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THE MAGAZINE FOR STUDENTS, ALUMNI, AND FRIENDS OF INDIANA TECH

Winter 2006 volume 2 issue 2

Tech Students, Faculty & Staff Support the Katrina Relief Effort “From Tech to the Moon” Alum George Shyrock Shares His Story

Faculty portrait: Jack Phlipot

New Coach Spotlight: Jeff Parrish

Volume two, Issue two Copyright © 2006 Indiana Institute of Technology Arthur E. Snyder, Ed.D., President Trends is published quarterly for students, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends of Indiana Tech by the university’s Creative Services Department. Janet Schutte, Marketing Director Samantha Teter, Marketing Specialist Drew Kora, Graphic Designer

For alumni news, please send to the above address, attention Alumni Office, call (260) 422-5561 extension 2219, or e-mail alumni@indianatech.edu. The editors reserve the right to edit articles for length and clarity. Articles may be reproduced with permission and proper attribution.

On the Cover The cover picture was taken on December 20th when the snow piled 8 inches high, temperatures dropped into single digits, and the sun shined brightly. But it wouldn’t last. A week later it was raining with lightning, thunder and flooding - just in time for the new year. For yet another year we find ourselves asking “Why stay in this crazy Indiana weather?” The answer’s easy: You can’t find Indiana Tech anywhere else.

IN THIS ISSUE

Please send comments, news, and feature story ideas to Creative Services, Indiana Tech, 1600 E. Washington Blvd., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46803, call (260) 422-5561, extension 2250, or e-mail JLSchutte@indianatech.edu.

Features

Stories

Faculty Portrait: Jack Phlipot ................................... 2

A Fair to Remember ...................... 8

Meet the man who’s fleshing out the new biomedical engineering program.

L3 Forum Season Wrap-up ............10 RBE Symposium, A Big Success ....11

Picking up the Pieces..................... 4 Tech students who helped with the relief efforts in Louisiana tell their stories.

The annual job fair was a big hit.

Departments Letter from the President .............. 1

New Coach Spotlight: Jeff Parrish ..................................... 6

In Memoriam ................................10

There’s a new leader on the sidelines for the men’s basketball team.

Alumni Briefs & News ..................12

From Tech to the Moon ................. 9 The alumni spotlight is on George Shyrock.

Faculty & Staff News .....................11 Sports Schedules ...........................13

from the President Greetings and Happy New Year! As we begin a new year, and the second half of our academic year, we continue to focus on our theme “Raise Your Expectations.” In this issue you will read about our effort to bring together students, faculty, and staff to engage in dialogue about a variety of issues in our society (pg. 10 “L3 Forum Season Wrap Up”). I feel very strongly about the importance of civil discourse on our campus; it is valuable to the growth of all of our constituencies, perhaps most of all to our learners…but not them alone. I believe that we all can grow in knowledge and wisdom as we experience the views of others. This is the basis for maturity and lifelong learning.

“Restriction of free thought and free speech is the most dangerous of all subversions. It is the one un-American act that could most easily defeat us.” -Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas

Building the L3 Amphitheater and teaching area was the “bricks and mortar” needed to initiate and support the vision I had for campus discourse. However, the bricks and mortar are meaningless without open and enthusiastic participants to bring them to life. I am pleased to report that we conducted two successful discussion forums outdoors this fall using the amphitheater and one in our theater this winter. Each forum has grown in attendance and interaction. The intellectual capital of our campus has come alive in a new way!

It is my view that our nation’s campuses are among the most active and vibrant laboratories that support our democracy. The safety of our campus provides an opportunity for our students to experience the freedom of discourse and the responsibility of citizenship. Our nation was built on discussion and debate. As educators and learners, we owe it to each other to create and cultivate opportunities for discourse. To this end, I trust and count on our faculty to teach varying points of view and to share their knowledge openly. I see our faculty as the guardians of academic life at Indiana Tech. They are up to my challenge to raise our expectations at every turn. In short, we are all about fostering robust and open dialogue on our campus. Come, join us!

