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Office of Residential Life and Housing

Guide to Campus Living


Descriptions of programs and services in this publication including, but not limited to, hours of service, personnel and cost, are subject to change by the University and/or the Board of Trustees. Every effort will be made to communicate information regarding changes through appropriate University information services and academic development and herein lies our mission statement. 2|Page


Table of Contents                   

Welcome to Your Spot – Pg.4 Residential Life’s Philosophy – Pg. 5 ISU Residential Life Community Standards – Pg. 6 Important Dates to Remember – Pg. 7 Residential Life and Housing Staff – Pg. 8 Things to Know – Pg. 9 Office of Residential Life Information – Pg. 10 Campus Resources – Pg. 11 Ways to Get Involved – Pg. 12 Employment Opportunities – Pg. 13 My Housing Contract – Pgs. 14-17 My On Campus Dining – Pgs. 17-20 Where Can I Live – Pg. 20 Amenities & Services – Pg. 21 Academic Themed Communities – Pgs. 21-22 Academic Cluster Community – Pg. 23-25 Residential Life Policies – Pgs. 25-27 The University Conduct Process – Pgs. 28-29 On-Campus Living Procedures – Pgs. 29-35

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Welcome to Your Spot Choosing to live on campus comes with many benefits such as living in an academically-supported environment, the ability to stay connected to campus through activities that foster educational, social, and leadership development and engaging with students from a variety of cultures, backgrounds and lifestyles. The Office of Residential Life & Housing offers a living and learning environment, committed to the academic success and personal growth of our residents. Students can choose to live on an academic theme housing floor where students are clustered by academic major, making it easy to form study groups and make friends. Our friendly and supportive hall staff are available 24 hours a day to provide guidance as well as educational and social initiatives for residents. Living on campus, you'll enjoy the convenience of being close to classroom buildings, library, the Student Rec Center, Hulman Memorial Student Union and easy access to dining halls and a wide array of social and athletic activities. Discover the living and learning experience at Indiana State!

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Residential Life’s Philosophy The Office of Residential Life and Housing at Indiana State University follows a residential curriculum model. The Residential Curriculum approach calls for Housing and Residential programs across the country to reconsider how students learn, develop and evolve. It challenges our office to rethink what we do and how we do it. A Residential Curriculum does not take away or change what our office does it simply restructures what we do and explains the who, what, where, when and how. It also calls for us to have specific learning goals and outcomes for student learning. In addition, it is a call to action to set a culture of continuous assessment of our services, initiatives, and daily work. Key components of a Residential Curriculum are the Educational Priority, Learning Goals, and Learning Outcomes. The Education Priority explains what we would like for all residential students to learn during their time in the Residence Halls. Learning Goals are the focus areas that support the Educational Priority. Learning Outcomes are the specific outcomes that each student should achieve at the end of their time in the Residence Halls. The ISU Residential Curriculum aligns with President Bradley’s Pathways to Success strategic plan.

Residential Life Educational Priority Residential Life prepares students to assume responsibility for their individual experience and to actively engage in their community.

Learning Goals Academic Success

Self-Awareness

Social Responsibility

Academic Success Narrative: Academically successful students constantly build upon their skill sets and knowledge base, utilize resources, and actively engage in the learning process. Through setting attainable goals and developing critical thinking skills, students will be successful.

Self-Awareness Narrative: Self-aware students are able to pull from past experiences to help define who they are, and how their actions affect others in their environment. Using their skills, they will build confidence and grow as an individual.

Social Responsibility Narrative: Socially responsible students consciously make decisions that will positively impact their community members and environment. They demonstrate character by creating and maintaining an inclusive atmosphere for generations to come.

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ISU Residential Life Community Standards Residential Life prepares students to assume responsibility for their individual experience and to actively engage in their community. As such, Residential Life supports the academic mission of the University by providing a living environment for students that is conducive to learning and total personal development. In order to create this environment, it is the responsibility of students to adhere to certain community expectations, set by the Office of Residential Life. These standards focus on respecting the community and its members, taking responsibility for one’s actions, and working to build trust between one another. As a Sycamore, I understand that there is a difference between trust and respect. Although people need to earn my trust, it is my responsibility to respect community members, including fellow students, University officials in positions of authority, campus police, hall staff (RA, APA, AHD, AC), and faculty. ACADEMIC SUCCESS Academic Environment/Success  I will respect my floor’s need to study by following courtesy hours  I will attend class regularly. It is my responsibility to contact professors in advance so that I can make up work and complete any missing assignments.  I will be prepared for class by arriving early, bringing all materials, and completing assignments (including reading).  I will seek out resources (APA, professor, tutor, advisor, etc.) if I need help.  I will respect my professor by being attentive, not falling asleep, and not texting during class.  I will utilize my outside of class time to study and prepare for class. Communication Methods  I will check my ISU email at LEAST on a daily basis. The “Sycamores” email (@sycamores.indstate.edu) account is the official ISU form of communication.  I will communicate in a professional way as an ISU student by using appropriate language and requesting a reasonable timeline for response (i.e. 48 hours) SELF-AWARENESS Safety/Security  I will close and lock my door every time I leave the room.  I will keep my key and ISU ID on me at all times, and refrain from allowing others to use them.  I will report any suspicious behavior I see on campus to hall staff or public safety. Transition through College  I will take personal ownership over my life and education.  I will take advantage of opportunities to gain independence from home, realizing that college is a time to grow and develop.  I will use critical thinking skills to solve problems, realizing there are appropriate times to turn to staff and my family for help, and there are times where I need to learn to solve my own problems. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Resolving Conflict  I will address conflict in a respectful and positive way, including not using language that is abusive or offensive, as well as not resorting to physical or verbal violence.  I will refrain from initiating or responding to conflict via social media (Facebook, Twitter, texting, etc.).  I will seek help from hall staff if I do not believe a conflict can be resolved in a positive way. Respecting Diversity  I will seek to gain a deeper understanding of people who are different from me.  I will refrain from intentionally using language or actions that may be offensive to others’ beliefs or lifestyles. Respecting the Home Environment, including Hygiene and Cleanliness  I will respect my “home environment” by cleaning up after myself, not damaging University property, and treating dining/housekeeping/maintenance staff with respect.  I will contribute to a positive environment by keeping up with personal hygiene, as well as respecting public areas by keeping my living space (both personal room and common areas) clean. 6|Page


Important Dates to Remember FALL SEMESTER 2016 FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 All halls will open for Fall Semester housing. Students will be assigned specific days and times regarding the move in process. First Contract meal served is lunch, Friday, August 19, 2016. TUESDAY, AUGUST 23 No show date. Room must be claimed by 6:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 23rd, or student is considered a No Show, and the room will be assigned to another student. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 Labor Day, no day or evening classes will meet. All University offices will be closed. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 Halls close at 12:00 noon for Fall Break. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27 Halls reopen 12:00 noon. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17 Halls close at 12:00 noon.

SPRING SEMESTER 2017 SUNDAY, JANUARY 15 Halls open 12:00 noon. MONDAY, JANUARY 16 No Classes, day or evening. Martin Luther King commemorated holiday. All University offices closed. TUESDAY, JANUARY 17 No Show Date. Room must be claimed by 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 17th or student is considered a No Show, and the room will be assigned to another student. SATURDAY, MARCH 11 Halls close at 12:00 noon for Spring Recess. Last contract meal served will be Friday evening in the HMSU Commons. SUNDAY, MARCH 19 Halls reopen at 12:00 noon. First contract meal served will be Sunday evening in the HMSU Commons. SATURDAY, MAY 13 Halls close at 12:00 noon.

NOTE: These dates and times subject to change, please contact the Office of Residential Life with any questions.

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Residential Life and Housing Staff Area Coordinator (AC): The ACs oversees building complex operations, staff supervision, student concerns, and staff/community development. Hall Coordinator (HC): The HCs oversees the day to day hall operations, staff supervision, student concerns, and staff/community development working in conjunction with the AC for their complex. Assistant Hall Director (AHD): The AHDs oversees the day to day hall operations, staff supervision, student concerns, and staff/community development working in conjunction with the AC for their complex. Resident Assistants (RA): RAs live in the residence halls and university apartments. Their role is to build community, relationships, and participate in an after-hours duty rotation to assist students. They also build community with students. Academic Peer Advocates (APA): The APAs live in the residence halls and university apartments. Their role is to assist first year students with their academic growth at Indiana State University. The APAs in the university apartments are only in the Sophomore Year Experience building, and help plan events/initiatives to ease the transition from freshman to sophomore year. Desk Worker: The desk staff are student workers and student staff (RAs/APAs) who help with student concerns and general customer service out of our building main lobbies, including loan keys check out, signing for packages, assisting with afterhours emergency staff contact Complex Administrative Assistant/Student Admin. Assistants: The Administrative Assistants support the AC and other hall staff in management of the day to day operations of the buildings. Custodial Team: The custodial team helps maintain the cleanliness of the Residence Halls and Apartments, and can be found throughout the buildings and hallways during the day. Maintenance Team: The maintenance team provides general and preventative maintenance for the buildings, including things that need to be fixed in your residence hall room or apartment

