Page 1

Indie Road

SALTY HAIR

$10 AUD #02 April 2018

indieroad.com.au


ASHFORD WHEELS & LOOMS

For all your spinning wheels, weaving looms, carders, textile equipment and supplies

Blending Board Create beautiful rolags for spinning or felting. 30x30cm.

Standard Carder

Wide Carder

Versatile and flexible. 20cm width. Choose 36, 72 or 120 point cloth.

Massive 30cm width, produces 100gm batt.

Kiwi 2

Joy 2

Traveller

Simple, smooth and easy to use. Excellent value!

So portable and light.

Small and beautiful. Choose single or double drive.

Choose single or double treadle. Carry bag included.

SampleIt Loom

>> Knitters Loom

Learn new techniques and sample wonderful yarns. Built-in second heddle.

Ultra portable, lightweight Rigid Heddle loom.

25cm width. Loom stand available.

Choose 30, 50 or 70cm weaving widths. Carry bag and stand available.

Just add yarn!

Fold and go with weaving in place

<< Rigid Heddle Loom Affordable and versatile, so easy and quick to warp and weave. Choose 40, 60, 80 or 120cm width. Loom stand available.

<< Folding Table Loom Weave traditional and modern patterns to create your own original fabrics. Choose 40, 60 or 80cm width, 4 or 8 shafts or 60cm - 16 shafts. Loom stand available. spinning

New stockist enquiries welcome Australia 1 800 653 397 New Zealand 0508 459 459 To locate your local stockist visit our website www.ashford.co.nz

The Wheel Magazine Ashford’s annual fibrecraft magazine. Spinning, weaving, felting, dyeing and knitting projects, patterns and articles from around the world. Don’t miss out! Subscribe at: www.ashford.co.nz/subscribe

felting

weaving

knitting

dyeing

ASHFORD’S FIBRECRAFT MAGAZINE – NEW ZEALAND ISSUE 27 2015 NZ $10 US $7 AUS $9 GBP £4 YEN ¥765 EURO €6

Katniss Cowl Blending Board

Magic

SUPER Rug

GREAT NEW PRODUCTS AND PATTERNS INSIDE

www.ashfordclub.co.nz

Ashford Wheels & Looms 1


EDITOR IN CHIEF Gaille Smith EDITOR Sam Buckingham SUB EDITORS Robynn Ross Abbey Bongers Roz Panetta GRAPHIC DESIGNER Patrizia Tresca The Huntd Creative PHOTOGRAPHY Ellie Bobbie Photography shot on location at Freshwater, NSW, Australia, unless otherwise stated. MODELS Kate and Lexi STOCKISTS New South Wales Yummy Yarn and Co. – Dubbo The House of Wool – Blackheath Mulberry & Flax – Newcastle Victoria Crumbz Craft – Healesville Unwind Craft Café – Keilor East Tasmania Salamanca Wool Shop – Battery Point Western Australia Sew Much Yarn – Kalgoorlie South Australia Knit Spin Weave – Clare Caboodle for Orange Gifts – Orange Queensland Natural Fibre Arts - Southside All enquiries for submissions and marketing can be directed to Editor in Chief, PO Box 278, Lindfield, NSW 2070, Australia or via our online form at indieroad.com.au.

Indie Road indie_road_aus

IndieRd

IndieRoadAU

IndieRoadAUS

Indie Road is an independent Australian magazine published by Creative Incentives and printed in Australia. Our submissions come with a signed guarantee they are original content, and they have secured permission to use content that is not wholly their own. Whilst Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, you can contact the designer directly for clarification. You will find their details at the bottom of each pattern.


WHATEVER YOU FOCUS ON GROWS TRAVEL Nunga, Ghanda (name of article to be added) P 13 DYE WITH US From the office of fair fading P 20 TUTORIAL Tunisian Crochet Basics by Abbey Bongers P 21

A TRIBE OF FIBRE ARTISANS Welcome from the Editors P 05 IN THE SPOTLIGHT With Zetta Kanta P 07

RECIPE Traditional Lemonade P 10


4 Inside Magazine

STAND TALL & WEAR A CROWN THE ALPACA ADVENTURE GUYS Tim Toshack & Graham Lugg P 24

YARN TRAIL A DIY yarn trail of the Central West of NSW P 36

PATTERNS ONE SKEIN SHAWL By Abbey Bongers (Abbeymade) P 39 PINEAPPLE DREAM DRESS By Juliette Bland P 41 BOHO BEACH CHAIR By Joanne Geaney - Chunky Knits P 45 CROCHET CHUNKY HEMP CORD BOWL By Nicola Baker P 48 STORE SPOTLIGHT

HYGGE THROW

Salmanca Wool Hobart

By Liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Meo

P 27

P 49

HYGGE

FILET KIMONO

Cozy up for winter the Danish way

By Jasmine Jones

P 29 WEAVOLUTION Resurgence in Weaving P 33

P 51 DECEPTION CARDIGAN By Kiri Fitzgerald P 57


5

From The Editor

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY? Everything! I love that I get to document moments that will never be repeated. I also love getting to know and work with different people. The best thing is to see the excitement on people’s faces once they see their photos. WHAT ARE YOUR HOBBIES? Surfing, swimming, snowboarding, skating, travelling, hiking and martial arts. YOUR LIKES AND DISLIKES? I like spending time with family and friends at birthdays and Christmas, playing sports, travelling and going on holidays. I love being with people who make me laugh, the ocean and everything related to it. I dislike the city, crowds, rude and obnoxious people, politics, when people ask me to photoshop their bodies (just NO), alarm clocks and my To Do list.

INTRODUCING ELLIE GAILLE

Editor-in-Chief I thought I would use my space over the coming issues to introduce you to the Indie Road team. Let me introduce you to Ellie. WHO ARE YOU? My name is Eliane Gonzalez (NOT ELAINE) but people call me Ellie. I am a photographer and I was born in Paraguay, South America. I left home about eight years ago to move to Spain with my mum who is Spanish, but I only lasted there three months as I decided to go travelling around the world. I was lucky enough to live in different continents and countries to learn about different cultures. A few years later I wanted to find a place to settle where I could have the lifestyle I secretly wanted, so I moved to Australia and fell in love with it straight away! WHAT DO YOU DO? I have done all sorts of things. I started working in childcare in London then I changed to tourism, hosting a chalet in the French Alps and hospitality at fine dining restaurants. It was a great experience as it helped me travel a lot and mould my personality, but the whole time my main goal was to become a full time photographer. I recently started getting busier with photography and I needed a job that would give me the flexibility to keep developing my business. I returned to work in childcare part time and I love it! I have a lot of fun at work with the kids and I am able to go home and keep working on my goals. TELL US ABOUT YOUR ROLE AT INDIE ROAD? I am a visual storyteller or you can call me a photographer. Yes, that’s right! I am helping Indie Road produce the images you see printed in this beautiful magazine.

WHAT ARE YOU PROUD OF? I am proud of people who choose to be real and different. People who don’t care about living up to the silly society standards but who choose their own path and write their own book, are the people I want in my circle. YOUR FAVOURITE COLOUR? My favourite colours are pink, purple and turquoise blue. YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD? Oh, this one is a hard one because I love all sorts of food. Haha. Being South American, I obviously LOOOVE meat! I also love Italian, Mexican and Middle Eastern food with a lot of flavours, so the more spices the better! WHERE CAN YOU SEE YOURSELF IN 10 YEARS? I’d love to be working on photography full time, travelling and surfing as much as possible with a lovely little family. I look forward to introducing you to a new member next issue. Live. Laugh. Create. Gaille x


6

Welcome to Issue 2! Entering into the Independent Magazine genre has its risks, with creators wanting to give birth to something authentic, intriguing and fresh. Independents (or “Indies”) are specifically niched and have to stand out from the crowd. Celebrating sub-cultures, special interests and passions from around the globe, these magazines give the zany, eccentric and rebellious person a place to belong. They have a readerfirst mentality, flipping the advertising-centric focus of conventional magazines on its head. Indies also revel in the physicality of the magazine, with each issue being a work of art in itself – one you can be proud to leave on your coffee table. A price point somewhat higher than the mass produced, advertising driven mags of the 90s, the Indies are a cut above and are now taking centre stage. Social media plays a big part in helping independent magazines like Indie Road grab a foothold in their market and speak to their sub-culture. Social media spreads the word, shares the passion and connects people. So, help us along by interacting with us on INSTAGRAM and FACEBOOK. Our Instagram handle is indie_road_aus and #indieroad. And you can find us on Facebook under IndieRoad Magazine. If you are not up to speed with social media, or would love to learn how to engage with us easily, pop on over to the blog indieroad.com.au/blog to read how Instagram can help you connect, stay in touch and spread your message. SAM

Editor

Typically, those who embrace the risk of launching an Independent magazine are rebels - rebels with a cause. These magazines allow those readers whose interests were once thought of as obscure, to freely and happily wave their “crazy flag”. It brings people together and creates community. I leave you with this - wave your flag proudly, share your passion and be proud. Once again, thanks for being part of our community. Until next edition, Sam x

From The Editor

I LOST MY HEART TO THE SEA


8

In The Spotlight

WITH ZETTA KANTA

Zetta, tell me something about yourself

different materials that could achieve

and your journey into this art form.

this and wool ticked all the boxes.

Ever since my early days studying

I experimented with this material and the

fashion design in Latvia and architecture

more I did, the more I fell in love with its

in Denmark, I have been drawn to textures.

plasticity, tactility and versatility. This is how the journey began.

We live in Melbourne now, but for some years I travelled all around the world

Your large scale tapestries and wall hangings

with my husband. He is a jazz pianist

are very unique. I’ve not seen anything

and vocalist, so we had the most amazing

like this before. What was the process and

opportunity to live in literally dozens of

inspiration behind them?

countries where he was contracted to perform. I stockpiled many memories that influence my art today. Around 2010 we decided to settle in Noosa on the Sunshine Coast. I was reviewing my creative path and knew I had to do something different. I wanted to go back to basics. My curiosity led me to research and

The process itself is called ‘felting’. It is an ancient art form that started from the necessity to build what were called ‘yurts’, which are basically, large tents families lived in. The majority of fibres I use are sourced directly from farmers. I have a great relationship with a local

discover the origins and importance

farmer who keeps coloured sheep.

of textile art forms in our living spaces.

