently purchased a 1967 roadster and wanted to learn more about Corvettes. “I wanted information about originality because modifications abound in the Corvette business,” Wolfred explains. “I have SOU T H

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Arts & Lifestyles

Waggoner leads the 1962 cars into the San Diego National Convention in 2012. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JOHN WAGGONER

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learned to appreciate the help of determining originality that comes with an NCRS membership.” Joining the club has helped Wolfred in other ways, too. “A couple years ago, I had an interest in purchasing a car in Florida,” he says. “Using the membership directory, I was able to discuss the vehicle with an NCRS member in Florida. He offered to review the car and send pictures of a car two hours from his home. This act speaks to people helping people and the underlying passion of the NCRS membership team.” Shelbyville’s Ralph Kramer isn’t a member of NCRS, but he has been involved in the club since he was public relations director for Chevrolet more than 20 years ago. “I think of John [Waggoner] and thousands of Corvette aficionados like him as angels,” Kramer says. “Expecting little in return, they nurture and protect their cars and their Corvette relationships


with a near religious fervor. If you’re in the business of making and selling Corvettes, as Chevrolet is, they (club members) are priceless allies.” Thanks to the efforts of NCRS club members, the history of this beloved car is now preserved. Kramer says NCRS officers preserved many years’ worth of Corvette memorabilia and paperwork, facilitating the creation of the National Corvette Museum in the early ’90s in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Ask any NCRS member to explain the allure of the Corvette, and you’ll come away with a multitude of answers. For Waggoner, the Corvette is “the only American sports car,” he says. “They’ve (the cars) always combined both good styling and, in later years, engineering enhancements. A lot of things you’ve got on your four-door sedan first came out on a Corvette.” For more information on the local chapter of NCRS, visit ncrs.org/in.

Waggoner’s daughter, Amanda, during judging at the NCRS meet in Canton, Ohio, in 1975. Above, Amanda’s triplets in June 2000.

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Andy Hillenburg’s team in 2000 at the Indianapolis 500.

Southside ties to the

Indianapolis 500 The big race celebrates its 100th running this year. We take a look at the contributions southsiders have made to it throughout the years. BY RICK SHAFFER

R

RECORD BOOKS FOR THE INDIANAPOLIS 500 tell us that Louis Schneider and Bill Cummings were the only two race winners who were born in Indianapolis. Schneider, the 1931 winner, and Cummings, the 1934 winner, grew up within the old city limits of Indianapolis on the near-west side. But that is not to say the south side of Indianapolis did not provide participants who helped make up the history of the “Greatest Spectacle in Auto Racing,” which will be conducted for the 100th time on May 29. There are countless people from the area who can say they had some sort of participation at the Speedway over the years. And there are several who have strong ties to the 500, including one who got to race in it and another whose family company played more than one role in its history. AN AMBITION FULFILLED

Upon visiting the Indianapolis Motor Speedway at the age of 5, Andy Hillenburg decided then and there that his ambition in life would be to race in the Indianapolis 500.

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“On my first visit to the Speedway (in 1968), I knew something big was going on inside, and I knew whatever it was, I wanted to be a part of it,” Hillenburg said. A 1981 graduate of Perry Meridian and a successful driver in the USAC sprint and dirt car series, he felt he was ready for the big race by 1989. The first step was joining the Rookie Orientation Program, but the car he was assigned to drive never materialized. A year later, a deal for him to drive a local team’s backup car also did not come to fruition. Hillenburg wondered if he would ever get a chance. “I was so crushed,” he recalled. “So I decided to look in a different direction. I felt like if nothing else, I would try to run the second best race, the Daytona 500. So I went south and won the ARCA race there twice and finally got to run in the Daytona 500 in 1998.” Interestingly, Hillenburg’s run at Daytona rejuvenated the idea of trying Indianapolis one more time. “After I ran in the 1998 Daytona 500, some friends of mine said, ‘Now that you’ve done Daytona, it would be neat if you could do the Indy 500.’ That’s how it started — just talk with some friends. And it was a group of friends who raised the money for me to run in the 2000 Indianapolis 500.” Two of those friends were safety equipment manufacturer Bill Simpson and Preston Root, whose father, Chapman Root, owned the Sumar Specials that ran in the 500s from 1953 to 1960. For 2000, Hillenburg chose the same navy blue and white Sumar paint scheme to honor the Root family’s participation at Indianapolis. Hillenburg qualified 33rd, and once the first of three parade laps were underway, he dropped back to savor the moment he had awaited most of his life. After waving to his dad in Turn 2 and his mother and brother along the main straightaway, he “closed the visor and went to work.” He would ultimately finish 28th after a mechanical failure sidelined him on Lap 91. He spent the rest of the day signing autographs and talking to fans. Hillenburg phased out his driving career in 2004 and today operates the Fast Track High Performance Driving School that opened more than 20 years ago. He PHOTOS PROVIDED


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in his career? “Well, let me put it to you this way,” Hillenburg responded. “I won my share of races, but running in the Indianapolis 500 is the biggest memory for me.” IN THE BOOKS

also does film and commercial work. The former allowed him to appear in the movie “Talladega Nights,” where he drove the car of Ricky Bobby’s French nemesis, Jean Girard. He currently resides in Charlotte, N.C., with his wife and four children. So how did racing at Indianapolis rank

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Kennedy Tank and Manufacturing has been located on the south side of Indianapolis since 1898. It has been at its current site at 833 Sumner Ave. since 1953, and a visit to the lobby lets one know immediately that the company has had more than a passing involvement in the Indianapolis 500. On display is a Kurtis-Offenhauser that was driven in the 1948 500 by Les Anderson. Anderson’s Kennedy Tank Special accounted for one of the seven times

Kennedy-sponsored entries qualified and raced in the 500 between 1936 and 1953. “The company got involved partly through civic pride and partly through a passion for the 500,” says Pat Kennedy, the current president whose great-grandfather, Patrick Washington Kennedy, founded the company. “But there was also a business side to this as our main customers at the time were oil companies. They (the oil companies) were also interested in auto racing, so we used the 500 as a means to entertain customers.” Kennedy Tank’s involvement in the 500 would take a new turn in the early 1950s when the company began manufacturing the tanks used for refueling during pit stops for the teams that competed in the race. The original tanks were pressurized, but after a number of fires during the 1964 season, a new design was introduced that allowed the fuel to flow via gravity. Kennedy Tank would continue to make 500 refueling tanks until 1996, when another company became the provider.


Hillenburg signing autographs.

Despite losing that connection, Pat Kennedy’s interest in the 500 did not wane. He continued to attend the race, and a chance visit to the Speedway ultimately resulted in a trivia book that first came out in 2010 and a recap book that followed in 2012. “I was interested in our company involvement and visited with Donald Davidson (the IMS historian) to see about our history,” Kennedy explained. “While I was there, I noticed the ‘Autocourse Official Illustrated History of the Indianapolis 500’ book in the gift shop and bought one. I highlighted parts of it and then started a trivia list with 20 to 30 questions that I was going to use on my friends.” Kennedy ended up expanding his trivia list to over 500 questions that were published under the title of “How Much Do You Really Know About the Indianapolis 500?” In its third printing and now titled “The Official Indy 500 Trivia Book,” it has more than 700 questions on the history of the race. His second book, “Indy 500 Recaps: The Short Chute Edition,” is in its fourth printing and has grown from 332 pages to 521 pages. So are there any plans for another book? Probably not, says Kennedy, who attended his first 500 in 1963 at the age of 7 and hasn’t missed a race since. Besides, with history continually in the making at IMS, Kennedy knows he will always have a project in updating both books. SOU T H

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OTHER 500 TIES

Five Johnson County college students were chosen to serve as 500 Festival Princesses this year. They are: Jessi Arbuckle of Greenwood, a graduate of Center Grove High School and a junior at Taylor University. Elyse Hoy of Greenwood, a graduate of Center Grove High School and a sophomore at Franklin College. Morgan Lee of Greenwood, a graduate of Center Grove High School and a junior at Indiana Wesleyan University. Nilofer Rajpurkar of Greenwood, a graduate of Center Grove High School and a junior at Purdue University. Katelyn O’Mara of Indianapolis, a graduate of Perry Meridian High School and a senior at Franklin College.

Three years before the first Indianapolis 500, Southport figured prominently in a race promotion by Carl Fisher, one of the four founders of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. In 1908, Fisher flew over Indianapolis in a Stoddard-Dayton automobile suspended from a gas balloon in order to promote the upcoming race. Fisher, who was the authorized dealer for Stoddard-Dayton in the Indianapolis area, served as co-pilot to George Bumbaugh. The gentlemen landed in Southport, whereupon Fisher was said to have driven the automobile back to downtown Indianapolis to a very enthusiastic reception by members of the local media. But it didn’t exactly happen that way. Fisher actually “flew” a stripped-down version of the car — sans the engine — and then drove a complete model back to his meeting with the press. AND THAT’S ONLY THE BEGINNING.

»A pair of Southport High School graduates would distinguish themselves at the

The Kurtis-Offenhauser driven in the 1948 500 by Les Anderson. Opposite page, the car is now on display at Kennedy Tank and Manufacturing.

Speedway. Joe Langley, a 1937 SHS grad, was a 500 chief mechanic in the 1950s and ’60s. Diane Hunt, a 1958 graduate, was named 500 Festival Queen in 1961 and later served on the board of directors for the festival.

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»Perry Township also gave us Earl Unversaw, who was riding mechanic with Bill Cummings when he won the 1934 race. As a token of their friendship, Cummings named his daughter Earlene in honor of Unversaw. »Howdy Wilcox II, who finished second to Fred Frame in the 1932 classic, resided in Perry Township during that time. » Perry Meridian graduate Brian Barnhart has been one of the top officials in Indy car racing. After working for various teams for 12 years, including a number of years with Al Unser Jr. when he won the 500 in 1992 and 1994, he became the superintendent of IMS in 1994. Currently, he serves as vice president of competition for the Verizon IndyCar Series. Brian’s father, Bob Barnhart, also worked for Indy teams for a number of years, most notably A.J. Foyt Racing. »Bill McCrary, a Perry Township resident, directed Firestone’s Indy car racing program for a number of years. »Bill Spangler, another Perry Township resident, served as chief mechanic for Indy 500 cars in the later 1960s and early ’70s. »Like Kennedy Tank, southside firm Troy Oil also served as a sponsor on Indy 500 cars. »Greenwood cafeteria owner Jonathan Byrd sponsored 500 entries several years and his sons are following in his footsteps by supporting current 500 drivers Conor Daly and Bryan Clauson. »And certainly last but not least, there are the 500 Festival Queens from the area. Southport High School added two more to the list in recent years. Annie Berning was crowned in 2009, two years after Danielle Sylvester’s reign. Last year’s queen was Whiteland graduate Ali Mathena, while Center Grove’s Riley Hoffman was crowned in 2011. The first Johnson County resident to be so honored was Greenwood’s Janet Lee Faires, who reigned in 1969. And remember the 1961 winner Diane Hunt? In 1986, her daughter, Wendy Barth, a Center Grove graduate, was named 500 Festival Queen. They remain the only mother and daughter to receive that honor.

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Goodwill

THE HEART

angel OF AN

I

IN 2013, WHEN STACIE DAVIDSON first heard about Community Angels, a nonprofit organization that assists Johnson County families dealing with disease, illness or injury, she knew she wanted to lend a hand. “With Community Angels, you are helping your neighbors, your friends and your family,” she explains. “You’re not sending a check to California or something; it’s right here in our county.” It wasn’t long, however, before Community Angels was once again on her mind — for another reason. In June 2014, Davidson’s 10-year-old stepson, Zane, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. His diagnosis will necessitate three-and-a-half years of medical treatment, and the family quickly began to experience the financial and logistical difficulties associated with such a life-changing diagnosis.