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Things to Know Someone is always available to assist you. During regular business hours you can get assistance from your Area Coordinator, Hall Coordinator, Assistant Hall Director or the Administrative Assistants. They are ready to answer your questions and assist you. Locations of Staff Offices Specific area Mills / Blumberg / Rhoads Burford / Pickerl / Erickson Lincoln Quad / University Apartments-North Reeve Hines / Jones / Sandison

AC Office Blumberg Hall Pickerl Hall Lincoln Quad

HC/AHD Offices Mills/Blumberg/Rhoads Burford/Pickerl/ Erickson/ Lincoln Quad

HMSU 608 Jones Hall

University Apartments

Main Office- Unit 3

500 Wabash

500 Wabash-2nd Floor 207

HMSU 608 Hines-HC/Jones-AHD/SandisonAHD Unit 3-Upper Class/Family AHD Unit 2- SYE AHD N/A

After normal business hours (nights, weekends, and holidays), a Residential Life staff member serves on a duty/on call rotation and are available to assist with emergencies. You can get in contact with the On-Call Staff by calling or stopping by the front desk of your hall. The exception for students in 500 Wabash or University Apartments, please see the posted On-Call Emergency numbers provided which will connect you directly with the staff member on duty. If you do not have access to a telephone, there is a campus phone call box located in every building. *For maintenance concerns, please submit a Work Order. If the maintenance issue is an emergency, please call the building front desk or after hours the on-call emergency staff on duty for immediate assistance. Work Order link: https://stsrvcs.indstate.edu/StudentHousing/Login.asp?TargetPage=SubmitWorkOrder.asp?

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Office of Residential Life Information RESIDENTIAL LIFE Address: Residential Life Office 218 N 6th St. Terre Haute, IN 47809 Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Telephone Residential Life: 812-237-3993 or toll-free 888-824-3920 Fax: 812-237-8525 Email: ISU-rlfaq@indstate.edu

RESIDENCE HALL FRONT DESK NUMBERS Blumberg 812-237-6641 *Cromwell 812-237-6611 Rhoads 812-237-6222 Mills 812-237-5999 Burford 812-237-5371 Pickerl 812-237-6111 Erickson 812-237-3031 Sandison 812-237-6333 Hines 812-237-5666 Jones 812-237-5777 Reeve: 812-237-5888 Lincoln Quad 812-237-5888 UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS & 500 WABASH Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Office Phone Numbers: UA Office: 812-237-2443 500 Office: 812-237-59910 Duty Hours: Monday-Friday 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 a.m. Weekends 24 hours Duty Phone Numbers: UA Duty: 812-298-6337 500 Duty: 812-243-9427

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Campus Resources Counseling Center The Student Counseling Center is located on the 2nd floor of the Gillium Hall, to make an appointment stop into the office or call at (812)237-3939. USEFUL FOR: Personal, career, and marriage counseling, group and individual counseling are among the services provided to students for a nominal fee. Financial Aid The Office of Student Financial Aid offers assistance to prospective and current students at Indiana State University. Their commitment is to serve the students and campus community in a consistent, knowledgeable, and efficient manner. International Programs and Resources Office The International Programs and Resources Office works with several key constituencies both on campus and in the community to promote a broader global perspective and expand engagement. The office specifically works with students, faculty, staff, and members of the community by facilitating opportunities to exchange dialogue to foster growth and development. Office of the Controller The office is located on campus at 200 North 7th St. and can be reached by phone at: 812-237-3535 USEFUL FOR: Checking student account balance, making payments Office of the Ombudsman Indiana State University provides a variety of ways students can find support. On occasion, traditional avenues used to meet student needs pose challenges. When traditional efforts fail to resolve problems and address concerns, students can turn to the University's Ombudsperson's office. The Ombudsperson can provide appropriate guidance to assist you in dealing with problems you might experience with the University’s rules and regulations. Public Safety Public Safety provides emergency response and safety services for the ISU Campus Community. The Public Safety office is located on campus at 210 North 6th St. the Public Safety Office is where students can purchase parking permits for campus parking lots. Public Safety can be reached 24 hours a day by dialing: 812-237-5555. Recreational Sports Recreational Sports offers a number of services to students such as gym services, fitness classes, intramural sports, massage therapy services (for a fee) and student employment opportunities. Student Health Promotions All ISU students are able to make an appointment through the UAP Clinic, located at the Student Recreation Center, 601 North 5th Street. Students should bring insurance information, ISU Identification card, and payment method for any co-pay required by the Clinic. To schedule an appointment, dial: 812-237-3883. NOTE: This service does not include non-student members of your household. USEFUL FOR: minor medical needs. *In the event of a medical emergency, please call ISU Public Safety at: 812-237-5555

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Ways to get involved Residence Hall Association (RHA) The Residence Hall Association (RHA) is a student organization that serves and represents students that live within the residence halls. All students living in the residence halls are members of RHA, making it the second largest student organization on campus. RHA has a general council, consisting of representatives from each hall, as well as an Executive Board. Every residence hall student is automatically a member of RHA and is welcome to attend the weekly meetings. Residents can get involved in RHA either through individual Hall Councils or by stopping by the RHA office. The office is located in Mills Hall. Hall Councils Looking to get involved right where you live? Each Residence Hall and the University Apartments have hall councils that meet every week to discuss area updates, plan activities for the community, and advocate for resident needs. It’s also a great way to meet new people—especially other community members and those who may be parents!! You’ll see events from time to time hosted by the hall council or Advocacy Group, and the goal is to increase the quality of life in the Residence Halls and University Apartments! Additional Ways to get involved on Campus The residence halls aren’t the only place where you can get involved—other campus interest groups exist to program and advocate for students too! Student Government, Greek Life, Recreational Sports, Union Board are a few of the many ways for your to get involved. Check out the ISU treehouse website to find more clubs and organizations for you to join. The office of Campus Life has several annual events such as Family Day, Homecoming, Miss ISU, Spring Week, and Sycamore Sunday.

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Employment Opportunities Campus employment is a great area to look for student work. Not only are the positions conveniently located but also hours are typically flexible and can be worked around class schedules. Within the Office of Residential Life and Housing, there are various opportunities for employment. Desk Receptionists A variety of individuals are employed in each hall to staff the front and night desks. S t u d e n t e m p l o y e e s a r e p a i d m i n i m u m w a g e b a s e p a y . Applications and information about the responsibilities of this position are available online via the career center website. After normal business hours a desk receptionist is responsible for assigned to assisting residents and their guests with gaining entry into the residence hall, some form of building security, and completes other duties as assigned. The hours of employment are determined according to the needs of the residence hall, but opportunities to work range from 12 to 20 hours a week are possible. Resident Assistants Each floor/suite is assigned a Resident Assistant (RA) to provide advice, conflict mediation, resources, social events, as well as policy interpretation and enforcement. RA’s are paid room and board. The hiring/selection process occurs during the spring semester for the upcoming academic year, all applicants must complete the SAHE 317 course prior to their employment. Academic Peer Advocates Academic Peer Advocates (APA) are assigned to live in designated communities to provide academic support. The APA resides and works with residents in providing academic resources, events and individual assistance. APA’s are paid room and board. The hiring/selection process occurs during the spring semester for the upcoming academic year, all applicants must complete the SAHE 317 course prior to their employment. Maintenance There are positions available as student maintenance workers and student housekeepers in the residence halls and university apartments. Applications are available online via the career center website. Dining Services Students are employed in the residence hall dining halls or the Commons for serving, clean up, and some preparation of food. Students usually work 10-18 hours per week. Preference in hiring is given to those students living on-campus. Applications for employment are available in the individual kitchens and at the Dining Services Central Office at 218 N. 6th Street. Located on the 1st floor of Erickson Hall at 6th and Eagle Street.

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My Housing Contract The Housing Contract is legally binding contract between the resident and t h e O f f i c e o f Residential Life and Housing that outlines the responsibilities of both parties. Because it is a legally binding contract, it is important for the resident to understand all components of the document. Please read the following and contact Residential Life if you have any questions. Please find the current academic year housing contact available on our website: http://www.indstate.edu/reslife under Resources and Terms and Conditions. University Housing Policy The University Housing Policy states that Freshman (student with less than 32 earned academic hours) are required to live in University residence halls unless they live and commute from their parent's home (within 60 miles from campus), or have a valid exception. Students who have lived in University residence halls for two semesters are exempt from this requirement. This policy applies only to single students. Exception to the University Housing Policy Exceptions to the University Housing Policy are granted in rare instances where unusual circumstances exist. Unless the circumstances are unusual and unless your request fits into a specific category, an exception will not be granted. If you wish to apply for an exception, applications are available from Residential Life. Your completed application should be returned to the Offi ce of Residential Life and Housing. One or more staff members in Residential Life will review the application. You will receive an answer to the application in writing. Students are cautioned not to sign legal agreements for housing off campus unless an exception has been granted. Applications can only be considered if complete and accurate information is provided. Incomplete applications may be returned to the student or may result in a denial. In the event that an exception is not granted and additional information can be provided, an appeal of the decision is possible. Information regarding the appeal process is available on the Office of Residential Life and Housing Website. Contract Release Process According to the terms and conditions of the Residence Hall Contract, once a student has signed an on-line contract, a release will be granted only in unusual or extreme circumstances. Students should make no commitment for other housing until a release has been approved. Applications for Contract Release or Exception to the Housing Policy are available at the Residential Life Office. Release Rationale: Students should be advised that contract releases or exceptions are granted only in situations involving extreme or unusual circumstances, the nature of which would prohibit living in a residence hall or impose a severe hardship. A desire to experience off-campus living is not considered an acceptable reason. The Residential Life housing contract is a legally binding contract for the full academic year. Students are cautioned not to sign legal agreements for off-campus housing until they receive an official release or exception in writing from the Residential Life Office. Housing Policy: The University Housing Policy states that Freshman (student with less than 32 earned academic hours) are required to live in University residence halls unless they live and commute from their parent's home (within 60 miles from campus), or have a valid exception. Students who have lived in University residence halls for two semesters are exempt from this requirement. This policy applies to single students. Categories considered for Contract Release or Exception: Please note the necessary documentation required to support the request. Medical: The student should describe the medical problem in as much detail as possible in the space allotted at the end of the application. Support documentation from a personal physician is helpful. Documentation may include: a diagnosis, laboratory report, X-rays finding, treatment (including a copy of any special diet or restrictions). Students are responsible for contacting the Student Health Center or their private doctor for related support documentation. 14 | P a g e


