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I NDIEU

SEPT.

FILMORE

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of the

OUL OUTH

On the Rise Musicians

Outer Health Inner Wealth Pg. 9

Pg. 19


READ and LISTEN discover the music that inspired this issue

Listen to our first ever magazine album compilation entitled, "Too Cool For School." These artists are some of IndieU's top picks for the back-to-school season!

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


TABLE OF CONTENTS 01  Read & Listen

17

03  What is IndieU? 05  Natalie's Note 07  Contributors 09  Hippie Health 12  Join the Team 13  Meet Eric Jones 15  Introducing: IAMWE  16  Introducing: Linney

16

17  Introducing: Noirre 18  Introducing: Lea Beiley 19  Soul of the South: Filmore 25  Upcoming US Festivals 27  2 Cool For School 29 Musicians to Watch

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09

31 Indie Trendsetters 32 Upcoming College Events

19 27 SEPT 2016

15 INDIEU.COM


REAL TALK

INDIEU.COM

WHAT IS INDIEU?

WHAT IS INDIEU? INDIEU IS HERE TO WAGE A WAR ON MUSICAL APATHY, MEDIA MANIPULATION, AND THE MAINSTREAM." "

In any college, in any city, in any state, in any country, there is a lonely songwriter or producer currently counting on one hand the social ‘Likes’ from the debut of their latest release. It was a passion project recorded over three semesters, mixed after study group, and destined for greatness. Instead: the online equivalent of a dead auditorium. Digital secrecy, lost to your ears like a bluebook on exam day.

IndieU began with a discussion about music. For decades music has been how a college discovers who it is, and music catalyzes that discovery, forging an identity so strong that no two campuses could sound alike.

Down the street, a local band performs to a group of four people, despite the nearby college’s 20,000 strong students, all complaining there’s nothing to do on a Wednesday night.

IndieU is here to wage a war on musical apathy, media manipulation, and the mainstream. For the first time ever, independent artists have a one-stop resource to share their music with college students —a demographic that successfully gave rise to highprofile acts like Childish Gambino, Vampire Weekend, Pink Floyd, and the Strokes.

Elsewhere there’s a YouTube listening party, where half the guests enjoy the pre-selected tunes, some hate them, and certainly nobody is dancing. The unfortunate host is left to battle bored stares and seething glares, dodging playlist hijacks as advertisements play on. Let’s not fool ourselves any longer. Independent music is in a crisis. Not its quality or the zeal behind it, but the way students have come to experience it and the way artists have come to connect to listeners.

27 SEPT 2016

"MUSIC IS THE THREAD THAT TIES TOGETHER COLLEGE LIFE, THE SOUL OF THE UNFAMILIAR COMMUNITY IT CENTERS."

If you can get the students on your side, you’ll get an instantly passionate, loyal fan base that can promote, share, and push your music to the fullest extent. Wherever you want to reach listeners, we give artists the chance to grow a strong localized fan base, and students the chance to listen to the crafts of their campus and community.

INDIEU.COM


INDIEU

credits

CREATIVE

BRIANNA BRYAN magazine director

FILMORE feature artist

NATALIE EDELL ceo & creative director

LINNEY venice wave fest artist

CONTENT CURATION

NOIRRE venice wave fest artist

BRIANNA BRYAN p.r. & content developer SHANNA STRONG content writer SARA SCHWARZ "Hippie Health" author RACHEL BRODSKY featured products: headphones

27 SEPT 2016

ARTIST FEATURES

LEA BEILEY venice wave fest artist IAMWE venice wave fest artist ERIC JONES artist spotlight EDITOR

DANA GETZ head editor & 'FILMORE'' author

INDIEU.COM


NATALIE'S NOTE

EVERY COMPANY HAS A STORY.

C

ulture. Even the word is full of life, tracing back to Cicero’s ancient Roman writings on the cultivation of the soul. Every country, city block, and campus are bursting with charisma all their own, granting them that everimportant thread to something bigger and grander than themselves. That culture is the backbone of IndieU. Many companies are created to sell something, cash in, and amble off on their merry way, but IndieU is something different. It was created for you and by you, meant to tie you everlastingly to an experience much

—it’s a movement. As a beacon for independent music, we’re

more transcendent. IndieU isn’t just a company

made up of a national network of people interested in the new and the next.