All her sheep are different breeds -

Surrounding myself with natural

Merino, Bond-Merino, Leicester - but

materials was important.

they all have one common thing: they

I was looking for softness, gentleness

are all rescue sheep. Seeing this loving

and to create a place that would resonate

relationship between farmer and animal

a sense of calmness and a connection to

inspires me to convey the simplicity and

the natural world. I started researching

beauty of human kindness into an art work.


9

In The Spotlight

It is evident from your work that you are passionate about nature and sustainability. There seems to be a kind of renaissance going on with forgotten art forms and a shift towards hand - made sustainable art. How do you see yourself in this movement? I want my wallhangings to have a voice and tell a story. Sustainability is a big word right now and for a good reason. This earth is weeping and we have to change the way we live, the way we think. The everyday choice to tread kindly on this earth starts from us. We will lose our treasures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; forests, rivers and oceans - if we do not make these small changes. Every wallhanging I make comes with a small poem that is created after I finish and sew the last embroidery stitch. This poem is the voice of each piece. The visual impact and these simple words provoke the viewer to stop and ponder on their role in saving this beautiful planet we live on. Article by GAILLE SMITH


10 Recipe

B Y A U T H O R H E R E LO U I S E S M I T H

Growing up with memories of my Gran making lemonade on a hot summer day inspired this recipe.

Ingredients - 3 cup caster sugar - 4 cup boiling water - 1 cup lemon juice (add more to taste, sweet yet sour)

Method 1. Bring sugar and water to a slow boil over medium heat. 2. Allow to cool. 3. Add lemon juice. 4. Refrigerate. 5. Add cordial to still or sparkling water over ice. 6. Decorate with lemon slices or mint.


DESIGNER

PAT T E R N

DESCRIPTION

“kimono” means a “thing to wear” (ki “wear” and mono “thing”)


B O H O B E AC H C H A I R Designer | Joanne Geaney Pattern | Page 45


TAKE ME TO


14 Travel Article

NUNGUA, GHANA

If you follow the coastal road southeast out of Accra you’ll find Nungua, a fishing village, and Aba House, a cultural centre and guesthouse and home to Cross Cultural Collaborative. This oasis of creativity was started by an American artist who saw visitors coming to Ghana having a superficial connection with the locals. Ellie Schimelman (given the name Aba - a female born on Thursday) decided to change that. Because Ellie’s background is in the Arts, she offers workshops, tours, visits to traditional craft villages and opportunities to live and work with African artisans that revolve around creativity. Each summer, visitors from around the world attend an Artists’ Residency where for two weeks they work independently and collaboratively across the street from the ocean, immersed in the local culture. Although open to all creatives and skill levels, many of the workshops explore indigenous African textiles. The cloth most recognizable as Ghanaian is Kente. Just by looking at it you know that it is very special. Woven on strip looms and in dazzling colors, Kente was originated by either the Ashanti or Ewe ethnics groups (depending on who you talk to.) The strips are sewn together to create toga-like wraps for men and women. Each pattern has a name based on a proverb or perhaps commemorating an event. The cloth of royalty, worn at ceremonial and religious events, displays status as well as connection to tradition. Although some designs are reserved for the Ashanti king and chiefs, anyone can buy Kente. It is expensive and only worn on special occasions. Sometimes children will buy Kente for an elderly parent to show their appreciation for a good upbringing. Visitors to Aba House can learn how to weave Kente. There is a weaver with his loom working in the yard.


15

Travel Article

Another fascinating cloth associated with Ghana is Adinkra. Symbols based on proverbs are carved into pieces of calabash and printed on cotton cloth. Originally symbols were printed on black cloth and worn to funerals. It is believed that the messages printed with the stamps are taken by the deceased to those who have already died. Still in use as funeral cloth, Adinkra is now also printed on cloth of many colours and worn on special occasions. It is sometimes worn instead of Kente because not everyone can afford to buy Kente. Participants in the Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Residency have a day long workshop with an artist from Ntonso, the famous Adinkra village. There is something to excite everyone interested in textiles and the possibilities are explored at large outdoor markets - traditional and contemporary galleries - museums and collaborations with local artists. Ghanaian contemporary artists are finding their voice on the international stage and many of them incorporate real cloth or borrowed symbols like Adinkra in their work. This is exciting to witness because it continues the rich tradition and symbolism of Ghanaian history. A sad reality is that outsiders like China and India (just to name a few) are copying traditional African cloth and bringing it to Ghana. Even though it is inferior in quality many Ghanaian women buy it because it is so cheap. The women know the difference, but not all can afford the originals. Cross Cultural Collaborative encourages textile lovers to experience Ghanaian cloth production before it changes forever. Even some of the

ubiquitous Adinkra is being printed with silkscreen instead of the traditional stamps because it is cheaper and faster. The silkscreened symbols often have no meaning and no connection to tradition. At the core of Cross Cultural Collaborative programs is the belief that the interaction between contemporary and indigenous artists enriches the creativity of both groups. Visiting artists experience a spiritual culture grounded in ritual and tradition, while locals are exposed to a wider world view. Believing that everyone is a teacher as well as a student, participants are invited to work with local children. The children make paper from sugar cane leaves and journals from the paper. There is no jurying for residencies. All that is required is a willingness to lose yourself in the local culture and to live, work and interact with Africans on a personal level. Many lasting friendships are formed and many creative collaborations are born. Some artists never leave their studios, making connections through imagination, but others feel that creativity comes from being out in the world and following their curiosity about the unknown. The mission of Cross Cultural Collaborative is to make the world a better place through the language of art. The 2018 Artist Residency at Aba House will be July 9-22, 2018. CULTURALCOLLABORATIVE .ORG


DESIGNER

PAT T E R N

DESCRIPTION

Do you love all things girlie, pink and dainty? This gorgeous lacy pineapple dress for your little princess shows exactly that.


CROCHET CHUNKY HEMP CORD BOWL Designer | Nicola Baker Pattern | Page 48


DESIGNER

PAT T E R N

DESCRIPTION

Finally, a use for that one skein buy that has been in your stash for far too long or that scrumptious hand spun yarn you just had to spin.


19 All things wool for fashion, warmth and comfort. Salamanca Wool Shop showcases the best of Tasmanian woollen produce, whether ready-made or individually created, and supports this with premium woollen and natural fibre products sourced from interstate and overseas. They can tell you the stories behind the products. They can also meet your creative needs, with yarn, patterns and craft accessories to create an individual piece. From astronauts to scientists in Antarctica, wool is the traveller's best friend. Where there's a wool there's a way!

Make & Create with Yarn for Charity

raising funds & awareness for mental health

Organiser:


20

BY MELISSA-JANE HARRISON

THERE IS LITTLE DOUBT THE CURRENT TREND IN KNITTING I S FA D I N G !

WHAT IS FADING? It is an art form of its own! The basic premise is to combine several skeins of yarn, either bought as a set or a combination of different yarns, to create a project that gradually moves from one colour to the next. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as blunt as a stripe, or as gradual as a gradient. It is somewhere in between. Tip: Speckled yarns tend to lend themselves well to this form of colour blending. They are perfect as a conjoining skein between two skeins that share a tone with the speckles. You can turn any pattern into a fade project. To achieve the faded look, you will need at least 3 skeins of yarn - a dark balance, a medium and a light balance skein. In the example of 3 skeins, you will work almost one third of the project in the first skein. Then you start alternating between the first and second skein row for row, or every second row, blending the two shades. You continue on in colour two for the second third of the project. When you are approaching the last third, you can start to alternate colours two and three. Continue to finish the project in colour three. That is the basic format of the fade concept and really the sky is the limit with your creativity! No one says you even have to use coordinating skeins! Go for bold contrasts and make your own statement on the world! Whatever you choose, have fun with it! Note: Jumper is not authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own design.

Fair Fading

FROM THE OFFICE OF


21 Tutorial

CROCHET BASICS BY ABBEY BONGERS (Abbeymade)

Tunisian crochet is a cross between knitting and crochet, usually made with a long crochet hook. In this issue, we offer the basic skills and commonly used terminology needed to create Abbeymadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s One Skein Shawl on page 39. Each row of tunisian crochet has a forward pass to work stitches onto the hook, and a return pass to work them off the hook. The wider the fabric is, the more stitches are worked onto the hook per row. FOUNDATION ROW FORWARD PASS (FP) All tunisian crochet patterns begin with a set number of chains. For practice, start with 10 ch. Insert hook into the back loop of the 2nd ch from hook, YO PT 1 (yarn over, pull through 1).

A.

*Insert hook into the next back loop, YO, PT 1* 8 times. There will be 10 loops on the hook. (a) RETURN PASS (RP) Every row of tunisian crochet requires a return pass: YO, PT 1 then YO, PT 2 sts until 1 lp remains on the hook. This last lp serves as the first st of the next row. (b) Always complete this step in a tunisian crochet project â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it is often not written into the pattern instructions. Note: the anatomy of the finished row in Figure B. There are 10 vertical bars front and back with spaces between them. All subsequent rows utilise the vertical bars of the previously finished row to make their stitches. TUNISIAN SIMPLE STITCH (TSS) Insert hook from right to left behind the front of the 2nd vertical bar from the hook (the rightmost vertical bar is never worked),

B.

C.


22 Tutorial

YO, PT 1. Repeat the same process with the next vertical bar until all sts have been worked. (c) If still working on the practice sample, there will be 10 loops on the hook. The last st of the row is best worked using both the front AND back loops of the st and this is the case for the majority of different tunisian stitches. Continue this process for a few rows for practice. (d)

DECREASING (DEC) Insert hook under two vertical bars, YO, PT 1. This creates an upside down V look to the two sts worked together.