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Beth Harriman uses her community group to help those in need BY CATHERINE WHITTIER

Within 10 months, Zane’s medical expenses reached approximately $850,000, an amount dangerously close to the $1 million maximum allowed by the family’s insurance policy. In addition to making multiple co-payments, the family incurred travel and food expenses associated with his hospital stays. “Cancer is not cheap,” Davidson says, who is grateful for the financial and emotional support of family and friends, Indian Creek Schools, the Johnson County community and the Greenwood Fire Department, where her husband, Matt, works. As expenses mounted, Davidson and her husband responded by taking additional work shifts, making their schedules even more chaotic. Although Zane’s biological mom, Susan Davidson, has shared custody and care of Zane through his treatments, Stacie and Matt quickly found they

PHOTOS PROVIDED


Beth Harriman, center, with Community Angels supporters Robert and Annetta Pence, owners of Robert’s Salon & Day Spa, at the Black-and-White Ball.

needed more assistance, despite their reservations about asking for help. Eventually, the couple agreed to receive professional house cleaning services, paid for by Community Angels, while they were away at Zane’s chemotherapy treatments each week. This seemingly small gesture “was a complete weight lifted off our shoulders,” Stacie recalls. Beth Meyer, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012, says she, too, was hesitant to ask for help when she found out she was sick, but she now also understands the value of such assistance. For six months while she was undergoing medical treatment, Meyer benefited from house cleaning services offered by Community Angels. “I was very grateful and thankful for those weeks that I didn’t have to worry about cleaning house,” Meyer says. “It allowed me to be tired (and) to focus on rest and rehabilitation.”

JUST SAY YES

“Sometimes the biggest obstacle, when it comes to trying to help people, is getting

The Davidson family, from left, Zeke, 15; Matt; Stacie; and Zane, 12.

them to accept it,” explains Beth Harriman, who founded Community Angels in 2011, after realizing how difficult it is for families to juggle daily chores, while dealing with the kind of adversity a family illness can bring. The idea for Community Angels began to form, Harriman says, when her sister, Diane, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2008. “The whole time she was in treatment, my mom would drive there (to Missouri where her sister lived) and be with her for her chemo treatments,” Harriman says. “Mom would stay a week, just to be sure she was OK, and help take care of the house.” Her sister also had tremendous support from church family and friends, which was reassuring to Harriman and her siblings, who were busy raising families in Indiana and unable to provide any practical help. “My sister had three months’

IN NEED OF HELP? Families who wish to take advantage of the assistance offered by Community Angels are asked to fill out a simple application, identifying which services would be most helpful. Once the application is reviewed and approved by Johnson County Community Foundation, Beth Harriman is able to assign tasks to a service provider who partners with Community Angels. Individual applicants may receive up to $1,000 in services. Most service providers work at a reduced rate, donating part of their time as a charitable contribution. Harriman stresses that financial need is not the litmus test for qualified recipients. “It’s not a financial thing,” she explains. “I think that’s what people think, but that has nothing to do with it.” Illness, she adds, affects both rich and poor. For more information, email Harriman at communityangels2011@ yahoo.com.

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Goodwill

worth of food in her freezer (that friends had made for them),” she recalls. That support, Harriman says, was invaluable. Then, in 2010, Harriman helped another friend, a single mother of two young boys, who was diagnosed with breast cancer. “She didn’t have that same support system,” she says. “It was more of a struggle for her. She didn’t want to burden people because they had their own families and their own activities. She wouldn’t

IN BLACK AND WHITE Each year, Community Angels founder Beth Harriman organizes a Black-and-White Ball to raise funds for the organization. This year’s event, planned for 6:30 p.m. May 7, will be held at the Biltwell Event Center, 950 S. White River Parkway West Drive, Indianapolis. The event features dinner and dancing, a silent auction and “lots of fun and surprises,” she says, but it also serves as an opportunity to update the organization’s local partners, as well as attract new involvement. To help sponsor the event, make donations or provide items for the silent auction, contact communityangels2011@yahoo.com.

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Zane during inpatient treatment at Riley Hospital in 2014.

reach out, and she wouldn’t ask for help.” But Harriman was persuasive. “I went and got groceries for her,” she recalls. “I bought food that I knew her kids could make easily.” Harriman also accompanied her friend to several doctor appointments and sat with her through a chemotherapy session. “It made me think of all the other little things — the other unthought-of things that affect your daily life,” Harriman says. By 2011 her children had grown and left home, and she found herself questioning how best she could spend her free time. Harriman looked into establishing a 501(c)(3) organization to raise money to


Matt administers chemotherapy treatments to Zane at home in 2014.

help people coping with cancer and other illnesses, but the procedure seemed daunting. “When I started looking into the whole process of having your own nonprofit — it’s expensive, it’s a lot of time, and you have to have a board,” Harriman says. “I didn’t have time for that.” As a co-owner of DCI Specialty Floors & Coatings, which she runs with her husband, Marty, as well as part-time surgery and scheduling coordinator for Community South OB/GYN, she didn’t feel able to handle the responsibilities of running an established nonprofit. “I just wanted to help people,” she says. Eventually, Harriman found her way to the Johnson County Community Foundation, which helps community members “establish charitable funds to make life better in the communities they love,” explains Gail Richards, president and CEO of JCCF. “We work with individuals, families, financial advisers and nonprofits. We connect people who care with causes that matter.” Harriman discovered that under the umbrella of JCCF she could simply raise money and help families in need. “I pay 2 percent of everything I bring in for their (JCCF’s) services,” Harriman explains. “They take care of my taxes. I can use their tax ID for fundraising, and they serve as my board. They have kind of guided me on my journey.

“When I talk about Community Angels, I really promote JCCF because of what they do,” she says. “They allow people who have dreams of wanting to help people become a reality.”

A MISSION TO HELP

Community Angels now accomplishes its work through time and money donated by numerous individuals and local businesses that embrace the organization’s mission. “If you were sick and couldn’t do all the unspoken things that you do that nobody thinks about, who’s going to do them?” Harriman asks. “We (Community Angels) can come in and take care of something.” Since its inception, Community Angels has provided gas and grocery cards, lawn and cleaning services, meal preparation and more. The organization seeks to lighten the load like a neighbor next door might have in days gone by, Harriman says. “Years ago, that’s what people did,” she explains. “Your neighbors were always there for you, and everybody helped each other out. We’ve gotten away from that nowadays. A lot of people don’t even know who their neighbors are. Deep down, people really want to help but are busy, and they just don’t know how. Some people are more able to give money, and they can feel good about that. It’s back to basics — being a good neighbor and helping each other.”


Profile

Lisa Carter’s approach to cancer care is holistic, from support through treatment to nutrition.

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A Compassion Thing Lisa Carter brings experience and empathy to her role as cancer coach By Julie Cope Saetre Photography by Josh Marshall

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Profile

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WHEN SHE MARRIED JAMIE CARTER — now the owner of Carter Plumbing — in 1988, Lisa Carter brought with her far more than an affinity for marketing, accounting and payroll, which she handles for the family business. She also brought a passion for nursing that has since evolved into what she terms “a ministry” — the role of cancer coach. As such, she conducts research for clients and helps them create a “game plan and a strategy” to fight the disease and then helps them carry out the agreed-upon protocol. “It’s definitely a holistic approach,” she said. “It’s pretty involved.” The process includes a full nutritional assessment of the patient and a resulting food plan to best support the client during chemotherapy or another form of treatment. Carter also draws up an appropriate exercise routine and helps clients deal with stress and other emotional conflicts. And she researches what alternative methods and clinical trials might be available, something overwhelmed patients and their families might not have the time or presence of mind to do. “There are just so many different things that you can do, and I don’t think people realize that,” she said. “They’re in shock. ... People collapse (upon diagnosis).” Carter knows this from personal experience. Her father, Roger Cole, was diagnosed with leukemia in 2000 and died from the disease in

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The PrimeLending Greenwood Branch

Welcomes Jody Bleier!

Contact her today to discover the PrimeLending difference. She is happy to serve you. 2004. Lisa’s husband, Jamie, successfully battled testicular cancer in 2003 by undergoing an intensive nine-week chemotherapy regimen. So Carter relates to her clients’ emotional turmoil and “learning the ropes of being diagnosed with cancer.” And she remembers her own reaction. “When I look back at my dad, I trusted the doctor at that point in time,” she said. “Now I would have handled it differently. I think it’s good to have as many avenues open (as possible) and definitely cross “There are all your T’s and dot just so many different things all your I’s.” Those family that you can experiences with do, and I don’t cancer inspired think people Carter to become realize that. a cancer coach. They’re in She was already shock. ... People well-prepared to collapse (upon start the journey, diagnosis).” having graduated from Purdue Uni—LISA CARTER versity with a B.S. in nursing and a B.A. in public health promotions. Even after marrying Jamie and entering the Carter family business, she kept up with the health and nursing fields through professional and medical publications. In 2011, Carter traveled to Canada to train as a cancer coach in a three-level program. Level 1 certifies the participant as a breast cancer coach. Level 2 expands that certification to all other forms of cancer. And Level 3 focuses on educating patients and their families about cancer and how to cope with a diagnosis. Since then, she has coached some 20 adult patients in the United States and Canada, receiving referrals through word-of-mouth, the National Association of Professional Cancer Coaches (cancerwipeout.org) and her cancercoachrn.com website. The coaching can be by phone and email from the Carters’ Trafalgar

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Profile

Left, Jamie Carter installs plumbing for an orphanage in Haiti. Above, the Carters’ son, Kelson, installs a new comfort height toilet for a cancer patient.

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY LISA CARTER

home or through in-person visits. In one case, an Arizona resident called for guidance in approaching a rare carcinoma; in another, Carter attended every doctor’s appointment with a client facing Stage 4 breast cancer. “I pour myself out in trying to research as much as possible,” she explained. “But I gain so much new knowledge myself. It’s definitely worth it to know all the different alternatives. There’s just so much out there. There’s a plethora of ... knowledge that you can gain.” While helping to run a long-standing family business and coaching cancer patients might seem enough to fill anyone’s planner, Carter doesn’t stop there. Before she fell in love with nursing, she had planned to be an accountant, and she handles accounting for the Carters’ property management and storage businesses as well as for Carter Plumbing. And both the Carters and their plumbing company are dedicated to charitable work locally,

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nationally and internationally. Light the Night, a fundraiser for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, is close to Carter’s heart because of her father’s illness, and Carter Plumbing is an event sponsor each year. The company also supports Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) in honor of Jamie’s successful battle. Carter Plumbing also pays for each of its technicians to sponsor a student at The Crossing in Whiteland, an alternative school with a mission “to empower struggling students to become contributing members of their communities.” The school works with students on accredited courses, job training and faith-based mentoring. This past Christmas, the Carters took gifts to children living in the Meridian-Raymond Neighborhood area. And earlier this year, Jamie remodeled a bathroom for a family who lost their father in an automobile accident last fall. Other area residents and businesses have taken

on much-needed home repairs for the family as well. Outside of Carter Plumbing, mission trips are a family priority. In 2012, she, Jamie and their daughter, Lauren, 24, traveled to Haiti, where Jamie completed a plumbing project for an orphanage. (Son Kelson, 25, doesn’t like to fly, so he held down the family business he has entered.) She and Lauren also have completed mission trips to Costa Rica and Cartagena, Colombia, all through Bridges of Hope International, which is affiliated with Greenwood-based Emmanuel Church, which the Carters

attend. And through Mount Pleasant Christian Church, the Carter family’s former church, she traveled on a mission trip to an Arizona Navajo reservation. The family’s charitable motivation is simple: “The ability to be able to give back to others,” she said. “Definitely to reach out in our community and support people who are struggling and need that help. It’s definitely a compassion thing.” Between work, coaching and volunteerism, Carter doesn’t have an abundance of free time. When her schedule does ease up? The simple pleasures are what count. “I do have a granddog, so he comes over,” she said, laughing.

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Home Trends

Sunroom addition by Gettum Associates Inc.

More for the Money

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From three-season porches to mudrooms, homeowners are finding creative ways to expand square footage

By Teresa Nicodemus

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HOPING TO INCREASE the living space in your home without the expense of a new addition? Chances are good there are hidden opportunities in already existing areas of your home. Converting porches and patios into additional rooms has become increasingly popular over the years, says Jason Gettum, vice president of Gettum Associates Inc. in Greenwood. And it can be easier than you think. Many older homes

already feature covered back porches, which can become screened porches to deter insects or provide shelter from inclement weather, or three-season rooms with windows. “A three-season room is an option to extend the seasonal life of a porch,” Gettum explains. “These rooms are typically not heated or cooled, yet provide more shelter than a screened porch with the addition of windows. It’s often considered PHOTOS PROVIDED


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Home Trends

the porch had screens encased in cedar frames, later being replaced by temporary windows that had to be taken in and out — a task that became more difficult as the Jensens aged. The couple hired Gettum Associates to install a modern, permanent window system to fully transition the porch into a user-friendly three-season room. “All of the new windows are light, sectioned and extremely flexible,” Jensen says. “We can push the window up to the top, all the way down or situate the pane in the middle of the window to take advantage of the breeze.”

Sunroom addition by Gettum Associates Inc.