We want to support local musicians and rising acts, then experience the music scenes that shape them. At IndieU, there’s not some distant, 60-year-old music exec selecting an artist’s top single and telling you what you should be listening to. Sure, the top

—they’ve led the industry like a well-oiled machine for centuries—but IndieU leaves the decision up to

dogs have their place

you. We don’t care about popularity or record sales, we care about the culture, and giving you the chance to forge one for yourself and for your community. We allow the unheard to be heard, and for the anonymous to blossom. Our mission is to help independent musicians grow and sustain a fan base so they can launch a successful and passionate career. Every listener, artist, or rep that joins our team is joining the IndieU family. As we continue to grow, we look forward to seeing you grow with us, and we can’t wait to see what you’ll discover.

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


ADOPT. DON'T SHOP.

Find your new best friend at your nearest shelter today!

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


c

o

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r

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EXEC. MARKETING DIR.

BRIANNA BRYAN @BRIANNABRYANMUSIC

With a family almost entirely involved in music and performance, it was inevitable for me to become a singer and performer myself. I've been blessed with the opportunity to share my voice in performances as small as school assemblies to competitions in New York on Broadway. I'm thrilled to continue sharing my passion with the world as I prepare to release more original music­ in addition to my debut single that was released this year on iTunes, Spotify, and more, called "Stars Inside Your Eyes." As an independent artist, I'm so grateful to be a part of the IndieU Music Community.

CEO OF INDIEU

NATALIE EDELL

@NATALIEEDELL

At 17 years old, I stood in line at a concert in Hollywood and successfully followed through on a ‘dare’ to find the manager of the performing artist to convince him to have his artist perform at my 18th birthday party. Three years later, I have worked at a Grammy Award winning music management company, managed multiple musicians, signed an artist to Interscope / Geffen Records, worked at Virgin Records, started this company, and the music manager I met that fateful night is now a partner of IndieU. IndieU was created from my life’s passion to help musicians grow and sustain a strong localized fan base in order to take their careers to the next level independently.

27 SEPT 2016

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

DANA GETZ @DANAGETZ I’ve been in love with music for as long as I can remember. When I was in first grade, my mother would blast the Beatles on our home stereo, grab me by the hands, and dance wildly around our living room, the jaunty harmonica of “Love Me Do” ringing out as we swirled and swayed across the carpet. Many years later, I forged a career in music journalism, having worked for publications like Entertainment Weekly, New York Magazine, and Alternative Press. I came across IndieU in college, growing instantly enamored with its independent mission and endless discovery, and I’ve served as its Editor­in­Chief for over three years. 

INDIEU.COM


b

u

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MEDIA MANAGER

GAIA BOMFIM

@GAIABOM

Music has always been a passion of mine as I’ve incorporated it throughout my life. I played the violin for ten years and had the opportunity to travel to various cities in the U.S. to perform live in an orchestra. I have also danced all my life which has taught me the beauty of the relationship of movement and beat. In my free time, I love to discover “unknown” music which led me to the independent artist movement and IndieU. As a business major, my mind is always set on the next big thing and one day hope to become an entrepreneur myself. IndieU is changing the ways of the music industry and I am so excited to be a part of its future success.

FEATURE WRITER

HEAD WRITER

@SARAFITZSCHWARTZ

@SHANNAVSTRONG

SARA SCHWARTZ While I was looking for ways to express myself, I always found comfort in music. Whether I was sad, happy, stressed out or anything in between, once I put in headphones everything made sense to me. After a dream I had one night, I knew that I had to find a way to work in the music industry. Now, I have been working for Sony Music for a year and am pursuing both music and writing. I am so thankful to get to share my passion and ideas while continuing to work towards my dreams. As my dad always says, "If you love what you do, you won't have to work a day in your life."

