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The New Indian Express MONDAY, December 13, 2010

edex

We wish to create not just competent but also compassionate managers. My role as a leader is simply to lead people to their highest purpose, greatest productivity and to their ultimate possibilty as a human source

cover story

— Debashis Chatterjee, DIRECTOR, IIM-KOZHIKODE

surprising top 50

wake-up MBA

Around A d 60 institutes i i participated in the survey. The following topped the list on different parameters

The first-ever survey on B-schools in South India reveal that institutes in tier-2 cities fare better p1 than those in metros

Rank

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Photo: MK Ashok Kumar

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Lakshmy

p10 p11 p12 p13 p14 p15 p16 p17 p18 p19 p20

CHENNAI

T

here are a dozen B-school surveys filled with statistics and information that, at times, can be overwhelming. But such exercises are important as it helps MBA aspirants to narrow down on their dream course and institute. With more then 2,000 institutes in the country, an all-India survey is now redundant. Students want a college closer home. Hence, edex has come out with the firstever survey on the B-schools in South India and Odisha. Predictably, IIM-Kozhikode has bagged the top slot (IIM-Bangalore didn’t participate). Surprisingly, the survey reveals that government institutes offer better facilities for students. The governmentrun Bharathidasan Institute of Management (BIM), Tiruchy, and Institute for Financial Management and Research (IFMR), Chennai, figure in the top 10. Over 60 B-schools participated in the survey conducted by CMER (GHRDC). The findings are startling and what we found is a mess that is management education.

B-schools in every town

are several hundred management p21 There schools in India that offer varied levels of MBA and specialised courses and

the moon. “Such a trend began p22 promise somewhere in the early 2000s,” says Allwin Agnel, founder and CEO, PaGaLGuY.

p23 com. “Until 2003 or 2004, the IIMs charged p24

not more than a couple of lakhs for an MBA. So graduates were happy when they got `15-20,000 as monthly salary. For some reason, the IIMs hiked up their fee and found no problems getting students. This made MBA a lucrative business. Thus, business schools mushroomed

everywhere and within a couple of years, the market was filled with directors and founders flush with cash.” IFMR is the most expensive B-school in the South. It charges `10-lakh for a twoyear programme. IIM-K and Badruka Institute of Foreign Trade, Hyderabad, take the next two slots with `9 lakh. Today, there are online alumni testimonials with details on the courses, fee, placement facilities, infrastructure and everything you want to know about MBA. But in the early 2000s, there were none. So students relied heavily on the promises made by B-schools and invested lakhs in their education. But all this changed when recession hit in 2008. “These students were in for a rude shock,” says Agnel. “Half of them didn’t get desired jobs and those who did

Read

edex

OTHER LEADING B-SCHOOLS

Name of B-schools

■ Christ University, Bangalore ■ Department of Management Studies, IIT-Madras, Chennai ■ Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore ■ T A Pai Management Institute, Manipal

In Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode, M Kerala Ke

2

Bh Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Tiruchy, Ta Tamil Nadu

3

Lo Loyola Institute of Bu Business Administration, Ch Chennai, Tamil Nadu

4

Ins Institute of Public En Enterprise, Hyderabad, An Andhra Pradesh

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TOP 10 B-SCHOOLS IN SOUTH INDIA 1

p2

5

Ins Institute for Financial Ma Management and Re Research, Chennai, Ta Tamil Nadu

6

De Department of Ma Management Studies, Po Pondicherry University, Pu Puducherry

7

SC SCMS-Cochin, Ke Kerala

8

PS PSG Institute of Ma Management, Coimbatore, Ta Tamil Nadu

9

De Department of Ma Management Studies (NIT), Tir Tiruchy, Tamil Nadu

10

These well-known institutes in the South did not participate in the survey for reasons known only to them

GIT GITAM School of Inte International Business, Visa Visakhapatnam, And Andhra Pradesh

HIGHER EDUCATION IS MORE THAN COLLEGE Mail your contributions and feedback to: edex@expressbuzz.com

Indian School of Business (Hyderabad), one of the best B-schools in India, does not offer two-year programmes. Since it was one of our pre-requisites for participation, ISB was not included in the survey. were unhappy with their salary packages. Word-of-mouth happened and now, there are many B-schools that are running in less than half their capacity. Five years ago, Amity used to take over 1,000 students but now they’ve admitted just 300. Even the number of people who took the CAT has decreased this year.”