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the middle ground between an enclosed porch and a sunroom.” For retired Greenwood couple Darlene and Ken Jensen, a three-season room was the perfect solution to enjoy the outdoors while dining and entertaining. Their ranch home, built in 1960, is nestled among trees in the Lawndale neighborhood. “We moved here 44 years ago and added a screened porch in the ’80s on the back of the home,” Darlene Jensen says. “We like being outside, and we had recently landscaped the yard and wanted to enjoy the view in a comfortable setting. Our young son at the time enjoyed having sleepovers out on the porch, too.” The 14-by-20-foot porch was built level to the home off the family room. At first,

SUNNY DAYS A sunroom, which functions as an interior room, as compared to an exterior room like a three-season room or screened porch, often can be converted into “additional family rooms, adding TVs and sound systems,” Gettum says. A sunroom was the ideal remodeling project for Richard Lee’s 15-year-old red brick ranch home in the Walnut Woods subdivision in Greenwood. Last year, he surveyed the screened porch at the rear of his home with new eyes, envisioning a comfortable sunroom that he could enjoy year-round. In 2015, the transformation began. With two of the porch’s walls connecting to the home, the remaining walls are framed in red brick with 4-foot screens, which are bordered in brick and open to a view of the backyard. A simple window conversion of the existing screens added luxury to the 12-by-20-foot space. Six large windows now extend from a 30-inch brick knee wall on the two exterior walls. The room flows from the kitchen with French doors that invite guests to the newly designed space. The porch’s cement floor was replaced with a soft gray ceramic tile to mimic white-washed wood. “Gettum Associates coordinated the contractors to run heating and cooling ducts, and they replaced the ceiling fan with a new remote-controlled fan with


dimmers, canned lights with dimmers and additional electrical outlets,” explains Lee. While enclosed porches and sunrooms often serve as nooks for dining in an indoor, yet al fresco setting, they can be much more, says Kris Ragsdale, interior designer and owner of Kris Ragsdale Designs in Greenwood. One of her clients uses a sunroom as an art gallery. A skylight and one wall entirely of windows streams filtered light into the room with a shading system that protects the artwork from full sun, yet allows the natural light to showcase an art collection. “Many artists will use a sunroom as a studio, hobbyists will use the room for crafting, and a room engulfed in natural light is perfect for sewing and needlepoint,” adds Ragsdale. “Sunrooms and enclosed porches have become versatile and multifunctional opportunities to repurpose space.”

Darlene and Ken Jensen’s finished three-season room. SOU T H

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Home Trends

MUDROOM IDEAS In addition to making patio and porch conversions, today’s homeowners are considering ways to redesign interior rooms into more functional spaces. Interior designer and owner of Windsor House Interiors in Southport, Brian Haggard says almost all European homes have a designated mudroom, a place to take off your boots and coat, he says, so we give a nod to the Europeans for the rise in popularity of mudrooms. These rooms can be an “extension of the laundry room or even off of a porch,” Haggard explains. “I had one client for whom we walled off an area of his garage to create a mudroom space to store his golfing supplies and children’s items.” Some homeowners create mudrooms out of the space between a detached garage and the home. The space can be walled in

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with screens or windows to connect the garage to the home and becomes not only an extension of the home, but a living space acting as a buffer zone that helps to keep snow, mud and outdoor debris contained. “This narrow hallway makes a decorative solarium between the two buildings,� Haggard says. When decorating these sun-drenched rooms, he suggests creating a color palette that plays off the existing colors within the home. For example, he says, for a gold or rust interior color scheme, choose a palette of yellow or tangerine for the sunroom or sunny mudroom. Fabric colors can fade quickly in sunfilled rooms. Use fabric made for indoor and outdoor use, such as Sunbrella. Porcelain and wood pieces for accessories wear well, and wrought iron and glassware will hold up better in direct sunlight, he adds.

Mudroom by Gettum Associates Inc.

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Marcy Hook-Moeller

olis ires p a n sp dia n i n I d k oc ates an ians R s l r c Gi educ ale musi fem l a S ZRO M c E N lo I L AD E BY M

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY GIRLS ROCK INDIANAPOLIS.

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n energetic murmur erupts from the Girls Rock Indianapolis headquarters, located on the second floor of the rustic and historic Murphy Arts Building in Fountain Square. It’s First Friday, an open-to-the-public monthly gathering of artists, musicians and creativity lovers, and although the old building allows for a brisk mid-winter breeze, the robin’s egg-blue GRI office offers an air that is warm and inviting. Young intern Maddie Theaman ushers visitors from the gray hallway into the vibrant office where artwork further brightens the walls and sketch books populate a folding table. Vice President Annie Skinner sets up her DJ equipment, providing music that eventually flows in waves over a crowd of girls who carry on hushed conversations about their favorite bands. GRI is a chapter of Girls Rock Camp Alliance, which started in Portland, Oregon, in 2007 as a platform for the empowerment and education of aspiring female musicians. The organization works to instill a sense of pride in female musicians from a young age. A chapter was formed in Indianapolis in 2010 after GRI co-founder Sharon Rickson spent time as a volunteer at the Girls Rock camp in Seattle. “It was a bunch of women playing instruments and getting together to donate their time to ensure girls could learn how to play,” Rickson says. “I saw what it did in Seattle and thought … ‘My community needs me.’” GRI began as a one-week, musical summer camp with approximately 40 girls in 78

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Annie Skinner Sheri Hughes with several Girls Rock participants.

Sharon Rickson


Carrie Pietz teaches guitar.

attendance. Today, the camp is divided into So when we were on our board retreat, we two weeks for girls ages 8 to 16 and boasts talked about how to fix that.” more than 80 attendees. Participants can The result led to the established headsing or play guitar, bass guitar, keyboards quarters in Fountain Square, which not or drums for bands that they form while at only serves as a space for the board and camp. Once asvolunteers to meet, signed a band, the but also as a gathergirls learn an original ing place for young “GRI helped me find the musicians I was looking song, which they female musicians. for to be inspired by. Camp is my favorite week perform on the last “We wanted a safe of the entire year. I never want to miss it, and day of camp in front place for kids to go on of family, friends and First Fridays,” Skinner I will always make time for GRI.” the public. says. “A place where  —CENTER GROVE SENIOR CASSY COHA For several years, girls could come inGRI’s only offering stead of being out on was the camp, which took the entire year the streets, possibly getting into trouble.” to plan and execute. However, GRI board Twinkle VanWinkle, GRI’s executive direcmembers, volunteers and participants wanttor, says the space allows the group to fured more. ther provide music lessons and mentorship “Camp is great, but when it was over, for young girls. it was over,” Skinner says. “You build this Lessons are held during the fall, winter and community and then it was like ‘See ya later!’ spring, with the summer camp filling out the SOU T H|INDYSOUTHMAG .COM

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year’s calendar. Lessons are priced moderately to accommodate all income levels, and girls are invited to apply for scholarships to attend the camp. “We don’t want to have a high price point for our services,” VanWinkle says. “We would like to make money to use for our programming, but we don’t want anyone left out.” Though GRI is based in Fountain Square, its offerings have reached girls well beyond the near-southside neighborhood. “I love that Fountain Square has its own community of arts and music, but that it’s so accessible,” says President Marcy Hook-Moeller, who lives on the south side. “Now, with yearround programming, we’re hoping people realize Fountain Square isn’t so far away. We’re passionate about reaching those places, like the south side, that need music and the arts.” Budget cuts often affect music and arts programs in area schools. In 2011, Franklin Township announced it would be cutting orchestra and music, along with other arts education courses, when state funding was reduced for the township. In such cases, GRI provides an educational alternative. Center Grove senior Cassy Coha has served as a junior volunteer for GRI for two years. “I always felt intimidated to play music and expand myself,” Coha says. Now, thanks to her participation with GRI, she has learned to play guitar and bass with other girls her age, while also developing self-confidence. “GRI helped me find the musicians I was looking for to be inspired by,” Coha says. “Camp is my favorite week of the entire year. I never want to miss it, and I will always make time for GRI.” What was once just a fun week for girls is now a well-recognized force in the local music scene. “GRI is now in the position where we can reach more areas,” Hook-Moeller says. “My heart is in the south side, and I want to keep reaching out that way.” To learn more about Girls Rock Indianapolis, visit girlsrockindy.com or call (317) 643-0233. 80

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Michelle Winkelman


THE MUSIC BUSINESS

Beyond Girls Rock Indianapolis, there are plenty of places to pick up an instrument around the south side.

Daniel Patterson Music Studio

Southport Road and Arlington Avenue, Indianapolis, (317) 374-8553, inpiano.com »Daniel Patterson offers piano lessons for children with techniques that make learning more enjoyable.

TOL Studios LLC 1077 Lovers Lane, Greenwood, (317) 709-4330, tolstudios.com/home.html »Run by musician Douglas Redmond, TOL is an all-ages studio specializing in drums, piano, guitar, bass, ukulele, vocals, songwriting, music theory and recording.

Guitarworks 996 State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 885-1510, guitarworks.in »Guitarworks offers lessons to all ages in instruments ranging from guitar, bass, drums, mandolin, banjo — even the marimba. Instruction is based on each student’s skill level.

Studio J Piano 7397 Cinnamon Drive, Indianapolis, (317) 889-6573, studiojpiano.com »Janelle Bracken is passionate about instilling a love for piano in her students and teaches beginners in her home studio.

Guitar Lessons Indianapolis 629 Barbados Drive, Indianapolis, (317) 719-7020, indyguitarteacher.com »Mike Middleton began playing in 1982, has played professionally since 1988 and uses his enthusiasm for the instrument to teach students in a fun, engaging way.

Indy Drum Lessons 720 W. Valley View Drive, Indianapolis, (317) 697-9518, indianapolisdrumlessons.wordpress.com »Matt Hogan has played professionally in jazz, orchestra and concert bands and welcomes students, ages 7 and older.

Violins 4U 53 S. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 889-9222, facebook.com/Violins4u »This music studio provides lessons, instruction, sheet music and an array of violins to play. Open to all levels, Violins 4U offers a unique opportunity for learning a classical instrument.

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Local plumber Bill Westrick flexes his muscles on national show

By Alisa Advani

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here is no question Bill Westrick looks the part of a sleek, competitive athlete. The 48-year-old Greenwood resident got serious about fitness in his 30s, and now he spends ample time training his naturally athletic physique. It’s his dynamic personality, however, and ability to creatively turn his life into a highly relatable character that clinched his spot on Seasons 6 and 7 of the popular NBC-produced show “American Ninja Warrior.” The series, which airs on NBC and Esquire channels, follows competitors as they tackle one daunting obstacle after another on courses designed for failure. Contestants participate in city qualifying and final rounds before competing in regional finals and moving on to the national final round in Las Vegas. The winner takes home $1 million. To date, no one has conquered the ultimate fourstage course.

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Westrick, whose biceps are overpowered only by his faith in God and love of family, says it was after he marathon-watched the first four seasons that he began to consider trying out. When auditions for Season 6 came around, he got his tryout tape ready to roll. Professionally, Westrick works as a plumbing prefab manager at Deem LLC. He parlayed this personal tidbit into a “world’s greatest plumber” personality for the show. He wowed producers during tryouts for both seasons with snappy tapes that showcased both his over-the-top persona as well his ripped, ready build that belies his age. “You have to get the producer’s attention in about 10 seconds,” he says. In the first minutes of his audition tapes, Westrick highlighted his strength, balance and overall grit by leaping from obstacle to obstacle in an attempt to win over the show’s producers. “When Scott, the Indiana storyline producer, called (after Westrick’s Season


6 tryout), he asked, ‘So you’re the world’s greatest plumber?’ And I said, ‘There can only be one!’” Scott was convinced, and so were the show’s viewers. Westrick says that he was chosen as a “rookie to watch” during his first season on the show. More than 3,000 people applied in 2014 for Season 6, and Westrick, then 46, was one of the 100 athletes chosen from Indiana for a shot at the St. Louis city qualifier. Despite intense preparation, he succumbed to the second obstacle, known as the Rolling Log, in St. Louis. When asked to troubleshoot that performance, Westrick, who also races motorcycles, BMX and dirt bikes, and four-wheelers in his free time, said he felt no stage fright but rather extreme pressure to succeed. A pinched nerve in his back also stalled his performance. Undaunted, Westrick recruited four friends to train alongside him for a shot at 2015’s Season 7 show. The team, known as “the Fast Five” and made up of Westrick, Danny Owens, 42, Joel McCall, 45, Gabe Dougherty, 41, and Daniel Niles, 29, met four to five days a week at 5 a.m. to pull, push, jump, dangle and climb their way into crushing physical shape at Mount Pleasant Christian Church’s Community Life Center in Greenwood. Westrick also teaches a boot camp class to parishioners there. The group of men continues to follow this severe workout schedule in between seasons of the show to maintain conditioning. “I do boot camp-style training one day, power lifting another day, balance training one day, body weight training

one day and speed training another day,” says Westrick. “Then we’ll do distance running, Murph training (a CrossFit workout) and the Iron Man training one day. And, of course, there’s the obstacle specific training. Essentially, I mix it up every week. It has to stay fun, or I get bored very quickly.”

