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THE MAGAZINE FOR STUDENTS, ALUMNI, AND FRIENDS OF INDIANA TECH

Fall 2005 volume 2 issue 1

Campus Rocked by Blessid Union of Souls concert

Faculty portrait: Norma Friedman

New Coach Spotlight: Laura Douglas

Annual Homecoming Photo Shoot


Volume two, Issue one Copyright © 2005 Indiana Institute of Technology Arthur E. Snyder, Ed.D., President Trends is published quarterly for students, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends of Indiana Tech by the university’s Creative Services Department. Janet Schutte, Marketing Director Samantha Teter, Marketing Generalist Drew Kora, Graphic Designer

For alumni news, please send to the above address, attention Alumni Office, call (260) 422-5561 extension 2219, or e-mail alumni@indianatech.edu. The editors reserve the right to edit articles for length and clarity. Articles may be reproduced with permission and proper attribution.

On the Cover On Thursday Sept. 1st, national recording artists Blessid Union of Souls played a free concert on the Fort Wayne campus. Their show marked the grand opening of the new Labor of Love for Learning (L 3 ) Amphitheater. In addition to the students, hundreds of concert goers from the local community came to cheer on the band. Plans for another concert at L 3 to kick off the 2006 school year are already under way.

IN THIS ISSUE

Please send comments, news, and feature story ideas to Creative Services, Indiana Tech, 1600 E. Washington Blvd., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46803, call (260) 422-5561, extension 2250, or e-mail JLSchutte@indianatech.edu.

Features Faculty Portrait: Dr. Norma Friedman ...................... 2 Meet the woman who’s been a leader at Indiana Tech for 27 years.

New Coach Spotlight: Laura Douglas ................................ 8 The volleyball team is back and Laura Douglas is at the helm.

75th Anniversary Weekend ........... 6 Have a look at the good times at Indiana Tech during our Homecoming weekend.

Stories A Win-Win Situation ..................... 5 Indiana Tech fights the “Brain Drain” by helping students get jobs.

The Reluctant Engineer ................11 Indiana Tech graduate Joseph Wilkinson tells his story.

Move-In Day ‘05 Photos ................14

Departments Letter from the President ............. 1 Alumni Briefs & News ..................10 In Memoriam ................................12 Faculty & Staff News .....................15 Sports Schedules ...........................17


From the President Raise Your Expectations! Our theme for the 2005-06 academic year, Raise Your Expectations is a fitting motto for the challenges our students, faculty, and staff face in the coming weeks and months. Achieving and exceeding our professional and personal goals requires great energy and enthusiasm … “stretching” to reach our objectives is a lifelong discipline that pays dividends. I hope you too are raising your expectations and looking forward to reading about the events and accomplishments of the people of Indiana Tech. We have successfully started another academic year, and we continue to celebrate our 75th year as an institution of higher education. We have launched several new academic programs, the women’s volleyball team, and many new student life activities, some of which you will read about in this issue of Trends. This issue of Trends also begins what I hope will become a regular part of future editions. We are profiling one of our finest and longest standing faculty members as well as our new head coach of the women’s volleyball team. Both are interesting women and important members of the Indiana Tech team. Also in this issue is a profile of student internships and the important role the Career Planning and Development Center (CPDC) plays in preparing our graduates for the world at large. We intend to introduce our readers to more of the people of Indiana Tech in the coming months and years. As many of you read this issue the leaves will be turning beautiful fall colors….winter awaits as the seasons change. Every season for the past 75 years has seen Indiana Tech serve learners with vigor and enthusiasm. I am sure we will continue for many seasons to come! Raise Your Expectations! Best regards,

Arthur E. Snyder, Ed.D. President

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Friedman seated in Cinema Tech, an on-campus theatre location for Cinema Center, which she helped bring to Indiana Tech.

FAC ULT Y P ORTR AIT:

Dr. Norma Friedman

Few people these days, it seems, can say they have been at their place of employment for over a quarter of a century. Indiana Tech is proud to have some of their own quarter century employees – eight, to be exact. Dr. Norma Friedman is one of those employees. Some may venture to say that Dr. Norma Friedman is Indiana Tech based on her multiple contributions to the university and numerous accomplishments in her 27-year career as a professor

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of business administration and social sciences. Trends | Fall 2005