Cordially,

Arthur E. Snyder, Ed.D. President

Trends | Winter 2006

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FAC ULT Y P ORTR AIT

Head, shoulders, knees...and Jack. A degree program as concentrated as biomedical engineering requires leadership with knowledge, skills and experience. Enter Jack Phlipot. While working at one of the leading manufacturers of orthopedic implants, Biomet in Warsaw, Phlipot wasn’t exactly looking for a new job. But through professor Jeff Walls, Tech MBA grad Phlipot received a call to gauge his interest in becoming an associate professor for the new biomedical engineering degree program. Having had previous teaching experience with Ivy Tech in addition to extensive corporate experience in the industry, it was an intriguing call. Phlipot received his BS in Manufacturing Technology in 1986 from Bowling Green State University. Two years later, he was working for Zimmer, Inc. in Warsaw as a project manager for hips and knees and development engineer in knee systems. After six years at Zimmer, Phlipot traded in hips and knees for a stint in automotive design engineering. In 1996, he moved back into

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Trends | Winter 2006

biomedical engineering at Biomet, where he excelled for 9½ years. While at Biomet, he worked in product development in hip and shoulder systems and handled marketing management duties. “Tech liked my background in biomed and marketing. When they approached me about the new degree program, I realized the need for a program with homegrown talent – students who were from the area and who would stay and work in the area,” stated Phlipot, who began his employment with Tech in August of 2005. The biomedical engineering program focuses on biomechanic skills – studying joints, muscles, bones and nerves to discover ways that artificial devices can be created to interface with or replace them.

In addition to his duties at Tech, Phlipot is the vice president for Hands of Hope International, a medical missions team that travels to Guatemala three times a year. Phlipot travels on one of those missions a year working the pharmacy and sharing evangelism. Domestically, he works occasionally at the Orthopedic Learning Center in Chicago, which teaches hands-on orthopedic surgical skills. “I want to work with the surgeons to ensure a great learning experience. I can keep in touch with the latest procedures and pay attention to the shop talk.” Phlipot has high expectations for the biomedical engineering program, which just launched this fall. He is active in the recruiting process with day school admissions staff in order to help build the program. He also assists current students with resumes and internship opportunities in the biomedical field. Under Jack Phlipot’s leadership, Indiana Tech hopes to become a leader in biomedical engineering education.

Jack’s Facts Hobbies/Interests: Cooking and baking desserts Favorite Food: Chocolate (I’m looking for the ultimate chocolate cake recipe.) Favorite Human Joint: Shoulder

Trends | Winter 2006

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“Pictures on television do it no justice,” said Corey Smith, an Indiana Tech student in the College of Professional Studies. “When you see it in person, it’s just devastating.”

trina When Hurricane Ka ugh pounded its way thro the Gulf Coast in late d August, it left behin any destruction beyond r in other natural disaste eople p t s o M y. r to is h . .S U ges a im l a e rr u s e th w a only s r, in the news; howeve some met reality head-on.

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Trends | Winter 2006

Smith is from New Orleans but has lived in Indianapolis for about eight or nine years. However, much of his family and friends still lived in the New Orleans area, and he never thought twice about opening his home to them. His father, stepmother, aunt, uncle, and cousin as well as Smith’s best friend and his wife and son stayed with Smith for about three or four weeks after the hurricane. “The important thing was that everyone was safe,” he said. “Everyone lost homes, they lost material items, things they can’t replace, like photos. But everyone was safe.” Smith’s stepmother is working now, and his friend’s wife has enrolled at Indiana-Purdue Indianapolis. Smith said they know it will be 18 to 24 months before they can go home. The families are still negotiating with insurance companies about rebuilding their homes. “It’s a huge undertaking for both parties–the insurance companies and the people,” Smith said. “And a lot of times the people are the losers.” Smith visited New Orleans in October, more than a month after the hurricane hit, and said nothing had been cleaned up at that time. “It looked like a bomb went off in the city.” While Smith’s connection to the hurricane and its aftermath was very personal through family and friends, others were drawn in through a desire to help those in need. Jarmeika Taylor, an Indiana Tech sophomore, was part of the military’s relief effort. She is a member of the 113th A Company but was deployed to Mississippi with the 1/293rd Infantry. “We were in Mississippi about six weeks, maybe seven,” she said. “I kind of lost count.” Taylor’s unit started off at Camp Shelby (Hattiesburg) and ran supplies to various counties. Then they moved to an airfield in Pascagoula for a while and then moved to a warehouse-type structure.