Westrick says the key to his training is keeping his body in a constant state of learning and growing. He also credits his gym at Mount Pleasant as a key component to his success. “They have been very supportive, and their facility has provided the space and flexibility for the Fast Five’s training,” he says. “I have built over 25 obstacles and set up a new training course every week. My team and I run the course and make adjustments to it based on completion of each obstacle.” For those who think they would love a good ninja work out, Westrick prompts someone to open an obstacle gym in the

area. “I would love to see an obstacle gym open in Greenwood,” he says. “I think it would be very successful.” In the meantime, consistent cross-training and muscle confusion workouts are key. Fast Fiver Danny Owens, who aspires to be on the show, too, says “working out with Bill is always a challenge. He’s not an in-your-face guy, but he holds you accountable if you decide to be challenged.” For Season 7, ANW sent Westrick to the Kansas City qualifier, where his wife of 25 years, Monica, and his 24-year-old daughter, Erika, cheered him on from the audience. They are his biggest fans SOU T H

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“I have built over 25 obstacles and set up a new training course every week. My team and I run the course and make adjustments to it based on completion of each obstacle.” —BILL WESTRICK

From left, Danny Owens, Westrick, Daniel Niles and Gabe Dougherty

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and supporters, and they both describe Westrick as passionately dedicated to his family and his sport. “He goes full speed or he’s asleep,” says Monica. “My dad is fun, adventurous, caring and supportive,” adds Erika. “He lives life to the fullest and makes me want to strive to be like him. When he does something, he puts everything that he has into it.” Westrick’s second attempt at the course again ended early, but that’s where this story of physical strength gains depth. Sure, Westrick knows what hurt his performance. “I ran at 2:30 a.m.,”

he says. “I was out of my comfort zone because I hadn’t eaten in hours. Then the anxiety set in, and I choked.” Initially, Westrick struggled after his second attempt on the show and says he “felt emotionally drained.” But within the depths of regret, he had an epiphany and, perhaps, a divine intervention. On his way home from St. Louis, he reflected on his performance as Monica drove. “I was still frustrated, feeling cheated and sorry for myself, so I closed my eyes and started to pray again,” he says. “This time I asked God what he needed me to learn from this experience. I had trained so hard. I knew that I could conquer that course. I had full expectations of coming home a winner.” Within 30 seconds of that prayer, Westrick says his phone chimed. It was a return text from a close friend that simply read: “Don’t let this get you. Your identity is in Christ alone.” With those words, the feelings of defeat lifted and a renewed purpose flowed. “My identity is in nothing physical; it’s all spiritual,” he says. “God reminded me that it’s about him. It’s not about me. As a lifelong Christian I understand that, but it’s still easy to get caught up with winning, ego, success and recognition — all things our world has to offer. Spiritually speaking, those things mean nothing. I look at ANW as an opportunity for me to be a good example of a Christian. That’s how I want to be remembered. Not as a ninja warrior, but as a Christ follower.” Moving forward, Westrick plans on trying out a third time for the show. Season 8 will air on the Esquire Network, but NBC has not yet released the premiere date. This time, Westrick hopes to appear with some of his team members from the Fast Five, while ultimately reaching the last obstacle and hitting that completion buzzer. But this time, with each challenge, he’ll honor his personal code. “I am a follower of Christ first; a husband to Monica, second; a father and grandfather, third; a hard worker, fourth,” he says, “and maybe a racer, fitness guru or ninja — if God wants.”


GET NINJA FIT Bill Westrick and his Fast Five crew regularly use these workouts to stay fit.

The Murph

Balance Training

Almost all experienced CrossFitters have attempted “Murph” at one point or another. It’s long, painful and named after Navy Lt. Michael Murphy, of Patchogue, New York, a Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan in 2005.

In balance training, the goal is to increase the body’s agility and to get someone in touch with his center of gravity.

THE WORKOUT 1-mile run 100 pullups 200 pushups 300 air squats 1-mile run

Body Weight Training Simple bodyweight exercises can be a great choice for achieving gains in strength, flexibility and overall health.

THE WORKOUT This can be done three to four times per week and will help you burn fat and build strength.

Bodyweight squats » 8 to 10 reps Push-ups (or knee push-ups) » 5 to 8 reps Plank » hold for 15 seconds Jumping Jacks » 15 reps Bodyweight Reverse Lunges » 6 reps per leg Lying Hip Raise (double or single leg) » 10 reps

THE WORKOUT Reverse Woodchop SETS: 4 REPS: 10 (each direction) REST: 1 minute Using a medicine ball or cable, start in a squatted position with weight slightly over your left foot. With arms straight, simultaneously stand up and rotate arms and torso diagonally to the right so that medicine ball/handle is over your right shoulder. Your arms should be fully extended toward the ceiling at the end of the movement. Pistol Box Squat SETS: 3 REPS: 10 to 12 each leg REST: 1 minute Use a chair, box or bench at about knee height. While sitting on the bench put one foot flat on ground while holding the other leg straight out and place your hands in front of you. Contract glutes and quads, then drive heel through the ground and stand up straight. Slowly return back to start until seated again. Repeat. Split Stance Shoulder Press SETS: 4 (switch leading legs each set) REPS: 10 to 12 REST: 1 minute Stand with feet hip-width apart and take one step forward so you are in a split stance. Lift dumbbells while keeping elbows at shoulder height. This is the start position. Press dumbbells overhead while engaging abs and glutes to provide stabilization. Bring weight back to start position.

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MODERN MARVEL

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Greenwood couple’s home bursts with

contemporary art and style

By Jon Shoulders Photography by Josh Marshall

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LUANNE AND JOHN BENSON’S Greenwood home is much more than just a comfortable dwelling that they built to enjoy their retirement years. It stands as a physical manifestation of the hobbies, passions and aesthetic preferences they have cultivated throughout their lives. After deciding to downsize from an eight-acre property off Morgantown Road where they spent 18 years, the Bensons opted for a one-level floor plan with a basement for storage. They added a number of unique features, such as a fireplace with no mantel and a floating hearth, a remote-controlled motorized screen for the back porch, a drop-down ceiling in the living room and discerningly placed artwork — much of which was crafted by LuAnne, who continues to pursue a post-retirement passion for painting. John formulated the home’s basic layout, which includes a three-car garage, three bedrooms and two-and-a-half bathrooms. LuAnne pored over stacks of magazines for design and decoration ideas, after which the Bensons hired Rick Campbell, a Greenwood-based residential and commercial builder, to bring their combined vision to fruition. Campbell says the six-month building process held many enjoyable challenges. “In Johnson County we don’t do very many contemporary homes at all,” he says. “A lot of my clients use somewhat typical, traditional styling, and even though I kind of jump out of the box a lot 90

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LuAnne Benson in her home


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LuAnne and John Benson

on my own, this was even more different than that and has a very contemporary style. They came up with most of the design ideas on their own, and I needed a lot of direction to fulfill their wants and desires.” Bright, colorful accents throughout the entirety of the 2,800-square-foot home, awash in an abundance of natural light and set against a backdrop of predominantly white-toned walls, shutters, flooring and appliances, are in large part the result of LuAnne’s desire for a lively, cheerful ambience. “I’m from New England and everything is dark there,” she says, adding that she and John moved into the home in December 2014. “All the historic buildings are very dark, and that always bothered me. We wanted to surround ourselves with glass and light and exposed windows, and see nature. Also, my favorite color is orange, and it’s fun to have all that bright, fun orange around.” Porcelain flooring and built-in shelving with minimal detail lend the home’s central living area an ultra sleek and modern feel — a theme that is also taken up in the kitchen through Corian countertops, Italian laminate cabinets and a glass backsplash. “Quartz and granite are just too busy for us for counters, and we wanted a real smooth and clean look,” LuAnne says. “It’s easy to clean, too. We did it first 92

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The Benson home is filled with LuAnne’s paintings. Left, to minimize counter clutter in the kitchen, a coffee station is set up in the nearby laundry room.

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at our condo in Florida, and we loved it so much we did it at the home as well.” The Bensons hired J.D. Dick, a consultant with Cabinetry Ideas design studio in Indianapolis, to design the kitchen layout. Campbell says the home’s windows presented difficulties in the building stages, but the challenges were worth the result. “John did not want trim around the windows, which is different,” he says. “Normally we case the windows, so it took a lot of work from the drywaller to get that really clean, contemporary look. Also, the ceiling in the great room is probably the most unusual ceiling I’ve ever done. That was a challenge because we didn’t have it drawn up, so we had to design it on site, and then we were able to tuck lighting in behind it.” One of the home’s three bedrooms serves as a fully equipped art studio in which LuAnne tends to various paintings-in-progress. The space serves as an artistic haven both for LuAnne and, often, the couple’s grandchildren, Aga, 17, Kyler, 12, Kali, 10, and Kenley, 5. “Kids are 94

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In honor of her late mother, LuAnne keeps her mother’s Chanel No. 5 on display.

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John, in his home office.

so busy these days with their iPads and things, but when my grandkids visit and get in there they sometimes sit for almost an hour doing art stuff with me,” LuAnne says. “They love going in there, and that’s been a really neat way to spend quality time with them.” An artist in his own right, John’s canvases are the home’s front and back yards, where he spends time landscaping during warm months, occasionally breaking for rounds of golf with friends. LuAnne stays busy as a choir participant at Mount Pleasant Christian Church and a member of Greenwood’s Southside Art League. John, a Lafayette native and Purdue University graduate, met LuAnne, a native of New Hampshire who attended Indiana Business College, in 1980 in Boston while both were working for the Balfour Co., a jewelry and publishing business. A year later they settled in Indiana and spent the 96

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next 30 years running the J.D. Benson Co., a private distribution firm that specialized in fraternity and sorority jewelry as well as recognition products for corporate businesses, until officially retiring in 2012. Aside from spending time hosting friends or presiding over impromptu art lessons for the grandkids, the Bensons, who will celebrate their 35th wedding anniversary this year, typically trek down to their custom-built condo on Longboat

Key in Florida at least once a year — often with their children, Courtney and Justin, and the grandkids. “We also love inclusive trips to Jamaica and try to go there for anniversaries,” LuAnne says. “There’s just something about it that’s special, and we love the people there. Then we get to come back to Greenwood where the people are so great. I don’t want to go anywhere else. It’s just a perfect fit for us.”

Clockwise, master bedroom and bathroom. Guest bathroom, Opposite page, guest bedroom.

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BEST OF THE

WEST National parks offer a place to rekindle your sense of adventure BY CJ WOODRING Americans have set their compasses for points due west since before the mid-1800s California Gold Rush and expansion of American territories. The urge to explore the unknown, wander the wilderness and seek the spectacular remains ingrained in the American psyche to this day. ¶Tourists by the thousands answer the call each year, making the Grand Canyon, home to the Hoover Dam, and Yellowstone our most-visited national parks. ¶Fortunately, you don’t have to wander over yonder on a cayuse, or set up camp in an abandoned gold miner’s shack to explore these natural wonders. Luxurious accommodations, fine dining, trendy boutiques and nightlife are readily available, welcome oases for today’s trendy travelers.

PHOTOS PROVIDED.

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expensive, destination choice. If you prefer to paddle your own canoe in a remote and natural region, consider the North Rim. Here you can hike, backpack, river raft, catch a ride on a mule and camp to your heart’s content. Finally, there’s the East Rim, where water sports, fishing, whitewater rafting and camping are pursued. Finally, base your choice of lodging, restaurants and activities not only on which rim you’ll be touring, but on where, and how long, you’ll be staying. Still undecided? Visit The Canyon (thecanyon.com) and select a rim, city and type of tour.