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r. Friedman took her first airplane ride out of her hometown in Massachusetts in 1978, when she was scheduled to give a presentation at Indiana Tech. By the time her presentation was over, she was offered a job to teach at the university, which she declined. Back in Massachusetts, eight weeks later, she received another call from Indiana Tech, asking again whether she would be interested in being an assistant professor. Being offered the opportunity twice swayed Friedman to make the move to Fort Wayne and accept the position. While teaching at Tech, she continued to fly back to New York once a month to finish her master’s degree in adult and higher education, as well as her doctorate at Columbia University. Throughout her Indiana Tech career, Friedman has been offered positions at other institutions, but none of them were intriguing enough for her. She has been inspired by Tech’s extraordinary growth as well as the professional growth opportunities that are present in this community. Some of those opportunities include consulting

with other non-profit organizations, such as the Trustee Leadership Development, which is a national leadership program funded by the Lilly Endowment. She is also a published author and presenter and has been honored with numerous awards from Tech as well as organizations such as the Fort Wayne Women’s Bureau. Many of the university’s accomplishments could not have succeeded without Friedman’s help. Early in her career, she showed her leadership by chairing numerous committees for curriculum development and management, faculty evaluation processes, college-wide assessments, and much more. Today, she continues that leadership by serving on Indiana Tech’s Board of Trustees as well as being a liaison to the East Central Neighborhood. She and colleague Matt Hendryx continue to work on economic development in the area that the Fort Wayne campus calls home. “We want to have more of a connection to our local community and find ways to partner with them on initiatives,” she said. Friedman also is on a

Norma Friedman at a Glance Education Ed.D. Adult and Higher Education Columbia University, New York, 1988 M.A. Adult and Higher Education Columbia University, New York, 1985 M.Ed. Human/Social Services Antioch College, Ohio, 1978 B.S. Leisure Studies and Services Magna Cum Laude University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1976 Academic Career Experience Indiana Tech 1978-Present, Tenured Professor– Business Administration & Social Sciences University of Massachusetts, Amherst 1975, 1977, Instructor

Current Consulting Experience Trustee Leadership Development–Lilly Endowment 1990–present Habits of the Heart–Indiana Humanities Council 1998–present Management/Organizational Development Consultant 1985–present Current Boards/Advisory Committees Fort Wayne Educational Foundation Indiana Tech Board of Trustees Cinema Center Fort Wayne Women’s Bureau Advisory Committee

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committee to form “student inspired courses” and is working on innovative ways to initiate new programs and courses. As part of a $1 million faculty development grant from Lilly Endowment, which Friedman assisted in procuring, she herself was granted a small portion to conduct research on the psychological needs of day school students. This summer, Friedman attended a highly selective program at Smith College

that focused on investigating, reflecting, and discussing the practice of contemplative studies and the benefits of stabilized attention and concentration. This program helped her learn more about how to institute contemplative practices, which helps reduce stress, slows down and focuses the mind, and develops purposeful reflection and deep concentration. She hopes to present her findings to Indiana Tech students, faculty, and staff. As if her plate wasn’t full enough, Friedman also is one of the initiators of the upcoming “RelationshipBased Education Symposium” that will be held on the Fort Wayne campus on Wednesday, Dec. 7. Faculty, staff, administrators, trustees and students are all encouraged to attend. The purpose of the symposium is to have an open dialogue about the concept and meaning of relationship-based education and its meaning for Indiana Tech. The event is considered a “practice” for a national symposium on this topic proposed for 2006 on the Indiana Tech campus. Friedman’s influence on Indiana Tech is widely apparent and after all these years she continued to be a leader in our educational community.

Friedman stands next to the cardboard cut-out of Albert Einstein she keeps in her office. Eisntein was a major inspiration to her career as an educator.

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Internships benefit students and employers alike. If you reside in Indiana, you have probably heard the term “brain drain” numerous times from local Chambers of Commerce as well as the state government. Indiana suffers from a low percentage of residents who hold a baccalaureate degree. While Indiana colleges and universities do a great job educating their students, upon graduation many leave the state to take their skills and knowledge elsewhere, thus inspiring the term “brain drain.” As an initiative to help stop the departure of many of our graduates, the state has worked with multiple corporations and businesses in pairing them up with college interns from Indiana schools. The development of a Web site, www.IndianaIntern.net, helps make those connections between students, employers and universities. According to this Web site, internships provide students the opportunity to apply what has been learned in the classroom to real work experience. Employers benefit by adding fresh ideas and additional skill sets to their workplace. It also offers employers a chance to attract and recruit new talent. Many employers go on to hire interns full-time upon their graduation. Indiana Tech saw a great opportunity to expand its career counseling opportunities through this initiative. The primary focus of the Career Planning and Development Center initially was to focus on senior job placement, writing resumes and career assessment. When the decision was made to set up an internship program, they found success. Out of approximately 100 students who were interested, 81 of them were awarded internships this past summer. Many of those students have been asked to return this fall, or even offered full-time positions. The CPDC worked hard to connect with local businesses in order to find placement for the students. The CPDC sponsored a job fair last fall to bring companies to our campus to meet our students. According to Nancy Weikel, internship coordinator for the CPDC, many employers remarked how well prepared our students were in meeting with them. “Based upon our post-fair survey, 98% of the employers gave us a 4 or 5 out of 5 rating for their satisfaction with the college fair. Many of them even commented that Indiana Tech’s was one of the best career fairs they’ve been to, as it relates to the quality and preparedness of our students.”