Low pedagogy quality A dearth of qualified professors is one of the biggest problems facing management education. Even with a PhD, professors are unable to keep up with the industry standards. “In the tier-2 and tier-3 B-schools, most of the senior faculty members hail from a commerce background. They have no clue how to teach an MBA course. Very few have faculty with PhDs,” rues Prof Rajendra Kumar Gupta, director, Sobhagya Consultancy, Mumbai. For instance, the Department of Management Studies, Pondicherry University, is the only varsity in the South that has PhDs as full-time faculty. IIM-K comes a close second with 96 per cent.


The New Indian Express MONDAY, December 13, 2010

edex

cover story TOP 10 B-SCHOOLS RANKED BY INFRASTRUCTURE Rank 1 2 3

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4

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5

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6

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7

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8 9 10

Name of B-schools Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Tiruchy SCMS-Cochin (School of Communication and Management Studies), Kochi Institute of Public Enterprise, Hyderabad Loyola Institute of Business Administration, Chennai Indus Business Academy, Bangalore Department of Management Studies, Pondicherry University, Puducherry Siva Sivani Institute of Management, Secunderabad Dhruva College of Management, Hyderabad Rajagiri Centre for Business Studies, Kochi

Infrastructure (Physical and academic) (140) 117.44 109.29 101.53

98.81 98.15 97.9 96.96

96.05 95.25 93.42

Our B-schools need to include more Indian cases in the curriculum and also become application orientated. As the corporate sector is competing with foreign multinationals, it helps graduates to tackle crisis situations in India, Europe and the US

VG Chari,

DIRECTOR-ACADEMIA, SIVA SIVANI INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT

A veteran in the field with more than two decades of teaching exdecade perience, Gupta says havperience ing a PhD is no use if they have no industry experience. “In medical colleges, professors are also doctors who do surgeries and practice medicine. The same standard should be followed in MBA as well. You can’t teach management based on theory alone.” Many professors claim to have published journals and have worked as consultants to major corporates. Gupta dismisses these claims and asks for proof. “How many of their articles have been cited in local or international magazines? If they’re conducting research, where are the results published? Very few universities allocate funds for teachers to pursue genuine research work. The entire system is terrible.” Our survey reveals IIM-K and Chennai-based Loyola Institute of Business Administration and IFMR are the top three in terms of research, publication and academic structure. In most of the top B-schools, the teaching load on the faculty is less — They wouldn’t spend more than 150-200 hours a year taking classes. But, they spend a lot of time pre-

paring the syllabus. “It’s through a clearly defined curriculum that an institute achieves its goals. Unfortunately, not many professors have a say in the syllabus. So you have MBA classes being conducted by people who’re completely ignorant about the relevance of the subject in current times,” says Saji Gopinath, director, TAPMI, Manipal. Perhaps to fulfil this lacuna, there’s a general trend of inviting senior faculty from other institutes or conduct guest lectures by industry experts. “But in Wharton Business School (University of Pennsylvania, USA) for instance, there’s no such thing as a visiting faculty. All professors work full-time but take classes for a particular semester,” says Agnel, a Wharton alumnus. “For the rest of the year, they’re busy preparing courses, writing books, working as consultants for business ventures, publishing articles and also pursuing and assisting in various forms of research in their respective fields. This keeps them updated on current events, and helps them while taking classes in the following semester or year.”