“Then we went back to the airfield expecting to come home and they explained. “The committee meets once a week to plan and discuss told us that we had to stay another two weeks because of Hurricane the next steps, including fundraisers, donation drives, and plans for Rita,” she said. “Eventually we went back to Camp Shelby and then future mission trips for help with cleanup.” to an Air Force base in Gulfport for about While visiting the area, Sprunger’s group two weeks. At Camp Shelby we slept in the was given a driving tour of the area damaged barracks. At the Air Force base we slept in “The people down there, they were by the hurricane. air conditioned tents. Everywhere else we slept in or on our trucks.” “As we drove around there were markings great. They were usually smiling on all the houses which identified which unit Taylor drove a 5-ton truck and delivered suphad searched the area, the date of the search, and friendly. No one was bitter. They plies to the various locations that were handhow many were found living, and how many ing out food, water, and ice. were found dead,” she said. “It was an eyewere all glad we were helping them “The people down there, they were great,” opening experience, and to have someone she said. “They were usually smiling and who lived through the hurricane telling us get the supplies they needed.” friendly. No one was bitter. They were all the stories of their family and friends who -Jarmeika Taylor, Sophomore glad we were helping them get the supplies lived in the area was amazing.” they needed.” Sprunger’s church group donated two vans Being away from school for a large part of the fall semester did cause and a trailer full of supplies and took two families Christmas shopping with money donated by church members. Although it has been some disruption to Taylor’s education. four months since the hurricane, she said there is still a great need “Soccer season had just begun and classes had just started. I missed for help. the entire soccer season and about six weeks of classes,” she explained. “So when I got back I re-enrolled in classes and did my best “When talking with the citizens of the area all of them had a consisto make up the work I missed plus the work that was currently be- tent story that the government was making no plans for cleanup for ing assigned. Now that the semester is over, I can proudly say that I at least two years, possibly three,” she explained. “There is a huge made it out with one A, and three B’s.” need for volunteers to go and help gut houses and start the cleanup process.” In Taylor’s mind, the opportunity to help people in need was worth Those still living in the New Orleans area face a range of challenges. any inconvenience to her. Mail delivery is inconsistent, making it difficult to communicate “The challenge was great and overcoming it was even greater,” she and pay bills. Public transportation is slowly re-opening. Stores and said “If I could do it all over again, I wouldn’t change a thing.” other businesses have limited hours because of a lack of employees. Indiana Tech faculty, staff, and students donated about $2,500 to the Although businesses are hiring, many people have nowhere to live American Red Cross as a group, while many individuals helped out and can’t take jobs. But Sprunger said people are coping. on their own. Admissions counselor Brienne Sprunger traveled to “Even with these drawbacks the people that we came in contact with New Orleans with a church group just before Christmas. were still in high spirits and working toward building their future,” “After the hurricane hit, our church decided to form a commit- she said. tee to discuss how we could help our sister church in the area,” she

Trends | Winter 2006

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NE W C OACH SP OTLIGHT

Former Assistant Parrish Takes on Head Coach Role in Men’s Hoops Jason Kline may not rank with basketball coaching

I grew up with a dad who was a coach and educator,”

legends like Bob Knight, Gene Keady, and Dean Smith,

Parrish explained. “We blended really well. Jason was

but he did build a successful Warrior team during his

comfortable with me stepping up, and I was comfortable

seven years at Indiana Tech. Jeff Parrish, however, had

doing it.”

no fears about stepping into Kline’s shoes as men’s basketball coach this season.

years, including serving as assistant basketball coach

“I had a good relationship with Jason and with his

at Churubusco High School, head basketball coach

dad (athletic director Dan Kline),” Parrish said of his

at Hicksville (Ohio) High School, and head baseball

three years as assistant coach to Jason. “I knew the

coach at South Side High School in Fort Wayne. He is

kids, and I was pretty familiar with the school, so that

a Fort Wayne native and graduate of Concordia High

helped a lot.”