Nejith Fernando, a native of Sri Lanka and recent graduate of Tech, completed his internship working for the campus, under the direction of associate director of student life Joel Harmeyer. Fernando agrees that his internship helped develop important skills for his future career success. “My internship helped me with time management as well as leadership skills. I was also able to use both decision-making skills and problem-solving skills during my time working for Tech.” Fernando would like to see more opportunities for international students in the years ahead. “International students are at a disadvantage. We can’t work off-campus for pay. I would like to see more internships offered in the form of a co-op (gaining course credits for time worked instead of a paycheck).” Upon graduation, Fernando was offered a position at Superior Essex, who helped him gain a work visa to stay in the United States. “My internship helped me with time management as well as leadership skills.” -Nejith Fernando

Currently, the CPDC focuses primarily on day school students, but will also work with CPS students for job placement and there is a possibility for internship opportunities as well. They also hope to start working with students during their freshman year, by offering career testing to help them decide on majors and career focuses. The next Career Fair is Dec. 1 and the CPDC is currently seeking additional businesses to participate. Alumni are always a great source for company contacts, according to Weikel. Those alumni who own their company or have decision-making influence on hiring and who are interested in finding out more about Indiana Tech internships should contact the CPDC for more information.

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Homecoming 2005

The 2005 75th Anniversary Homecoming celebration offered its annual fare of alumni events, along with special dedications and a culminating gala event.

Annual events returned, such as Engineering 101, the alumni golf outing, reunions and alumni sports games. Special events included the dedication of Scully Square, named after past president Thomas Scully, the Broshar dedication of the Career Planning and Development Center, and former president Donald Andorfer’s talk on his book of Indiana Tech history.

The highlight event this year was the 75th Anniversary Gala, held on Saturday night, September 24 in Andorfer Commons. The Andorfer space was transformed into an elegant and festive room with silver and blue decorations and beautiful linen table coverings. Creative Dining served up an exquisite meal and after dinner entertainment was provided by the renowned 1960s group, “The Marcels.”

Homecoming is always a special time to welcome back alumni. If you haven’t attended a Homecoming celebration in the past, please keep next year in mind. We would love to see you! photos by: Clint Keller and Indiana Tech Creative Services

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New Coach Spotlight

Laura Doug l a s Meet the woman who has brought volleyball back with a bang Douglas was hired at Indiana Tech in the summer of Starting a new collegiate sports program can’t be 2004 to help with recruiting for the new women’s team easy, but Laura Douglas has proven in a short time and also assisted in coaching the women’s basketball that it can be done, and done quite successfully. program. While working part-time in recruiting and Indiana Tech canceled its women’s volleyball program coaching, an opportunity arose more than 20 years ago because last December for Douglas to of budget reasons. When the When the powers that be decided also oversee the new Wellness powers that be decided to restart Center and she accepted. Today, the program, one name stood out to restart the program, one name she holds both positions at Tech in the crowd of who should lead it: and has done a tremendous job Laura Douglas. stood out in the crowd of who in both. Douglas is a Fort Wayne native. As of Oct. 5, the team had Many of the Tech staff, including should lead it: Laura Douglas. Dan Kline, knew Laura through a record of 8-6 and was ranked her sister Sarah Douglas, who 8th in the region. You can tell was a Tech softball player and grad, and who also Douglas is proud. When asked whether she had any worked in the business office after graduating. Laura hobbies, she replied, “I don’t have time for hobbies! followed her older sister’s athletic footsteps and was a I am fortunate that my job is my hobby.” A great volleyball great at Indiana University-Purdue University, attitude to have and Tech is fortunate to have her Fort Wayne. Many of her records, such as kills in a as a new coach. match and career digs, still hold today. Douglas also found the time to play basketball during college. She Fun Facts about Laura graduated with an elementary education degree in the spring of 2002. Two weeks after Laura’s graduation, Favorite Food: Japanese Sarah was killed in an automobile accident. For two years after earning her degree, Douglas taught first grade at St. John Lutheran School, as well as coached girls’ volleyball at Elmhurst High School. Then the call came from Kline, asking whether she would be interested in starting up the women’s volleyball program at Tech. Her love of the sport made it easy for her to accept the position.