WHERE TO STAY

GRAND CANYON To view the Grand Canyon is to stand in awe of its crimson canyons and mountains’ purple majesty. Designated a national park in 1919, Grand Canyon National Park is located in a remote northwest area of Arizona and governed by the National Park Service. The park is a natural and scenic wonder, containing several major ecosystems, and hosting myriad plant, bird, reptile, amphibious and fish species. It is also home to nearly 90 mammal species, including the indigenous short-horned lizard, which squirts blood from its eyes when threatened. The most difficult decision when planning a trip to the Grand Canyon may be deciding which rim to tour, then choosing how you’d like to both access and explore it. Bus, airplane, automobile, helicopter, train, ATV, SUV/Hummer, boat and raft are all popular options, and plenty of tour

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operators are in place to help you make the best choice. Each rim is 60 to 72 miles from any significant town, which translates to a minimum hour to an hour and 45 minutes of drive time by car or tour van. Or a longer trek by air. Tours most often originate from a major airport: Phoenix Sky Harbor and Las Vegas International are each five hours from the South and West rims; Flagstaff, Sedona and Williams, Arizona, are also points of origin. Tours to the South Rim, a component of Grand Canyon National Park, are the most popular. This rim is more centrally located, easier to access and offers more lodging and activities. The West Rim is owned and operated by the Hualapai Tribe on tribal land and boasts Hoover Dam and the Sky Walk attraction. Its proximity to Las Vegas and a host of tour options make it an increasingly popular, but more

Grand Canyon’s El Tovar Hotel (grandcanyonsouthrimhotels.com; 10 Albright Ave., Grand Canyon; 800-2416456) combines history, luxury and fine dining. Built in 1905 just feet from the South Rim, the National Historic Landmark offers rooms at several price points. Many of the suites have a porch or balcony; the Zane Grey Suite is appointed with wall art specific to the Western novelist. The Grand Hotel at the Grand Canyon (grandcanyongrandhotel.com; 149 State Highway 64, Grand Canyon; 888-634-7263), is located just one mile from Grand Canyon National Park and a short ride from the South Rim. The three-story chalet, the region’s premier hotel, is one of a few with an indoor pool and spa. Book the Grand Suite for studio-style luxury. Designed to replicate an historic train depot, the Grand Canyon Railway Hotel (thetrain.com/lodging/the-grandcanyon-railway-hotel/; 233 N. Grand Canyon Blvd., Williams; 928-635-4010) is located a block from downtown Williams and historic U.S. Route 66, and 32 miles west of Flagstaff. It’s a perfect place to stay when visiting the canyon (65 miles) via Grand Canyon Railway (thetrain.com/the-train/ schedule-routes; call 800-843-8724 for reservations). The award-winning Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain (sanctuaryoncamelback.com; 5700 E. McDonald Drive, Paradise Valley; 855245-2051) is a renowned luxury resort and spa. Enjoy a fireside martini at Jade Bar and Asian-influenced cuisine at Elements, the upscale in-house restaurant. The Sanctuary is located eight miles north of the Phoenix Sky


Royal Palms Resort & Spa. Below, Quiessence.

Harbor International Airport, less than five minutes from downtown Scottsdale. Royal Palms Resort & Spa (royalpalmshotel.com; 5200 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix; 800-6726011) was begun in 1929 as a couple’s desert getaway. Luxuriously appointed rooms, fine dining in T. Cook’s Restaurant, and the Alvadora Spa ensure guests an enjoyable stay. Pump up the romance by booking a casita. The Penthouse Suite at The Venetian (venetian.com; 3355 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas; 702-414-1000) is all about unparalleled luxury. Envisioned as a tribute to Venice, Italy, the hotel recreates the romance of that city with a replication of the Bridge of Sighs, the Campanile Tower and St. Mark’s Square, replete with gondola rides.

WHERE TO EAT Hand-crafted French cuisine and the region’s most extensive wine program are just two reasons to savor dining at L’Auberge Restaurant on Oak Creek (lauberge.com/dining; 301 Little Lane, Sedona AZ; 855-702-0063). Cited as “One of the Top Ten Restaurants in the Southwest” by Condé Nast Traveler, the venue offers a magical and romantic setting beginning at 7 a.m. daily and including Sunday brunch. Head to Saltrock Southwest Kitchen at the Amara Resort and Spa (amararesort.comsedona/saltrock.html; 100 Amara Lane, Sedona; 855-324-1313) for regional cuisine. The restaurant features a three-course, prix fixe menu along with standard entrées that include roasted salmon and New York strip loin. Dine indoors or al fresco and enjoy craft margaritas as you watch the moon rise over Red Rocks. Named Phoenix’s best restaurant

by local outlets, Quiessence (quiessencerestaurant.com; 6106 S. 32nd St., Phoenix; 602-276-0601) offers contemporary cuisine and a seasonal tasting menu at Farm at South Mountain, a superior getaway. Delectable French cuisine and a world-renowned cognac collection are hallmarks of Alizé, a AAA four diamond award restaurant sitting 56 floors atop the Palms Casino & Resort (alizelv.com; 4321 Flamingo Road, Las Vegas; 702-951-7000). Select from two awardwinning menus: the Alizé a la Carte Menu and the Alizé Tasting Menu. A breathtaking view of The Strip is complimentary. You’ll enjoy a Different Pointe of View (tapatiocliffshilton. com/different-pointeof-view-restaurant; 11111 North 7th St., Phoenix; 800-947-9784) from the Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs Resort atop Phoenix’s North Mountain. A panoramic view of stunning sunsets and the North Phoenix Mountain Preserves awaits you, along with American cuisine with a distinctive Mediterranean influence. Many gluten-free menu selections are available.

Tlaquepaque Arts and Craft Village (tlaq.com; 336 State Route 179, Sedona; 928-282-4838). Designed to replicate a traditional Mexican village, the setting features arched entryways, a courtyard fountain and a chapel, setting of many destination weddings. Get your kicks — and nearly anything else — on Route 66. Arizona is home to the longest stretch of the historic national roadway (visitarizona.com/ itineraries/the-mother-road-route-66), which passes through downtown Williams (experiencewilliams.com/ shopping). Authentic Western apparel, home decor items, saddlery and more can be found here. Scottsdale Downtown (downtownscottsdale.com) is the heart of the city’s art scene, focusing on Southwestern and Western art and Native American crafts, a nod to the region’s history and the Sonoran Desert in which the city is located. The seven-district area is home to retail and cultural attractions and dining, also showcasing more than 50 installations

OUT AND ABOUT Stroll cobblestoned walkways beneath the shade of sycamores at globally renowned SOU T H

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Tlaquepaque Arts and Craft Village

of public art, including Robert Indiana’s LOVE statue. Known for its arts and cultural events and painted murals, Roosevelt Row Arts District (RoRo) (rooseveltrow. org) is a walkable district in downtown Phoenix, home to boutiques and awardwinning restaurants. Other points of interest in Phoenix include the Musical Instrument Museum (4725 E. Mayo Blvd.; 480-478-6000); the Children’s Museum of Phoenix (childrensmuseumofphoenix.org; 215 N. Seventh St.; 602-253-0501); and the Desert Botanical Garden (dbg.org; 1201 N. Galvin Parkway; 480-941-1225), a unique 140-acre garden showcasing more than 50,000 plants in beautiful outdoor exhibits.

Tlaquepaque Arts Desert Botanical Garden and Craft Village

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK Established in 1872 as America’s — and the world’s — first national park, Yellowstone National Park (nps. gov/yell) is a 3,500-square-mile panorama of cultural landscapes. Once home to Native Americans, the park is located in the northwest corner of Wyoming, with Montana and Idaho each claiming a tiny percent. The region’s human history can be traced back more than 11,000 years, as evidenced by trails, archaeological sites and oral histories. Rare plants and forests cover about 80 percent of the park, a mountain wilderness that is home to 300 species of birds and 67 species of mammals — think bison, elk, grizzlies and wolves. Yellowstone also harbors a majority of the world’s geysers, including Old Faithful, which erupts

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every 35 minutes to two hours, displaying a 90- to 184-foot plume of water for up to five minutes. Places of interest include the Grand Prismatic Spring, the park’s largest hot spring; Upper Falls, a 109-foot cascade at the head of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone; and Hayden and Pelican valleys, primary wildlife viewing areas. More attractions are listed at nps.gov/ yell/learn/historyculture/places.htm. The park has five entrances; the West Entrance is the busiest. It is open all year, although with the exception of the North Entrance, most roads are closed to auto travel between early November and late April. Towns nearest the entrances include West Yellowstone, Cooke City and Gardiner, Montana; and Jackson Hole and Cody, Wyoming.


Travel

While all towns offer scenic beauty, outdoor recreation and glimpses of history, each has a distinct personality and flavor. Jackson Hole, two hours from the South Entrance, is most upscale. Cody is steeped in pioneer history, and tiny Cooke City and sister village Silver Gate are small, rustic and remote. The park offers accommodations from lodges to campgrounds, as well as numerous restaurants and picnic areas. Visit yellowstonepark. com to plan your trip.

experience. The award-winning venue features suites and homes with unparalleled mountain views, a luxurious spa, dining in the redwoodpaneled Grill Restaurant and a private ski lodge. Seasonal options include dog sledding, white water rafting, heliskiing and private tours of Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks. Located three blocks from Jackson’s historic Town Square, Rusty Parrot Lodge and Spa (rustyparrot.com; 175 N. Jackson St., Jackson; 888-739-1749) has beautifully appointed rooms, including the Owner’s Suite with two woodburning fireplaces and a whirlpool tub for two. The lodge’s AAA four diamond The Wild Sage Restaurant offers regionally sourced food items and an extensive wine list. Relax at The Body Sage Day Spa (307-733-4455) and enjoy massage therapy and body treatments. The Spa Suites at Rustic Inn (rusticspasuites.com; 475 North Cache St., Jackson; 800-323-9279) is Jackson Hole’s luxury boutique hotel. The inn is located minutes from Yellowstone’s South Entrance and set on 12 acres adjacent to the National Elk Refuge. The inn offers five oneand two-bedroom options, seasonal menus and an extensive wine menu. Premier Spa Suites feature a couple’s massage room with soaking tub, dry sauna and eucalyptus steam room. Discover Hotel Jackson (hoteljackson.com; 120 N. Glenwood, Jackson Hole; 307-733-2200), Jackson Hole’s newest boutique luxury hotel, opened in 2015 in Town Square. With first-class accommodations in a Western setting, the property incorporates

reclaimed barn wood, leather elements and metal accents amidst breathtaking mountain views. Guest rooms and suites feature fireplaces and spa-inspired bathrooms. Dine at Figs, the hotel’s flagship restaurant, for Mediterraneaninspired small plates and signature dishes with locally sourced ingredients.

WHERE TO EAT Local Restaurant & Bar (localjh.com; 55 N. Cache St., Jackson; 307-2011717) is an American steakhouse and bar owned and operated by chefs Will Bradorf and Paul Wireman of Trio: An American Bistro. The menu features dry-aged steaks and housemade sausages, locally sourced products, specialty cocktails and an extensive wine list. Meats are grassfed, hormone-free and cut in-house. Snake River Grill (snakerivergrill. com; 84 E. Broadway; Jackson; 307733-0557), located on Jackson’s Town Square, offers a fine dining experience based on New American cuisine. Menu features include small plates and entrees such as cast iron seared elk tenderloin and grilled black angus shortribs. The grill offers signature cocktails and 300 California and international wines. For an unforgettable culinary experience featuring FrenchAmerican fare, visit Rendezvous Bistro (rendezvousbistro.net; 380 S. Broadway, Jackson Hole; 307-7391100). The venue, one of a string of fine dining establishments opened by restaurateurs Roger Freedman and Gavin Fine, showcases an expansive raw bar and menu items created from seasonal local ingredients.

The Spa Suites at Rustic Inn

WHERE TO STAY The Cody Hotel (thecody.com; 232 W. Yellowstone Ave., Cody; 307-5875915) is Cody’s premier luxury hotel and located less than an hour from Yellowstone Park’s East Entrance. The hotel offers rooms and suites, a hot tub, indoor pool and fitness room. An elegant year-round destination set atop East Gros Ventre Butte, and a short drive from Jackson Hole Airport, Amangani (peaceful home) (aman.com; 1535 N. East Butte Road, Jackson; 307-734-7333) offers not just accommodations, but a lifestyle SOU T H

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More upscale Jackson restaurants are listed at thecatalogues.com/ go/Jackson-Hole/Dining. Located in the first-grade classroom of the city’s 1918 renovated schoolhouse and five miles from the park’s West Entrance, Madison Crossing Lounge (madisoncrossinglounge.com; 121 Madison Ave., W. Yellowstone; 406646-7621) is built on memories. Friendly owners and staff hope diners will make new memories as they enjoy bison filet mignon, sample a huckleberry burger and partake of the venue’s extensive wine, whiskey, beer and specialty cocktail list. High quality cuisine served in a cozy, unique atmosphere is a hallmark of Serenity Bistro (serenitybistro.com; 38 N. Canyon St., West Yellowstone MT; 406-646-7660). Enjoy lunch or dinner indoors or al fresco, selecting from burgers and entrées that include elk tenderloin and twice-cooked quail. Wine and domestic beers are available, along with Montana microbrew and draft beers.