27 SEPT 2016

SHANNA STRONG Wishing to be a singer at the age of ten, music has always been close to my heart, recording original songs I wrote with my sister and performing them as a duo at a young age. Now years later, I've transitioned to being an actor, working on Disney Channel, MTV and other networks. But, I’ve still held onto my love of music, especially with how it can reinvent my work. How a TV show or film is scored can greatly affect the project and seeing my work unfold with that addition always elevates my experience of it. Alongside my entertainment passions I love creative writing, specifically short stories, so IndieU has allowed me to broaden my artistic horizon in an exciting way I’ve never experienced. 

INDIEU.COM


SARA SCHWARTZ

outer health INNER WEALTH

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


hippie

HEALTH

T

They say college is the greatest time of your life: an open stage to explore your newfound freedom, an opportunity to find yourself on unbound terms. But it can also be a time of extreme stress—one magnified by recent headlines of overworked students, poor mental health facilities, and campus suicides.

Between classes, exams, friends, and social commitments, it can be hard to find the time to take care of yourself, but it’s key to remember that that’s ultimately the most important thing. While there’s no magic fix­it for everyone, many experts have pointed to mindfulness as a helpful resource. Here’s how you can try it yourself: Set goals. Before your term starts, think about what you want to accomplish and create a suitable timeline: five weeks, 10 weeks, the semester, the entire year. Then take a few minutes to write these goals on a post­it, in your phone, in a notebook, or wherever is most convenient for you. The crucial part is to be honest and figure out what’s important to you to achieve, whether it’s getting straight A’s or only skipping class once a week. No one will see the list but you, so don’t hold back, but make sure to keep things within reason—you don't want to set the bar too high in the beginning. As time goes on, these goals may change or new ones might arise, and that’s okay—cross the old ones off and swap in the new. Take it one day at a time and one goal at a time. The point is that by identifying what takes precedence, you’ll be able to better prioritize your commitments and schedule; It might sound silly, but it’s incredible what having a clear focus can do. Get organized. This is something that you can approach in whatever way works best for you, whether you’re a neurotic, OCD, color coder or the kid who has loose­leaf papers shoved in the bottom of their backpack. A tried­and­true method is to make a monthly calendar and keep a running to­do list. Keep it traditional by buying a planner or go digital by creating a Google calendar and tacking items onto the sticky notes app—just have it in a clearly visible, accessible place. Start with the simple tasks and build to the bigger ones—that way, it will feel like you’re accomplishing more. It takes less than a minute to jot something down in a calendar and even less time to glance at it. On those hard days when you feel like you haven’t done anything productive, flip to your to­do list and remind yourself how much you’ve done!

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


Refresh and refocus. After making sure your outside world is in check, focus inward with a little meditation. Start by clearing your mind of cluttering thoughts and focusing on your breath, paying special attention to your inhalations and exhalations. It’s completely natural for your mind to drift, so accept wandering thoughts as they arise, but then let them pass like clouds in the sky of your mind. If you have a particular aim with your practice, set your intention by reciting a word or phrase called a mantra. This can be as specific as “I am productive” or as simple as a calming “Om.” Crystals can also be helpful. For example, if you are about to study for a big exam, try meditating with a fluorite crystal. Fluorite helps with mental clarity and focus, and also increases your ability to concentrate. Having a physical object that you can direct your thoughts toward during meditation will help you clear your mind and redirect your center. There is no right way to meditate, just do whatever feels right and take as much time as you need. Starting is this most important part, and the more you practice, the easier meditation will become for you.