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Trends | Fall 2005

Favorite Vacation Spot: Belize Favorite Movie: Anything based on a true story Summer Activities: Beach volleyball


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Alumni Briefs Hermene Hartman Next in Speaker Series The University Forum Speaker Series will host Hermene Hartman, Publisher and CEO of Hartman Publishing Group D/B/A N’DIGO at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3. in Andorfer Commons. Hartman is a media consultant with expertise in a variety of dimensions: advertising, communications, marketing, public relations, and publishing. Her publication, N’DIGO has evolved from a publication freely distributed at hot spots around Chicago to what is now an annual publication, N’DIGO Profiles, an insert in the Chicago Tribune and Crain’s Chicago Business with a total readership of 4 million. Hartman has capitalized on her success in the media field to establish a foundation to provide merit-based scholarships to assist AfricanAmerican families. To raise the

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needed funds, she has held several galas for “goodwill purposes.” The latest gala held in the spring of this year brought Muhammad Ali and Gladys Knight as guests. During the past 10 years, her foundation has awarded more than $2 million in scholarship funds to 160 students. Mural Graces Library Walls McMillen Library in Andorfer Commons is home to a new mural. The artwork on the east wall of the coffee shop area was conceptualized and painted by Professor Nancy Tuschling, assistant professor of arts and social sciences. With the assistance of Mary Scudder, director of the Freshman College, Tuschling put in more than 160 hours creating the painting over the summer. History Book Available The history of Indiana Tech has been compiled as part of the 75th

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anniversary celebration. Former President Donald Andorfer scoured the university’s archives and interviewed many faculty, staff, and alumni to collect stories of the ups and downs of the institution. The book is filled with information, anecdotes, and photos to illuminate how Indiana Tech came to be what it is today. “Indiana Tech: The First 75 Years” was available at homecoming, and there are still copies available. If you would like to purchase a copy, call (800) 937-2448 ext. 2219 or e-mail slgambrell@indianatech.edu. The price of the book is $50. by D on

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Generous Gift from Warmack Estate Indiana Tech received $640,000 from the estate of alum Ralph Warmack. The gift will establish a scholarship fund for both day and evening students. Mr. Warmack resided in Boulder, CO.

Alumni News 1960s

Robert G. Guernsey, BSCE 1966, now lives is Dunstable, Md. His e-mail address is septicbob@aol.com.

1970s

Rakesh Prasad, BSEE 1972, is president and CEO of Ohm Networks Inc. and lives in Ottawa, Ontario. He has published and presented papers on “Environmental Effects on Fibre Optics” and “Electronic Switching in a Telephone System.” He modified and published “International Parameters for Satellite Transmission” for broadcast standards. Prasad holds the Canadian patent for a “Remote On-Demand Application Server” with the patent pending in the United States and Europe. He was the conference guest speaker on “Networked Multimedia for Low Cost Corporate Training and Collaboration” at Comdex Canada ‘97. Prasad is a member of Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario and Toastmasters International. His e-mail address is Prasad@ohmnetworks.com.

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1990s

Loren P. Kraft Jr., BSBA 1997, became senior pastor at Stillmeadow Church in Baltimore, Md in July 2005. He lives in Sykesville, Md. Jason Kline, BSBA 1994, has been appointed men’s basketball coach at Park University in Park, Mo. Kline coached the Indiana Tech Warriors for seven years and was named the WolverineHoosier Athletic Conference Coach of the Year for 2004-2005.

2000s

Samantha Teter, MBA 2004, joined the Creative Services team at Indiana Tech in June 2005. In January, she and her husband adopted a daughter, Maya Grace MinXuan. Maya was born March 6, 2004 in Jiangxi, China. Teter was a recipient of the Future 40 award from Fort Wayne Business Journal.


Alumni Spotlight:

The Reluctant Engineer by Joseph F. Wilkinson, BSCE 1946

I

graduated from high school in Fort Wayne at 17. The Great Depression was winding down, but my parents couldn’t afford to send me away to college. The only opportunity to get a degree was Indiana Technical College. I enrolled in the civil engineering department that September. In those days, Indiana Tech operated on a quarterly system. Nine quarters with 20 credits per quarter produced a degree. As the classified ads in such magazines as Popular Science read: AN ENGINEERING DEGREE IN 27 MONTHS. I was not an enthusiastic student. My grades were uniformly poor. I kept on for seven consecutive quarters. Because I was studying something in the national wartime interest, my draft call-up was deferred for a year. I received my draft notice on D Day, June 6, 1944, and 10 days later I was in the Army. Studying engineering almost got me killed. I scored high on the Army IQ test. Had I been drafted at 18 with no college, I probably would have been assigned to some service unit, like the Signal Corps or Ordnance Corps. Because of my engineering studies I was tabbed immediately for Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP). Under this operation, bright young men, the Army’s possible future leaders, were sent to college. The commander of the Army Ground Forces objected, claiming that would deprive the combat units of intelligent soldiers. As a concession it was decreed that all soldiers picked for ASTP had to take their basic training as infantry riflemen. I sweated through 13 weeks of infantry training that summer in Alabama and at the end was assigned to Rutgers University to resume civil engineering

classes. But as 1944 wound down, the war in Europe wasn’t ending as fast as hoped. The combat divisions needed replacements and ASTP proved a rich source. Bright young men were pulled out of ASTP and sent as infantrymen to Europe. They were killed, wounded or captured by the thousands in the Battle of the Bulge. After two months at Rutgers I was back in the infantry. I was in combat as a rifleman in the last two campaigns in Europe. My foxhole partner was shot in the chest. While standing nose to nose with a man from my squad a bullet took an eighth of an inch of skin off his Adam’s apple. Our new second lieutenant was killed six days after he took over the platoon. Had OSHA existed then, I’d have filed a complaint.