OUT AND ABOUT Museums are popular attractions in the area, repositories of archival relics and historical lore that draw visitors from throughout the country. The closest to the park (52 miles from the East Entrance) is Buffalo Bill Center of the West (centerofthewest.org; 720 Sheridan Ave., Cody; 307-587-4771), considered America’s finest Western museum. Shopping destinations include Downtown Gardiner, which features gift shops, art galleries and specialty stores including Cedar Creek Stained Glass (facebook.com/pages/Cedar-CreekStained-Glass/639669446093982) and Yellowstone Gallery and Frameworks (yellowstonegallery.com). Jackson, Wyoming, is the top tourist destination in the West, and Jackson Hole is steeped in high-end goods: jewelry, fashion and accessories, fine art, antiques and specialty items (thecatalogues. com/go/Jackson-Hole/Luxury). The town’s Gaslight Alley (madejacksonhole.com/pages/gaslightalley; N. Cache St. and Deloney Ave., Jackson Hole) is a treasure trove of locally owned and operated shops that include an apparel store, bookstore, jewelry stores and galleries. Nightlife is a given in Jackson Hole (jacksonhole.com/nightlife.html), and sidewalks stay unrolled seven nights a week. Live bands, full mugs and openmic night bring a little bit o’ Nashville to this Wyoming mountain town.

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HOOVER DAM Originally named Boulder Dam (thenPresident Herbert Hoover renamed it after himself), the majestic Hoover Dam was built during the Great Depression as a means to harness the Colorado River, provide a water source for farmers and hydroelectric power to the burgeoning West, and to create work for jobless citizens. Located in Black Canyon desert country, the dam spans the Colorado River between Nevada and Arizona. The 726-foot structure has been cited by the American Society of Civil Engineers as one of American’s seven modern civil engineering wonders. A visit to Hoover Dam (usbr.gov/ lc/hooverdam) is most often included in tours to the Grand Canyon’s West Rim, where it’s located, and in South Rim tours. It’s also a highlight of most Grand Canyon helicopter tours. Hoover Dam and Lake Mead are less than an hour’s drive southeast from

Las Vegas, making that city’s airport the most popular fly-in. Sightseeing options range from 90-minute air tours to day-long motor coach tours; some companies provide a tour of the dam and a private cruise on Lake Mead. Visit grandcanyon.com/news/ hoover-dam for details. For more information, including which vehicles are allowed to cross the dam and how to arrange permits and reservations for paddle craft and rafting, visit usbr.gov/lc/hooverdam/ paddlecraft/canoenew.html. Because tours are conducted in confined spaces and in a power plant emitting electromagnetic fields, this trip is not recommended for those who wear a pacemaker or defibrillator or who are claustrophobic.

WHERE TO STAY Skylofts at MGM Grand (skyloftsmgmgrand.com/flash/html;


3799 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas; 877880-0880) offers guests an exclusive aerie with a stunning view and preferred access to on-site dining options. The luxury boutique hotel experience includes airport transfers in a RollsRoyce Ghost limousine and access to the 29th floor Skylounge. Access to the globally renowned Canyon Ranch Spa (canyonranchdestinations.com/ lasvegas; 800-742-9000) and a hautecouture shopping mall replete with a Lamborghini showroom are just a few of the reasons visitors select the Palazzo Resort Hotel Casino (palazzo.com; 3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas; 866-2633001). Celebrity chef restaurants and top-notch entertainment are the others. A conservatory, botanical gardens and designer boutiques are just a few of the highlights at the Bellagio (Bellagio. com; 3600 Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas; 800-916-4339), located in the heart of the Strip about two miles from McCarran International Airport. Book a Lakeview Suite, where you can dream on a cashmere pillow-top mattress and indulge in an Italian marble bath with soaking tub. Dine at Le Cirque, a AAA five diamond award restaurant, featuring French cuisine, or at chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Prime Steakhouse, both on site. Then get your game on in the casino. To experience the glamour of Vegas without the noise of the Strip, consider Lake Las Vegas Resort & Spa (westinlasvegas.com; 101 Montelago Blvd., Henderson; 702-567-6000). Located 13 miles from Hoover Dam, the setting offers Moroccan-inspired Spa Moulay; Reflection Bay Golf Club, Nevada’s only public Jack Nicklaus signature golf course; and fine dining at Marssa Steak & Sushi, a AAA four diamond restaurant. Book the Casbah Suite for a totally luxe experience.

WHERE TO EAT French cuisine by chef Pierre Gagnaire, recipient of the Forbes five star award for 2014, dominates the menu at Twist by Pierre Gagnaire, the signature restaurant of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel (mandarinoriental. com/lasvegas/fine-dining/twist-bypierre-gagnaire; 3752 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702-590-8888). The seven-course tasting menu with seven wines pairs flavors and textures through globally sourced foods that include Russian sturgeon and Colorado rack of lamb. Enjoy the main

dining area or opt for private dining and a customized tasting menu. Picasso in the Bellagio Hotel (bellagio.com/en/restaurants/picasso. html; 3600 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702-693-8865) pairs art with culinary artistry in a mini-museum of original works by the namesake artist. The kitchen of the AAA five diamond award restaurant is overseen by executive chef Julian Serrano, a master in French- and Spanishinfluenced cuisine. It’s called Old Homestead Steakhouse at Caesars Palace (caesars. com/caesars-palace/restaurants/ old-homestead; 3570 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702-731-7560). But don’t let the name fool you. The upscale urban dining room and bar, burgundy leather booths and legendary fine cuts aren’t suited to boot scootin’ occasions. Menu selections include the 10-ounce Japanese A5 wagyu, ribeye gotham and old homestead burger. Pair with a selection from among 15,000 bottles harbored in the wine cellar. Chicago may be his kind of town, but Las Vegas claims Ol’ Blue Eyes in Sinatra at the Wynn Encore (wynnlasvegas. com/Dining/FineDining/Sinatra; 3131 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702770-8000). Chef Theo Schoenegger’s spin on classic Italian cooking includes personal favorites he prepared for the legendary entertainer. Select Frank’s Spaghetti & Clams or Ossobuco “My Way.” Mementos from Sinatra’s career, including his Academy Award, enhance the occasion. For a power lunch hot spot, pop into Spago Las Vegas inside The Forum Shops at Caesars (wolfgangpuck.com/ restaurants/fine-dining/9044; 3500 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Suite G-1, Las Vegas; 702-369-6300). Locals love the Wolfgang Puck-owned eatery, which offers American cuisine, gourmet pizza, indoor and al fresco dining and often a glimpse of celebrities.

OUT AND ABOUT Before leaving the Hoover Dam site, visit nearby Lake Mead Recreation Area (lakemead.areaparks.com; 601 Nevada Way, Boulder City; 702-293-8906). Created by the dam, it’s the largest reservoir in the United States, boasting more than 500 miles of shoreline. North Shore Drive wends through canyons and countryside rife with rock formations and indigenous plants and animals. There are nine main access points to the area, which offers land and water

sports as well as sight-seeing and dinner cruises on the lake. Luxury, one-of-a-kind goods and personal service are synonymous with Las Vegas. Hotel lifestyle centers include high-end boutiques at Wynn Esplanade (wynnlasvegas.com/Amenities/Shops/ WynnEsplanade; 3131 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702-770-7000), a complex that encircles the hotel’s Lake of Dreams. Touted as “The Shopping Wonder of the World,” The Forum Shops at Caesars Palace (3570 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702-893-4800) feature more than 150 specialty stores and fine restaurants. Don’t miss the Fall of Atlantis animatronic show, a 50,000-gallon aquarium. The Shops at Crystals at Aria Resort & Casino Las Vegas (theshopsatcrystals. com; 3730 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702-590-7111) have been cited as the world’s largest collection of high-end fashion stores under one roof. Fifty boutiques, a half-dozen restaurants and galleries are included, among them theGALLERY, which features work by glass sculptor Dale Chihuly. Any time is spa time, and Vegas boasts the best. Costa del Sur Spa inside South Point Hotel & Casino (spacostadelsur.com; 9777 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas; 702-797-8030) offers a spa and full-service salon guaranteed to relax and rejuvenate. Gals, try the Just For You Facial or Fiji Goddess of the Sun Ritual. For guys, the For Men Only package offers three hours of body bliss. Add a bit of kitsch to your life with a one-hour guided tour through The Neon Museum (neonmuseum.org); 770 Las Vegas Blvd. North, Las Vegas; 702-3876366). Founded in 1996, the “Boneyard” features more than 150 iconic signs that have lighted up Sin City nights. SOU T H

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weddings

Heather Nicodemus & Kyle Short Oct. 3, 2015 Wedding and reception at The Montage

It was a midsummer night in 2012 when Heather Nicodemus crossed a street in Broad Ripple and spontaneously called out to Kyle Short, who was walking in her direction. The pair ended up talking all night, she says, which began a trend of long conversations for their next several encounters. “We had our first date three days later at Cooper’s Hawk,” she says. “Our date began at 7:30 p.m., and we talked until the restaurant closed and they asked us to leave. This happened on our next three dates, as well.” By Christmas Eve of 2014, the couple, by then living together in Greenwood, returned home from a holiday gathering with family. “As I walked into the home, I saw the Christmas lights were on,” Heather says. “As I approached the Christmas tree, I noticed someone had added red ribbon all over our tree. I jumped back and saw ‘Will u merry me?’ (yes, merry, as in Merry Christmas.)” Hanging below the ribbon was the engagement ring in a box. They married at The Montage in Indianapolis (the wedding “was beyond what I could have ever dreamed of,” Heather says), before heading to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, for their honeymoon. Photography by Amanda Debusk Photography.

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Alexis Tracy & Jacob Morris Sept. 19, 2015 Wedding and reception at Willowfield Lavender Farm

To Alexis Tracy and Jacob Morris, much of life is an adventure. On their first date, they climbed a fourstory building together (“Best first date ever,” Alexis says), and since that spring evening in 2010, they have climbed buildings (apparently, that’s a hobby for some), hiked in state parks and taken a great big leap into marriage. It was September 2014 when Jacob proposed to Alexis during, fittingly enough, a visit to McCormick’s Creek State Park. They had waded through the creek to find a secluded spot where they could have a picnic. It was there that Jacob “asked me to join him on our biggest adventure yet,” Alexis says. The couple married in 2015 at Willowfield Lavender Farm, and though they have yet to go on a honeymoon, they do hope to take a cross-country road trip soon. In the meantime, they have stayed busy establishing their new cabin and small farm, where “we are beginning a whole new book of adventures together,” Alexis says. Photography by About FACE Photography.