TUNISIAN PEARL STITCH ( TPS) Bring working yarn to the front of the hook before inserting hook into the vertical bar (e), YO, PT 1. Repeat the same process for each st in the next few rows for practice. (f) (Note that the last st of a row of TPS should be worked in the same method as TSS.)

FINISHING/BIND OFF ROW To make a neat finishing edge that matches the starting edge, insert hook into the next vertical bar and pull through both loops (like a slip st.) Repeat for each st along. (j)

TUNISIAN HONEYCOMB Tunisian honeycomb is a combination of TSS and TPS that are offset and alternated. Eg. Work 1 TSS, 1 TPS, 1 TSS, 1 TPS and so on until the last st of a row which is always worked as a TSS. When the lps are on the hook, there is a visual difference to how the st looks - the TPS sits further back than the TSS due to the working yarn placed in front of the st before it is worked. (g)

Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries - abbeymade@gmail.com

On the next row, begin with the alternate st to the row before. Eg. 1 TPS, 1 TSS, 1 TPS, 1 TSS and so on. Once familiar with how the sts look, it is easy to see which stitch to work on each row, so work a few rows for practice. (h) Honeycomb st has a fabulous drape and texture. If the correct hook size is used, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t curl like many other tunisian sts, making it ideal for shawls and wraps.

D.

INCREASING (INC) Add a YO to the hook before working the next st, giving an extra loop on the hook at the completion of the forward pass. For a more finessed increase, work a st (TSS or TPS) into the top of the ch between the two vertical bars. (i)

E.

F.

G.

H.

I.

J.


Sydney Takeshta, London Light Photography


24 The Alpaca Adventure guys

ADVENTURE GUYSS TIM TOSHACK & GRAHAM LUGG

The influx of new residential developments changed the ambience of our quiet little village of Bungendore, NSW, so we sold up and moved to a 25 acre property near Yass, NSW. Having purchased this acreage, we wanted to use it purposefully and find some livestock to keep the grass down. We really liked the idea of purchasing some type of heritage sheep, but we had an open mind about the land use. We attended our local small farm field day at Murrumbateman and there in a big tent were all these long necked, big eyed exotic animals called alpacas. The adventure began.

Association for the past 14 years in committee roles, convening and stewarding at alpaca shows. Alpacas were imported into Australia from Chile in 1989 and later Peru. This saw the start of the alpaca industry in Australia. Alpacas have adapted very well to our hot summers and cold winters, creating ideal conditions for fleece production. There are two types of alpacas in Australia. The Huacaya (which Lualto run) looks more like a sheep fleece, only without the lanolin. The Suri type of alpaca has the long flowing locks (like Bob Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dreadlocks.) The fleece quality of the breed has improved dramatically since the first animals arrived in 1989, allowing the industry to go onto the next stage of development of a fleece industry.

The Lualto Alpaca Stud was registered and then we purchased a pregnant female and two wethered males (all black) in 2003. Within a few years our stud had acquired and bred 100 alpacas (now mainly white with a few other colours thrown in) with good quality animals purchased from around Australia. Our property could not sustain the ever increasing herd, so in 2006 we packed up again and moved to a larger property still in the Yass district. Today we run approximately 200 alpacas and have been actively involved in the Australian Alpaca

Alpaca Ultimate yarn started production in 2008 as a collaboration between two alpaca studs in Australia and one in New Zealand. We purchased the business in 2014 as we were interested in taking the production of alpaca fibre into yarn to a new level. Stringent procedures for producing a high quality, soft handling, luxurious yarn were developed using 100% Australian Alpaca Fibre. We send our fibre to a leading commercial mill in New Zealand to be spun and dyed into a high quality yarn which is sold through our Australian Alpaca Yarn website.


25 Hand Dyeing

Alpaca Ultimate yarn is made from our own fleece as well as fleece sourced from some of the leading alpaca studs in Australia. Each fleece is scientifically grid tested to determine micron and comfort factor and thoroughly skirted to eliminate all the unwanted fibre and contaminants. Each fleece is graded into five different baled lines with each line used in the different plies of yarn being 1 ply, 2 ply, 4 ply, 8 ply and a boucle yarn equivalent to 10 ply. The 1 Ply is 70% alpaca / 30% silk, while the 2, 4, and 8 ply yarns are all 100% alpaca. There are up to 21 different colours in some of the different plies. Australian Alpaca Yarn is working with a designer from Sydney, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;meoâ&#x20AC;?, to enhance the knitting pattern range which is also available through the website. Our goal is to increase our range of yarn using different blends of fibre with the alpaca and to continue the adventures of Australian Alpaca Yarn.


26

Hugadoliies

BY ROBYNN - EL ROSS

UNIQUE GIFTS FOR EVERYONE WHO NEEDS EXTRA LOVE PATTERN Available on Ravelry | Robynn-El

@Robynn-El

@ robynnelstudio@gmail.com


SALAMANCA WOOL


There is nothing quite like wool. At the Salamanca Wool Shop you will find wool in many forms, from raw fleece to commercial fabric that has been made into garments. Because of the range I often say the shop has a split personality. Walking into the shop you are greeted with a sea of colour. The question is often “Where do I look?” When I am buying for the shop I follow some simple guidelines, but like the English language there can be exceptions. My scoring card for deciding what goes into the shop: • the goods must have at least 75% wool or natural fibres, • r anking where it was made – Tasmania, Australia, New Zealand, the rest of the world, • t he supplier must be ethical in how they conduct their business, • t he supplier must not undercut me as a retailer if they sell online (exception is on sale items), •h  andmade knitted/crocheted garments or hand spun yarn must be made by local fibre artisans. I find I am always battling for space. Each year I aim to give space to quality woollen clothing and accessory labels. You will find Merinomink, Merino Snug, Only Merino, Hedrena, Aklanda, Valia, Bridge and Lord, Fields, Bella, Ronnie Avery Design, Bills Socks, Mongrel Socks, MKMl and Hanna Hats stocking our shelves. Added to these are the local hand knits that are in store. I either buy from a local knitter or I commission knitters to knit patterns I have selected or designed.

The other half of the shop is the wool wall. On this are a wide range of yarns such as White Gum Wool, Bellevue Park, Rosabella Threads, Salamanca Wool Shop hand dyed yarn, Filatura di Crosa, Debbie Bliss, Sublime, Heirloom, Biggan Design, Misti Alpaca, Zealana, Zauberball, Katia, Inca Spun and Indiecita. The Ringrove Collection includes tops (silk, alpaca and wool), handspun local yarn and fleece. All your spinning and felting requirements are available at Salamanca Wool Shop, alongside the patterns, magazines, needles and hooks to support the yarn we carry. Do I man the shop every day? No. I am supported by my wonderful husband and staff. We provide advice on knitting and garment choice. The answer will depend on which of us is answering the question as we all have different experiences and strengths! Do not expect too much from my husband in the way of knitting and yarn information as he is better on the other side of the shop. When in doubt, he phones his wife. For those wanting to learn to knit or brush up on skills, we offer knit and crochet group classes. We can even arrange private lessons if requested. Looking for chill out time? Join us on the first Wednesday of the month where we gathering at a local bar for a knit, knatter and a drink. If you are in Hobart, we would love to see you either in the shop or at our knitting group. We can be found at 69 Salamanca Place, online at salamancawoolshop.com, or on Twitter, Trip Advisor and Facebook.

28 Store Spotlight

SALAMANCA WOOL SHOP ENCOMPASSES ALL THINGS WOOLLY FOR COMFORT, FASHION AND WARMTH.


Photgraphy by @birgittetheresa


30 Cozy up for winter

FOR WINTER THE DANISH WAY BY ROZ PANETTA

Hygge (pronounced Hyoo guh), is about creating a warm and comfortable environment for family and friends.

Think piles of fluffy cream mohair, natural coloured wool, faux fur rugs, vintage chenille, soft and lofty knits in palest pink, mountains of squishy pillows - accentuated with crisp linen for the perfect boudoir or an inviting couch.

Picture yourself at home sharing nourishing food and drink, relaxing in handknitted socks and watching a crackling fire while snuggling under your favourite throw.

A blanket or knitted throw makes for the perfect snuggle time. The bonus is that whilst knitting your cuddly throw, you are also keeping warm as it grows. In itself, the act of knitting is a cosy and homely feeling. It allows creativity to flow as you knit something unique and beautiful for your home or for a loved one. The rhythmic sound of clicking knitting needles can induce a state of calm and wellbeing. Knitters know the meditative benefits of their craft, especially after a long busy day at work or with a growing family.

With such long cold winters, it is no surprise that home is so important to the Danes. Their love for nature, beautiful interiors and simple handmade objects is renowned. We may not have those freezing winters in the southern hemisphere, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enjoy the same comfort and sense of wellbeing in our own homes. Textiles offer such variety when styling our homes and an individual look is easy to achieve. Think about the colours that work best in your environment. Consider the latest trends and add your own ideas. Neutrals are safe and very Nordic and look amazing when layered. Using different textures within those neutrals will make the ordinary extraordinary.

WILL YOU HYGGE THIS WINTER? Cover your bare floors with rugs. This will soften the sound and instantly create a designated space to set up your winter nest. Adding heavy drapes on windows will help keep the warmth in and add to the overall cosy feel. Fabrics to consider include damask, velvet, heavy linen, denim and wool blends.


31 Cozy up for winter

Choose defused lighting and candles. If you’re worried about the flame, you can buy little imitation candles that use a battery and fit into pretty handmade votives using birch bark. Fairy lights strung in a dark corner or over a curtain rail instantly creates wonder. Sometimes you don’t need a lot of light to knit by.

accompanied by a rich creamy hot chocolate drink.

Find textured and squishy homemade cushions in lots of shapes and sizes for your couch. Try using a large quilt or bedspread to throw over the lounge first to give your room a seasonal change and add to your new hibernating winter ritual.

Adorn your walls with lots of gorgeous family photos. Try making a macramé or woven wall hanging using lush yarn and roving in a colour that ties into your scheme.