Financial: Release for financial reasons are granted only in situations involving significant change in the student's financial situation since the contract was signed. Individuals not on file with the Financial Aid Office but wishing to request a release based on financial reasons must complete special forms. Forms are available in the Residential Life Office. Additional, documentation indicating change in financial status is always helpful: proof of lay-off, loss of job, new medical expenses in the family, etc. Single Parent: Student must provide a copy of the child's birth certificate. Attempts to accommodate the family in our Family Housing environments will be made before a contract release is granted. Live-in Employment: Student will need to submit a letter from their employer. Military Service: A student requesting an exception for time served in the military should provide a copy of his/her certificate of service or other documentation showing length of active duty. Commuting from Home or Living with a Relative: Students requesting a release to commute from his/her parent' place of residence (within 60 miles) must submit a notarized letter from parents or guardian supporting the fact that the student will be living at home and commuting for the academic year or its remainder. This option is only available for students requesting an exception. Students who have already signed a contract will not be release based on their request to commute, but can apply for a contract release if they meet any of the other listed release categories. Marriage: A student requesting a release on the basis of marriage within the semester needs to submit a letter indicating the anticipated date of marriage and his/her spouse's name. The marriage must be substantiated by a copy of the Marriage Certificate. Failure to file the certificate copy within two weeks after marriage will nullify the release. Buyout of contract: A student can be automatically released from the contract by buying out the remaining portion of the contract. This process is not automatic for students still under the Housing Policy. The buyout rate is sixty-five (65%) percent of the remaining contract. Procedures: Applications are available the Residential Life Office or on-line . The application should be filled out as completely as possible. The application and supporting documentation should be returned to the Residential Life Office. If the student wishes to meet with the committee, an appointment should be made at the time the application is submitted. The student will be notified of the decision in writing. An email will be sent to the student's ISU email address or mailed to a permanent address if requested. Appeals of the committee's decision should be made in writing within five (5) working days to the Executive Director of Residential Life, Amanda Knerr. The student should have new or additional information, in order to file an appeal. Residence Halls and University Apartment Application Costs *Subject to revision by the Board of Trustees whenever such action is deemed necessary. There are two initial application sign- up fees that all students desiring to stay on campus must complete before be being considered for on-campus housing: 

A $20.00 non-refundable processing fee. While completing your application you will be directed to an online site to pay the required fee. Your application will not be marked as “submitted” if you do not pay the $20.00 fee. A $150.00 initial housing payment. This payment is refundable if you do not sign a contract/lease. We can see that you have submitted an application even if you do not pay this fee, but you will not be considered for an apartment until you pay this $150.00 payment. You can pay the initial housing payment in-person at the Controller’s Office or by calling them at 812-237-3511.

Cancellation of Application The application for on-campus housing may be canceled if you have not signed a contract nor accepted a space for on campus housing. Written notice and communication must be provided to the Office of Residential Life indicated you have withdrawn from the university. You can then request a refund on your $150 initial housing payment if provided noticed to the Office of Residential Life and Housing by June 30th. 15 | P a g e


Cancellation after signing a housing contract If you have already signed a contract/lease but no longer wish to live in the University Apartments, you must contact Residential Life and fill out a contract release form. Please note by starting the contract release process does not automatically guarantee that you will be released from your housing contract. Reapplication During the spring semester, all students will be contacted about the re-application process. Deadlines will be identified and communicated accordingly. In order to secure your spot you must admire to the outlined process. For those students desiring to stay in the university apartments you may not have the exact space that you had the previous year as well as you must have a $0 balance on your account to secure your placement for the following summer and academic year. University Apartments Specific Terms and Conditions The University Apartments has two contract options. 1. Academic Year Contract. This contract starts August 1st and ends May 31st. 2. Summer only contract. This contract is granted to students who are finishing summer classes after May 31st, are continuing as a resident in the UA’s over the following fall semester, or are an incoming resident starting classes over the summer. For more specific information about University Apartment guidelines and requirements, please see the University Apartments Handbook. Denial and Eviction The University reserves the right to deny housing or evict tenants who are not in good conduct or financial standing with the University, violate the policies of Residential Life, have a criminal record, or falsify information on their housing application. It is the policy of Residential Life to carefully screen applicants who have criminal records. While conviction of a crime will not necessarily result in denial of housing, it is the policy of the Office of Residential Life and Housing to not house individuals who have been convicted of violent crimes or certain other felonies. Payment for On Campus Housing Rates for on-campus housing are approved and set by the Indiana State University Board of Trustees and can be found on the Office of Residential Life website. Students are billed for their on-campus housing and need to check their account to see their balances. If you would like to set up a payment plan, you will have to contact the Controller’s Office and choose from various payment plan options. Delinquent Accounts Every student has a schedule of due dates for their housing payments. It is the students’ responsibility to meet these deadlines. The Office of Residential Life & Housing does not send bills to parents. Billing information can be found online via the My ISU Portal. Liability The student agrees to indemnify and save the University harmless from any and all loss, including attorney’s fees, by reason of accident, injury, loss, or damage to persons or property while living on campus. The University shall not be responsible for the loss of, or damage to personal property while living in on campus housing. All students are urged to make sure his/her personal property is covered by renters insurance. Causality Loss If the on campus space is destroyed by fire, other unavoidable casualty, interruption of utilities, or rendered unusable for any cause, other than the negligence of the student the contract shall be terminated. The liability for the rent will cease upon payment of the rent to the date of termination, if no other like apartment can be offered to the tenant/resident. 16 | P a g e


Personal Property Insurance The University can assume no responsibility for loss of, theft of, or damage to, the personal belongings of residents. Each resident is urged to make sure that his/her property is adequately insured against such perils either through their parents insurance or by purchasing insurance at www.studentinsuranceprograms.com/pp.

My On Campus Dining Universities around the country are striving to make their food service programs fit the lifestyles of their students. Indiana State University has looked at many of the efforts being made on other campuses, and has developed a dining program that is second to none. It features the advantages of the “enter-the-dining-room- for-all-you-can-eat” type of plan with the exceptional variety of the “pay-as-you-go” world of fast food and fine dining. One advantage of this type of meal program is the flexibility to select different menu items from multiple locations at hours that accommodate the schedules of today’s busy university students. Overview of Meal Plan Students utilize the University identification card for access to the benefits of their meal plan. A magnetic stripe on the I.D. card is encoded with an identification card number. The dining service computer contains information, which is matched to the number encoded on the card. This enables the student to eat in any available dining facility. Since meal plans are based on paying only when the student eats, it is important that meal swipes are used only by the student who has paid for that plan. A resident may purchase a meal for another student guest, but the guest must accompany the meal card holder, and present a valid student I.D. to be exempt from sales tax. Non-student guests will be charged Indiana Sales Tax. Meal Plans/Description Credits are the currency used at the Sycamore Towers, Lincoln Quad Dining Hall and their associated carryout locations. In the Dining Halls, students pay one price at the door and can eat all they like during that meal. In dining hall carryout locations, all items are Ala carte (each item has a price). Use of credits in the dining halls is the best use of your meal plan money. Flex 10

Best Flex 12

High Flex 14

1360 Credits/Semester Approximately 10 meals

1734 Credits/Semester Approximately 12 meals

1972 Credits/Semester Approximately 14 meals

per week

per week

per week

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Commons Cash is currency which can be used at all ISU Dining campus locations. Commons Cash has a dollar for dollar value. After determining the Flex plan that best fits your lifestyle, choose the amount of commons cash that you will need for the semester. $102.00 Commons Cash or $6.00 per week for budgeting purposes $204.00 Commons Cash or $12.00 per week for budgeting purposes $306.00 Commons Cash or $18.00 per week for budgeting purposes The NonFlex option is also offered, however this only provides 10 meals in the Dining Hall per week.   

Unused meals are forfeited at the end of the week Dining in the Commons, Carry outs and satellite locations are not part of this plan. Commons Cash cannot be added to the Non Flex plan

IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT MEAL PLAN SELECTION:  

Do not fear an “under-buy” of the meal plan because with all the Flex plans, you can add Commons Cash (dollar for dollar) or Credits ($.30 each for residents) at any time. Do not fear an “over-buy” of the meal plan because balances roll over into the spring semester (as long as you live on campus) and adjustments can be made at that time.