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Parrish’s coaching experience spans more than 20

School and Tri-State University. His father, Glen, was a

Parrish and the younger Kline actually have very similar

high school basketball coaching legend in Fort Wayne

backgrounds.

earning nearly 425 wins in 37 years.

“He’s an only child, I’m an only child. He grew up with

Parrish says he never had any doubts about a career

a dad who was an educator and coach his whole life,

as a coach.

Trends | Winter 2006

TECH

WARRIORS Favorite food: Pizza Favorite basketball team (other than Indiana Tech): Michigan State Favorite sport other than basketball: Baseball Favorite movie: “Against All Odds” Favorite vacation spot: Cancun

“It got into my blood early and it stayed,” he explained.

on the list of priorities.

“Growing up I saw my mom and dad have a happy

“They have to take care of a few other obligations first,”

home and a successful life, and I wanted that. So far, so good.” When announcing Parrish as the new head coach, Dan Kline stressed that he would maintain continuity in the success and philosophy of the program.

he says. “Then they can come in the gym and take care of basketball.” When it comes to basketball philosophy, Parrish stresses defense, rebounding, and running the fast break. But he knows it won’t be easy to maintain recent success

“Number one, for Jason and for me, has always been

after losing several key players who were seniors on last

you’re going to get your degree if you come to Indiana

year’s squad. He said he tries to keep the team upbeat

Tech,” Parrish said. “Even if your athletic career is over,

but realistic.

we’re going to stay after you to graduate. We want them

“I knew we weren’t going to win 29 games (like last

to be able to survive on their own after college, not ask

year’s team). That had never happened before,” he

mom and dad for everything.”

said. “I knew it was going to be tough; I wasn’t blind

He stresses that he wants the student-athletes to

coming in.”

become better people, and basketball is second or third

Trends | Winter 2006

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a fair to remember On December 1, over 200 students attended the Indiana Tech Career Fair 2005 in hopes of finding employment or internships with local companies. This year’s fair welcomed 63 companies who themselves were in search of quality employees. This is the second year that the Career Planning & Development Center (CPDC) has hosted a college fair for Tech students. Companies such as Merrill Lynch, Regal Beloit, Superior Essex and Wells Fargo were in attendance as well as government agencies, including the FBI and Social Security Administration. Tom Rhoades, Captain and Director of Training for the Fort Wayne Police Department, noted many benefits of attending Tech’s career fair. “Career fairs such as this allow organizations like us to reach out to

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Trends | Winter 2006

Indiana Tech Career Fair 2005 up-and-coming leaders in our community. We have a chance to tell them who we are.” Rhoades also stated that the new criminal justice degree program has opened up opportunities for their department. “Dr. (Neil) Moore is a natural salesperson for our department.” Students also found benefit in attending the fair. “There aren’t a lot of openings in my career field, but this has been beneficial for me to get to know Fort Wayne companies since I am not from this area,” commented sophomore information systems major Keshia Adkins. The CPDC hopes to attract additional companies next year and to also target several major corporations outside northeast Indiana.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT: GEORGE H. SHYROCK, SR.

A

friend from my home town, Al Sellens, was so enthused about Indiana Tech that he talked me into enrolling in 1949. Sellens managed to stay single during his college days and graduated with his BSEE in 1951. On the other hand, I met and married a lovely Fort Wayne girl and my family responsibilities slowed me down considerably. In my last year at Tech I was a full time student and a full time employee! It took me until May of 1954 to earn my BSRE degree.