Placing a rattan basket of extra throws, cushions and your knitting WIP, looks as inviting as a stack of magazines (Indie Road on the top, of course) or books on a side table ready to browse or simply admire. A fireplace is beautiful, yet modern heating or reverse cycle air conditioning will give your space the necessary comfort and warmth. To really express your hygge, bake some homemade cookies or indulge in a slice of cake

Vis

w e it N

d n a l a e Z

Bring the outdoors in with handmade wreaths of evergreen foliage tied with jute then propped on the mantelpiece. Collect similar size sticks on your walk, or buy some cinnamon sticks. Bundle and tie up with string and display with your other items.

Hygge is for everyone who loves his or her home and creature comforts.

H YG G E

(HU-GUH)

(n) The art of inviting closeness and paying attention to what makes us feel open hearted and alive. Enjoying life’s simple pleasures. A coziness of the soul.


SUBSCRIBE TO

Indie Road

ONLINE ORDERS indieroad.com.au MAIL ORDERS Complete the form and send to PO Box 278, Lindfield, NSW, 2070 . Please note subscriptions include postage within Australia. International postage fees will apply. NAME ADDRE S S

SUBURB STATE

POSTCODE

COUNTRY PHONE NUMBER EMAIL SUB SCRIBE FOR ( TICK BOX)

PAYMENT METHOD Visa /Mastercard/Cheque

Single Issue $13

Card #

1  year Subscription $40

Exp

2 year subscription $76

Security Code

Dye-a-long $40 per mystery box

Signature

Online subscription available online from $6

100% Australian Alpaca Yarn

F E LT & H I D E

KNITTERS GUILD

A self-taught Sydneysider specialising in wet felting, leather work and crocheting. Producing unique handmade home wares using Australian wool and sustainable and environmentally friendly products.

Over 25 locations across New South Wales. We offer workshops, tutorials, a well-stocked library, shows, exhibitions, events, retreats and friendship. Everyone is welcome. Fun, Friendship, Knitting and Crochet.

feltandhide.nicshane.com

kgnsw.org.au

@feltandhide

Shop online for a wide selection of colours available in 50gm balls or on cones in 1, 2, 4, 8 Ply and Boucle.

www.australianalpacayarn.com.au We produce quality yarn by using only the best Australian alpaca fibre.


Photo by Jenny Walton of Great Blue Fiber


34 Weavolution

BY JENNY WALTON Great blue fiber

It’s not the 1970s - but lately the textures and woolly wall hangings of that era are making a comeback. Acknowledged as one of the oldest surviving crafts in the world, the tradition of weaving traces back to Neolithic times – approximately 12,000 years ago. Weaving has found a new niche and a second coming after the macramé and fibre splendour of the 70s and looms are once again commonplace at craft and fibre stores. The art of interlacing fibres together is the foundation for creating textiles and art. The vertical thread is the warp and the horizontal thread woven between these strands is the weft. With the rise of contemporary artists reinventing this ancient art with a fresh perspective, weaving is seeing something of a renaissance. Small shops selling accessories, hand made pieces and wall art are popping up in many places. A love for hand made seems to be finding a new audience. While weaving, I love the connection I have to the history and longevity of this craft. The soothing and deep awareness of doing something that has lasted thousands of years, and slowing down to create something with intent and purpose, adds balance to my busy days. I try to use natural fibres with ecologically sustainable dyes and from sustainable farms. That is important on my journey as an artist and as a human. For those interested in learning to weave, it is so easy to start and not much is needed in the way of tools. A small lap loom can be found inexpensively or bought online from Etsy stores. You will need different yarns varying in colours and weights, a tapestry needle, a shed stick which is woven through the warp to make space as you weave, sharp scissors and a dowel or something from which to hang your finished piece. There are some great tutorials online as a jumping off point. For example, Lindsey Campbell of Hello Hydrangea has great tutorials to follow and she is a wonderful weaver with great ideas.

Weaving is a suitable craft for the time poor person, or the crafter who wants something they can pick up and put down easily. I have always been drawn to the arts, but caring for my family meant my time and artistic energy was limited. As my personal time grew, so did my need for artistic expression. I bought my daughter a lap loom for a present and found myself helping her and fell in love! Living near the beautiful Chesapeake Bay in Maryland, US, I find many of my inspirations from this environment. My favourite pieces are artistic renditions of local spots where we walk with our kids and dogs. I usually include local driftwood and sea glass as accoutrements. Inspiration can be found anywhere you live, or taken from abstract shapes and colours you like. If you are interested in seeing some of the fun and unique styles that modern weaving embodies, check out Natalie Miller ( nataliemillerdesign.com), Maryanne Moodie (maryannemoodie.com) and Ann Roth (annrothtextiles.com). Ann has been weaving since 1975, in and around various administrative and curatorial positions with non-profit arts organizations, university museums and commercial galleries in Vermont, Maine and North Carolina. Most recently Ann taught colour theory and was the gallery director at Meredith College in Raleigh, North Carolina from 2001-2014. Since then Ann focused on working in her studio. Ann’s work has been shown in local, regional and national solo, invitational and juried exhibitions and received a BFA from the University of Michigan and an MFA in Textile Design from the University of Kansas. Since 1996, she has been using shibori and ikat techniques to dye white cotton fabric before tearing it into strips for warp and weft. Sometimes precisely calculated, sometimes left more to chance, colours and shapes meet and/or overlap as the over, under, over under of the weaving process progresses. Surprises, nuances, transparencies and layers emerge from pairing a simple weave structure with the complicated process used for creating the warp and weft. GreatBlueFiber.etsy.com

GreatBlueFiber


36 West Central Fibre Trail

YARN TRAIL N E W S O U T H WA L E S

Y U M M Y YA R N & C O

C O N V E N T & C H A P E L WO O L S H O P

CABOODLE OF ORANGE GIFTS

THE HOUSE OF WOOL B YG O N E B E A U T Y S T R E A S U R E D T E A P OT M U S E U M

THE WOOL INN

B A N K S I A YA R N

GRETA’S HANDCRAFT CENTRE

T H E T E A COSY

SY D N EY

T H E T E A C O S Y 33 George Street The Rocks G R E TA’ S H A N D C R A F T C E N T R E 309A Pacific Hwy, Lindfield NSW 2070 B A N K S I A YA R N S 3 E Market St, Richmond NSW 2753 T H E W O O L I N N 14/450 High St, Penrith NSW 2750 T H E H O U S E O F W O O L 40 Govetts Leap Rd, Blackheath NSW 2785 B Y G O N E B E A U T Y S 20-22 Grose St, Leura NSW 2780 C O N V E N T A N D C H A P E L W O O L S H O P 28-30 Louee St, Rylstone NSW 2849 C A B O O D L E O F O R A N G E G I F T S 186 Anson St., Orange NSW 2800 Y U M M Y YA R N A N D C O Rear 138 Macquarie Street (entry via Myer carpark), Dubbo NSW 2830 DUBBO


DESIGNER

PAT T E R N

DESCRIPTION

Chunky knits, stretchy jeans and a top are always a good ‘go to’ outfit.


H YG G E T H R OW Designer | Liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Meo Pattern | Page 49


39

One Skein Shawl - Pattern

BY ABBEYMADE Difficulty: Easy

Finally, here is a use for that one skein impulse buy that has been in your stash for far too long or that scrumptious hand spun yarn you just had to spin! The Tunisian honeycomb pattern explained on page 21 gives a lustrous drape effect to a vibrant feature yarn.

PAT T ER N N OT E S

Weigh your skein of yarn and record the weight YARN

before commencing. The shape of this shawl is

The sample was made using 1 skein of 4 ply

developed by adding an increase at the beginning

Misti Alpaca hand painted sock yarn (100g/3.5oz,

of every 3rd row until 40% of the yarn is used. The

400m/437yds.)

next 20% of the yarn is worked using the same row width without any increases or decreases. The last

EQUIP MENT

40% of the yarn is worked with a decrease at the

- 6.5mm tunisian crochet hook

beginning of every 3rd row. Working in percentages

- Kitchen scales

rather than listing the number of rows to be worked means this shawl pattern is flexible for different yarn weights and hook sizes.


40

ROW 1

Ch 3, TPS in 2nd ch from hook, TSS in last ch. (3 sts) ROW 2

TSS in each st. (3 sts) ROW 3

Inc, TSS, TPS, TSS in last ch. (4 sts) ROW 4

TSS, TPS, TSS, TSS in last ch. (4 sts) ROW 5

TPS, TSS, TPS, TSS in last ch. (4 sts) ROW 6

Inc, TSS, TPS, TSS, TSS in last ch. (5 sts) Continue working honeycomb st rows with an increase at the start of every 3rd row until 40% of the yarn weight has been used. The sample shawl resulted in 46 sts on the row once 40% of the yarn had been used, a total of 129 rows. Remember that these row numbers may differ based on the yarn and hook size used. S ECT IO N 2

Continue working honeycomb st rows without adding any increases until a further 20% of the yarn weight has been used. Approximately 40% of the yarn should remain in the unworked skein before starting the next section. S ECT IO N 3

Make a decrease at the start of every 3rd row and continue working honeycomb st rows in this pattern until 3 rows have been worked with only 3 sts on each row. The shawl shape will now be a mirror image when folded in half lengthwise. F IN IS HIN G

Make a tunisian sl st bind off row as described in the Tunisian Tutorial on page 21. If any yarn remains, you can make two tassels for sewing onto the start and end points of the shawl. Weave in all ends. Block lightly if required. Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries - abbeymade@gmail.com

One Skein Shawl - Pattern

S ECT IO N 1


41

Pineapple Dream Dress - Pattern

BY JULIETTE BLAND Difficulty: Intermediate

Do you love all things girlie, pink and dainty? This gorgeous lacy pineapple dress for your little princess, size 6-9 months, shows exactly that.