As a reminder, initial resident meal plans can be purchased and added to your University account. Any Commons Cash or Credits that you add at a later date must be paid for at that time. 

Security – Your meal plan account is safer than cash, or any other exchange. In the event of a lost or stolen card, your account can be shut down so there is no unauthorized use.

Convenience – YOU CAN’T MISS A MEAL! Dining Halls (or carry-outs) offer meal service from 7am-10pm and carry-outs provide food for your room.

Dining Options Generations Generations offers a full restaurant experience featuring locally-sourced items whenever possible. A full lunch buffet featuring a salad bar, multiple entrees, sides, desserts and beverages is available daily Monday - Friday. Meals available for dine-in and carryout. Lincoln Quad Enjoy a delicious meal at this all-you-care-to eat dining restaurant located upstairs in Lincoln Quad. From healthy foods to wholesome favorites, Lincoln's Dining Hall serves what you crave. Some of the exciting options offered are Delicious Entrees, Pizza, Deli, Grille, Salad Bar, Soft Serve Ice Cream, and Freshly Baked Cookies in the dining room. One low price gives you outstanding variety, and you can come back for seconds! 18 | P a g e


When your busy schedule doesn't allow you to sit down and eat, don't skip a meal! Lincoln Dining is a continuous dining facility offering sit-down or carry out meals.

Sycamore Dining Hall This campus dining restaurant serves a wide variety of options in an all-you-care-to-eat setting. It is located in the heart of Sycamore Towers, with entrances through Blumberg, Cromwell, Mills, and Rhoads halls. Don't let Sycamore Dining Hall’s large size stop you from experiencing the wide variety of options in store for you. We offer:  The Grille and Deli with made-to-order sandwiches  Pizza and Pasta area which features fresh baked pizza daily.  Exhibition Cooking Line for cooked-to-order dishes  Classics Line featuring home-style favorites  Salad Bar, Soups, Desserts, Soft Serve Ice Cream and a very large beverage selection Also located in Sycamore Dining Hall is Mills Carryout; open for lunch and dinner (Monday - Thursday). The menu includes freshly made hot food items and Simply to Go sandwiches, salads & side items as well as assorted snack & beverage items. Mills Carryout can be accessed through the entrance just off the Mills Hall lobby. The Sycamore Commons Located in the Hulman Memorial Student Union, the Commons offers a large variety of choices for all appetites. All locations accept cash, credit/debit and Commons Cash. Resident Students with Meal Plans: The following Commons locations accept Credits: Einstein Bros., Pizza Hut, Burger King, Taco Bell, Sub Connection, Krispy Krunchy Chicken and Edy's. Credits may only be used 1:30 PM-Close Friday-Sunday. Commons Cash: Students with less than 28 credit hours are restricted from using Commons Cash between the hours of 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday during the fall semester. The Campus Cupboard (convenience store) accepts Commons Cash with the same restrictions as the rest of the Commons. Other Campus Options Cups & Chaucer Located in the lobby of the Cunningham Library Cup & Chaucer proudly serves a full line of hot & cold beverages from Starbucks. Also featured is a range of food items from Simply to Go. If you're in the library taking a study break or just nearby, stop in for a real treat! Accepts Cash, Credit/Debit, Commons Cash and Commuter Meal Swipes. Jazzmen Cafe’& Brewery With locations downstairs in the Lincoln Quads Dining Hall and in the Bayh College of Education, Jazzman's Café invites patrons to wake up and smell the fresh brewed selection of coffees or kick back and relax to soothing jazz sounds as you enjoy a fresh gourmet salad, hearty sandwich, a refreshing smoothie, or a made-from-scratch dessert. Stalker Hall Daily Grind Located in the lobby of Stalker Hall, the Daily Grind proudly serves a full line of hot & cold beverages from Starbucks. Also featured is a range of food items from Simply to Go. Accepts Cash, Commons Cash, & Credit/Debit Cards

Sick Tray A student who is ill may request a sick tray. This tray, consisting largely of liquid and soft foods, may be obtained by asking Hall Staff for a special meal pass. A friend of the sick person then picks up and delivers the food. Special meal passes for sick trays are good only for one meal. If a person is ill longer, an additional pass may be obtained for the next meal. The rationale for this policy is that the Area Coordinator needs to be aware of the condition of the ill student. Weekend sick tray requests require the same special meal pass. 19 | P a g e


Student Recreation Center Juice Bar Stop by before, during, or after your workout for a delicious smoothie, power drink, or a healthy snack. Accepts Cash, Commons Cash, & Credit/Debit Cards.

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Community Blumberg Hall Burford Hall Cromwell Hall^ Erickson Hall Hines Hall Jones Hall Lincoln Quad Mills Hall Pickerl Hall Reeve Hall Rhoads Hall Sandison Hall University Apartments 500 Wabash

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The Office of Residential Life and Housing understands that students want flexibility in their living options. Therefore, we offer a v a r i e t y o f o n - c a m p u s o p t i o n s f o r s t u d e n t s , v i s i t i n g s c h o l a r s a n d f a m i l i e s .

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Classroom Community Blumberg Hall Burford Hall Cromwell Hall^ Erickson Hall Hines Hall Jones Hall Lincoln Quad Mills Hall Pickerl Hall Reeve Hall Rhoads Hall Sandison Hall University Apartments 500 Wabash

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^Cromwell is closed for the 2016-2017 Academic Year for Renovations.

Every Residence Hall and University Apartment has its own unique identity and quality.

Academic Themed Communities ACADEMIC LEARNING COMMUNITIES In our Academic Learning Communities, students are taking at least one academic course together in addition to living together in one community. Just like our Academic Clustered Communities, our Academic Learning Communities exist to help students successfully transition from the secondary school environment to being a successful student at ISU. Students in these communities have opportunities to connect their classes and their faculty beyond the traditional classroom. Students can expect to have an Academic Peer Advocate who serves as the Supplemental Instructor in their common 21 | P a g e


class. Their faculty members will also come into the halls regularly for events, study sessions and often even to join students for dinner. Many of our academic communities begin with a pre-fall program held before the start of classes in August. These communities create an intentional environment where the focus is to help them build relationships and connections with faculty, staff, and fellow students that will benefit them as they move forward in their academic career. LEADERSHIP LEARNING COMMUNITY (APPLICATION REQUIRED) The Leadership Learning Community (LLC) is a living-learning community on Indiana State University campus sponsored by the Residential Life Office. The LLC is dedicated to developing students into future leaders on our campus and in the community. Student leadership skills will increase through community service, inclusiveness, effective communication, self-discovery, personal growth and involvement. Members will strive for excellence: while keeping a positive attitude, being responsible, compassionate, and serving as a positive role model for others. This community will require participation in Project Success and arriving to campus early. MULTICULTURAL MEN ACHIEVING SCHOLARSHIP MMAS mission is to assist multicultural men in reaching their personal and professional goals through education, leadership, and mentorship. Multicultural men will actively engage in activities to help them become responsible men, successful scholars, and productive citizens. Participants will understand the importance of character development, community engagement, and seek opportunities to develop others in their community, town, city, and world. This community will require participation in Project Success and arriving to campus early. MULTICULTURAL WOMEN ACHIEVING SCHOLARSHIP MWAS mission is to assist multicultural women in reaching their personal and professional goals through education, leadership, and mentorship. Multicultural women will actively engage in activities to help young women become responsible in the college environment, successful scholars, and productive citizens within the community. Participants will understand the importance of character development, community engagement, building each other up, supporting fellow women, and seek opportunities to develop others in their community, town, city, and world. This community will require participation in Project Success and arriving to campus early. LEAP (MUST PARTICIPATE IN THE SUMMER LEAP PROGRAM) LEAP is a 3-week residential summer bridge program that provides instruction in basic college success skills and the opportunity to earn 3 college credits. Students whose admission requirements include successful completion of LEAP may request housing on the LEAP floor. Students on the LEAP floor will be enrolled in the same UNIV 101 freshman seminar course in the fall. POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LEGAL STUDIES COMMUNITY Students interested in political science or legal studies should consider this academic learning community. Students registered for this ALC will reside in Mills Hall and will be registered in Political Science 107: Leadership, Ethics, and Democracy. Students living in this community will have an opportunity to connect with students, faculty, and peer mentors who have an interest in political science and legal issues. Students will participate in a variety of programs and activities both inside and outside of class to help them determine if this is an appropriate academic and career path to pursue beyond the first year. PROJECT SUCCESS ISUCCEED COMMUNITY (INVITE ONLY) Indiana State University has created a pilot hybrid program “ISUcceed/Project Success� to help our freshmen have a successful transition and first year of college. ISUcceed is a mentoring program designed to address issues that new underrepresented minority college students may face and helps to support students as they become scholars. Project Success, is a summer bridge program that provides an opportunity for you to get a jump-start on college and on your academic success.