hippie

HEALTH

Check in with yourself. This is one of the best and easiest ways to stay mindful during the school year. It’s so easy to get caught up with all the things going on in our lives that we forget to acknowledge our own feelings. The simplest way to check in with yourself is to create some sort of reminder to ask, “How am I feeling?” You can set an alarm on your phone, get a ring or bracelet with that intention in mind, or simply put a note on your mirror. If you’re happy and content, then continue moving through your day, but if you’re anxious or stressed out, take some time to recollect yourself. Slow down and ask why you aren’t okay in that moment. Go back to your goals: are you accomplishing what you set out to do? If not, write down new objectives or develop a ‘mood tracker’ to keep tabs on your good days and bad. Check on your to­do list and see how you can reorganize yourself to better accommodate your present situation. Then take five minutes to refocus and refresh. Nine times out of ten, taking those extra steps to reevaluate will help ease your anxious feelings. Respect your body. Your body is the shell that carries your mind throughout the day, so treat it with the respect that it deserves. This doesn’t necessarily mean going gluten free, paleo, vegan, or working out until you can’t move. All it means is eating the foods and doing the things that will make you feel good. If cutting animal products from your diet makes you happiest, blaze ahead, or if you love pigging out on eating mac & cheese, go for that instead. When it comes to working out, you don’t have to ‘go hard’ everyday. If you’ve been hunkered down studying all day, try some simple stretches or take a brisk walk for thirty minutes. Being mindful of your body’s needs goes hand in hand with achieving mental clarity. Keep these steps at hand and you’re on your way to mindfulness.

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


Become An

OFFICIAL CAMPUS REP Represent the music community on your campus. Apply Here!

27 SEPT 2016

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Click Here to

LISTEN NOW!

"ThE NIGHT" Eric Jones

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our soul

? w y w y ' ' ? w ’ . ' "Would you look inside your soul for me? .” for me me

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the night s got a hold on me WWW.IMERICJONES.COM

ERIC

JONES 27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


Despite his family’s long-standing roots in music, Eric Jones often wrestled with pursuing a more “practical” career over a passionate one. After a years-long stint chasing journalism, the now 28-year-old rapper finally ceded to his musical fate and released his debut album over the summer. The resulting project packs meticulous rhymes and expansive production into an 11-track collection aptly titled Books vs Beats.

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


IAMWE came together after decades of touring in other groups and a final streak of bad luck. Now the Arizona quartet comes back alive as ever, touting a reach-for-the-rafters, dance-soaked style fit to contend with pop rock vets like OneRepublic and Maroon 5. “All of our careers had come crashing down, and in that bleak season, we found a family that had been down the same road, had the passion and the dedication to make it happen, and boom, here we are,” singer Nate Huss tells IndieU of the band’s formation. “For the record, it was worth every sacrifice.” Read the full interview

27 SEPT 2016

IAMWE VENICE WAVE FEST

Listen Now INDIEU.COM


LINNEY VENICE WAVE FEST

Linney makes music with an uplifting message, lacing high-spirited, effervescent pop with positivity-centric lyricism. Earlier in 2016, she teamed up with Grammy-winning producer Ran Jackson and put out a pair of EPs: March’s Things We Say and June’s Things We Do. Now, she’s looking to hone in on the impact her projects could make: “I want to connect. I want to make a difference,” she tells IndieU. “I’m wondering at this point if I can do a better job of that by just being me and not hiding behind a bunch of noise." Read the full interview

27 SEPT 2016

Listen Now INDIEU.COM


NOIRRE VENICE WAVE FEST

Culling sounds from across his West Coast home, Noirre skims youthful psych pop, hot-blooded R&B, and breezy, funkpunctuated grooves. At 19, the Sacramento-born singer has already carved an impressive career: he’s released two solo records, nabbed ample airtime on college radio, scored a place at the renowned Berklee College of Music, and signed on to front a full-fledged band. “[My second album] Nostalgia was the first time that I really sat down and looked at the actual composition and poetry that made up my music,” he tells IndieU of his fastpaced evolution. “Before then it was all ears, and that record taught me how to feel.” Read the full interview

27 SEPT 2016

Listen Now INDIEU.COM


LEA BEILEY VENICE WAVE FEST Blending wistful, acoustic-driven folk with somber lyrics a la Bon Iver or Daughter, this L.A. songstress writes and records out of California. She recently enlisted producer friend J. Roosevelt for a moody electro dazzler titled “Subtract & Divide” that’s since racked up a quarter of a million listens on Spotify. Plus, she’s 100 percent DIY: “I have a personal relationship with every part of my creative process and I like it that way,” she tells IndieU. Read the full interview