After getting my degree I discovered my real interest was in the aerospace industry, so most of the next 20 years were spent in research, development, and production programs with several major corporations. My employers included General Electric, Bell Aircraft, Fairchild Aircraft, Applied Science Corporation of Princeton (NJ), the Slumberger Corporation (France), Texas Instruments, Mohawk Data Sciences, and North American Rockwell. All these engineering positions were challenging and of great interest. I worked on a fascinating variety of military missiles, aircraft, and spacecraft including Gemini and Apollo. This last was the high point in my engineering career! I was a member of North American Rockwell’s Launch Operations at the Kennedy Space Center during the Apollo-Saturn program. When the first lunar landing was accomplished in 1969 I was an engineering manager on

the Apollo Command and Service Modules at the Space Center and will always feel great pride in having had an engineering role in that extraordinary achievement! Less than a year after the Apollo 11 lunar landing, NASA made substantial reductions in personnel at the Kennedy Space Center and I was, for the first time in my engineering career, released along with thousands of other engineers and technicians. I made numerous attempts to connect with other firms but found my experience and background as a senior aerospace engineer was greater than many corporations were seeking. With a wife and five children to support, I returned to Sarasota, Fla., and entered the insurance world. The initial years were a study in frustration but eventually I made it through a difficult startup and moved on to open my own agency. Twenty years of dedicated, hard work produced excellent results, and I was able to retire in 1990.

A father of five, grandfather of eight, and great-grandfather of five, my retirement years are being happily spent writing and publishing books about our family lines for the benefit of my descendants. There are many fine memories of my years at Indiana Tech. In addition to being a serious student, I served on the Student Council, was a makeup editor on The Technician, served as president of the Kekiongan Amateur Radio Club (W9BHR), and sang in the Glee Club. I have always been pleased with two facts in my life: choosing engineering as a career and being a graduate of Indiana Tech.

Trends | Winter 2006

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Season Wrap-up A primary reason that the L3 amphitheater and outdoor classroom were created on the Fort Wayne campus was to involve the university community in civil discourse. In keeping with this theme, the L3 Forums were created. These forums encourage open dialogue among the entire university community. Indiana Tech offered three such forums this past semester. The forums begin with a single theme that encourages discussion on individual ideas and perceptions. Facilitators allow open discussion while remaining neutral, asking questions to help facilitate the dialogue. The first forum was a result of the Hurricane Katrina

situation, asking the question “What is our responsibility in times of domestic crisis?” The second forum, titled “War: What is it good for?” led by President Snyder, discussed the reasons that wars are started and their positive or negative impacts and outcomes. The third forum, held in the Andorfer Theater due to chilly winter weather, focused on prejudice and diversity. Elaine Pontillo, vice president for Academic Affairs, is the driving force behind the forums. “I believe that a university should provide opportunities for students to explore their thoughts and ideas with others. We are trying to create a more learning-centered atmosphere by holding forums that encourage open discussions outside of the classroom,” stated Pontillo.

In Memoriam

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The forums have received very positive feedback from students. Some faculty members require their class to attend the forums, but many students come voluntarily to join in discussions with fellow students, faculty and staff. New forum ideas and facilitators are already being planned for next year, including topics such as relationshipbased education (a follow-up to December’s campus wide symposium), a follow-up on the prejudice and diversity issue, and adoption. While faculty and staff are asked to develop new ideas for topics, students will also be encouraged to join in the planning process. “Anyone in the university community can come up with ideas,” added Pontillo.

We have learned of the deaths of the following alumni and friends:

Harold F. Wiblin Harlan, IN BSEE 1973

Maurice Carpenter Reedsport, OR BSDR 1957

Robert W. Niemeyer Germantown, WI BSME 1942

Roswell Samuelson Cedar Rapids, IA BSRE 1951

Dhu aine Davis Bruceville, IN BSEE 1955

John C. O’Donnell Fair Oaks, CA BSEE 1962

Marcel Cloutier Framingham, MA BSEE 1959

Ronald E. Dupuy Bullhead City, AZ BSME 1959

Russell E. Lutz Mohnton, PA BSCE 1949

William W. Warren Telford, PA BSRE 1951

Albert Wanzie Mount Carmel, PA BSCE 1948

Harry J. Okeson Fort Wayne, IN BSCE 1959

Robert Ickes Barto, PA BSEE 1949

Willard G. Bloss Brentwood, TN BSRE 1949

Trends | Winter 2006

Faculty & Staff News

Tech Community Explores Relationship Based Education In searching for a way to describe what makes Indiana Tech special, Professor Steve Dusseau was struck by the term “relationship based education.” In early December, about 150 participants gathered in Andorfer Commons to explore what relationship based education really means. The symposium brought students, faculty, and staff together to answer thought-provoking questions. “How can we further this idea,” President Arthur Snyder asked in his opening remarks at the symposium. “This is the beginning of more exploration than we ever thought it to be...but it’s worth it.” Dusseau stressed the need to learn from students and spend time with them. After the opening remarks from Snyder and Dusseau, the participants were divided into small groups to talk about the significant teachers in their lives. They discussed the traits of those teachers and how those traits can be developed and applied at Indiana Tech. The groups then reconvened in the theater to report their findings and compiled a list of more than 50 characteristics of effective teachers and mentors. Common themes were communicating with students, finding common interests beyond coursework, being available to students, taking the time to show interest in students, challenging students with high expectations, and having passion and enthusiasm for their subject matter and teaching in general. Professors Susan McGrade, Norma Friedman, and Steve Malloris organized the symposium and will compile and analyze the findings of the small group discussions. The results will be published and shared with the university community to help foster the further development of relationship based education.

Indiana Tech has welcomed several new staff members to the university: • Lacy Monday, administrative assistant (Plainfield) • George Leugers, programmer/analyst • Jeri L. Burkhart, enrollment manager (Warsaw) • Maria Reichhart, associate admissions counselor • Glenn Druhot, director of the Career Planning and Development Center • Austin Yoder, associate admissions counselor • Robert Hobbs, coordinator of custodial services • Steven Hanan, director of Institutional Advancement • Sharmila Chowdhury, CPS admissions representative • Shelly Bounds, controller

Institutional Advancement...Advances! The Office of Institutional Advancement has experienced new additions to their department over recent months. Louise Jackson was recently promoted to vice president for Institutional Advancement. Jackson oversees the department and works closely with donors on gifts of $1,000 or more. Chad Pieper, a former admissions counselor for Tech, has stepped into the role of director, alumni relations and annual fund. He focuses on alumni relations and gifts of less than $1,000. Our new director of grants, Linda Kreft, came to us from Arts United and focuses solely on grant-writing and grant opportunities. The newest member of the team is Steve Hanan, director of Institutional Advancement. Hanan works closely with Louise on gifts of more than $1,000. This newly formed team is supported by the efforts of administrative assistant, Sheena Gambrell and travel coordinator, Julie Thiel. Diane Maldeney, a prospect researcher for the department, has retired from Indiana Tech after 30 years.

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Alumni News Happy New Year! 2006 is now upon us, and the Institutional Advancement staff embraces the challenges they face in this oncoming year. We have a relatively new staff full of energy and enthusiasm as we strive to raise non-tuition based dollars for Indiana Tech. Our travels in the next few months will take us to Tennessee, California, Florida and Arizona where we will reconnect with alumni and strengthen our relationships. Building relationships with our alumni is a key component of Institutional Advancement’s focus, and we look forward to meeting with you. Don’t forget to check us out on our web site or better yet communicate directly with us at alumni@indianatech.edu. We love to hear what our alumni are doing, so please share. As we look back on 2005, we thank all of you who donated to Indiana Tech. Your support is vital to the success we are experiencing in educating our students. Best wishes for a healthy and prosperous new year! – Louise Jackson, Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Alumni Briefs 1990s

Gil Farley, BSTR 1994, is an oncology sales specialist for Novartis Pharmaceuticals. His e-mail address is gffiv@comcast.net.