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Academic Clustered Communities Academic Clustered communities are different than our Academic Learning communities in that students choosing to live in these communities are clustered together by major or college but do not take a transition course together. Academic Clustered communities exist to help students connect with others in their major or college and work to incorporate faculty and resources into the living environment. Students can expect to have an Academic Peer Advocate who shares their same major or is part of their same college. These communities bring in academic advisors, faculty, and other staff to host and attend events held in the hall. Many times, faculty and staff will even venture into the dining halls to eat a meal with students in these communities. These communities create an intentional environment where the focus is to help them build relationships and connections with faculty, staff, and fellow students that will benefit them as they move forward in their academic career. Rhoads Hall College of Technology: The 2nd – 5th floors of Rhoads are home to our College of Technology students. Students in the Aviation program are specifically housed on the 2nd floor to help them make connections with the first year students in their major. The 3rd-5th floors house any student within the college that chooses to participate in the academic clustered community. Cromwell Hall Criminology/Criminal Justice: The 2nd and 3rd floors of Cromwell are the spot for you if you’re a Criminology/Criminal Justice major. The APA’s on these floors are upper-class students of the same major. Exploratory Studies: If you are part of the Exploratory Studies program through the University College, you can call the 8th and 9th floors of Cromwell home! The RA and APA on this floor will be junior or senior level students who have experience and knowledge in helping students connect to different opportunities within the university. Education: Floors 10-12 are home to our College of Education students. The APA’s on these floors are education majors and are there to help connect you to faculty and help you prepare for your 4 years as an Education major! Burford Hall College of Business: The 3rd-5th floors of Burford are the spot for you if you’re a Business major. The APA’s on these floors are upper-class business students. Burford is also the closest hall to the College of Business! Fine Arts: The 6th floor of Burford is home to our Fine Arts majors. Burford Hall has practice rooms on the first floor and a performance space in the lobby that includes a stage. The APA on this floor is also a student in one of the fine arts majors. Erickson Hall Psychology: If you are a psychology major, than you can call the 4th floor of Erickson home for a year. The APA on this floor is a fellow psych major who is there to assist you as you start your journey into the field of Psychology. Sandison Hall Nursing: The 2nd – 7th floor are home to many of our Nursing students. Sandison also houses a select number of upper-class nursing students who offer some great insight into being a nursing student. Sandison is also home to the McKee Nursing Lounge on the first floor of Sandison. There are also two academic advisors who have offices in the lobby. Athletic Training: First year athletic training students live on the 8th and 9th floors of Sandison and each floor has an APA who is an upper-class athletic training students. Hines Hall College of Nursing, Health, and Human Services: For those students in the College of Nursing, Health, and Human Services who are not Nursing or Athletic training majors, Hines Hall, floors 6-10, are the spot for you! For those 23 | P a g e


Nursing and Athletic Training students not placed in Sandison, Hines Hall is also an option for you. The faculty and staff in your college work to collaborate and bridge the two buildings together for college wide programs and events. Hines Hall is located right next to Sandison. Additional Learning Communities Sophomore Year Experience (SYE) – University Apartment & Lincoln Quad The SYE learning community is dedicated to providing an educational experience where sophomore students will grow academically, personally, and in career readiness during an important year of college transition. It is the goal of the program that by the end of a participant's sophomore year they will 1) have a peer support group at ISU, 2) have decided upon an academic major that fits with their goals & values, and 3) have participated in career readiness activities - all of which will lead participants one step closer to completing college. Resident Assistant (RA) and Academic Peer Advocate (APA) staff specifically trained on the sophomore transition will organize activities and initiatives to build a community that supports sophomore students in their second year of college, create connections with fellow students, and begin a transition to living off campus in a more independent living environment. This community is housed in Unit 2 of the University Apartments. Participants will live in Unit 2 of the University Apartments and understand that they will be assigned or choose a roommate that is also a participant in this community. Requirements By agreeing to live in this community, participants will be required to do the following: • Actively participate in three SYE activities/initiatives each semester: o(1) Academic Success Activity/Initiative o(1) Social Activity/Initiative o(1) Career Readiness Activity/Initiative • Set and actively work to achieve semester goals • Attend and actively participate in one community meeting per month If participants do not complete the requirements as listed above, they will be required to move out of the SYE community and move to an on-campus residence hall. FREQUENT ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SYE COMMUNITY Q: Why are there requirements to live in the SYE Community? A: Sophomore year is a year of many transitions, and national studies show that 1) there are decreased resources for sophomore students compared to freshman year, 2) taking major classes may lead to difficulties attaining the same level of academic success as one’s freshman year, and 3) that the proverbial “sophomore slump” actually exists. Also, moving away from main campus during this time can be a bigger transition than one might think. Studies show that sophomore living communities that actively engage in academic success, social activities, and career readiness have a more successful sophomore transition, and have a better chance at completing their degree. We want to make sure that if we house students in a community that is disconnected from main campus (with a more independent style of living), our students will still actively participate in co-curricular activities to ensure they have the best chance to succeed during their sophomore year Q: This sounds great! However, I’m concerned that I will be too busy to participate in these activities. A: We know that our students can be quite busy. Maybe you are working a ton of hours at a job to afford attending college. Maybe you’ve made several great connections last year, and are involved in campus / your major already. However, as stated above, there are several new challenges that you will face in your sophomore year that don’t have to be a challenge with the appropriate resources. We will bring resources to the SYE community, and it is ISU and Residential Life’s hope that participants in this themed community take advantage of those resources. If you already participate in activities that fall in line with academic and career readiness learning goals, we will work with you to find a way for as many of your outside activities to meet these requirements. For example, if you can’t make a 24 | P a g e


specific community meeting, we will set up times where you can meet with the RA or APA to discuss what you missed. If you already attend a Career Center presentation (resume review, internship 101, etc.), that can count too. We still do want you to go to a social event to help make the UAs your new home, but there will be so many opportunities for this that there shouldn’t be any problem with you meeting the requirements. Q: I already have a strong GPA, career path, and friend group. Do I still have to attend activities in the SYE Community? A: It sounds like you have made the most of your time at Indiana State University so far, and are on the path to earning your degree! As stated previously, research and experience shows us that even students who had a strong freshman year will experience unexpected transitions that will potentially make one’s sophomore year more difficult than freshman year. We will work to make SYE activities dynamic, engaging, and relevant to sophomores. Also, since new challenges arise as you learn more about your major classes, extra academic support and career readiness tips coming from upper-class students who have already made it through their sophomore transition won’t hurt! Q: What is it like living in the SYE Community? A: Independence, community, resources, and fun – those are a few words we use to describe the University Apartments! The University Apartments are located less than a mile from main campus, and is a short ride on the campus shuttle, drive, or bike ride away. Residents will share a one bedroom or one bedroom with study apartment, and it is fully furnished. This means a couch, living room chairs, kitchen table & chairs, and end table in the common space, and each person receives a twin bed, desk & chair, and dresser. There is plenty of closet space and a full kitchen & bathroom – the only thing you need to bring is a microwave! While you may be living in a sophomore building, you will be surrounded by a community of juniors/seniors, graduate & PhD students, families, and a large contingent of international students. There are several social gathering locations, including the Community Center in the lower level of Unit 4 (large television, pool table, video games, study space, and more!), floor lounges, and laundry rooms on every floor. There’s also plenty of green space where residents can grill out, play sand volleyball, or catch an outdoor movie!

Residential Life Policies All ISU students are responsible for conducting themselves in a manner that does not infringe on the rights of others or interfere with the educational function of the University. The following are the Office of the Residential Life and Housing policies. Students are responsible for adhering to University policies as stated in Code of Student Conduct. If found in violation of Residential Life Policies or University Code of Student Conduct a students will go through the University Conduct process. Abuse of a Staff Member Residents and guest need to follow any reasonable request of an Office of Residential Life and Housing staff member acting in the performance of his or her duties. No person shall use abusive language or display other behaviors which are threatening and directed toward an Office of Residential Life and Housing staff member. Alcohol Policy The regulation on the use of alcoholic beverages in the residence halls/apartments are consistent with university policies and Indiana state law which prohibits the purchase, use or possession of an alcoholic beverage by individuals who are not at least 21 years of age. In all University housing, with the exception approved apartments in 500 Wabash and the University Apartments-Units 1, 3, and 4, alcohol is not permitted to be possessed and/or consumed, regardless of age. These regulations apply to all students who reside in University housing as well as students’ guest(s). It should be noted that the presence of empty alcoholic beverage containers leads to a rebuttable presumption that the student(s) found in possession of such containers possessed and/or consumed the original container’s contents. If empty alcoholic beverages containers are found in the student’s residence in violation of these regulations, the student will be asked to remove these containers and may be referred through the student conduct process. (See Alcohol Policy-Apartment Addendum) 25 | P a g e