27 SEPT 2016

Listen Now INDIEU.COM


SOUL

of the SOUTH

INTRODUCING: FILMORE, a new rising star, paving his own path in America's Country Capital. by Dana Getz

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


T

yler Filmore may have grown up in the Midwest, but his southern soul runs deep. Coming of age in St. Louis, Missouri, he spent much of his childhood wrestling between music and sports, but when he landed the lead of his high school musical, fate intervened. “It was a hard decision but I knew music was going to be my life,” he tells IndieU of deciding to quit baseball. Years later, he’s living in Nashville and navigating the cutthroat streets of America’s country capital, a city he says shaped him into the songwriter he is today. Last May, he released his debut album, Truth, a seven-song collection of stadium-sized, string-bleeding anthems that speak to why Filmore fell in love with music in the first place. Read the Interview

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


“The southern sound has always been a part of me, but I think it’s the storytelling and truth in what country music has to say that has always had my heart,” he says. “I set out to be myself and not have someone tell me who I am.” For more on Filmore, IndieU caught up with the country crooner, discussing how his move to Nashville impacted his sound, the making of his very first music video, and what he’s plotting for the future.

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


As an independent artist, I have the freedom to truly tell my story and build something... INDIEU: Tell me a bit about your background. When were you first introduced to music, and how did it grow into a career? TYLER FILMORE: I grew up in Wildwood, Missouri. I’m the oldest of four and always focused more on sports growing up, but I found a love for music at a young age. My mom always tells this story of how I used to stand on the couch in the living room with a big wooden spoon from the kitchen and perform, just singing whatever and making up songs. One time I was rocking so much I did a front roll right off the couch, almost started crying, but jumped right up and kept performing! During my senior year of high school, I got the lead in the high school musical and quit baseball, which was my favorite sport. It was a hard decision but I knew music was going to be my life.

You're from Missouri originally. Did your hometown have a strong affinity for country music? Were you always drawn to a southern sound? There was a strong love for country music in Wildwood.I grew up with a lot of various influences, from ‘80s icons like John Cougar, Def Leopard, and Van Halen to timeless classics like Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, and The Beatles. My mom is from Colombia, South America and moved to the U.S, when she was 15, so I also grew up listening—and dancing—to a lot of Latin music. The southern sound has always been a part of me, but I think it’s the storytelling and truth in what country music has to say that has always had my heart. And you're based in Nashville now, which has one of the most competitive music scenes in the nation, particularly for country music. How do you navigate that as an independent artist? Nashville is amazing and has taught me so much. It has shown me a lot of different schools of thought and different sides of music, which helped me create a sound that was me. The way I've navigated it is by trusting my gut and being original. I set out to be myself and not have someone tell me who I am. As an independent artist, I have the freedom to truly tell my story and build something that I think everyone can relate to. How has living in Nashville affected your outlook on the industry? I think it just teaches you how the industry works. Just like anything there are ups and downs, and there is a risk and reward. But I think Nashville has helped me navigate toward what I want as an artist. I have so much respect for everyone in this town and the community. How has it informed your songwriting? Nashville has made me the songwriter I am today, hands down. Songwriting is one of my favorite things in the world, and Nashville has shown me so many different styles. I see all my best friends reaching success and it's amazing. We all learn from each other and constantly push each other to be better writers.

27 SEPT 2016

INDIEU.COM


Your music video for "Left Our Mark" plays as sort of an ode to simple country living. Was that the concept you were aiming for?  Yeah. I just wanted to shoot a video that embraced everything I did in my hometown growing up. I wrote that song about Wildwood and everything in there is a true story. "Red Rock Drive" from the first verse is even the street I grew up on. And that was your first official music video, correct? Tell me about that experience. It was a 360 video, which was a lot of fun to shoot. We actually shot the whole video in 90 seconds. The song was sped up when we recorded it and then we slowed it down so the video would be in slow motion. It was all done in one take, which was tough! You put out your first EP, Proof, in May. What did you learn from working on that project? I learned a lot from this project. I co­produced the whole album with different writers from each song. The whole EP was me pulling favors and working day and night to perfect my sound. It's truly a part of who I am. From your Facebook, it looks like you're already plotting new tracks. Can you tell me about those? What else is on the horizon? I am putting out more music before the end of the year. I’ve written so many songs I want to share with y’all, but I’m just making sure I get each tune right. I’ve also got some fall tour dates, one with Sam Hunt and a few with Micheal Ray. I can't really say more than that without getting in trouble, but the rest of the year is looking unreal and I'm extremely thankful for my team, family, friends, and everyone out there sharing my music.