I was out of the Army around June 1, 1946, just in time to sign up for the summer quarter at Indiana Tech. By the end of the year I had earned a bachelor of science. The infantry did wonders for my scholarship and my grades were respectable. Early in 1947 I was at Indiana University at Bloomington, enrolled in the school of journalism, and I graduated in late summer, 1949. I went to Paris for a year, ostensibly to study French under the remains of my GI Bill allotment. The main reason I was in Paris was in hopes of getting a job in journalism. I didn’t. I returned to the United States in the fall of 1950 and went to New York to go job hunting. It took six weeks for me to be hired as a copy boy in the 109-year-old Brooklyn Eagle. Within five months I was promoted to general assignment reporter. Early in 1955, the Newspaper Guild went on strike against the Eagle. On the coldest day of the year I began three months on the picket line. The Eagle went out of business because of the strike, and I was out of a job. I signed on with the U. S. Information Agency to work as press officer in Bombay. At the end of my two-year tour I concluded I didn’t want to be a federal PR man and resigned. It was back to New York and job hunting. I was hired by McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. as an assistant editor on Engineering New-Record, a weekly news magazine covering construction. My combination of newspaper work and civil engineering background served me well. I was promoted rapidly and within 10 years I was the managing editor. In my final 12 years at McGraw-Hill I was chief editor of two mining magazines, continued on next page

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Engineering and Mining Journal and Coal Age. Work for McGraw-Hill magazines took me to all the continents, to most of western Europe, to China, Siberia, South Africa, Colombia, Iran, Saudi Arabia. It wasn’t all travel. Most of the time it was the old nine-to-five routine. I’ve done a lot of traveling on my own. I’ve lived and traveled in 61 countries, including such unfrequented places as Bhutan, Bulgaria, Mongolia, Namibia, Uzbekistan, Laos, Latvia. When I was 42, I began running regularly to reinforce my health and I’m still running. When I was 56, I ran the New York marathon and the Paris marathon two years later. At 59, I walked from Vienna to Innsbruck, 332 miles in 14 days. At 63, I climbed most of Mount Ararat, in Turkey. Ararat was my only mountain climbing experience. I decided I would not die of terminal vanity and didn’t try for the peak. Also when I was 63, McGraw-Hill sold my magazines to a Chicago publisher, declared me an honorary 65 and retired me. I have little talent for leisure and I had an alternative to shuffleboard. From my earliest reporting days I wrote free lance magazine articles. I’ve sold more than 60. Among the survivors of the magazines that published me are Sports Illustrated, Family Circle, Parents, Popular Science, Smithsonian, Rotarian, Architectural Record, National Enquirer, Reader’s Digest, and American Legion. It was easy enough to make free lance writing a full-time instead of a parttime job. As for being an engineer and never working at engineering, my wife says: “Engineers make good husbands. They’re so handy around the house.”

If you would like to share your story of life after Indiana Tech, please contact Janet Schutte at (260) 422-5561 ext. 2250 or JLSchutte@indianatech.edu.

In Memoriam We have learned of the deaths of the following alumni and friends:

Roland Rushby S. Glastonbury CT BSCE 1952

Forrest P. West St. Petersburg, FL BSME 1953

Francisco “Frank” Bracho Holland, Ohio BSME 1968

Thomas E. Pinkham Fort Wayne, IN BSEE 1959

Dorothy “Dottie” Fitzgerald Kokomo, IN BSRM 1977 Earl Nozaki Honolulu, HI BSEE 1962

Theodore Baleshta Victoria, British Columbia BSEE 1953

David A. Westrick Fort Wayne, IN BSRE 1953

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Willard G. Bloss Brentwood, TN BSRE 1949

Mark A. Freeman Fort Wayne, IN BSBA 2004

David McCarty West Chester, OH BSME 1958

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Dhuaine Davis Bruceville, IN BSEE 1955

CORRECTION:

The death of James W. Fuzy, BSEE 1967, was mistakenly reported in the summer issue of Trends. Fuzy is currently living in Fort Wayne. We apologize for the error.


Relationship Based Education an Indiana Tech Symposium

What is Relationship Based Education and how does it affect you? This concept is at the core of Indiana Tech’s teaching philosophy. We invite all students, faculty, staff, and trustees to learn how Relationship Based Education defines the Indiana Tech community. Students, faculty, staff, and trustees are invited to attend this engaging symposium followed by a special complimentary dinner on:

Casual Cork Club

Wednesday, December 7, 2005 2:30-5:30pm in Andorfer Commons Dinner served at 5:30pm Pre-registration is required. Day school classes will be dismissed from 2:30 to 5:30. To reserve your seat or for more information, contact nsfriedman@indianatech.edu, or call 422-5561 ext. 2287. RSVP required by November 7.