Alcohol Policy-Apartments Addendum For apartments in 500 Wabash and the University Apartments-Units 1, 3, and 4 that meet and follow the following listed qualifications and regulations, alcoholic beverages may be possessed and consumed for personal use only. Bulk containers, (kegs, beer balls, beer bongs, etc.) of any type are not permissible. Alcohol must be confined to the individual’s apartment with the door closed. Alcohol is not allowed in public areas of the community such as the hallway, stairwell, floor lounge, bathroom or elevator. No person of legal drinking age shall drink alcohol in the presence of minors (those under the age of 21). The age of the all assigned residents determines if alcohol is permitted in the apartment, if anyone under the age of 21 is assigned to the apartment alcohol is not permitted. In 500 Wabash and the University Apartments, where all persons (residents and/or guests) of an apartment are of legal drinking age, alcohol is permitted to be possessed and/or consumed in that apartment with the door closed. In University Apartments Family Housing Units children/dependents a r e n o t considered traditional assigned residents or guests, this policy does not apply to those specific units within UA-Unit 4. (See Alcohol Policy) Creating a Harmful Educational Environment Actions, or threatening behavior by individual students, groups of students or student organizations, which interfere with the orderly functions of the residence halls, or actions which endanger the health or safety of members of the residence hall community, will be deemed as a policy violation. Students may not interfere with the safe and clean environment of others. Students, groups, or student organizations will be asked to disperse or leave the community. Door Propping/Tailgating It is against the Office of Residential Life and Housing’s policy to prop open a lobby, stairwell or emergency doors. You also cannot prop your room/apartment door open if you are not in your room or apartment. Tailgating is defined as walking in behind someone and not being swiped or keyed into the building. This is strictly prohibited and the resident/student will be found responsibility for the behavior of the student if something was to occur. Failure to Discourage Failure to discourage another person from committing an act that violates Residence Hall Policies, University Policy, or State of Indiana law is prohibited and residents and guests should make an effort to discourage another person from violating a regulation and/or to report a violation of which one has knowledge. Guest Policy Students are allowed to have guests, both during the day and overnight, so long as all fellow roommates approve of the guest staying. Guests must be escorted at all times by the host resident, and the host will be responsible for the behavior of the guest. If guests are causing issues in the community, Residential Life staff members have the right to ask your guest to leave. Each residents is limited to two guests with them upstairs in their residence hall floor/room at any one time. Residents wanting to meet with a larger group are encouraged to use the building common area (Lobby, Class Rooms, and Meeting Rooms) to socialize or study. Overnight visitation has these additional regulations:  Non-ISU minor (Under the age of 18) guests must be approved by the professional staff of Residential Life prior 24-hours prior to guest arrival.  Overnight guests will be permitted to stay for a maximum of three consecutive nights in a given hall. This is not to exceed ten days a semester and must be accompanied by a roommate’s prior consent.  Guests may be required to leave at the discretion of the Area Coordinator or other Residential Life staff members. Identifying Yourself All Residents must positively identify themselves when asked by Residential Life staff members acting in the performance of their duties. The preferred form of identification shall be a current and valid University Identification card, state ID card, or driver’s license. Key Policy Keys are issued to residents/tenants of the Residence Halls and Apartments, and must remain in the possession of the 26 | P a g e


resident/tenant. For the security of the building, resident and apartment keys may not be given to any other student or guest for any circumstance. Keys may not be copied for any reason. Pet Policy Residents/tenants may not keep or harbor dogs, cats, or other animals. Only fish, in tanks 10 gallons or less, are allowed. Contact the Office of Residential Life and Housing for questions regarding service animals and any questions concerning pets. Smoking Policy Indiana State University is a smoke-free campus. This means that smoking tobacco or any other substance is not permitted within the residence halls/apartments, the entrances to the residence halls/units, the parking lots, or in any other area of the University Apartments grounds that is not identified has a smoking area. If the smell of smoke carries over from your residence hall or apartment to the hallway you will also be found responsible for violating the smoking policy. You are permitted to smoke in the following areas:  City Sidewalks (1st Street, Farrington Street, 3rd Street, Crawford Street)  Designated smoke areas on campus Quiet Hours The Office of Residential Life and Housing staff members have a shared responsibility with students to insure that residence halls/university apartments are positive environments that support studying and sleeping. Contributing to unreasonable noise in the residence halls is not permitted. Noise should not be audible outside the door, floor or ceiling of a room. Within a room, study or quiet time takes priority. For this reason, the University quiet hours are in effect for all residence hall floors and University Apartments from:

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10:00 p.m. until 8:00 a.m. the following morning, Sunday through Thursday and Midnight to 10:00 a.m. on Friday, Saturday and holidays.

During quiet hours, it is a reasonable expectation that residents should be able to study or sleep in their rooms, uninterrupted by extraneous noises. To ensure that an academically supportive environment exists, the following guidelines will be in effect:  The noise level resulting from stereos, radios, television, talking, etc., in any area (rooms, bathrooms, etc.) should not be heard one door away from where it is originating. Also, no stereo should be able to be heard outside any residence hall. When using stereos, headphones are encouraged.  Floor lounges are to be used for quiet activities (cards, television watching, games, programs, cooking, eating, etc.) plus any program approved by residence hall staff. Obviously, in open lounges, students and staff need to be even more aware of how their noise is affecting others.  Conversation in the hallway must be held in a lowered voice.  The primary responsibility for enforcement of quiet hours shall rest with individuals who are bothered by the noise.  Residence hall staff will intervene to support quiet hours in those situations when they personally know of noise or when a resident has been unable to accomplish a successful intervention.  Quiet hours will be in effect 24 hours a day during finals week. Generally quiet hours will begin at midnight on the Friday evening of the weekend before finals (if finals begin on a Monday).  Drums and musical instruments should be played in music practice rooms, not in the residence hall rooms. Residents who interfere with the rights of others to sleep and study during final exam week may be relocated or removed depending on their exam status. Weapons and Fire Arms Residents/tenants may not possess, store, or use firearms or other lethal weapons on any University property at any time – including the Residence Halls and the University Apartments. To do so is a violation of your housing/lease contract and the ISU Student Code of Conduct. The storage of firearms and weapons in an automobile on campus is also prohibited. 27 | P a g e


The University Conduct Process There are several levels to the Indiana State University judicial process. If students are allegedly involved in violations of Code of Student Conduct, Residential Life policy or the Housing Contract, they may see Residential Life staff in Conduct Discussions/Meetings. If a student violates a severe Code of Student Conduct, the case will be handled by the Student Conduct and Integrity office. These conduct meetings are based on educational growth and development within a residential community that emphasizes the importance of personal health and academic success. The Office of Residential Life and Housing understands the importance of the collegiate experience and a residents’ rights to experience a variety of educational sanctions and outcomes. Please visit https://www.indstate.edu/student-conduct for additional information on the Student Conduct and Integrity Office. All residents should review the code of Student Conduct and be aware of their Rights and Responsibilities as a student at Indiana State University. See a direct link to the Code of Conduct here: (http://www.indstate.edu/sites/default/files/media/Documents/PDF/Code%20of%20Student%20Conduct%202015-2016_1.pdf)

Conduct Meetings and Discussions Conduct Meetings and Discussions are scheduled appointments with Office of Residential Life and Housing graduate and professional staff members. During the meeting the alleged violations are discussed and the resident’s responsibility for the alleged violations is determined. Once responsibility has been determined, Residential Life staff will explain the educational sanctions. Educational Sanctions Residents found to be responsible for an alleged violation must complete all sanctions assigned by the University’s staff or further conduct action will be taken. Sanctions may be imposed for both violations of the Code of Student Conduct or violations of Residential Life policy and housing contract. Administrative Relocations Residents may be administratively relocated if the Area Coordinator believes it necessary for the maintenance of order and the good of the community. Upon review of the situation, the appropriate Residential Life Assistant Director may assign the student to another room, floor or hall. When notifying a student of relocation, they should be informed that this action is being taken administratively. When possible and reasonable, students will be allowed two to three days to complete the relocation. However, the Area Coordinator and/or appropriate Assistant Director may require that the move take place immediately in order to bring order to an untenable situation. Administrative Contract Terminations A resident may have his/her contract administratively terminated if he/she poses an imminent, continuing threat to students and/or staff or has been involved in a severe case of misconduct. Residents may also have their contract administratively terminated if they have acted continually in a manner that significantly disrupts the community of the floor or hall. Examples of situations justifying contract termination include but are not limited to: assaulting another student or staff member, selling drugs, possessing weapons/explosives, and engaging in severe harassment, arson, or vandalism. Students who have contracts administratively cancelled may appeal this decision to the Executi ve Director of Residential Life who shall have final determination of the matter. Appeals of Administrative Actions Students wishing to appeal administrative relocation or contract termination may do so by submitting a letter of appeal within 48 hours (excluding weekends) of notification of the action. However, the administrative action may require a temporary move pending the outcome of any appeal (i.e. the student may be required to move temporarily while waiting for a decision on their appeal). The decision to temporarily relocate during the appeal period would be made by the administrator making the decision, (i.e. Assistant Director, Associate Director or Executive Director of Residential Life). 28 | P a g e


Student Conduct and Integrity Office and Philosophy The Student Conduct and Integrity (SCI) Office handles student code of conduct violations. We encourage students to “Be Rooted”, in the Code of Student Conduct (Code) but being educated on their rights and responsibilities’ as Sycamores. “I didn’t know” isn’t a reasonable excuse for engaging in behavior that goes against Indiana State’s standards or expectations. The Code contains policies governing the behavior of all students and student organizations at Indiana State University. These policies and prohibited conduct are necessary to orderly operation of the University and the maintenance of an environment designed to enhance the academic and personal growth of students. Student Rights Student Conduct and Integrity (SCI) wants every students to know their specific protections and actions as a student of Indiana State University. No student has to earn these and each student receives them equally. Utilizing these rights is up to the students; however, some are worked directly into the protocol of SCI. Below are rights of students at Indiana State University as it relates to the SCI office:     

A student has the right of others based upon the nature of the University’s educational processes. A student has the right to participate in free exchange of ideas and peaceful assembly in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. Each student has the right to be free from discrimination; including harassment, on the basis of race, sex, religion, disability, age, nationality origin, sexual orientation, or veteran status. A student has the right to privacy except as otherwise provided by law and University policy/procedure. The rights to fair and equitable procedures determining when and upon whom consequences for violation of campus policies should be imposed.