Listen Now

27 SEPT 2016

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27 SEPT 2016

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UPCOMING U.S. FESTIVALS OCT. 28

FEB. 17

MAR. 22

MAR. 23

JUN. 15

JUN. 28

VOODOO MUSIC FEST NOISE POP SAN FRANCISCO NEW ORLEANS, LA

TREEFORT MUSIC FEST BIG EARS KNOXVILLE, TN BOISE, ID

FIREFLY MUSIC FEST DOVER, DE

27 SEPT 2016

SUMMERFEST MILWAUKEE, WI

MAR. 10

SOUTH X SOUTHWEST AUSTIN, TX

MAY. 26

SASQUATCH FEST GEORGE, WA

AUG. 11

OUTSIDE LANDS SAN FRANCISCO, CA

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SUPPORT THE INDIE MUSIC MOVEMENT WITH SOME NEW CLOTHING CHECK OUT THE NEW INDIEU STORE!

27 SEPT 2016

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2SCHOOL COOL FOR

2927JULY SEPT 2016 2016

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COOL KIDS SING

IN THE SHOWER

AND OUR CAMPUS REPS DO IT ALL THE TIME. HERE'S SOME OF THEIR FAVORITE SONGS TO SING. 1. Stable Song by Gregory Alan Isakov

2. Work Song by Hozier

3. This Must Be The Place by Talking Heads

4. Always Alright by The Alabama Shakes

5. Ready to Start by Arcade Fire

6. Wanna Be by Spice Girls

7. Blood by The Middle East

8. Symptoms by Atlas Genius

9. Sleeping Lessons by The Shins

10. Valerie

by Amy Winehouse

2927JULY SEPT 2016 2016

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MUSICIANS TO LOOK OUT FOR

IndieU x Venice Wave Fest Contest Winner LeoLeo  LeoLeo blends the synthetic qualities of indie pop with a new age rock twist. Influenced by music titans like Radiohead, Prince, and Otis Redding, the best­friends­ turned­L.A.­duo draw from an array of genres for an unconventional but irrefutably unique style. 

Click their pictures to hear their music. You never know, you may just find your new favorite song!

Brik.Liam Brik.Liam spreads his buttery croon across everything from jazzy, smile­inducing R&B to emotive slow jams, sounding much like an Usher protégé.  

Lou Pine Layering the simplistic soul of Ray Charles and Otis Redding with bombastic, blown out rock, this L.A. blues guitarist touts howling vocals and grungy guitar licks. His back­ to­basics style has earned him some impressive gigs, including stops at SXSW and Hollywood’s famous Troubador.

27 SEPT 2016

Townes Townes bill their style as ‘western sounds from the Mojave Desert underground,’ churning out warped and jangly psychedelics rooted in rock ‘n’ roll. The California quintet keep it lo­fi, too: they recorded an entire album live from their living room.  

Joey Supratta  Doubling as rapper and record label exec (he owns his self­started Supratta Records), Joey Supratta doles out truth­concentrated rhymes with an old school flair and a hushed, reverent flow.  

Xavier White A college dropout turned bona fide musician, Xavier White crafts electro­streaked R&B with silky vocals and walloping, club­ ready bass. The result is a modern take on the likes of Usher and Jason Derulo.

Hudson Henry Hudson Henry’s bubbly, acoustic­ driven pop screams Top 40 potential. The 24­year­old L.A. singer couples colorful production with summery musicality to create breezy, head­ bobbing easy listeners.  