N OT E S

Ch - chain

Sl st - slip stitch

Sc - single crochet

Sp/s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; space/spaces

YARN

Dc - double crochet

Beg - beginning

Stenli Souffle â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 200g of colour 226

Tr - treble crochet

(85% cotton/15% polyester, 280g/9.8oz,

Corner cluster - 5 dc in the same stitch

900m/984yds.) Any 4ply cotton will suffice.

Beg shell - ch 3, 1 dc in starting sp

NEEDLE S AND NOTI ONS

- 2.75mm crochet hook - Tapestry needle - 2 small buttons - 1 metre of contrast ribbon

Shell - 2 dc, ch1, 2 dc in ch sp Db shell - 2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc in ch sp V st - in one sp make 1 dc, ch 1, 1 dc Picot - ch 3, sl st in last dc made Ch 3 at the beginning of each row counts as the first stitch. Work instructions between * * and [ ] for the stated number of times.


42

CH AIN 89 Chain 3 at the end of each row be-

comes first dc of next row. ROW 1 Work into back loop of ch. Dc in 4th ch

from hook, dc in next 8 ch, *corner cluster in next ch, dc in next 21 ch,* three times. Corner cluster in next ch, dc in next 10 ch. Ch 3, turn. (103 sts) ROW 2 Dc in next 11 dc, corner cluster in next st

RO U N D 1 3

Beg shell, *ch 1, shell in next v st, ch 1, shell in next shell,* 31 times. Ch 1, shell in next v st, ch 1, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells) RO U N D 1 4

Beg shell, *ch 2, shell in top of next shell,* 63 times. Ch 2, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells)

(3rd dc of corner cluster from the previous row), *dc in next 25 dc, corner cluster in next dc,* three times, dc in next 12 dc. Ch 3, turn. (119 sts)

RO U N D 1 5

ROW 3 Dc in next 13 dc, corner cluster in next st, *dc in next 29 dc, corner cluster in next dc,* three times, dc in next 14 dc. Ch 3, turn. (135 sts)

RO U N D 1 6

ROW 4 Dc in next 15 dc, corner cluster in next st,

*dc in next 33 dc, corner cluster in next dc,* three times, dc in next 16 dc. Ch 3, turn. (151 sts) ROW 5 Dc in next 17 dc, corner cluster next st,

*dc in next 37 dc, corner cluster in next dc,* three times, dc in next 18 dc. Ch 3, turn. (167 sts) ROW 6 Dc in next 19 dc, corner cluster in next st,

*dc in next 41 dc, corner cluster in next dc,* three times, dc in next 20 dc. Ch 3, turn. (183 sts) ROW 7 Dc in next 21 dc, corner cluster in next st, *dc in next 45 dc, corner cluster in next dc,* three times, dc in next 22 dc. Ch 3, turn. (199 sts) ROW 8 Dc in next 24 dc (working last dc in the 3rd dc of corner cluster.) Ch 14, miss 49 dc for armhole, dc in next 51 dc, ch 14, miss 49 dc for 2nd armhole, dc for remaining 25 dc, ch 2. Join with sl st to beg of row (top of turning ch.) (25 dc, 14 ch, 51 dc, 14 ch, 25 dc)

RIBBON HOLE ROW ROU ND 9

Ch 5 (counts as tr, ch 1), miss 1 st *1 tr, ch 1, miss 1 ch/st,* 64 times. Join with a sl st to the 4th ch. (65 tr, 65 ch 1 sps) SKIRT

Work in rounds for skirt part of dress. Do not turn work from now on. ROU ND 10

Beg shell in 1st ch 1 sp, v stitch in next ch 1 sp, *shell in next ch 1 sp, v stitch in next ch 1 sp* 31 times. Ch 1, 2 dc in last ch sp, ch 1, join with sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 v sts) ROU NDS 11 & 12

Beg shell in top of previous beg shell, v st in next v st, *shell in next shell, v st in next v st,* 31 times. Ch 1, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, join with sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 v sts)

Beg shell, *ch 3, shell,* 63 times. Ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells) Beg shell, *ch 3, 8 dc in top of next shell, ch 3, shell in next shell,* 31 times. 8 dc in top of next shell, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 groups of 8 dc) RO U N D 17

Beg shell, *ch 3, [dc, ch 1] 7 times (in each dc from previous 8 dc), dc in last dc, ch 3, shell,* 31 times. [Dc, ch 1] 7 times (in each dc from previous 8 dc), dc in last dc. Ch 3, (2 dc, ch 1) in first sp as beg shell, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 pineapples)

Pineapple Dream Dress - Pattern

BODICE


43

Pineapple Dream Dress - Pattern

ROU ND 18

Beg shell, *ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 7 times, shell in next shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 7 times. Ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 pineapples) ROU ND 19

Beg shell, *ch 3, miss first ch 3 sp, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 6 times, miss next ch 3 sp, shell in next shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 6 times. Ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 pineapples) ROU ND 20

Beg shell, ch 1, 2 dc in same st as beg shell, *ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 5 times, miss next ch 3 sp, db shell in next shell sp,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 5 times. Ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 db shells, 32 pineapples) ROU ND 21

Beg shell, ch 1, shell in next ch 1 sp, *ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 4 times, [shell in next ch 1 sp, ch 1] twice,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 4 times. Ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells, 32 pineapples) ROU ND 22

Beg shell, *ch 3, shell in next shell, ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 3 times, shell in next shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in ch 1 sp, ch 3] 3 times. Ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells, 32 pineapples) ROU ND 23

Beg shell, *ch1, v st in ch 3 sp between shells, ch 1, shell in next shell, ch 3, [sc, ch 3] twice, shell in next shell,* 31 times. Ch 1, v st in ch 3 sp between shells, ch 1, shell in next shell, ch 3, [sc, ch 3] twice. Ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells, 32 v sts, 32 pineapples) ROU ND 24

Beg shell, ch 3, shell in v st, ch 3, shell in next shell, *ch 3, sc in ch 3 of pineapple, ch 3, shell in next shell, ch 3, shell in next v st, ch 3, shell in next shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, sc in ch 3 of pineapple, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (96 shells, 32 pineapples) ROU ND 25

Beg shell, *ch 3, shell in next shell, ch 3, 2 dc in next shell, 1 ch, 2 dc in next shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, shell in next shell, ch 3, 2 dc in next shell, ch 1, 2 dc in same place as beg ch, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (33 shells, 63 half shells) ROU ND 26

Beg shell, *ch 3, 8 dc in next shell sp, ch 3, shell in ch 1 sp between the 2 dc sets,* 31 times. Ch 3, 8 dc in next shell, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 groups of 8 dc)

YO U A R E THE PINE APPLE OF MY EYE


44

Pineapple Dream Dress - Pattern

ROUND 27

Beg shell, *ch 3, [dc, ch 1] 7 times (in each dc from previous round), dc in last dc, ch 3, shell in shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, [dc, ch 1] 7 times, dc in last dc, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 pineapples) ROUND 28

Beg shell, *ch 3, [sc in next ch 1 sp, ch 3] 7 times, shell in shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in next ch 1 sp, ch 3] 7 times, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 pineapples) ROUND 29

Beg shell, *ch 3, [sc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3] 6 times, shell in shell,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3] 6 times, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 shells, 32 pineapples) ROUND 3 0

Beg shell, ch 1, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, *ch 3, [sc in ch sp of pineapple, ch 3] 5 times, db shell* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in ch sp of pineapple, ch 3] 5 times, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (32 db shells, 32 pineapples)

N EC K E D G E & BU T TO N BA N D S ROW 1 Join yarn to right side of back bodice.

Make 17 sc down 1st side towards ribbon row, ch1, turn. (17 sc)

ROUND 31

ROW 2 Sc in each of next 16 sts, 2 sc in next st, sc

Beg shell, ch 1, *shell in next ch 1 sp, ch 3, [sc in ch sp of pineapple, ch 3] 4 times, shell in ch sp of shell, ch 1, shell in next ch 1 sp,* 31 times. Ch 3, [sc in ch sp of pineapple, ch 3* 4 times. 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells, 32 pineapples)

ROW 3 Sc in each of next 7 sts, ch 2, miss 2 sc

ROUND 32

Beg shell *ch 3, shell in next shell, [ch 3, sc in ch 3 sp of pineapple] 3 times, ch 3, shell in shell,* 31 times. [Ch 3, sc in next ch 1 sp] 3 times, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (64 shells, 32 pineapples) ROUND 33

Beg shell *ch 1, shell in ch 3 sp between shells, shell in next shell, [ch 3, sc in ch 3 sp of pineapple] twice, ch 3, shell in shell,* 31 times. [Ch 3, sc in next ch 1 sp] twice, ch 3, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, ch 1, sl st to top of ch 3. (96 shells, 32 pineapples) ROUND 3 4, P ICOT ROU ND

Beg shell, picot, 2 dc in same place as beg shell, *ch 3, [2 dc, picot, 2 dc in next shell] twice, ch 3, sc in last ch 3 sp of pineapple, ch 3, 2 dc, picot, 2 dc in next shell,* 31 times. [Ch 3, 2 dc, picot, 2 dc in next shell] twice, ch 3, sc in last ch 3 sp of pineapple, ch 3, sl st in top of beg shell. (96 picot shells) Cut yarn and weave in ends.

in each of next 85 sts, 2 sc in next st, sc in each of next 16 sts down other side of back bodice. Ch 1, turn. (111 sc) (buttonhole) sc in each of next 4 sts, ch 2, miss 2 sc, sc in next st, 2 sc in corner, sc in each of next 87 sts, 2 sc in corner, sc in each of next 16 sts down other side of bodice. (121 sc, 2 x 2 ch for buttonholes) Cut yarn. Sew button band side to the ribbon band. A R M HO L E S

With right side facing, join yarn in centre of under arm on bodice ribbon band. Work 2 sc in each ch 1 sp of this section. Now working in edge of bodice at armhole, work 2 dc, picot, 2 dc in 1st armhole corner of row 7, *skip 3 dc, work another picot shell in next st,* 14 times total, work 2 sc in rem bodice ribbon band row. Cut yarn and weave in ends. Repeat for another armhole. AS S EM B LY

Sew 2 buttons on back of bodice to match buttonhole band. Cut enough ribbon to weave around ribbon band holes, making a bow at the back of the dress. Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries aprilshowersbaby@bigpond.com


45

Boho Beach Chair - Pattern

J OA N N E G E A N E Y FROM CHUNKY KNITS Difficulty: Easy - Intermediate

Create the ultimate Coastal vibe in your home with a beautiful vintage piece of furniture and just a few simple macramé knots. With a little bit of time and patience you can create your very own piece of Coastal Bohemian heaven in just one weekend! The total cost for this project was approximately $120.