2000s

Pamela M. Sudlow, BSBA 2000, was recently employed by Wealth Management Group in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. She will be working as a registered investment advisor. Her e-mail address is psudlow@hotmail.com. Barbara Ball (Howard), BSBA 2001, lives in Indianapolis and was recently hired by the US Postal Service. She will be working as an internal control analyst. Her e-mail address is bball0126@sbcglobal.net. Darren Braithwaite, MBA 2002, is working as the vice president, Procurement Operations for Lehman Brothers. He lives in Woodhaven, N.Y. His e-mail address is darrenbraithwaite@hotmail.com. Daniel Jacks, BS 2005, is a manufacturing supervisor for Eaton Corporation and lives in Athens, IL. His email address is danajacks@eaton.com.

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Trends | Winter 2006

Almost a million (or two)! Indiana Tech’s Office of Institutional Advancement has made tremendous progress towards the $1 million matching grant from the Lilly Endowment. Beginning June 1, 2005, Indiana Tech was given the challenge of raising $1 million which would be matched dollar per dollar as part of Lilly’s “Initiative to Strengthen Philanthropy for Indiana Higher Education.” The university has until December 31, 2006 to raise the $1 million, but as of November 2005, over $860,000 had already been raised. Louise Jackson, vice president of Institutional Advancement, hopes that our ability to raise the million dollars in less than a year will qualify the university for a larger matching grant program in the future. The university would like to extend its thanks to all alumni, faculty, staff, students, corporate partners and friends who have contributed towards the $1 million goal.

Warrior Baseball VARSITY SCHEDULE Date Time Challenger 2/25/2006 .......2:00 PM...........Olivet Nazerene 3/5/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Spalding (KY) 3/6/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Spalding (KY) 3/7/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Martin Methodist* 3/8/2006 .........1:00 PM...........North Alabama* 3/9/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Trevecca Nazerene 3/10/2006 .......12:00 PM .........Cumberland (TN)* 3/11/2006 .......12:00 PM .........Cumberland (TN)* 3/18/2006 .......1:00 PM...........St. Francis (IL)* 3/19/2006 .......1:00 PM...........St. Francis (IL)* 3/22/2006 .......6:00 PM...........Manchester 3/23/2006 .......3:00 PM...........Olivet Nazerene 3/25/2006 .......1:00 PM...........Rochester College* 3/26/2006 .......1:00 PM...........Marian College* 3/28/2006 .......6:00 PM...........Shawnee St. 3/29/2006 .......12:00 PM .........Shawnee St.* 3/30/2006 .......1:00 PM...........Grace College* 4/1/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Concordia University* 4/2/2006 .........12:00 PM .........Concordia University* 4/4/2006 .........4:00 PM...........Bethel College 4/5/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Ohio Dominican* 4/6/2006 .........3:00 PM...........University of St. Francis 4/8/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Siena Heights* 4/9/2006 .........12:00 PM .........Siena Heights*

4/11/2006 .......3:00 PM...........Valparaiso 4/14/2006 .......1:00 PM...........Aquinas* 4/15/2006 .......12:00 PM .........Aquinas* 4/22/2006 .......1:00 PM...........Indiana Wesleyan* 4/25/2006 .......4:00 PM...........Eastern Michigan 4/26/2006 .......6:00 PM...........Indiana Wesleyan 4/27/2006 .......6:00 PM...........University of St. Francis 4/29/2006 .......12:00 PM .........Madonna University* 4/30/2006 .......1:00 PM...........Madonna University* 5/1/2006 .........5:30 PM...........Huntington 5/2/2006 .........3:00 PM...........Spring Arbor JUNIOR VARSITY SCHEDULE Date Time Challenger 3/14/2006 .......2:00 PM...........Kellog CC* 3/17/2006 .......1:00 PM...........Kalamazoo CC* 3/21/2006 .......2:00 PM...........Tri-State* 3/24/2006 .......2:00 PM...........St. Clair CC* 3/25/2006 .......1:00 PM...........St. Clair CC* 3/28/2006 .......2:00 PM...........Lake Michigan CC* 4/3/2006 .........1:00 PM...........Ohio Northern* 4/10/2006 .......4:00 PM...........Kellog CC* 4/12/2006 .......4:00 PM...........Tri-State* 4/15/2006 .......3:00 PM...........Sinclair CC* 4/19/2006 .......4:00 PM...........Valparaiso* 4/28/2006 .......2:00 PM...........Valparaiso 5/1/2006 .........4:00 PM...........Sinclair