Nolan Forghani Blending the power­ packed raps of G­Eazy and Logic with Chris Brown’s hook­imbued coo, this 22­year­old Bay Area rapper toggles between smoothly sung choruses and sleek, risqué rhymes. 

Kiovi Kiovi’s angst­laden ambient rock was built for introspection. The East L.A. band drifts from mellow, elongated melodies to gritty, unkept riffs, baring the sort of raw­ edged soundscapes fit for facing unexplored emotions. 

Prez Harris Prez Harris plies his hip­hop with high­ impact lessons, doling out pristine, swearless rhymes with politically charged lyricism and an aspirational edge. 

Westpark Equal parts fervent and snarky, this Orange Country trio crafts eclectic garage rock akin to a roughly cut Cage the Elephant. Gnarled vocals and raucous guitar consume their spastic, head­ thrusting jams. 

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MUSICIANS TO LOOK OUT FOR

Cody Joe Hodges Greatly influenced by the outlaw country forged by western icons like Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash, Cody Joe Hodges updates their legendary style with a progressive lyrical approach. After several of his songs hit No.1 on the country charts, the Texas singer continues to skyrocket with his latest track, “Hellbent on Loving You,” a provocative foot­ stomper driven by his signature southern growl. 

Foxtrax They may have stumbled across their name during a snowy trip through the woods, but Foxtrax have been nothing but fire since their early 2015 formation: the New York trio has already earned title as a band to watch from industry heavyweights like Live Nation and iTunes. Bursting with bright guitar and bold drum work, their debut EP, The Cabin, is filled with heading­nodding modernity.  

Atlee This Los Angeles rapper marries boom­ bap beats, bouncy hip­ pop production, and beyond­his­years lyricism. “Had to go through my worst just to get to better days / selling dope is the best decision I never made / Don’t get it twisted, hustling forever be on my resumé,” he singers on his freshly released debut EP, Lost in Translation. 

Cody Brazil Cody Brazil found music in the darkest of places: he was dealing with bouts of mental health problems when he randomly started messing around in the studio. He’s since cultivated a rambunctious, rapidfire hip­hop style, going on to share stages with fast­rising acts like Travis Mills, SoMo, and Mike Stud.  

MOSSOM Hailing from Cleveland, Ohio, this drum­and­bass duo put a harder, heavier spin on the raw rock revitalized by the likes of Jack White and The Black Keys. Spluttering riffs and brazen lyrics define their self­titled debut EP, serving up a sound so sinister it’ll make your hair stand on end.  

! t n e l a t h c u S . y d o b y r e v e o t s t a r g Con

27 SEPT 2016

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Billie Marten’s sweet and simple style is the perfect fit for her honeyed acoustics, shirking pop stars’ high glamour get-ups for more down-to-earth ensembles. The 16-year-old London singer typically pairs distressed vintage denim and minimal jewelry with a collection of sophisticated button ups, basic tees and sweaters, and a plethora of flannel.

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I N D I E T R E N D S E T T E R S

Frank Ocean toes the line between classic and contemporary, drawing inspiration from both traditional looks and trendy, top echelon brands like Dior and Givenchy. The R&B crooner, who recently christened his independence with the release of his long-awaited sophomore album Blonde, toggles between timeless suits and colorful, forward-thinking apparel accented with one of his signature bandanas. It’s an apt style for an artist that so often pushes boundaries in his music. 27 SEPT 2016

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MARK YOUR CALENDARS: COLLEGE FESTIVALS APR. 13

CIMMFEST DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

MAY. 21

DILLO DAY NORTHWESTERN

APR. 29

MOVIN' ON FEST PENN STATE

MAY. 30

JAZZ REGGAE FEST UCLA

MAY. 12

MANIFEST COLUMBIA COLLEGE CHICAGO

MAY. 15

EXTRAVAGANZA UCSB

HAVE IDEAS TO BRING NEW MUSIC TO YOUR CAMPUS?

SET UP YOUR OWN EVENT! 27 SEPT 2016

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SEPT ISSUE NO. 2


IndieU Magazine September Issue No. 2