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Daddy/Daughter Dance Feb. 20 // Beeson Hall 3

1. David Park and Gracia, 8 2. Refreshments 3. Joe Mummert and Lucia, 5 4. Todd McCullough and Madelyn, 8 5. Marcus Davis and Wren, 4 6. Josie Albright, 11, and Addie Marshall, 11 7. Steve Redmond and Kylie, 8

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Valentine’s Dinner Presented by The Castlewood Singers Feb. 13 // Mallow Run Winery 2

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1. Cathy and Mark Nolen, Pat and Jack Huter 2. Stephanie and Sean Carney 3. Jim and Lorie Chalfin 4. The Rev. Kirsteen Wilkinson 5. Lauren and Nick McColley, Susan and Tim Bryant 6. The Castlewood Singers perform. 7. John Richardson 8. Cassie McGill, Rachelle Hawkins, Jenni Hill, Denise Louthain

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9. Jeff and Kim Aliff 10. Bonnie and Dave Sprowl

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Daily Journal Bridal Show January 31 // Valle Vista Golf Club 1. Cindy Cable 2. Whisk Bakery Cakes 3. The Men’s Wearhouse 4. Courtney Dragoo, Nicole Downing and Audrey Rairdon of Scotty’s/Hillview 5. Brittania Thompson of Just the Two Us Officiant Services 6. Sarah McCarty and Kylee Ramsey of Barn at Bay Horse Inn Events 7. Chloe Chappelle from Dye’s Walk Country Club 8. Elite Salon & Spa

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20th Annual Jim Rhoades Memorial Hog Roast

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Dec. 3 // Scott Hall, Johnson County Fairgrounds

1. Indian Creek FFA members cooked hundreds of pork chops. 2. Allen Anderson serves pork chops.

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3. Proceeds from the event go to the Interchurch Food Pantry and Good Cheer Fund. 4. Franklin Rotary Club volunteers serve guests. 5. Karen Pease poses with Santa Claus while her husband, Jim Pease, takes a photo. 5 6

PHOTOS BY SCOTT ROBERSON

6. Catering provided by Malone Catering and served by volunteers.

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Calendar of Events

MARCH TO MAY

and services, local environmental leaders, lifestyle activities and the Eco-Science Fair. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org

April 29-30 Tony Award winner Patina Miller at The Cabaret at the Columbia Club

Lea DeLaria, best known as Carrie “Big Boo” Black on “Orange is the New Black,” is also a jazz singer, Broadway star and comedian. She puts her distinct jazz spin on the works of the gender-bending pop icon David Bowie. Times vary. Tickets: $35 to $75. Location: The Cabaret at The Columbia Club, 121 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 275-1169 or thecabaret.org

» MARCH March 14

The Johnson County Antique Market is a one-day show that offers a selection of antiques and vintage collectibles, including primitives, furniture, jewelry, glass, linens, tools, toys, advertising and more. Homemade breakfast and lunch are available at the market kitchen. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost: $2. Location: Johnson County Fairgrounds, 250 Fairground St., Franklin. Information: jcantiquemarket.com

March 15

Spend the afternoon finding eggs and visiting with the Easter Bunny during the annual Beech Grove Easter Egg Hunt. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Sarah T. Bolton Park, 1300 Churchman Ave., Beech Grove. Information: (317) 788-4986 or beechgrove.com/sarah-t-bolton-park

March 16

Indianapolis will celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by making the downtown canal run green. Put on your green outfit and join the party

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March 18-26

When CB’s dog dies from rabies, he begins to question the existence of an afterlife in “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead, an unauthorized parody by Bert V. Royal.” Time: 8 p.m. March 18, 19, 24, 25 and 26; 2:30 p.m. March 20. Tickets: $18 adults; $16 children. Location: Buck Creek Playhouse, 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 862-2270 or buckcreekplayers.com

March 19

for live music, dancing, special celebrity appearances and more. Time: 5 p.m. Location: Downtown Indy Canal Walk, downtown Indianapolis. Information: indystpats.com

March 17

The 36th annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade is made up of high school bands, floats, Catholic schools, Irish dancers, bagpipe and drum bands, Irish organizations and dignitaries. Time: 11:30 a.m. Information: indystpats.com Before, during and after the 36th annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade, enjoy the block party on Vermont Street between Pennsylvania and Meridian streets with a beer garden, live music, Irish merchandise for sale and more. Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Information: indystpats.com

March 18-19

The Indiana State Museum will provide a platform that showcases how individuals and companies can tackle environmental issues at the “Going Green Festival” This year’s event will showcase eco-friendly products

Hop on over for the annual Easter egg hunt in Province Park. Children ages 2 to 10 can enjoy this free event. The hunt will take place in a grassy area by Sunset Shelter. In case of rain, the hunt will take place in the Cultural Arts & Recreation Center. Strawberry the Bunny will be present for pictures so don’t forget your camera. Time: 10 a.m. Location: 396 Branigin Blvd., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org Celebrate creativity from a woman’s perspective at the 10th annual Women in Art Market. See and buy one-of-a-kind handmade artwork from more than 35 regional artists, including works in basketry, jewelry, fiber arts, ceramics, painting, photography and more. Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: eiteljorg.org Celebrate the Gnome Away from Home Show with a family fun program making small gnomes and fairy houses and figures out of natural objects. Time: 11 a.m. to noon. Location: The Garfield Park Conservatory and Sunken Garden, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 3277184 or garfieldgardensconservatory.org


BY AMY NORMAN

The 25th Annual Shamrock Run and Walk is the official race of the St. Patrick’s Day Celebration. The race is open to people of all ages and abilities. Come join the fun with thousands of others by participating in either the 4-mile run (with timing tag) or the 4-mile fitness walk (without timing tag). The course starts at Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis and goes to Fountain Square, home of the Irish Hill, before finishing back on the circle. Time: 10 a.m. Cost: $25. Information: indystpats.com The Cancer Support Community Central Indiana welcomes Emmy Award-winning writer, comedian and “Late Night” host Seth Meyers as headliner for the 16th annual comedy fundraiser “Laughing Matters.” Time: 9:15 p.m. Tickets: $45.50. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org Featuring selections of fine and rare wine from around the world, the Elegant Vintages International Wine Auction is a black-tie optional event that includes live and silent auctions. All proceeds benefit the Indianapolis Zoo. All guests will enjoy a multicourse gourmet dinner paired with wines and live entertainment following the auction. Time: 6 to 11 p.m. Tickets: $175. Location: Conrad Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. Information: indyzoo.com

March 19-20

Enjoy satisfying soups, freshly baked bread and desserts that will warm your belly and your heart. Featured soup: St. Patrick’s Irish stew. Saturday and Sunday’s music: Fifetones. Food is served from noon to 6 p.m. Live music is from 2 to 5 p.m. Cost: $8. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or mallowrun.com

March 19-April 4

It’s spring break, and garden gnomes from far and wide have gathered at the Garfield Conservatory for a tropical vacation. Come see this whimsical display of garden gnomes enjoying the tropical escape and see if you can spot them all. Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. Cost: $3 per person; $8 per family. Location: The Garfield Park Conservatory and Sunken Garden, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 3277184 or garfieldgardensconservatory.org

March 20

Learn more about directing, acting, special effects and promotion within the film industry during the Independent Film Workshop, which is part of the Heartland Film Festival. Time: 1 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or historicartcraft.org

March 24

Spend some quality time with your youngster and meet some other moms during Mommy and Me preschool play date. Enjoy soft equipment and other fun during the indoor play date for preschool and toddler-age children and their moms. Time: 2 to 4 p.m. Location Hornet Park Community Center, 5245 Hornet Ave., Beech Grove. Information: (317) 788-4986 or beechgrove.com/hornet-park

March 24-April 16

Enjoy a vintage marionette show, complete with scenery and rising curtain. These classic marionettes will bring the story of “Sleeping Beauty” to life. Tickets: $12. Times vary. Location: Peewinkle’s Puppet Studio, 25 E. Henry St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 917-9454 or peewinklespuppets.org

America, Crossroads of America Council invite you to race your derby cars and watch as they zip down the two-story, 125-foot track and across the finish line. The track will be open to the public all week with the official race on April 2. All participating cars must be registered by 1 p.m. on race day. Enter a derby car by 2 p.m. for the Best of Show competition. Cars will be honored based on visual design. The track will continue to be open for Fun Runs on Sunday. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org

APRIL April 2

Fans and families are invited to participate in the ninth annual 4Kay Run to kick off the 2016 Women’s Final Four in the heart of downtown Indianapolis. The event is in honor of the late North Carolina State University and Olympic women’s basketball coach Kay Yow. Time: 8 a.m. Cost: $30; $35 day of the event. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: ncaa.com

Fountain Square Music Fest will host a series of concerts in various Fountain Square venues including The Hi-Fi, Radio, White Rabbit Cabaret, Pioneer and Fountain Square Theatre. Tickets: $55 to $90. Information: fountainsquaremusicfest.org

Get up close and personal to the Women’s Final Four action during Super Saturday. The fan event includes open practices, team autograph sessions, the WBCA Coaches’ AllAmerica Team announcement and more. Time: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: ncaa.com

March 26

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March 25-26

All roads lead to downtown Indianapolis as Bankers Life Fieldhouse hosts the 2016 IHSAA Boys Basketball State Finals. Time: 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets available March 21. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com Enjoy satisfying soups, freshly baked bread and desserts that will warm your belly and your heart. Featured soup: spring minestrone. Music: Davis & Devitt. Food is served from noon to 6 p.m. Live music is from 2 to 5 p.m. Cost: $8. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or mallowrun.com

March 29-April 3

The Indiana State Museum and Boy Scouts of

The 2016 Women’s Final Four heads to Indianapolis to determine the top women’s college basketball team in the nation. Times vary. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com

April 4-May 8

“Symphony in Color” is an enrichment program of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra Association offering a unique blending of symphonic music and visual arts. Involving more than 30,000 Indiana schoolchildren each year, it culminates in a juried exhibition at the Hilbert Circle Theatre and the Indiana State Museum. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org SOU T H

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Calendar

April 5

The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra presents “Discovery Concert: The Orchestra Moves.” Partner with the Indianapolis Symphony “Link Up” program, a nationally recognized curriculum by Carnegie Hall, that brings music and melody to classroom students in Grades 3 through 6. Time: 10:15 a.m. Tickets: $8; $7 for children. Call (317) 231-6759 for reservations. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 639-4300 or indianapolissymphony.org

April 5-6

Everyone’s favorite redhead returns to IU with all the laughter, all the joy and all the heartfelt sentimentality that has inspired generations of readers, movie fans and theatergoers to fall in love with the timeless, rags-to-riches tale of “Annie.” Directed by original lyricist and director Martin Charnin and choreographed by IU alum Liza Gennaro, this production of “Annie” will be a new incarnation of the iconic original. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $39 to $65. Location: IU Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: (812) 855-1103 or iuauditorium.com

April 8

Five members of comedy royalty come together for “The Comedy Get Down.” The world tour features Cedric “The Entertainer,” Eddie Griffin, D.L. Hughley, George Lopez and Charlie Murphy. Time: 8 p.m. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com

April 9

Outcry 2016, which champions, represents and promotes the local church, the Bride of Christ, stops in Indianapolis. The worship tour exists to highlight the creativity, heart and missions of the local church. The tour features Hillsong Worship, Kari Jobe, Jesus Culture, Elevation & Martin Smith, with Brian Houston preaching. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $29.95 to $99.95. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com The 500 Festival Miler Series offers walking and running events at three distances that coincide with typical training programs geared toward the Mini Marathon. It’s the perfect, lowpressure opportunity for participants to gauge their progression in preparation for the Mini Marathon. 10-Miler race starts at 8 a.m. Cost: $18 early registration; $22 day of the race. Location:

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NCAA Hall of Champions, 700 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: 500festival.com Star of “Kinky Boots,” “You Can’t Take It With You,” “Wicked,” “Rent,” “Legally Blonde” and Netflix’s “Masters of Sex,” Annaleigh Ashford brings an eclectic evening of sequins and song from the disco days of Donna Summer to the haunting melodies of Kurt Weill and Stephen Sondheim to a sing-a-long of Alanis Morrisette during her show “Lost in the Stars.” Ashford will be joined by Will Van Dyke and The Whiskey 5. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $35 to $75. Location: The Cabaret at The Columbia Club, 121 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 275-1169 or thecabaret.org

April 22 Earth Day Extravaganza at Beeson Hall

The Indy Eleven kick off their home season against the Ottawa Fury FC. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $11 to $100. Location: IU Michael A. Carroll Track and Soccer Stadium, 1001 W. New York St., Indianapolis. Information: indyeleven.com

April 9-10

Power Recycling Weekend offers a chance to get rid of the clutter and help the environment. Drop off your old electronics, phone books, cardboard and paper ready for shredding. There is a $5 processing fee for TVs and monitors. Location: Indianapolis Zoo, 1200 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: indianapoliszoo.com

April 11

The Johnson County Antique Market is a one-day show that offers a selection of antiques and vintage collectibles, including primitives, furniture, jewelry, glass, linens, tools, toys, advertising and more. Homemade breakfast and lunch are available at the market kitchen. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost: $2. Location: Johnson County Fairgrounds, 250 Fairground St., Franklin. Information: jcantiquemarket.com

April 14

The Indianapolis Indians battle the Columbus Clippers in the season home opener at Victory Field in Indianapolis. Time: 7:05 p.m. Tickets: $16 for box seats; $12 for reserved seats; $10 for the lawn. Location: 501 W. Maryland St., Indianapolis. Information: indyindians.com

April 14-17

Explore the romanticism in Tchaikovsky’s ”Romeo and Juliet” Overture, Wagner’s Prelude and Liebestod to his opera ”Tristan und Isolde,” and Franck’s symphonic poem ”Psyché et Eros,” based on the Greek myth. Times vary. Tickets: $15 to $85. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 6394300 or indianapolissymphony.org