New Grant Doubles Your Giving Power I am pleased to announce that the Lilly Endowment has awarded a grant of $1 million to Indiana Tech for an Initiative to Strengthen Philanthropy for Indiana Higher Education. This special initiative is Phase II and designed to build on the momentum of two companion initiatives offered by the Lilly Endowment in 2002. The grant amount of up to $1 million is payable on a dollar for dollar matching basis. All qualifying funds must be paid in full between June 1, 2005 and Dec. 31, 2006. Qualifying matching funds must consist of contributions of cash or property (marketable securities, cash equivalents, and real property) from private sources such as individuals, corporations

or foundations. Deferred gifts and pledges or promises to pay will not qualify for the match. Corporate gifts that match donor’s gifts will also constitute qualifying matching funds. This is a wonderful opportunity for Indiana Tech to increase its annual giving. Please consider a gift and assist Tech in receiving the full $1 million grant over the next 18 months. If you have any questions, please contact me at (260) 422-5561 ext. 2346 for assistance.

4th Annual Fort Wayne Alumni Chapter Wine Tasting Friday, November 4, 2005 7:00pm at Indiana Tech’s Andorfer Commons $40 per couple/$25 per single The evening will feature: Wine-Tasting by Lebamoff’s Cap’n’Cork Hors D’oeuvres Silent Auction Wine purchase opportunities You must be 21 or older to attend Call 260-422-5561 ext. 2219 to RSVP by Nov. 1

Thank you for your continued support of Indiana Tech! Louise Jackson Vice President, Institutional Advancement

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Move-In Day 2005

Move-In Day ‘05

Sunday, August 21 was a busy day on the Fort Wayne campus – the official “move-in” day for day school students. Parents carried bedding, luggage and crates of books and CDs while the students acclimated themselves to their dorm rooms and their new dorm-mates.

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Faculty & Staff News Judy K. Roy was named to the newly created position of vice president of finance and administration in August. Her role will provide leadership to the business office, information technology services, and buildings and grounds. Roy brings an impressive set of strategic, financial, and managerial skills which she gained through a 20 year career. Most recently, she worked at Parkview Hospital as the director of finance. Randy Stegall has been hired as the new head baseball coach to lead the Warriors. Stegall is a former assistant baseball coach from Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tenn., and assisted the Cumberland team to a 2004 NAIA National Championship as well as their showing in the 2005 NAIA Final Four. Stegall’s own collegiate baseball career highlights include NAIA All-American First Team Short Stop, NAIA Player of the Year Runner-up, as well as setting records for batting average, hits in a season, runs in a season and total bases in a season, all for Cumberland University. He then went on to play for the Cincinnati Reds organization. Jeff Parrish has been promoted to head coach of the men’s basketball team. Parrish had been an assistant coach for the Warriors for the past three seasons. Parrish’s coaching experience spans more than 20 years, including serving as assistant basketball coach at Churubusco High School, head basketball coach at Hicksville (Ohio) High School, and head baseball coach at South Side High School in Fort Wayne. Louise Jackson was named vice president of institutional advancement in August. Jackson had worked with the Advancement team as director of major grants and gifts for the past year. Bob Confer has been promoted to the position of admissions counselor.

Chad Pieper has moved from the traditional program admissions team to the Office of Institutional Advancement as alumni relations/annual fund director. Indiana Tech has welcomed several new staff and faculty members to the university: • Debra J. Berg-Simon, academic service specialist • Timothy J. Ludwig, programmer/analyst • Linda M. Kreft, director of grants • Shatea McNeil, associate admissions counselor • Marah E. Pester, admissions presenter • Yolanda Madison, administrative assistant (Indianapolis) • Joshua J. Hubert, custodian • Benjamin Lee, director of online learning • Jennifer Fisher, admissions counselor • Nicole Moon, administrative assistant (Buildings & Grounds) • Andrew Achenbach, instructor of sports management Faculty Use Lilly Grant for Professional Growth Indiana Tech received a $1 million grant from the Lilly Endowment in September 2004 to create a Faculty Development Fund. A year later, several faculty members have projects in the works to take advantage of this opportunity for professional growth. The $1 million grant was awarded through the Endowment’s Initiative to Recruit and Retain Intellectual Capital for Indiana Higher Education Institutions. The goal of the program is to improve educational opportunities for Indiana residents by helping Indiana colleges and universities recruit and retain the best faculty and students to fulfill their institutional goals.