Warrior Softball VARSITY SCHEDULE Date Time Challenger 2/25/2006 ........1:00 PM ............DePauw* 3/4/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/5/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/6/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/7/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/8/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/9/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/10/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/11/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/12/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Gene Cusic Classic 3/15/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Urbana University* 3/17/2006 ........12:00 PM ..........MCC/WHAC Challenge 3/18/2006 ........12:00 PM ..........MCC/WHAC Challenge 3/21/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Indiana Wesleyan* 3/25/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Grace* 3/27/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Tr-State* 3/29/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Tiffin University* 3/31/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Cornerstone* 4/1/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Siena Heights* 4/2/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............St. Xavier University* 4/4/2006 ..........3:00 PM ............St. Joseph’s College* 4/8/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Aquinas* 4/9/2006 ..........1:00 PM ............Concordia* 4/13/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Aquinas* 4/15/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Siena Heights*

Home games are highlighted in Orange.

4/20/2006 ........3:00 PM ............St. Francis University* 4/22/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Concordia* 4/23/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Madonna* 4/26/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Marian College* 4/29/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Cornerstone* 4/30/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Madonna* 5/10/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Regionals 5/11/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Regionals 5/12/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Regionals 5/19/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Nationals 5/20/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Nationals 5/21/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Nationals 5/22/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Nationals 5/23/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Nationals JUNIOR VARSITY SCHEDULE Date Time Challenger 3/22/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Grace* 3/26/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Elgin CC* 3/28/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Tri-State* 3/29/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Tiffin University* 3/30/2006 ........3:00 PM ............Ancilla* 4/1/2006 ..........11:00 AM ..........Huntington* 4/5/2006 ..........3:00 PM ............Tri-State* 4/10/2006 ........1:00 PM ............Clark State CC* 4/19/2006 ........3:00 PM ............St. Francis* 4/25/2006 ........2:00 PM ............Clark State CC*

* Doubleheader

Trends | Winter 2006

13

Tech Treasures

The official headquarters for Indiana Tech clothing, gear, accessories, and more. featured item:

CAMPUS HOODIE A must have - this grey sweatshirt features Indiana Tech’s new mascot! It features a drawstring hood and cinched wrists to keep the cold out with a soft inner lining for extra comfort. Sizes S-XL.

$19.95 (reg. $25.50) item#: 8550 To order, stop by the gift shop in the lower level of Andorfer Commons, call (800) 937-2448, ext. 2301, or fax (260) 420-1453. Please add $5 to your order for shipping.

Stop by the store on the lower level of Andorfer Commons and see what other great gifts we have. Browse our shop and make purchases online at www.indianatech.edu/techtreasures.

Carl Mack Will Speak at NSBE Dinner The Indiana Tech chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers has invited a nationally known historian as keynote speaker for its first benefit dinner. Carl Mack will speak at the “Operating in Excellence” dinner on Feb. 27. Mack, the new executive director of the

NSBE, is a historian, author, and speaker who has been featured in media reports around the country. His lectures on Martin Luther King Jr. and black history appeal to audiences of all ages, genders, races, and ethnicities. He has received several awards for his involvement in community and humanitarian efforts. The dinner is a fund-raising event to build the NSBE’s scholarship endowment and

support the organization in its mission to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally, and positively impact the community. Cocktail hour is from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. Feb. 27 at the Grand Wayne Center in Fort Wayne. For information on tickets, contact the group at nsbe@indianatech.net.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Fort Wayne, IN Permit No. 159

1600 East Washington Blvd. Fort Wayne, IN 46803


Trends: Winter 2006 (Volume 2, Issue 2)