On-Campus Living Procedures Abandoned Property If students leave items in their room and no longer are assigned to that space, resident will be responsible for the cost of removal and temporary storage. Staff will bag and tag personal items left in the unoccupied student rooms/half of room. Residents will be contacted by hall staff through their @sycamores.indstate.edu email address to notify you of the abandoned property and to set up a time for item pickup. Residents are provided a 10-day time period to notify staff and retrieve their abandoned items. With limitations on storage space, students who fail to pick up items during this assigned time frame will have their abandoned items donated to local charitable organizations. Bicycle Registration We highly recommend our residents to register his/her bicycle with ISU Public Safety. Should the bicycle become lost or stolen, having the bicycle’s information on file with Public Safety may expedite your recovery of the bicycle. Fire Safety The University has taken many precautions to limit the danger of fire in the residence halls, but the main responsibility falls to the residents. Below are policies students need to follow: 1. Any appliance that may create a fire or safety hazard should not be used in student rooms or in any area of the suites in Lincoln Quad. Gas appliances of any kind, grills and space heater are prohibited. The use of: hot plates, electric skillets, toasters, irons or any appliance with an exposed heating element or heating surface are prohibited in the halls. 2. Highly flammable products must not be brought into the hall or apartment. The use of kerosene, gasoline, naphtha, benzene, and propane are prohibited. 3. To prevent the rapid spread of room fires on the floors, residents should not remove ceiling tiles (suspended or interlocked) at any time. 29 | P a g e


4. Candles, oil lamps, fireworks, sparklers, and smoke bombs may not be kept or used anywhere in the residence halls. 5. All lighting needs to be UL approved for the student's safety and the safety of others. Halogen lamps are not allowed in student rooms. 6. Do not overload electrical circuits. Care should be taken in the use of all electrical cords and the overloading of sockets. All electrical cords should be UL approved. Extension cords should not run under rugs or closed doors. 7. Fire doors are to be kept closed. These doors prevent fire, smoke and fumes from spreading through the building in the event of fire thus keeping some routes clear for safe exit. Glass inserts in the fire doors may not be covered with paper, cellophane or paint. 8. Make sure access to doors and window is clear. Furniture must be arranged to permit full opening of doors and windows. Lofts must not be located in front of windows. 9. Bicycles should not be chained to stairways or left on landing. Personal belongings should not be left in corridors, stairwells, or other common areas. 10. Anyone who tampers with the firefighting equipment, fire alarms, guard rails, exit lights, or any other equipment on the campus in such a way as to endanger his/her own safety or the safety of others, subjects himself/herself to disciplinary actions up to and including suspension which may be taken in addition to civil action. Each residence hall has a central fire alarm system. This system calls the fire department, ISU Public Safety and sounds an alarm in the building. Smoke detectors are located in public areas, hallways, and individual student rooms. In addition, there are fire alarm boxes and fire extinguishers on every floor. When an alarm sounds staff members will take all necessary steps to assist in the prompt evacuation of a building. Students are required and expected to leave when an alarm sounds. Conduct action will be initiated with all students who fail to obey alarms. Staff members cannot be expected to unlock every door to alert residents. In the case of fire, the residence hall staff's primary responsibility is to make sure that the building evacuated and that the residents stay away from the building until it is safe to reenter. Fire and police personnel will be advised of any areas or occupants whose safety or accountability is in doubt. Preparedness: Be completely familiar with fire drill procedures and follow them implicitly. Know your fire exits and some convenient alternatives including all dining room exits. We aware of the location of the nearest pull stations, in the case of an emergency utilize these while exiting the building to make others aware of the emergency. Fire drills are conducted each semester in the residence halls to help residents stay aware of proper fire safety response, remember you must exit the building during all alarms. In Case of Fire: Pull an alarm. Close your room door. Immediately evacuate the building and follow fire drill procedures. After evacuation notify the staff or emergency responders of the fire location in the quickest way possible. All fires, no matter how small, should be reported to residence hall staff immediately. Any resident responsible for causing a fire in University Housing may be charged for the cost of repairs or replacements. When Alarm Sounds: React to every alarm as if there is a fire. Keep calm and follow full emergency procedures and/or instructions. Quickly put on clothes appropriate for the weather, and sturdy shoes. Open blinds, close windows and closet doors. Turn off electrical equipment except overhead light. Take your room keys, student ID, lock your door and proceed to nearest assigned fire exit. Do not use elevators. Walk rapidly, but do not run. Remain outside the building until the signal is given to return. Individuals with mobility impairment should call 911 and notify Public Safety as to his/her location. Furnishing & Decorations for my Room/Apartment All residence halls rooms come with the following One of each per resident:  Twin Bed  Dresser  Desk + Desk Chair Residence Hall rooms contain two twin beds that are a little longer than the standard size mattresses. It’s suggested you use extra-long twin sheets (36" X 80"). Students living in the residence halls are encouraged to rent a loft from www.bedloft.com. 30 | P a g e


All furnished apartments will receive the following items One of each per resident:  Twin Bed  Dresser  Desk + Desk Chair One per furnished apartment:  Dining Table + Chairs  Sofa and/or Living Room Chairs  Coffee Table or End Table Decorating/Additions The Office of Residential Life and Housing recognizes that the student’s room is his/her home for the academic or contract year. Therefore, we attempt to provide all necessary furnishings. In order to help ensure the longevity of student room furnishings, the following guidelines are necessary:

 

Anything installed on walls, such as mirrors, bookcases or bulletin boards must remain as installed. Furniture may not be removed from the room. Extreme care should be exercised in moving any furniture within the room to avoid damage to the floor or furniture.  The room arrangements must not place furniture in such close proximity as to cause scratching on the sides of the dresser-desks, or chests.  Damage to furniture or the room will be billed to the room occupants and will not be considered as due to ordinary wear and tear.  Draperies are furnished by the University and are an essential part of the overall aesthetic appearance of the residence hall. Therefore, draperies are not to be replaced or removed by students.  Security chains and/or alarms that would prevent access by a staff member in the case of an emergency, or in any way damage the door, may not be installed on a room door.  No room painting is allowed. University Apartment residents/tenants need to receive written consent before installing the following:  Additional locks or fixtures  Additional electronic wiring  Outside antennas/satellite dishes  Shades, blinds, awnings or window guards  Nails, tacks, tape, bolts, screws in the walls, doors, floors, and ceilings  Additional plumbing attachments, faucets, or shower heads Inspection of Residence Hall Rooms and Apartments In the interest of health and the general welfare of the community, the University reserves the right to enter and inspect residence hall rooms and apartments for safety, cleanliness, upkeep, and policy violations. Staff members will provide adequate notice and will announce themselves prior to entering a resident’s room or apartment. The University also reserves the right from time to time, at its own expense or the expense of its agents or contractors, to make renovations, repairs and alterations in and about the on campus housing space and may enter the premises for these purposes. Keys: Room/Apartment The safe handling of your keys is the initial source of security on campus. We ask residents to exercise great caution in ensuring the location of their keys at all times. You are urged to lock your room whenever you leave (even if just for a minute or two). You are not p e r m i t t e d t o loan your keys to any other person. It is not permissible for anyone, other than authorized University personnel, to make duplicates of University keys. Misplaced Key: When a resident is unsure of the location of his/her key, there is some delay in its return, or the resident 31 | P a g e


is locked out of his/her room, they should go to the front desk to obtain a loan key. The resident is required to show identification and sign a key agreement form. The charge for obtaining a loan key is $5.00 for each key. The resident has 72 hours to return the loan key or be charged for a lock change. Lost Key: When the resident reports, to hall staff during University business hours, that his/her key is lost or stolen, the lock is changed and the resident is charged for the lock to be re-cored and all new keys to be cut. Charges are calculated at the cost of changing out the core(s) associated to all room/apartment doors, the cutting of new keys for that core and the cost of labor. These costs have been reviewed and approved by the University Board of Trustees. If the key is reported lost during non-University business hours, the resident and roommate can either: (a) accept temporary accommodations until the next University business hours, or (b) request and emergency lock changed (this option does have extra cost associated for bringing staff in facilities staff after hours). Mail & Deliveries The mailboxes located in the first floor lobbies of each building are for the receiving mail. In the University Apartments and 500 Wabash the first floor lobbies are designated for US Post Office mail only. There is no “Campus Mail” service for University Apartments or 500 Wabash. Your room/apartment key opens your individual mailbox, with the exception of 500 Wabash who are issued mailbox keys. Residence Hall/Apartment staff members do not have access to the individual mailboxes. Tampering with the mailboxes or individual’s mail is prohibited by law. The Post Office requires that your mail be addressed in the following manner:

Residence Halls RESIDENCE HALL SAMPLE: Your Name Building Name, Mailbox ### Terre Haute, IN 47809 University Apartments UNIT ONE SAMPLE: Your Name 100 Farrington St. Apt ### Terre Haute, IN 47807 UNIT THREE SAMPLE: Your Name 201 Crawford St. Apt ### Terre Haute, IN 47807