• Faculty mentoring Web site: Rose Arant, assistant professor of business administration, and Dr. Jim Schaffer, associate professor of business administration are working on a site to use as a mentoring tool for new adjunct faculty in the College of Professional Studies. • Addressing the Psychological Needs of Indiana Tech Students: Dr. Norma Friedman, professor of business administration and social sciences, is developing methods to address the psychological problems of students. • Project Management Programs Initiative: Linda Hite, assistant professor of computer studies, is researching and evaluating the demand for courses and programs in project management. • High Speed Photographic Measurement System: Richard Kenefic, associate professor of electrical engineering, is developing a high speed photographic measurement system to support engineering department projects related to machine vision. • Initiating the Center for Automotive Engineering Education at Indiana Tech: Feng Lin, associate professor of mechanical engineering, is working to establish a center of automotive engineering education with support training for a faculty member who will be responsible for the center. • F.U.E.L.S. Project (Future Unix Enterprise Level Server): Martin Mansfield, associate professor of computer sciences, is transforming an existing server into a scalable, secure and all around enterprise level Unix file server to be used by students. • Improving the Teaching of English at Indiana Tech: Susan McGrade, assistant professor of English and director of educational enrichment, is working toward improving the teaching of English through improvements in curriculum and English faculty education.

Projects currently being funded through the grant include:

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College of Professional Studies– In a State of Growth The College of Professional Studies has undergone tremendous growth in recent months, thanks to new locations, new programs and increased enrollment. On Oct. 21, Indiana Tech celebrated its newest location in Plainfield with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house. Plainfield is west of Indianapolis and will reach students in nearby counties and localities. This location will offer the majority of degree programs currently being offered in CPS.

justice and information systems are three new degree programs being offered in CPS this academic year. Our admissions teams are working hard to tap into these new markets and to work with their local corporations to ensure adequate enrollment to get these exciting new programs off the ground. Offering new locations and new degree programs has undoubtedly added to CPS’ increased starts and enrollment numbers this academic year. Numbers continue to look strong throughout the rest of the year.

With Plainfield up and running, even more new locations are currently being researched, including Muncie, Kendallville, Gary and Kokomo. Classes are currently offered in Kendallville and Kokomo at off-site locations. Indiana Tech has formed a partnership with Fourth Wave, a high-technology holding company that seeks to be a worldwide leader in the management of emergency and non-emergency operations for governments, universities and the health care industry. Through an alliance with Ivy Tech, CPS began offering classes at Fourth Wave’s downtown location in Session 3. New degree programs in niche markets not only attract new students, but they offer the opportunity to form new alliances with companies and organizations throughout the state of Indiana. Organizational leadership, criminal

Out with the Old, In with the New Indiana Tech has seen many new degree programs, campus improvements and added locations over recent years. Change and improvement has been a constant within our university. In keeping with this theme, the Creative Services department, in cooperation with the president’s

old logo 16

Trends | Fall 2005

office, has developed a new logo to replace the current blue icon logo, which has been in existence for at least 25 years.

creates a fresh, classic looking type treatment of our name and does not rely on an abstract icon to represent the university.

Our new look accomplishes a few things for Indiana Tech’s image. First, we have gone back to emphasizing the university’s official school colors of orange and black. Second, this new look

Be on the lookout for more improvements to the look of Indiana Tech. Creative Services will be using this new logo to design a new range of print materials for the university.

new logo


Warrior Men’s Basketball Day

Date

Opposer

Location

Time

Day

Date

Opposer

Location

Time

Fri/Sat

Nov 4-5

SportOne Classic

Upland, IN

TBA

Wed

Jan 25

Aquinas University**

Grand Rapids, MI

7:30

Sat*

Nov 12

Illinois Tech

Indiana Tech

3:00

Sat

Jan 28

U of Michigan-Dearborn**

Indiana Tech

3:00

Wed

Nov 16

Huntington College

Huntington, IN

7:00

Wed

Feb 1

Cornerstone University**

Indiana Tech

7:30

Fri/Sat

Nov 18/19

Tri-State Tournament

Angola, IN

TBA

Sat

Feb 4

Madonna University**

Indiana Tech

3:00

Sat

Nov 26

IU-South Bend

Indiana Tech

3:00

Wed

Feb 8

Concordia University**

Indiana Tech

7:30

Sun

Nov 27

University of Saint Francis

Indiana Tech

3:00

Sat*

Feb 11

Davenport University

Indiana Tech

3:00

Wed

Nov 30

Marygrove College

Detroit, MI

7:00

Wed

Feb 15

Siena Heights University**

Adrian, MI

7:30

Fri/Sat

Dec 2/3

Trinity International Tourney

Chicago, IL

TBA

Sat*

Feb 18

Aquinas University**

Indiana Tech

3:00

Wed

Dec 7

Taylor-Fort Wayne

Indiana Tech

TBA

Wed

Feb 22

WHAC 1st Round

TBA

TBA

Fri/Sat

Dec 9/10

Grace College Tournament

Winona Lake, IN

TBA

Sat

Feb 25

WHAC Semifinals

TBA

TBA

Wed*

Jan 4

U of Michigan-Dearborn**

Dearborn, MI

7:00

Mon

Feb 27

WHAC Championship

TBA

TBA

Sat

Jan 7

Cornerstone University**

Grand Rapids, MI

3:00

Mon

Jan 9

Marygrove College

Indiana Tech

7:00

Opposer

Location

Time

Wed

Jan 11

Madonna University**

Livonia, MI

7:30

Sat

Jan 14

Concordia University**

Ann Arbor, MI

3:00

Wed*

Jan 18

Davenport University

Grand Rapids, MI

7:30

Sat*

Jan 21

Siena Heights University**

Indiana Tech

3:00

Warrior Women’s Basketball Day

Date

Opposer

Location

Time

Day

Date

Sat

Oct 22

Edison C. C. (scrimmage)