M AT ER IA L S

- Approx. 250-300m of 5mm natural white cotton rope from KnotKnitting.com.au, Macrame cotton rope suppliers. You will have plenty left over for tassels and embellishments. - 1 vintage style folding deck chair (I found mine on Ebay for $20.) - 1 tin of white chalk paint from the local hardware store fine sandpaper

NOTE

Before embarking on any kind of furniture re-furbishing journey, consult the appropriate professionals on ‘how to’ restore vintage furniture and abide by any necessary safety directions, especially if you intend on using it as a practical

- 1 pair of sharp scissors and pliers (in case you need to carefully extract any old, rusty nails or staples) for trimming rope ends L ET ’S D O IT !

Strip your chair! If you bought it second hand, remove materials, nails and staples carefully, using appropriate protection for this task. Lightly sand the wooden part of the chair and paint with a layer of chalk paint.

homeware item. This pattern details my own work

ST EP 1

in creating this piece. Slight variations may occur

Measure and cut your rope to approx. 600cm each. Do this 24 times. (This number depends on the width of your chair and how far apart you would like to make the knots. You may like to add more rope and alter the pattern accordingly.) Fold your rope in half and make a Larks Head Knot. Repeat this for all pieces of rope along the width of the top part of your chair frame. You will make 24 Larks Head Knots.

depending on where you find your chair frame and how you decide to use it. KNOT KNOWLE D G E

Some knowledge of basic Macrame knots is needed for this pattern. Go to indieroad.com.au under the heading SUBMISSIONS and TIPS for Larks Head, Square Knot and Josephine Knot.

Each piece of rope will be assigned a number 1-48 if you use 24 pieces, as each piece of rope, once made into a Larks Head knot onto your frame, creates two pieces of rope hanging down to work with.


46

C R E AT E T H E U LT I M AT E C O A S TA L V I B E I N Y O U R H O M E W I T H A B E A U T I F U L V I N TA G E PIECE OF FURNITURE AND JUST A FEW SIMPLE M AC R A M É K N OT S .

Make 12 Square Knots. (To make a Square Knot, you need four pieces of rope. This equates to two Larks head Knot pieces joined together.) Working from left to right, make a Square Knot with pieces 1, 2, 3 and 4 then make another Square Knot with pieces 5, 6, 7 and 8. Repeat this until you have completed one row of 12 Square Knots across the top of your frame. ST EP 3 / ROW 2

Make 11 Square Knots. This will form a ‘tile’ pattern. Start your first Square Knot in this row with ropes 3, 4, 5 and 6. ST EP 4 / ROW 3

Make 12 Square Knots. Start your first Square Knot with ropes 1, 2, 3 and 4. ST EP 5

Continue making rows of Square Knots until you have 6 rows completed and you begin to see a ‘tile’ pattern form. ST EP 6 / ROW 7

Starting with ropes 1, 2, 3 and 4 from the left, make 6 Square Knots. This will bring you to the centre. STOP and proceed to the far right side of the chair. ST EP 7 (ST IL L O N ROW 7 )

Starting with ropes 45, 46, 47 and 48 and working from right to left, make a Square Knot. Continue with 5 more Square Knots, working in towards the centre of the piece. Leave two ropes on either side of the centre to hang down. (This should leave ropes 23, 24, 25 and 26 hanging.) Row 7 has 12 Square Knots. ST EP 8 / ROW 8

Working from left to right, pick up ropes 3, 4, 5 and 6 and make a Square Knot. Continue making 4 more Square knots until you reach the centre of the piece. ST EP 9 (ST IL L O N ROW 8)

Working from right to left, pick up ropes 43, 44, 45 and 46 and make a Square Knot. Continue making 4 more Square Knots until you reach the centre of the piece. Row 8 has 10 Square Knots. ST EP 1 0 / ROW 9

Working from left to right, pick up ropes 1, 2, 3 and 4 and make a Square Knot. Continue making 4 more Square Knots until you reach the centre of the piece. ST EP 1 1 (ST IL L O N ROW 9)

Working from right to left, pick up ropes 45, 46, 47 and 48 and make a Square Knot. Continue making 4 more Square knots in this row until you reach the centre of the piece. Row 9 has 10 Square Knots.

Boho Beach Chair - Pattern

ST EP 2 / ROW 1


47

Boho Beach Chair - Pattern

STEP 12 / ROW 1 0

ST EP 17 / ROW 1 3

Working from left to right, pick up ropes 3, 4, 5 and 6 and make a Square Knot. Continue making 4 more Square Knots until you reach the centre of the piece. Leave ropes 21 and 22 to hang down in the centre.

Pick up ropes 21, 22, 23 and 24 and make a square knot under and to the left of the ‘v’. Repeat on the right side.

STEP 13 (STILL ON ROW 1 0)

Working work from right to left, pick up ropes 43, 44, 45 and 46 (leave ropes 47 and 48 to hang down) and make a Square Knot. Continue making 4 more Square Knots until you reach the centre of the piece. Leave ropes 27 and 28 to hang down. Row 10 has 10 Square Knots. STEP 14 (STILL ON ROW 1 0)

This is the main feature of your chair and the trickiest part. Notice the 4 ropes hanging down from Row 7. Pick these up. Leave approximately 3cm of rope hanging down and make a Josephine Knot using all four ropes. This knot will finish with 4 ropes hanging down, which will become ropes 23, 24, 25 and 26. (See TIPS under “Submissions” on the website for the Josephine Knot.) STEP 15 / ROW 1 1

Pick up ropes 21, 22, 23 and 24. Measure approx. 3cm underneath and diagonally right of Row 10. Join ropes to make a Square Knot. Create another Square Knot on the right side of the Josephine Knot with ropes 25, 26, 27 and 28. STEP 16 / ROW 12 Make a third Square Knot in the centre, under the two previous knots, forming a ‘v’ shape with ropes 23, 24, 25 and 26.

You should have 5 Square Knots in a group under the Josephine Knot. ST EP 1 8

Leave approx. 10cm of rope. The next three rows (Rows 14, 15 and 16) of Square Knots are not as close together. The “tile pattern” appears looser. ST EP 1 9 / ROW 1 4

Make 5 Square Knots beginning from the left of the chair with ropes 1, 2, 3 and 4. Stop at ropes 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28 and leave these hanging down. Repeat 5 Square Knots from the right side of the chair. ST EP 2 0 / ROW 1 5

Pick up ropes 3, 4, 5 and 6 and make 5 Square Knots from the left and 5 Square Knots from the right, leaving the four centre ropes hanging down. ST EP 2 1 / ROW 1 6

Make 12 Square knots in a row. ST EP 2 2 / ROW 17

Gather 8 centre ropes (21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28) and make one large Square Knot holding two ropes at a time. ST EP 2 3

Leave 10cm of rope. You’re almost finished! ST EP 24

Continue making rows of 12 Square Knots until you reach the end of the chair. ABOUT JOANNE

ST EP 2 5

Jo has an eye for interior design and is

Finish off by wrapping each rope around the chair frame once and securing with a Square Knot. You can weave ropes under each other if you feel it will help to hold the ropes firmly.

passionate about beautiful and luxurious home décor items. This fibre artist, teacher and mum of two loves to create macramé pieces, knit and crochet. Featured in a major 2017 Australian lifestyle magazine, Jo’s journey to create timeless pieces continues as she enjoys inspiring others in the community to learn about fibre arts.

You may also complete the chair with two rows of 12 Square Knots and leave rope hanging down like tassels, or make your own tassels and attach them. Comb out the fringe with a fine tooth comb or keep ropes as they are. You can find Jo’s projects in her ETSY Store ChunkyKnitsbyJo Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries - chunkyknitsbyjo@gmail.com


48

Crochet Chunky Hemp Cord Bowl - Pattern

BY NICOLA BAKER Difficulty: Easy

Nicola has a passion for traditional artisan crafts and creating homewares with a difference. Recently Nicola introduced leather craft to Felt & Hide, which began from her love of creating wool and felt.

RO U N D 1

Start with a magic ring, ch 1. Make 6 sc into magic ring. Close ring by pulling loose cord. (6 sc) RO U N D 2

2 sc into each of the sts of previous round. (12 sc) RO U N D 3

*1 sc into the first st, 2 sc into the next st* 6 times. (18 sc) MATERIALS

- 100% natural polished chunky hemp cord (1 ball, 400g, 74m, 2.7mm thickness)

RO U N D 4

*1 sc into each of first 2 sts, 2 sc into 3rd st* 6 times. (24 sc)

- 2.5mm brown round leather lace

RO U N D 5

- 12mm crochet hook

*1 sc into each of the first 3 sts, 2 sc into 4th st* 6 times. (30 sc)

PAT TERN NOTE S

The pattern works in a continuous round. Use a stitch marker in the first stitch of each round to keep track of the start and end of

RO U N DS 6 -1 0 (O R U N T IL CO R D RU N S O U T )

1 sc into every st of the round. (30 sc) F IN IS HIN G

Add a round of slipstitch with leather lace. Weave in ends and turn inside out.

each round. Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries wooltakesshape@nicshane.com


49

Hygge Throw - Pattern

BY LIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;L MEO

Throw

Difficulty: Easy - Intermediate

Knitting is my passion and relaxation. It inspires me to be more creative, to be observant and to draw ideas and colour palettes from nature. Most of my designs are freeform and develop on the needles, so they are often spontaneous. Recording my experimentation and planning my projects has allowed me to share my knit designs with others. Having a little bit of discipline is good, but being creative is liberating. Once you have confidence knitting other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patterns, I encourage you to make something that is all your own work.