April 15

Enjoy a special evening of music during “Heart and Soul: The Songs of Hoagy Carmichael and More,” directed by Ball State faculty members Ron Hellems and Johnna Tavianini with special coaching by Shannon Forsell, The Cabaret’s artistic director and CEO. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $15 to $45. Location: The Cabaret at The Columbia Club, 121 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 275-1169 or thecabaret.org

April 16

The Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Series raises funds and awareness for the breast cancer movement, celebrates breast cancer survivorship and honors those who have lost their battle with the disease. Location: Military Park, 601 W. New York St., Indianapolis. Information: komencentralindiana.org

April 16-24

Firefighters will converge on Indianapolis for


the Fire Department Instructors Conference. Times vary. Location: Indiana Convention Center and Lucas Oil Stadium, 100 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. Information: fdic.com

April 19-20

Theatergoers will be transferred to the streets of Dublin as the romantic musical “Once” comes to Bloomington. This event, based on the 2007 Academy Award-winning film, is propelled by its ensemble of actor/musicians who perform their own instruments live on stage. “Once” tells the story of a street musician about to give up on his dreams when a beautiful young woman takes a sudden interest in his haunting love songs. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $39 to $65. Location: IU Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: (812) 855-1103 or iuauditorium.com

April 22

Celebrate our Earth during the Earth Day Extravaganza. Activities, crafts, snacks, entertainment by Ruditoonz and the movie “WALL-E” will be part of the fun. The movie starts at 7 p.m. in Beeson Hall at the Cultural Arts & Recreation Center, 396 Branigin Blvd., Franklin. Activities begin at 6 p.m. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org

April 22-23

The First Book for Kids Community Garage Sale will be from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Scott Hall, 100 Fairgrounds St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org

April 23

Help spruce up the Franklin parks during the Clean Community Challenge. If you have a group that would like to volunteer, contact Holly Johnston at (317) 736-3689 or hjohnston@ franklin.in.gov. Time: 9 a.m. to noon. Location: Franklin parks. Information: franklinparks.org The Earth Day Indiana Festival highlights more than 125 environmental nonprofits, companies and groups. The festival includes a music stage, workshops and food vendors. The Butterfly Parade will be led by Jim Poyser at 3 p.m. The event’s mission is to highlight sustainability, environmental protection and resource conservation. Time: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Military Park, 601 W. New York St., Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Zoo invites a group of 15 juried artists to make art “en plein air” (outdoors) at Naturally Inspired Paint Out Day. During

the event, zoo guests have an opportunity to observe the artists as they turn a blank canvas or a hunk of clay into a work of art inspired by the natural world. The artwork will be displayed from June 1 to Aug. 24. Artwork will be available during a silent auction on Aug. 25. Location: Indianapolis Zoo, 1200 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: indianapoliszoo.com

April 29-30

Patina Miller, Tony Award-winning star of “Pippin” and “Sister Act,” shares how she got from Pageland, South Carolina, to Broadway, as told through songs ranging from Sondheim to “Sister Act.” Fans will also recognize her from the CBS drama “Madam Secretary” and “The Hunger Games.” Times vary. Tickets: $35 to $75. Location: The Cabaret at The Columbia Club, 121 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 275-1169 or thecabaret.org

April 29-May 1

The Indiana Comic Con hosts exhibitors that cater to a wide spectrum of interests, including comic books, magazines, toys, games, Star Wars, Star Trek, anime, manga, cosplay, artwork, sketches and apparel. In addition, a roster of comic industry professionals and comicdom-related celebrities are in attendance to meet and greet. Time: Noon. Tickets: $30 to $35 for one day; $60 for three days; free for kids 12 and younger. Location: Indiana Convention Center, 100 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. Information: indianacomiccon.com

April 30

Don’t miss the Beech Grove “Go Green!” spring festival featuring a tree giveaway, kids activity area, environmental education, animals and fun. Time: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Sarah T. Bolton Park, 1300 Churchman Ave., Beech Grove. Information: (317) 788-4986 or beechgrove.com/sarah-t-bolton-park

April 30 to Jan. 28

Come see 200 unique, interesting and important objects that shaped Indiana during “Indiana in 200 Objects Bicentennial Exhibition.” As we celebrate the state’s 200th birthday, this is a chance to explore Indiana’s past and present, while being inspired to think about its future. From the formation of the landscape itself to the most newsworthy moments in our history, each of these objects holds its own place in Indiana’s story. Times

vary. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org

MAY May 2-3

Based on the screenplay of the acclaimed 1994 film by Woody Allen and Douglas McGrath, “Bullets Over Broadway” is a hilarious musical comedy about the making of a Broadway show. It’s the story of a young playwright who, in desperate need of financial backing for his next show, accepts an offer he can’t refuse from a mobster looking to please his showgirl girlfriend. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $39 to $65. Location: IU Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St., Bloomington. Information: (812) 855-1103 or iuauditorium.com

May 5-6

The OneAmerica 500 Festival MiniMarathon Expo is the exciting start to the Mini-Marathon weekend. .Time: 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday. Location: Indiana Convention Center, 100 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 262-3400 or 500festival.com

May 6-7

Marin Mazzie is back and better than ever in “Yes! It’s Today.” The three-time Tony nominee will share an evening of music from Jerry Herman, John Kander and Fred Ebb. Mazzie has starred in “Bullets over Broadway,” “Kiss Me Kate,” “Ragtime,” “Passion,” “Monty Python’s Spamalot,” “Next to Normal,” “Into the Woods” and more. Times vary. Tickets: $35 to $75. Location: The Cabaret at The Columbia Club, 121 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 275-1169 or thecabaret.org

May 7

The OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon isn’t just for runners and walkers. Come down to the post-race party and cheer on the thousands of participants as they cross the finish line. Many activities are planned for all ages in addition to live music and a variety of food vendors. Location: Military Park in downtown Indianapolis. Information: 500festival.com The Finish Line 500 Festival 5K uses the same start/finish line as the mini, but it carries a strict 56-minute time limit for completion. Time: 7 a.m. Cost: $40. Information: 500festival.com SOU T H

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Calendar

features, water basketball, concession stand and sun decks. Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org

At the Artcraft Theatre March 18 & 19: “The Big Sleep” April 8 & 9: “A League of Their Own” April 22 & 23: “It Happened One Night” May 13 & 14: “Wizard of Oz” May 27 & 28: “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” Classic movies are shown on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless otherwise indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or www.historicartcrafttheatre.org.

May 9

The Johnson County Antique Market is a one-day show that offers a selection of antiques and vintage collectibles, including primitives, furniture, jewelry, glass, linens, tools, toys, advertising and more. Homemade breakfast and lunch are available at the market kitchen. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost: $2. Location: Johnson County Fairgrounds, 250 Fairground St., Franklin. Information: jcantiquemarket.com

May 13-15

From the silver screen to the Great White Way, choral music has played a prominent role in the popular music of every generation. The Symphonic Choir joins the ISO and maestro Jack Everly for “Pops: A Choral Spectacular,” a salute to your favorite music from the stage and screen featuring choruses from throughout Indianapolis. Times vary. Tickets: $20 to $80. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 639-4300 or indianapolissymphony.org

May 14

Bring the kids to Monument Circle for the Chase 500 Festival Kids’ Day & Rookie Run. Kids can ride a 70-foot Ferris wheel, race remote-controlled cars and test their skills in a race-car simulator. Time: Noon to 4 p.m. Cost: $16 in advance for the run, which includes technical T-shirt; $8 the day of the event for the run; $10 technical T-shirt sold separately. The other events are free. Information: 500festival.com

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Get ready for the Indianapolis 500 with the Angie’s List Grand Prix of Indianapolis, which will feature road course racing. The stars of the Verizon IndyCar Series take to the IMS road course to kick off the month of May. Tickets: $25 to $77; children 12 and younger free. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, 4790 W. 16th St., Indianapolis. Information: indianapolismotorspeedway.com

May 14-Sept. 3

Every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon beginning May 14, the Franklin Farmers Market offers locally grown fruits and vegetables, art and crafts, and fresh flowers. Location: Corner of Jefferson and Jackson streets in downtown Franklin. Information: (317) 3461258 or discoverdowntownfranklin.com

May 20-21

French composer Maurice Durufle set the familiar Requiem text to music for choir, orchestra and two soloists, building on Gregorian chant as the melodic basis throughout the composition. Known as a meticulous composer with 14 published works. Times vary. Tickets: $20 to $80. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 6394300 or indianapolissymphony.org

May 21

The Franklin Aquatic Center opens, featuring an Olympic-sized pool with diving well, 190foot water slide, a new heated zero-depth pool with a play structure including 16 interactive

Travel the rails on a miniature transportation network at Johnson County Park. The Indiana Live Steamers take you on a journey through forested park land, over several bridges, across prairies and along creeks. Time: Noon to 4 p.m. Cost: $2 per person. Location: Johnson County Park, 2949 E. North St., Edinburgh. Information: indianalivesteamers.org

May 24

Give the gift of life. Donate blood at the American Red Cross Blood Drive. Times vary. Location Hornet Park Community Center, 5245 Hornet Ave., Beech Grove. Information: (317) 788-4986 or beechgrove.com/hornet-park

May 25

The greatest spectacle in tortoise racing takes place at the Zoopolis 500. Location: Indianapolis Zoo, 1200 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: indianapoliszoo.com

May 27

Enjoy Strawberries on the Square Streetfest from 11 a.m. until the strawberries are sold out. Location: Downtown Franklin. Information: (317) 346-1258 or discoverdowntownfranklin.com The 2016 Indianapolis 500 weekend, culminating with the 100th running of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing, kicks off with the legendary rock band Journey during Miller Lite Carb Day. The concert is free with Miller Lite Carb Day admission of $30. Fans wanting the closest access to the stage can purchase a $20 upgrade to the Miller Lite Concert Pit. Schedule of the day’s events: 8 a.m.: Gates open. 12:30 p.m.: Indy Lights Freedom 100 (40 laps); 3:30 p.m. Miller Lite Carb Day Concert; 6 p.m.: Gates close. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, 4790 W. 16th St., Indianapolis. Information: indianapolismotorspeedway.com The 500 Festival Memorial Service will include the joint service color guard presentation of colors and performances by the Capital City Chorus. A wreath-laying ceremony, dedicated to the memory of all Hoosiers in all wars who sacrificed their lives in defense of the nation, will take place while the names of those Indiana service members who have fallen within the past year are read


aloud. Time: Noon. Location: North steps of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument, downtown Indianapolis. Information: 500festival.com

May 27-June 12

“Assassins” lays bare the lives of nine individuals who assassinated or tried to assassinate the president of the United States, in a historical “revusical” that explores the dark side of the American experience. From John Wilkes Booth to Lee Harvey Oswald, writers Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman bend the rules of time and space, taking the audience on a nightmarish roller-coaster ride in which assassins from different historical periods meet, interact and inspire each other to harrowing acts as they take a shot at the American Dream. Time: 8 p.m. May 27, 28, June 3, 4, 10 and 11; 2:30 p.m. May 29, June 5 and 12. Tickets: $20 adults; $18 children. Location: Buck Creek Playhouse, 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 862-2270 or buckcreekplayers.com

May 28

Get into the spirit of the Indy 500 at the IPL 500 Festival Parade as it celebrates 56 years of tradition. Time: Noon. Location: Downtown Indianapolis. Information: 500festival.com The 500 Festival Snakepit Ball will be rocking. The black-tie party includes red carpet arrivals by celebrities in town for race weekend and special VIP guests. Time: 6 p.m. Tickets: $275. Location: Indiana Roof Ballroom. Information: 500festival.com

May 29

Get ready for an exciting race as Indianapolis celebrates the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500, which continues to be “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” Time: Gates open at 6 a.m.; racing begins at noon. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Information: indianapolismotorspeedway.com

May 30

Start training for the Memorial Day Mile through Province Park in Franklin. All participants younger than 18 will receive a medal. The women’s/girls’ race begins at 9:15 a.m. The men’s/boys’ race and family jog/walk begins at 9:45 a.m. Entry fees: $5 for ages 18 and younger; $12 for older than 18; a technical shirt for all participants; instant results with chip timing. Information and to register: MemorialDayMile.com

Indy’s Southside Magazine

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A Look Back

In the Books Lela Kiely, Betty Friedersdorf and Frances Blake at the Franklin Library.

PHOTO COURTESY OF

Johnson County Museum of History

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SOUTH | Spring 2016  
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