Indiana Tech

10:00 am

Wed * Jan 4

U of Michigan-Dearborn** **

Dearborn, MI

5 pm

Sat

Oct 29

Ancilla College (scrimmage)

Indiana Tech

Noon

Sat

Jan 7

Cornerstone University **

Indiana Tech

1 pm

Wed

Nov 2

Indiana Wesleyan University

Marion, IN

7 pm

Wed

Jan 11

Madonna University **

Indiana Tech

7:30 pm 1 pm

Fri

Nov 4

SportONE Tournament

Indiana Tech

TBA

Sat

Jan 14

Concordia University **

Indiana Tech

Sat

Nov 5

SportONE Tournament

Indiana Tech

TBA

Wed * Jan 18

Davenport University **

Grand Rapids, MI 5:30 pm

Tues

Nov 8

Grace College

Indiana Tech

7 pm

Sat

Siena Heights University **

Adrian, MI

Wed

Nov 9

Huntington College

Indiana Tech

7 pm

Wed * Jan 25

Aquinas College **

Grand Rapids, MI 6 pm

Sat *

Nov 12

Malone College

Indiana Tech

1 pm

Sat *

Jan 28

U of Michigan-Dearborn** **

Indiana Tech

Tues

Nov 15

Goshen College

Goshen, IN

7 pm

Wed

Feb 1

Cornerstone University **

Grand Rapids, MI 7:30 pm

Fri

Nov 18

University of Saint. Francis

Ft. Wayne, IN

7 pm

Sat

Feb 4

Madonna University **

Livonia, MI

1 pm

Sat

Nov 19

Spring Arbor University

Indiana Tech

1 pm

Wed

Feb 8

Concordia University **

Ann Arbor, MI

7:30 pm

Tues

Nov 22

Taylor University

Upland, IN

7:30 pm

Sat *

Feb 11

Davenport University **

Indiana Tech

1 pm

Tues

Nov 29

Saint Joseph’s College

Rensselaer, IN

7 pm

Wed

Feb 15

Siena Heights University **

Indiana Tech

7 pm

Wed

Dec 7

Marian College

Indianapolis, IN

7 pm

Sat *

Feb 18

Aquinas College **

Indiana Tech

1 pm

Fri

Dec 16

Bethel College Tournament

Mishawaka, IN

TBA

Thur-Tues

Feb 23-28

WHAC Tournament

Sat

Dec 17

Bethel College Tournament

Mishawaka, IN

TBA

TBA

Fri

Dec 30

Urbana University

Urbana, OH

7 pm

Home games are highlighted in Orange.

* Men/Women doubleheader

Jan 21

3 pm 1 pm

TBA

** WHAC games

Trends | Fall 2005

17


Forum Held at L3 In observance of Constitution Day, Indiana Tech hosted an open forum on Wednesday, Sept. 21, at the Labor of Love for Learning amphitheater. The topic of focus for this interactive event was addressing our responsibility during a national disaster like Hurricane Katrina. The forum was intended to demonstrate that the role of our university to develop and promote responsible citizenship applies to real life events. 3

Forum Held at L

Sept. 17th was selected as the date for Constitution Day due to the fact that on Sept. 17, 1787 the delegates to the Constitutional Convention met for the last time to sign the United States Constitution and presented it to the American public. A Constitution Day event was held on campuses nationwide.

Humanities Class Will Visit Italy Indiana Tech’s next study abroad opportunity will be a journey to Italy in January 2006. Students will travel through Italy for nine days, complete course work upon return, and receive 3 credit hours of humanities electives.

of Rome, including the Colosseum, the Roman Forum, and the catacombs; Vatican City, including St. Peter’s and the Sistine Chapel; the ancient port of Ostia; the island of Capri; Pompeii and Sorrento.

The course focuses on Roman history and culture. It includes guided tours

The tentative departure date is Jan. 5, and the course is open to both

traditional and College of Professional Studies students. For more information on how to join other students, Professor Susan McGrade, and President Arthur Snyder on this adventure, contact McGrade at semcgrade@indianatech.edu, or (260) 422-5561, ext. 2358.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Fort Wayne, IN Permit No. 159

1600 East Washington Blvd. Fort Wayne, IN 46803


Trends: Fall 2005 (Volume 2, Issue 1)