YARN

16 x 50gm balls 8ly Australian Alpaca

F IN IS HED M EAS U R EM EN TS

Approx. 157 cm square

Ultimate (1600m/1750yds) in Hayman Blue (For spinners, this is approx.11 wpi.) MATERIALS

- 5mm circular knitting needles

ROW N OT E S

On the Danish lace stitch pattern and all wrong side rows, knit the knits and yarn overs, and purl the purls as they appear. The wrong side row is not indicated on the graph.

- Two stitch markers - Darning needle TENS ION

22 sts to 10cm over st st using 4mm needles. I have chosen a larger needle for the throw (5mm) to emphasise the lace pattern.

A B B R EV IAT IO N S US ED

pm place marker sm slip marker yo yarn over ssk slip, slip, knit k2tog knit two stitches together


50

ROW 3

Using 5mm circular needles, cast on 224 sts. (Each row consists of a border of 8 sts moss st, 13 pattern repeats of 16 sts per pattern and border of 8 sts moss st.) The bottom border is made with 12 rows moss stitch.

Sm, p3, k2tog, k2, yo, k1, p1, k1, yo, k2, ssk, p2, sm. ROW 5

Sm, p2, k2tog, k2, yo, k2, p1, k2, yo, k2, ssk, p1, sm. ROW 7

Sm, p1, k2tog, k2, yo, k3, p1, k3, yo, k2, ssk, sm. ROW 9

ROW 1

K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to end. Rep Row 1. Repeat above two rows 5 times more for 12 rows. Keep moss stitch pattern over 8 stitches either end of work for side borders of throw. Use stitch markers to mark the beginning and end of the Danish lace pattern. Begin Danish lace stitch. ROW 1

Pm, p4, k2tog, k2, yo, p1, yo, k2, ssk, p3, pm. ROW 2 AND ALT ROWS

Knit the knits and yarn overs, purl the purls and keep moss st pattern correct.

Sm, p1, k3, k2tog, k2, yo, p1, yo, k2, ssk, k3, sm. ROW 1 1

Sm, p1, k2, k2tog, k2, yo, p3, yo, k2, ssk, k2, sm. ROW 1 3

Sm, p1, k1, k2tog, k2, yo, p5, yo, k2, ssk, k1, sm. ROW 1 5

Sm, p1, k2tog, k2, yo, p7, yo, k2, ssk, sm. ROW 17

Sm, p1, yo, k2, ssk, p7, k2tog, k2, yo, sm. ROW 1 9

Sm, p1, k1, yo, k2, ssk, p5, k2tog, k2, yo, k1, sm. ROW 2 1

Sm, p1, k2, yo, k2, ssk, p3, k2tog, k2, yo, k2, sm. ROW 2 3

Sm, p1, k3, yo, k2, ssk, p1, k2tog, k2, yo, k3, sm. ROW 2 5

Sm, p1, yo, k2, ssk, k3, p1, k3, k2tog, k2, yo, sm. ROW 27

Sm, p2, yo, k2, ssk, k2, p1, k2, k2tog, k2, yo, p1, sm. ROW 2 9

Sm, p3, yo, k2, ssk, k1, p1, k1, k2tog, k2, yo, p2, sm. ROW 3 1

KEY

Knit

â&#x20AC;˘ Purl

O

YO / k2tog \ ssk

Sm, p4, yo, k2, ssk, p1, k2tog, k2, yo, p3, sm. Repeat the above 31 rows of pattern for 9 and 1/2 repeats or length desired, finishing with Row 16 on the wrong side. Moss stitch for 12 rows and cast off in moss stitch. F IN IS HIN G

When you have completed the knitting, weave in the ends. You can wet block the throw if desired, however a damp cloth and iron on a medium setting will help steam the pattern. Use a very gentle pressure to lightly steam the throw, as you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to stretch the pattern out too far. Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries rpanetta@optusnet.com.au

Hygge Throw - Pattern

PAT TERN


51

Filet Kimono - Pattern

W I T H O PT I O N A L B I R D M OT I F BY JASMINE JONES Difficulty: Easy

MATERIALS

-P  atons Regal 4 ply Cotton (750g/27oz, 2475m/2700y), 15 balls in white -2  .5mm standard crochet hook (check gauge)

ST ITC HE S

The main filet body is crocheted in extended double crochet (edc). Edc is recommended because it is

As this is a foundation pattern, you can play with

taller in comparison to standard dc, resulting in

yarn types and length to suit the occasion or

a truly square filet. In the charts, edc is displayed

your height. Be creative and try another motif.

using the same symbol as double crochet.

-G  auge (unblocked), 11 horizontal filet spaces x

There are two ways of making solid/closed areas

10.5 vertical filet spaces = 10cm/4â&#x20AC;? square.

of filet. Refer to Charts 1 and 2 for examples.

Use a larger or smaller hook to obtain correct

The sample kimono used the Chart 1 method

gauge before commencing the kimono.

which created a squarer result. See chart 1 & 2


52

C H A I N 23 4 . ROW 1 Edc into the 9th chain from the hook, ch

2, sk 2 ch, edc into the next ch, (that is the third chain along from the last edc - see Chart 1.) *Ch 2, sk 2, edc,* 74 times. (76 filet spaces) ROW 2 – 1 0

Turn, ch 5, edc into the next edc, *ch 2, edc into next edc* 75 times. (76 filet spaces per row) ROW 1 1

The tail of the bird starts in this row. Work as per Row 2 for the first 34 spaces. In the 35th ch 2 space (see chart back), work a solid/closed filet (either 2 edc or a 2 edc tog, depending on your choice of technique from Charts 1 or 2. Continue to work the remainder of the row as per Row 2. (76 filet spaces) ROW 12 – 4 5

Turn, ch 5, work open and closed filet spaces as per chart back pattern. Cast off at the end of Row 45. (76 filet spaces per row) ROW 4 6

Chain 66 (which will become the foundation chain for the left sleeve), cast on edc into the final edc of Row 45 and continue to work across the back according to the chart. After the final edc, ch 71. (66 ch, 76 filet spaces, 71 ch) ROW 47

Turn, edc in the 9th ch from the hook, *ch 2, sk 2, edc,* 21 times along the foundation ch. Work open and closed filet spaces as per chart back pattern. (76 filet spaces) *Ch 2, sk 2, edc,* 22 times along the remaining foundation ch. (120 filet spaces in total) ROW 4 8 – 93

Turn, ch 5 and work open and closed filet spaces as indicated by the chart back. (120 filet spaces per row)

Start Finish Chain - ch Single Crochet - sc

Extended Double Crochet - Edc

Extended 2 dc tog

Extended 2dc cluster

Increase - Edc , ch 1 , Edc

Chart 1.

C HART 1

Chart 2.

C HA RT 2

2 dc

Filet Kimono - Pattern

F O U N DAT I ON


53

Filet Kimono - Pattern

ROW 94

EDGING

(Shoulder and neck opening begins): Turn, ch 5

Edging is recommended to be worked in a standard dc as filet height is no longer a factor. The first edging row is made around the entire garment piece.

and work across 51 spaces towards the centre. (51 filet spaces) ROW 95- 129

Turn, ch 5, work as per front chart. (51 filet spaces per row) The top of Row 99 is the centre shoulder line. Place a stitch marker in one of the ch 2 spaces of this row. ROW 13 0

Turn, ch 5 and work as per front chart. Make an increase in the last edc (edc, ch 1, edc) as per Chart 3 - increase chart. (52 filet spaces) ROW 131 - 133

Turn, ch 5, and work as per front chart. (52 filet spaces) ROW 13 4

Turn, ch 5 and work as per front chart. Make an increase in the last edc. (53 filet spaces) ROW 135 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 137

Turn, ch 5, and work as per front chart. (53 filet spaces) ROW 13 8

Turn, ch 5 and work as per front chart. Make an increase in the last edc. (54 filet spaces) ROW 139 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 152

Turn, ch 5 and work as per front chart, noting the charted increases in Rows 142, 146 and 150. (57 filet spaces on row 152) ROW 153

Turn, ch 5 and work across 35 spaces to begin the bottom left front panel. ROW 15 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 198

Turn, ch 5 and work as per front chart. Cast off. This completes the left side of the garment. To complete the right side of the garment, go to ROW 93. With right side facing you, attach yarn on the outer right side edge of garment, ch 5 and work along 51 spaces then continue as per the right side chart, stopping at row 198. (Written instructions are reversed.) Note, there should be 18 spaces separating each side of the garment that forms the neck opening. V

With right side facing, cast on dc or attach yarn and ch 3 in the back bottom right or left corner space. Dc in the same space, ch 1, 2 dc in the next filet space, *ch 1, 2 dc* around the entire kimono with the following exceptions (also shown in charts provided in blue): - corner spaces: 2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc; - armpits and back neck junctions: 2 dc tog, 2 dc tog (shown in chart). Work 2 dc, ch 1 and join with slip stitch to the first stitch. Stay attached to begin joining the seams.


54

Fold the garment so that right sides are facing. Crochet the join up the side from the bottom of the garment to the edge of the sleeve, as per side join chart, ch 2 (counts as half of a 2 dc tog), then place the other half of the 2 dc tog in the opposite corner space, ch 2, 2 dc tog across both sides of the garment in correlating ch 1 spaces, continuing up the side of the garment. Skip making the ch 2 between the 2 dc togs in the armpit as per armpit chart. 2 dc tog in the bottom corner of sleeves to complete the side join, ch 1 and turn work the right way out. Working around the edge of the sleeve, 2 sc over the left side of tog, then place 1 sc between the next 2 dc, then 1 sc in the chain one space, 1 sc in between the 2 dc, 1 sc in the ch 1 sp around the sleeve, 2 sc in the join tog space, close row by joining with slip stitch and cast off. Complete the other side

ARM PIT Chart 3. Increase

ARM PIT

by starting at the hem and finishing with the final edge on the sleeve. FINAL EDGE

FRONT

FRONT

AAach tassels AAach here ontassels the hem here on the hem in the ch2 spaces in the ch2 spaces

With right side facing, attach the yarn to the front left hem in the 3 ch corner space. Either cast on dc or ch 3 (counts as dc),

FRONT

AAach tassels here on the hem in the ch2 spaces

ch 2, dc in the next ch 1 sp, ch 2, dc in the next ch 1 sp around the bottom of the hem. Dc in the ch 3 corner space of the right side, ch 1 (working over the dc just made) work 2 sc, (1 sc between the 2 dc, 1 sc in the next ch 1 space). Continue as per chart up the front right side of the opening, around the back of the neck and down the opposite side, finishing with 3 sc over the first dc made. Cast off. The ch 2 spaces around the bottom of the hem are the spaces where you attach tassels. Block kimono.