Zero peer learning Unlike B-schools in the US, UK and


The New Indian Express MONDAY, December 13, 2010

edex

Numerous changes should be made in the admission process, selection process, recruitment of faculty, etc. Industry should work closely with society and must support the careers of deserving students. Social entreprenuership should be promoted in a big way

cover story

p1 p2 p3

Europe, students are not required to have work experience before they apply for an MBA. “A majority of students at the IIMs and other top institutes are freshers — mostly graduates from engineering or commerce. There’s no diversity in a batch. What will one fresher teach another?” avers Amit Saboo, founder, ProAvenues, an assessment company in Mumbai. This is evident in our survey, which showed that 93 per cent of students at BIM and 91 per cent from IIM-K are engineers. Overall, in 62 B-schools, 28 per cent of students are engineers and 32 per cent come from the commerce stream. Almost 65 per cent of them are men. Adds Agnel, “In my batch at Wharton, there were students from 96 countries from varied educational and professional backgrounds. Forty per cent of the class had women. There were also very few freshers. This diversity is an absolute requirement, not just

— RK Mishra, DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC ENTERPRISE, HYDERABAD

for learning but also for networking.” Gopinath concurs and adds, “The percentage e of women may be more in local B-schools but it’s negligible gible in top institutes. Without diversity, what kind of exposure would you get in a classroom? You’ll have a very narrow perspective of the business world, which would be strongly influenced by your teacher’s viewpoints.” One of the ways to fix the problem is to slightly alter the admission process. Admission to any B-school heavily depends on the percentage of marks students score in entrance exams and also at the graduate level. “Students need to meet certain standards but marks should not be the only criteria,” says Saboo. “In the West, admissions are based on multiple factors like your GRE/GMAT/ TOEFL scores, graduate percentile, recommendation letters from colleges,

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T 10 B-SCHOOLS TOP BY ADMISSION PROCESS Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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8

p6 9 10

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Name of B-schools Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Tiruchy Loyola Institute of Business Administration, Chennai Department of Management Studies (NIT), Tiruchy Institute of Public Enterprise, Hyderabad Dept of Management Studies, Pondicherry University, Puducherry Rajagiri Centre for Business Studies, Kochi Institute for Financial Management and Research, Chennai IFIM Business School, Bangalore SCMS-Cochin, Kochi

Admission system and process (240) 233.12 132.75 117.42 115.55 114.31 108.95 90.65 90.49

90.17 86.88

Marks should not be the only criteria. In the West, admissions are based on multiple factors like your GRE/GMAT/TOEFL scores, your graduate percentile, recommendation letters, reference letters (if applicable), your essay, resume and also sometimes personal interviews. The admission process is clearly defined and less ambiguous

p8 p9 p10 p11 p12

— Amit Saboo, FOUNDER, PROAVENUES, MUMBAI Photo: Nagaraj Gadekal

TOP 10 B-SCHOOLS BY FACULTY RESEARCH, PUBLICATION & ACADEMIC FINANCIAL STRUCTURE

p13 p14

Rank

Name of B-schools

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1

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2

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3

p19 p20 p21 p22 p23 p24

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode Loyola Institute of Business Administration, Chennai Institute for Financial Management and Research, Chennai SCMS-Cochin, Kochi Kochi Institute of Public Enterprise, Hyderabad Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Tiruchy PSG Institute of Management, Coimbatore IFIM Business School, Bangalore Department of Management Studies, Pondicherry University, Puducherry Indus Business Academy, Bangalore

Faculty research, publication & academic financial structure(310)

TOP 10 B-SCHOOLS BY PERCENTAGE OF FULL-TIME FACULTY WITH PHD Rank

Name of B-schools

% of full-time faculty with PhD

1

Dept of Management Studies, Pondicherry University, Puducherry

100

2

Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode

96

3

Department of Management Studies (NIT), Tiruchy

69

4

Institute for Financial Management and Research, Chennai

67

5

Department of Management Studies, Anna University, Chennai

67

135.82

6

Loyola Institute of Business Administration, Chennai

64

134.39

7

MOP Vaishnav College, Chennai

63

8

GITAM School of International Business, Visakhapatnam

57

126.91

9

Institute of Management in Kerala, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram

56

110.92

10

GITAM Institute of Management, Visakhapatnam

54

169.18 166.6 157.72

146.55 140.28

131.38


The New Indian Express MONDAY, December 13, 2010

edex

Management education is mostly an ‘add-on’ course to engineering in India. This stepmotherly treatment given to a programme, which is aimed at grooming creators of wealth for the nation is a sad commentary on professional education. This should be stopped

cover story

— GPC Nayar, CHAIRMAN, SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION AND MANAGEMENT STUDIES COCHIN, KOCHI

COST OF EDUCATION IN TOP 10 B-SCHOOLS Rank

Name of B-schools

Cost of education in lakhs

Where are the jobs?

1

Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode

`9.04

2

Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Tiruchy

`5.22

p5

3

Loyola Institute of Business Administration, Chennai

`7.40

p6

4

Institute of Public Enterprise, Hyderabad

`6.10

p7

5

Institute for Financial Management and Research, Chennai

`10

p8

6

Department of Management Studies, Pondicherry University, Puducherry

`0.12

p9

7

SCMS-Cochin, Kochi

`5.40

p10

8

PSG Institute of Management, Coimbatore

`2.1

9

Dept of Management Studies (NIT), Tiruchy

`1.17

GITAM School of International Business, Visakhapatnam

`5.25

p11 p12

10

reference letters from ref you your employers (if applicable), your essay, appli resume and also sometimes personal interviews. The admission process is clearly defined and less ambiguous.” B-schools are famous for their attractive ads that cite free laptops and 24hour wi-fi connection as some of their USPs. Though students are now smart enough and won’t be carried away by such shameless gimmicks, what attracts them, however, is the promise of 100 per cent job placements. “New institutes cannot guarantee quality placements. They’re barely a couple of years old, with very less industry interaction,” explains Sudhakar Rao, GHRDC, Hyderabad. “Over a period of time, when B-schools invite experts for panel discussions, mock interviews, grade internships and guest lectures, it gives them an opportunity to know what the institute can produce.” He adds that it’s important to know the placement system of an institute. “How many people work in a placement team and who heads it? What’s their industry interface? What has been their track record and where have they found jobs for students?

Do they engage industry experts in academia or do they just ask for jobs? This gives students a glimpse into the kind of recruitment that would take place on campus.” Though IIM-K tops the survey (320 points out of 360) for highest placement record followed by BIM (270) and LIBA (233), the glaring differences between the top three slots highlight the difficulty in finding jobs. Institutes often promise high compensation packages and this leads to high expectations. “Students want a corner office and a huge pay in their first job but are unwilling to work for it,” says Madhuri Menon, a Chennai-based consultant in executive business coaching and also the ex-VP-HR, IFMR. “I look for candidates who are adaptable and can think quickly on their feet. There are students who’ve received high salary packages but those are just exceptions — probably one in a thousand.” With barely-there infrastructure, poorly qualified faculty, unrealistic promises of jobs and disillusioned students who graduate with almost zero skill levels, B-schools in India are operating on a weak foundation with a bleak future. Stricter norms for new schools, regulated fee structure and accountability are some of the ways through which it can be rectified ■ — lakshmy@expressbuzz.com


The New Indian Express MONDAY, December 13, 2010

edex

Our curriculum should be designed in such a way that it has a global outlook and at the same time sticks to our roots. Students should know what is happening around the world and also learn how to relate it to the Indian context

salary myths

R Nandagopal, DIRECTOR, PSG INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT, COIMBATORE

be reasonable

Big bucks are rare

TOP 10 B-SCHOOLS RANKED BY PLACEMENT Rank

Getting an MBA does not guarantee you a six-figure salary package. Learn on the job and improve your skill