UNIT TWO SAMPLE: Your Name 200 Farrington St. Apt ### Terre Haute, IN 47807 UNIT FOUR SAMPLE: Your Name 101 Crawford St. Apt ### Terre Haute, IN 47807

500 Wabash 500 Wabash SAMPLE: Your Name 9 N. 5th St. Apt ### Terre Haute, IN 47807 Maintenance The resident/tenant agrees that no alterations or changes in the building, furniture, or equipment on said premises will be made without first obtaining the consent in writing from the University. A breach of this contract/lease will be cause for termination of the contract/ lease, at the option of the University. The resident/tenant will pay any and all damages, which may be sustained to said property by reason of such breach. The resident/tenant must bear the cost 32 | P a g e


of repairing damage to their room/unit, building, equipment or furnishings resulting from carelessness or negligence. This will include such items as cleaning clogged sinks, drains, and toilets for repairing disposals that fail to operate because of improper use. Parking All residents/tenants must register their vehicle with ISU Parking Services and purchase a parking permit to park on campus. There is a specific parking pass required for the University Apartments residents/tenants. The Public Safety office offers a “UA Parking Only Permit,” which is an option to be used only as a supplemental permit for spouses and/or driving-age children. A regular student/staff/faculty permit must be purchased first to qualify for this particular permit. Please contact Parking Services at 812-237-8888 for more specific parking information. Vehicles must be parked within the designated, white lined, spaces. Residents are expected to observe any reserved, handicap, and no parking restriction zones. All restricted zones are identified with posted signs and/or yellow or blue paint. Do not park in front of the dumpsters at any time. The dock areas are for immediate loading and unloading. Pest Control All residents share the responsibility of helping to control the presence of pests and insects in the residence halls and apartment buildings. You can help control pests with the following:         

Refrain from leaving exposed food and dirty dishes on counters, floors, tabletops, sinks or stovetops. Refrain from leaving food in open bags or boxes. All refrigerators should be tightly closed. Be sure to keep your kitchen, bathroom, and community kitchen areas clean and free of clutter. Do not leave piles of papers, magazines, empty grocery bags in trash rooms, residence hall rooms or apartments. Take the trash to the trash room or dumpster daily. If you live in 500 Wabash or the University Apartments DO NOT use contact paper or any kind of shelf paper in your cabinets or drawers. Have all water leaks repaired by submitting a work order immediately. Vacuum all carpeted areas regularly, and sweep and mop all hard surface floors regularly. Report any pest issues immediately by completing an online Work Order and follow up by notifying building staff.

The Office of Residential Life and Housing reserves the right to treat your residence hall room or apartment for pests. If you find a pest issue in your residence hall or apartment it is a requirement to complete a work order and report it to you building staff immediately. We will schedule an inspection/treatment as soon as possible. If treatment is required, you will be provided a time frame (traditionally 24-72 hours) to complete our inspection check list to prepare your living space for proper treatment. Failure to do so will be violation of Residential Life Policy and result in student acquiring charges for scheduled treatment(s) as well as contract consideration. University Apartment Tenants: Each apartment is scheduled for pest control treatments on a monthly basis. Tenants are responsible for preparing their apartment in advance for pest control. Scheduled dates may fall during University holidays and break periods. If you plan to be out of town during your scheduled pest control period, you will need to prepare your apartment before leaving your apartment. Please note that the pest control company cannot wait for you to prepare your apartment. Room Appliances Compact Refrigerator: Students will be permitted to have refrigerators in their rooms, subject to the following conditions:  Maximum Capacity 4.5 Cubic Feet & Maximum amperage: 1.5 amp as the electrical system cannot tolerate any additional amperage.  Refrigerant must be non-toxic Freon gas, and kept in good working condition or be removed from the premises.  The University will not be responsible for any damages to the refrigerator, or spoilage of its contents, due to electrical power failures or other circumstances. Microwaves:  700w or Less Microwaves are permitted in residence hall rooms 33 | P a g e


Sales/Solicitation Sales and solicitations may be made only by officially recognized campus organizations, only if the sales/solicitations are for the general benefit of the University and/or community, and only once per semester per hall per organization. Organizations should be aware of the following:  Door-to-door selling or solicitation is not permitted in the residence halls.  Sales and solicitations presentations to a group are not permitted in student rooms.  Mailbox stuffing is not allowed unless items are individually addressed, or authorized by Residential Life. It is the responsibility of each organization to complete the following procedures. Adherence to these guidelines will facilitate approval of present and future applications. a. Obtain approval for sale or solicitation from the Residential Life Office. b. Assume responsibility for set-up and clean-up of area(s) to be used. c. Provide all monies (especially change) needed for the sale/solicitation. d. Leave a copy of the completed application form on file in Residential Life at least one week (seven days) prior to the event. All materials needed by the organization must be provided by the organization Search and Seizure Students, their on campus residences, their possessions and/or other area where they have an expectation of privacy are subject to search and seizure under the following circumstances: 1. Criminal Actions: When police officials have probable cause to believe a crime either has been or is being committed they may conduct searches based on consent, a valid search warrant, incident to arrest or, in the case of motor vehicles, with proper probable cause or for purposes of inventory prior to being impounded. 2. Administrative Actions: When campus officials believe a University regulation either has been or is being violated they may conduct searches based on consent or the permission of designated University officials(s). In addition, administrative searches of residence hall rooms may be conducted by designated University officials as part of either an announced or unannounced health or safety inspection. 3. Emergency Situations: Police and/or University officials may conduct searches if an obvious threat to life or property exists. In all cases above, if contraband is found in the room, Public Safety will confiscate and remove items from the room. In addition, Public Safety can direct Hall Staff to end the search or continue looking no matter what form of search is being used. Depending on the type of Search being conducted and what is found in the room, students will be sent to city court (given a citation), referred to the Student Conduct and Integrity office or both. Syringe Disposal The proper disposal of syringes is important due to the safety of our staff responsible for the collections and sorting of trash. Since syringes and needles are a medical necessity for some it is imperative that the proper disposal occurs to prevent needless test and immunizations on behalf of an accidentally injured employee. Hypodermic needles must be disposed of in the following manner:   

Place a cover over the needle point (could be the original cover). Place needle in a “sharps” container, this can be provided by hall staff or the Office of Environmental Safety. o Office of Environmental Safety can be found on the 2nd floor of 951 Sycamore Street, (812)237-4022. Full “Sharps” Containers can be disposed of by contacting hall staff or the Office of Environmental Safety for scheduled pick up of the container by authorized staff.

Trash Removal Trash disposal from student rooms is the responsibility of the resident. Trash needs to be disposed of in designated trash areas (Trash Rooms located in the hall or Dumpster/Trash Cans located exterior to the building). Please see posted signs 34 | P a g e


or hall staff for proper trash disposal locations. Improper trash disposal includes leaving trash in common area locations or disposing of trash in community location trash cans such as lounge/lobby or bathroom trash cans. Issues of improper trash disposal will be address with the community and followed up with through the University Conduct process if necessary. Telephone Information Telephones (land-line) service is no longer available in the residence hall rooms unless a student voluntarily signs up for telephone service. Students wishing to sign up for telephone service must complete a telephone service agreement form, available with the Office of Residential Life. The fee for land-line service is per month fee, paid by the semester and charged to student’s University account. Weather Emergency What should I do during a tornado or severe storms? The emergency alarm, a wailing siren, is sounded throughout campus in the case a tornado being sighted in the area. Some Residence halls and University Apartments have an alarm system that will announce the warning along with the siren sounding. The emergency alarm is usually tested the first Tuesday of every month at 11:00 a.m. When the alarm sounds students should get as fully dressed as time allows, take your room key, Student ID and flashlight, close your window, exit the room, and close and lock the door. Remain on your floor, sit quietly on the corridor floor next to a concrete wall and wait for instructions. Do not panic and follow the guidelines and instructions of staff members. University Apartment residents should close your windows, take a flashlight and battery operated radio, go into your bathroom, and close the door. Remain there until the storm has past. Weightlifting Devices To avoid possible building damage and noise concerns, weight lifting machines along with free weights are not permitted in on campus housing rooms. The ISU Student Recreation Center has a complete weightlifting area that is available to students. Window/Window Screens Residents in all University housing buildings and apartments residents are not permitted to cover windows with aluminum foil or any other type of covering. Using this material could damage windows and negate window warranty. Students violating this policy will be asked to remove the items from the window and could be charged for damage to window. Please see our Residential Life building staff if you have any questions. Window screens are not to be removed by students for any purpose because of the hazards involved and the damages that may result. If the screen is removed or damaged in any way, the resident is subject to a service charge plus any additional damage charges or cost of the screen. Work Orders If something in your room or apartment is in need of repair, please submit a Work Order. Work Order forms are available online at www.indstate.edu/reslife. Simply log in using your ISU Portal ID and password. Work orders communicate directly with our maintenance staff, please be specific and describe what the specific concern is. *IF YOU HAVE AN EMERGENCY, such as a toilet overflowing, contact the Front Desk during normal business hours, after business hours the Housing staff member on duty for each area can be contacted.

Thank you for living with us! Welcome to your new spot! #GoState 35 | P a g e

Residential Life Handbook  

2016-2017 Residential Life Handbook: Guide to Campus Living

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