FINAL EDGE ROW FINAL (marked EDGE ROW in purple) (marked in purple)

TAS S E LS FINAL EDGE ROW (marked in purple)

NECK

NECK NECK

Tassels are attached with a slip knot and can be made to any length. Using 10 strands per tassel, fold the strands in half and attach to each chain 2 space with a slip knot. Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries jaz11jewel@gmail.com

Filet Kimono - Pattern

JOINING SIDE JOINING CHART (marked in orange) SIDE JOINING CHART (marked in orange)


55


56 hyg

Join us on our 2018 ramble:Victoria 14 - 26 July 2018 over 20 "stopovers" discounts & prizes galore tours & dinners fun & entertaining Participating: Wondoflex, Woolarium, Granite haven llamas, Great ocean road woollen mill, zigo zago, cloverleaf corriedale stud, tarndie, Ixchell Angora Bunny and Funky Fibre Art, Unwind Craft Cafe, The Wool Stash, Winterwood Felt & Craft Supplies, Fibres of the Yarra Valley, Craftee Cottage, Oak Weaving Studio, Spinaddict, FIbresmith, maker maker and more coming...

Book here www.yarntrail.com.au


57

Deception Cardigan - Pattern

BY K I R I F I TZG E R A L D Difficulty: Easy - Intermediate - top down

This long, top-down raglan cardigan is worked in a soft organic wool. The yarn is held double for the cabled band to give the illusion of a chunky, while the body of the cardigan uses a single yarn to avoid weight and bulk. The reversible cable allows the collar to be worn flat or folded back and the cardigan can be worn open or closed with a shawl pin or brooch.

F IN IS HED M EAS U R EM EN T

10) skeins in Duck Egg

Garment bust: 91 (103, 112, 122, 131, 143.5) cm / 35¾ (40½, 44¼, 48, 51¾, 56½)” Garment length: 64 (66, 67, 69, 70.5, 72) cm / 25¼ (26, 26½, 27, 27¾, 28¼)” Sample size 103cm/40½”.

NEEDLE S

S P EC IA L IN ST RU CT IO N S

YARN

Debbie Bliss, Falkland Aran 100% Organic Wool (100g/3.5oz, 180m/196yds), 7 (7, 8, 9, 9,

- 4.5mm 80cm circular knitting needle - 5mm 80cm circular knitting needle - 4.5mm double pointed needles - 5mm double pointed needles - 9mm knitting needle - 4 stitch markers - Stitch holders or waste yarn - Cable needle - Darning needle TENSION

17 sts and 23 rows to 10cm/4” in stocking stitch using 5mm needle

C12FR – slip 6 sts to cable needle and hold to front, (k1, p1) 3 times from left hand needle, (k1, p1) 3 times from cable needle. C12BR - slip 6 sts to cable needle and hold to back, (k1, p1) 3 times from left hand needle, (k1, p1) 3 times from cable needle. M1L (make 1 left) - pick up bar between the last stitch you knitted and the one you’re about to knit, bringing needle from front to back and knit into the back of this stitch. M1R – (make 1 right) - pick up bar between the last stitch you knitted and the one you’re about to knit, bringing needle from back to front and knit into the front of this stitch. pm – place marker sm – slip marker Deception Cardigan is worked in rows. A circular needle is used to accommodate the large number of stitches.


58

Using 5mm needle, cast on 50 (56, 58, 56, 58, 62) stitches. S ET U P ROW ( WS) P2 for left front and raglan

line, pm, p7 (7, 7, 5, 5, 5) for left sleeve and raglan line, pm, p33 (39, 41, 43, 45, 49) for back and raglan line, pm, p7 (7, 7, 5, 5, 5) for right sleeve and raglan line, pm, p1 for right front. ROW 1 ( R S) K1, (M1L, sm, k1, M1R, k to m) 3

times, M1L, sm, k1, M1R, k1. 58 (64, 66, 64, 66, 70) sts ROW 2 Purl to end. ROW 3 (K to m, M1L, sm, k1, M1R) 4 times, k to end. ROW 4 Purl to end. Repeat last 2 rows 18 (20, 22,

23, 25, 27) more times. 210 (232, 250, 256, 274, 294) sts

S P LI T F O R S LE EV E S

Remove all markers as you come to them. ROW 1 ( R S) [K to m, slip next 48 (52, 56, 56, 60,

64) onto holder for sleeve, cast on 2 (2, 3, 5, 6, 7) sts using backwards loop cast on, pm for side, cast on 2 (2, 3, 5, 6, 7) sts] twice, k to end. 122 (136, 150, 164, 178, 194) sts Work straight in stocking stitch for 5 rows. WA I ST S H A P I N G DEC ROW ( R S) (K to 4 sts before side m, k2tog,

k2, sm, k2, ssk) twice, k to end. 118 (132, 146, 160, 174, 190) sts Work straight in stocking stitch for 9 rows. Repeat above 10 rows four more times. 102 (116, 130, 144, 158, 174) sts IN C ROW ( R S) (K to 3 sts before side m, M1R, k3,

sm, k3, M1L) twice, k to end. 106 (120, 134, 148, 162, 178) sts Work straight in stocking stitch for 3 rows. Repeat above 4 rows four more times. 122 (136,

DO ALL THE THINGS YO U LOV E

150, 164, 178, 194) sts. Body measures approx. 34cm / 13¼” from underarm. Switch to 4.5mm needle and inc 3 (1, 5, 3, 1, 3) sts in first row, work in rib as follows for 13cm/5”. 125 (137, 155, 167, 179, 197) sts ROW 1 ( R S) K4, (p3, k3) to last st, k1. ROW 2 P4, (k3, p3) to last st, p1.

Cast off in pattern leaving last st on needle.

Filet Kimono - Pattern

YO K E


59

Deception Cardigan - Pattern

BAND

Turn work and pick up and k2 sts for every

S LE EV E S

3 rows up right hand side, 1 st for every

Transfer sleeve stitches to 5mm DPNs, start

stitch across top of right sleeve, back of neck

at centre underarm and pick up and knit 3

and top of left sleeve and 2 sts for every 3

(3, 4, 6, 6, 7) sts, knit around sleeve stitches,

rows down left hand side.

pick up and knit 3 (3, 4, 6, 6, 7) sts from underarm,

241 (257, 275, 267, 271, 279) sts

pm for start of round. 54 (58, 64, 68, 72, 78) sts

Knit 5 rows.

Knit 4 (4, 4, 4, 2, 2) rounds.

Cast off in knit.

DEC R N D : K1, k2tog, k to last 2 sts, ssk, k1.

Continue in st st (knit every round) working Dec Rnd every following 14th (10th, 8th, 8th, 7th, 6th) round 5 (7, 10, 9, 11, 14) more times. 42 (42, 42, 48, 48, 48) sts. Continue straight until sleeve measures 43cm/17â&#x20AC;?. Switch to 4.5mm DPNs and work in k3, p3 rib for 10 rounds. Cast off in pattern. Repeat for 2nd sleeve. C A B LE D BA N D

Using 9mm needle and yarn held double, cast on 26 sts. ROW 1 ( R S) : (K1, p1) to last 2 sts, k2. ROW 2 P2, (K1, p1) to end.

Work rib pattern as established for 4 (6, 8, 8, 8, 10) more rows. N EXT ROW (K1, p1) 6 times, C12BR, k2.

Work rib pattern as established for 7 rows. N EXT ROW C12FR, (k1, p1) 6 times, k2.

Work rib pattern as established for 7 rows. Repeat above 16 rows ten more times. N EXT ROW (K1, p1) 6 times, C12BR, k2.

Work rib pattern as established 5 (7, 9, 9, 9, 11) more rows. Cast off in pattern. FINISHING

Sew cabled band around front of cardigan, stretching slightly to fit. Weave in ends and block. Disclaimer: While Indie Road does its best to ensure every pattern is accurate, we request that the designer be contacted for clarification / to answer any queries kirihillier@yayforyarn.com.au.


CHUNKY

KNITS by Jo

chunkyknitsbyjo@gmail.com Etsy Shop: ChunkyKnitsbyJo @chunkyknitsbyjo


“Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent, in the ideas of living.” – Mary Ritter Beard (author of ‘Woman As Force In History’)

WOMEN HAND IN HAND: A JOURNEY THROUGH SOUTHERN INDIA On this unique hosted journey through Tamil Nadu, meet inspiring individuals making a real projects in Mahabalipuram and Pondicherry, learn how the issues facing some of India’s most impoverished communities are being tackled, and meet the local women making it happen. Marvel at their strength and enthusiasm as you visit their villages, workshops and kitchens, hear their uplifting stories and join intimate, traditional dining and sari-dressing events. 10–21 SEPTEMBER 2018 12 Days | $7,435 per person twin share Guest Host Danielle Chiel, founder of the ‘Knit One, Change One’ project, will share her unique story of educating, empowering and employing local women in Southern India through knitting. Her project has ensured remote rural communities benefit from the craft by providing an income that helps support families and local communities.

Call 1300 851 925 for more information or to order your free copy of 2017-18 ‘Hosted Small Group Journeys’ brochure or visit abercrombiekent.com.au/hostedgroups

Indie Road issue 2  
New