Page 1

MODULE 1

ideation


M1 / 1.2 Whether it was the linguistic variations that did it, I found this tsk more difficult than I thought it would and I found myself no longer seeing an object, but a series of lines and shpes. Yet this confusion lead me to the conclusion that it was simply the abstraction of a whole into individual parts- folds of a piece of paper or pastry- that when seen collectively produce the magnificent folds of a croissant. The transition from the smooth and irregular lashings of the originnal image, the refinement into the geometry of 3 triangles with the central apex showed a process of reductive simplification that illustrated meticulous method to create such a dynamic form. To bring the entire formation of the croissant down to the apex intersection of the 3 triangles illustrated the starting point. Yet in order to reach this point, we were given a complete object and told to go backwards towards the origin. When thinking about this in relation to the semester task, it is opposite yet paradoxially the same. We begin with a concept and work backwards from the sketch design to establish a geometric pattern and form- we find a method to fit the design. Yet whilst this plays out, the final outcome is not fully realised until we reach the origin of the process which is both the start and the end. It is rather fitting that I spontaneously started drawing on the page in the bottom right and corner and worked bck towards the origin.

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M1 / 1.1

To create my measured drawings of the object, I first spent a few minutes in direct contact with the object, feeling the weight of it, its center of gravity, testing its flex, its resistance to pressure etc. I attempted to emulate the intimacy of being near my object and drawing precisely not from observation, but from analysis, as seen through the passionate descriptions of “making” Jenson’s book. The next stage was to select an appropriate scale for my drawings as it was too large to fit on the page and I selected a 1:5 scale based on the recommendations of my tutor. This proved to be sufficient. I then dimensioned the real-life object and translated it into the scale and transferred the outlines to the page. From here, it was simply a process of filling in the gaps and adding as much detail as was possible with this simple structure. I chose to draw a subset of the intersection of the span and spline as it is in this central core of the structure that the stability lies. This system of compression with the crossed wire holding the rods in place seemed at odds with the tensile structure of the skin + bone system that is the kite. However, whilst this joining seemed at odds with the system of observation, the stretching of the canvas from the apex of the diamond shape illustrated with fine simplicity the power of tension and aerodynamics in simulating flight with just a strip of canvas, 2 wooden rods and some sticky tape.

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M1 / 1.7

This is the perspective view of the object modelled in rhino. Whilst the basic frame was simple to create using circles and the extrude tool, the surface that was to represent the fabric needed to stretch over the rods in an organic and fluid manner. The properties of materiall translate to a more dynamic sruface that attaches at each of the outer points of the kite but stretches taut over each rod. It is this tension caused by the fabric that allows the kite to acheive flight as it creates an aero-dynamic plane. In order to replicate the behaviour of this material , I created a surface that stretched to the base of each of the rods where they would be connected and the mesh created a smooth curve between these that mimiced the tautness of the kites material span.

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M1 / 1.7

This is a 1:2 scaled drawing of the top view of the kite. This shows how the material is stretched to the very corners of the rods.

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M1 / 1.8

When approaching this task, I tried to think beyond the traditional materials such a paper and wooden rods to something that created a more metaphoric and symbolic meaning. In order to get creative, I knew I had to first broaden my mind and find innovative ideas to use regular materials so I decided to opt for commonplace items found in the home to morph into something that represented the skin & bone structures we have been exploring in the tutorial. I required something with a degree of rigidity for my bones and a malleable element for my skin in order to replicate the principles of the material system. I experimented with pens, knitting needles, skewers, rulers, coat hangers, electrical cords before deciding on using sewing pins as my bone element. The function of the pin proved most valuable in securing the object as it was required to be a free-standing, volumetric structure. Yet they also proved to be constraining in that they did not tend to operate in conjunction with each other, but more as seperate entities. In order to bridge this gap, I chose sticky tape as my skin structure primarily for its adhesive function. However, the sticky tape also incorporated the symbolic element that I was looking for; the thin stretches of tape created a thin, embryonic, skin-like effect. When thinking about the structure of the bone framework, I had to consider the properties of both of my chosen materials in order to achieve an effect model that illustrated the material system. My aim was to create a permeable framework with geometric spans.

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M1 / 1.8

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M1 / 1.8

concept 1.

concept 2.

concept 3.

My first reaction to the brief was one of protecting ones own personal space against an intrusion. This defensive response lead me towards the exploration of armour and weapons one can use to defend themselves against external forces. I investigated a broad range of precedents including both historicall and contemporary examples. Traditionally, the metal plated sheets would join together like pieces of a puzzle to form a shield against enemy weapons and prevent fatal blows. The solidarity of this armour was impractical as it prevented swift movement and thus forced the wearer to stay and fight. Contemporary examples, primarily in the fashion industry, take this idea of armour and transform it into a metamorphism of the protection of the vital organs in organic, sometimes ethereal ways. The aesthetic is one of bold clean lines whilst the selection of materials is often based on its visual effect. As such, this concept overs a wide range of technical focuses that focus on form and connectivity between panels.

The tale of Achilles and his undoing focuses on ones vulnerabiilities and the weakness of the supposedly invincible human body. Whilst this seemingly follows a similarly war-like tangent to concept 1, my exploration of the achilles heel comes when ones personal space is broken down through intimacy. Whether it is familial or romantic love, an individual is only capable of true love when one feels truly vulnerable to another, yet safe in the trust that they are no longer an intruder but share that personal space with you. The areas of vulnerability on the body-the heel, the heart, the head- respresent the physical location where vulnerabilites can be found and therefore should be celebrated. In order to highlight these areas the structure should either isolate or exclude these areas in order to symbolise the role they play in sharing ones personal space with someone.

In Sommer’s article “Personal Space� he describes multiple studies of our reaction to invasions of personal space in relation to interpersonal relationships. Using public transport as a prime example of the changing parameters of this lofty concept of personal space, the situation of crowding alters our behaviour to avoid, dehumanise and disconnect from our surroundings. In order to emphasise these behaviours, my third concept focuses on the confrontation with invasions of personal space, in the style of total imersion therapy whereby the patient is forced to encounter the full strength of the stimulus until the anxiety response disipates. Sommer notes that facial interaction is far more intrusive than side on or rear, in that order. If we are inverting the concept, it is only natural that we should reverse the order and form the structure from the back, around the side, leaving the front open. Both metaphorically and literally, the person grows a back bone that merges around the body and creates a restrictive cave that maintains open body language and maintains the intimiacy of eye contact with the frontal aspect. The skin and bone system makes this concept possible as the rigidity of the bone structure can form a sturdy structure whillst the skin can emphasis the transition from the back, to the side, to the open front, perhaps through a gradient from dark to light.

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M1 / 1.8

c1.

c2.

c3. VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

India mckenzie module 1  
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