Tasneem Zavery BANGALORE

p11 p12 p13 p14 p15 p16 p17 p18

I

t’s a dream of every MBA graduate to land a top job that helps him rake in the dough. With 100 per cent placement guarantees and sky-high college fee, students often expect to get a six-figure pay package with all the added benefits. Unfortunately, that happens very rarely. “Earlier students used to ask me questions about topics and additional projects. But these days after the first semester, they enquire whether they’ll secure a good job in a company and get a high salary,” says Suresh Chandra, assistant dean, academics, Indus Business Academy, Bangalore. “If they’re aiming for a good job, they need to improve their capabilities.” Most of the time, students choose

institutes that have a higher record in placements and salary packages. “They don’t do a background check on the faculty,” says Nagendra Shenoy, alumnus of IFIM Business School, Bangalore. “Expectations are high from both companies and students, and if they are not met, there is disappointment.” When a student is hired, they need to realise that there is a skill-industry gap. “You should know whether you meet the industry expectations and satisfy their employability criteria,” DN Murthy, dean, IFIM. Look at the rankings of institutes but don’t just stop there, suggests PD Jose, the chairperson of career development service, IIM-Bangalore. “Talk to the alumni, objectively evaluate the school and beware of institutes that make false claims. Remember the first job is not always a career, it is the experience that counts” ■ — tasneem@expressbuzz.com

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Name of B-schools

Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Tiruchy Loyola Institute of Business Administration, Chennai Institute for Financial Management and Research, Chennai IFIM Business School, Bengaluru Department of Management Studies (NIT), Tiruchy Department of Management, Studies, Pondicherry University, Puducherry Institute of Public Enterprise, Hyderabad SCMS-Cochin, Kochi PSG Institute of Management, Coimbatore

Placement (National, international and entrepreneurship) (360) 320.80 270.89 233.88 229.65

195.96 189.83 173.15

170.66 166.17 165.58


The New Indian Express MONDAY, December 13, 2010

edex

methodology

Management education should focus more on comprehensive understanding of business and society. Students are quite narrow-minded and are busy chasing the big bucks. They have to develop good thinking and become more socially responsible

— K Siva Rama Krishna, PRINCIPAL, GITAM INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT, VIZAG

research h process

How did we

DO IT

about 200 institutes and invited them. Seventy-four participated — 62 from South India and 12 from Odisha. To be eligible for the survey, institutes had to function for a minimum of two years and offer twoyear MBA programmes — the reason we couldn’t include Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, and the Great Lakes

Institute of Instit Management, C Chennai. A compr comprehensive questionnaire was sent to the shortlisted Bschools. A team from CMER visited almost 30 per cent of the institutes to verify the data. Others were validated by evaluating the original documents submitted by institutes. All the data

T

he idea to do a survey of B-schools in South India and Odisha sprung from the fact that the burgeoning number of institutes has made it impossible to get a clear picture on the state of management education by doing a national-level analysis. It’s time to go regional and that’s exactly what the edex (The New Indian Express) and the Centre for Management Education and Research (CMER-GHRDC) survey has done. CMER has been doing surveys on business schools for five years now. Its executive director, MP Sinha, has over 45 years of experience. There are over 900-plus B-schools in South India and Odisha. We shortlisted

From left: Jagnarayan Prasad, Mekhla Sinha, Anju Anupam, MP Sinha, Gurdeep Singh, Shivi Sharma, Srinath Mathto, Shraddha Mishra and Dilip S Gupta

were verified and critically analysed in detail. The B-schools were rated on parameters like infrastructure, quality of faculty, research, consultancy, publications, management development programmes, admission, curriculum and delivery system, placement, industry interface, collaboration with the national and foreign universities, their USP, etc. These were further divided into sub-parameters for a more rigorous and error-free assessment. The survey also laid emphasis on qualitative aspects like teaching aids, use of library, recruiters’ preference for students, soft skills and a sense of social responsibility etc. Faculty members were evaluated for their intellectual disposition towards research, training and consultancy. We also looked at the academic/financial structure of the institute (the percentage of the income spent on the faculty’s salary and development), which is an indicator of the quality of intellectual competence. Some of the well known B-schools like IIM-Bangalore, Christ University, Bangalore, TAPMI, Manipal, and IITChennai’s Department of Management did not participate for reasons known to them only ■

p1 p18 p19 p20 p21 p22 p23 p24


The New Indian Express MONDAY, December 13, 2010

edex

We need to have an increased emphasis on ethics and especially business ethics in management education. Managers need to recognise that business should succeed but not at the cost of compromising the self, the poor and the environment

rank stats

Fr P Christie SJ,

DIRECTOR, LIBA, CHENNAI

..Continued Continued from P 12-13

OVERALL RANKING OF TOP 50 B-SCHOOLS IN SOUTH INDIA Infrastructure Faculty, Research, Publication & (Physical & Academic) Academic Financial Structure

Programme Delivery & Curriculum

Admission System & Process

Placement (National, International & Entrepreneurship)

180

240

360

Networking, Industry Interface, Exchange Programme & Collaboration

Total

140

310

31 SSN School of Management &

76.12

75.69

48

79.03

123.6

25.44

427.88

32

64.35

67.82

60

74.7

115.46

42.64

424.99

p2

33 Karunya School of Management,

75.61

68.21

86

67.8

74.75

50.28

422.65

p3

34 Veltech High Tech Dr Rangarajan

53.01

76.47

60

75.94

100.83

54.71

420.95

p4

Computer Applications, Kalavakkam, Tamil Nadu Institute for Technology and Management, Bangalore, Karnataka Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu

Dr Sakunthala Engineering College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu

110 1340

p5

35 Dept of Management Studies,

69.26

98.68

40

68.1

110.74

32.27

419.04

36 RVS Institute of Management

63.68

97.07

64

67.41

89.2

33.2

414.55

PSNA College of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu Studies & Research, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu

64.61

82.46

84

66.27

80.75

35

413.09

38 DC School of Management and

79.66

77.27

56

78.69

81.57

37.89

411.07

86.4

81.44

52

55.73

99

73.11

70.76

46

67.54

123.67

Technology, Idukki, Kerala

39 AIMIT, St Aloysius College, Mangalore, Karnataka

40

Warangal Institute of Management, Warangal, Andhra Pradesh

p6 p7 p8

37 KLS Institute of Management

Education & Research, Belgaum, Karnataka

p1

34.03 408.59

p9 p10 p11 p12

25.67

406.76

p13

41 Saintgits Institute of Management,

70.55

78.38

50

74.78

87.27

35.79

396.78

p14

42 Sri Krishna School of Management,

60.75

74.59

44

76.74

94.75

42.86

393.68

p15

43 Nehru College of Management,

75.12

85.57

36

58.94

93.53

39.86

389.02

p16

44 Bangalore Management Academy,

52.25

82.25

48

70.85

76.67

48.93

378.95

45

SSM College of Engineering, Namakkal, Tamil Nadu

45.02

99.11

32

61.61

91.66

46.16

375.55

46

Member Sree Narayanapillai Institute of Management & Technology, Kollam, Kerala

51.05

88.67

40

59.67

86.5

45.48

371.38

47 RV Institute of Management,

66.93

77.78

36

57.34

91.78

37

366.83

p21

48 Siddaganga Institute of Technology,

59.82

78.63

38

58.87

90.83

37.88 364.04

p22

49 Badruka College PG Centre,

40.03

76.01

42

73.23

108.67

Kottayam, Kerala

Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu Bangalore, Karnataka

Bangalore, Karnataka Tumkur, Karnataka

Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh

50 Department of Management Studies — JJCET, Tiruchy, Tamil Nadu

p17 p18 p19

21.12

361.06

p20

p23 p24

51.6

64.43

52

70.56

64.67

54.18

357.43

Indian Express Survey of best BSchools in south India  

A realistic survey of business schools in south India carried our by Indian Express Group

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