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WELCOME NEW AND RETURNING SYCAMORES

Let ter from President Bradley Page 2 Let ter from Police Chi Bil Mercier ef Page 14

Let ter from SGA Pre Andre Brousseausident Page 24 g n i y a p Highest-eers car -17 Pages 16


NOTE F ROM T HE PRESIDENT Dear students,

President Bradley Page 2

Greetings to all, and a special welcome to those new to the campus. I hope that you are ready for an exciting and productive year. As you make decisions on how to spend your time, consider the various ways you can become involved – in your academic area, in the multitude of student organizations and activities, and in the community. These experiences will not only enhance your time at Indiana State, they are likely to have an impact on the rest of your life. From Donaghy Day to Alternative Spring Break, from trike to tandem, from Greek life to academic organizations, from studying abroad to volunteering in a local community center -- your choices are almost endless. Don’t forget to also take advantage of the many cultural opportunities here, most of which are free to our students. These include Division I athletics, the Performing Arts Series, the Terre Haute Symphony, the University Speakers Series, the many productions, exhibits and performances put on by our School of Music and Departments of Theater and Art. I hope to see you at these events. With a diverse student body coming from virtually every state in the U.S. and more than 50 other countries, Indiana State also offers many multi-cultural activities through the African-American Cultural Center, the International Affairs Center and a variety of student organizations. Embracing the diversity of individuals, ideas and expressions is one of ISU’s core values and is a critical component to preparing our students for living and working in today’s global economy. Research shows that students who become engaged in the university beyond the classroom are more likely to succeed academically and ultimately, more likely to graduate. Also, don’t forget to ask for help. Indiana State’s faculty and staff care about your success. If you are having difficulties, there are many services and resources available across campus. Along the way, if you have ideas on how ISU could improve its services and programs, please let me know. Most of all, I look forward to congratulating you when you walk across the stage to receive your degree. Best of luck for a great year. With warm regards, President Daniel J. Bradley


www.indianastatesman.com

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 3

Tuition rate increase set at 1.5 percent for 2012-13 ErnEst rollinE

Special to the Statesman

Indiana residents attending ISU this fall can expect to save more on tuition as ISU board of trustees’ decision to scale back scheduled increases take effect. Last fall, the board of trustees decided to scale back scheduled tuition increases for in-state undergraduate students from 3.5 percent to 1.5 percent for the academic year of 2012-13 takes effect. In a statement released by ISU President Dan Bradley the new rate sets tuition at $3949 per semester for Indiana students. At the proposed rate the total tuition and fees would have been $4030 per semester. The change saves in-state undergraduates $81 per semester. “We have a goal of keeping the rate of increase in tuition so that it is equal to inflation,” Bradley said. When it comes to tuition rates increases a measuring stick is the general inflation rate. The suggested rule is that tuition rates increase at approximately twice the general inflation rate. The US Inflation rate is 1.4 percent. The reduced rate of 1.5 percent is one percent lower than the state recommended 2.5 percent. The Indiana Commission sets the recommended rates for Higher Education. Bradley said the rates were As a suggested rule of thumb tuition rate increase are set at approximately dou- set to have an average of 2.5 percent over two years. ble the inflation rate (Illustration by Jamie Nichols).

For the 2011-12 year the rate increase was set at 3.5 percent. According to the U.S. Department of Education the national average of tuition increases for public, four-year universities from 2008-2011 was 15 percent. For the same period ISU increased tuition by 17.9 percent. The scaled back tuition increase only impacts instate students. As publically funded university their greatest priority is to the student of taxpayers in the state of Indiana who has more investment in the state, Bradley said. For the 2012-13 academic year tuition fees for outof-state residents is $4963 per semester, an increase of [insert number], from 2011-12 academic years, which stood at $4251 per semester.

“We have a goal of keeping the rate of increase in tuition so that it is equal to inflation.” President Dan Bradley

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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 4

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Don’t carry around your campus map. Familiarize yourself with campus and find all your classes ahead of time. Don’t dress up for class. Relax and go casual. Don’t look like an ISU billboard. Wearing head-to-toe Sycamore gear is a clear sign of a freshman. Don’t wear high school shirts unless you’re sleeping or working out in them. You’re a college student now! Don’t lug around all your textbooks in a giant backpack. Don’t ask other Sycamores what grade they’re in. Ask what year they are. Don’t wear your room key and school ID on a lanyard around your neck. Don’t travel in packs. Freshman tend to have a mob mentality and do everything in groups. Embrace your independence and learn to do things on your own. Don’t try to be liked by everyone. You don’t have to be a sterotypical “crazy college student” in order to be noticed.


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 5


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 6

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HIGH SCHOOL VS COLLEGE RESIDENCE HALLS

LEARN ON YOUR OWN

Most freshman students will no longer be commuting from home to school five days a week by private transportation or bright yellow school bus. With oncampus housing, the classroom is within walking or biking distance. In addition, classmates live with you so the chances of running into someone from your Psych 101 course on Mondays are higher (even greater with themed and academic housing grouping students pursuing similar majors)

Unlike high school teachers, professors have very different roles. There’s more lecturing and less student-teacher interaction than you experienced in high school. It’s your responsibility to take notes and study outside of the classroom in order to get a good grade. Look for a tutor, or contact ISU’s Student Academic Services Center if you start to fall behind.

F REEDOM You are in control. There is no one forcing you to do anything in college. Whether you decide to go to a class or sleep in; succeed or fail is entirely up to you. Much of your success or failure depends on how you prioritize.

YOU ARE IN CONT ROL

MORE WORK The number of classes may seem fewer but the expectations are greater. Professors will tell you for every hour you spend in the classroom, prepare to spend two hours outside of class preparing and studying. Read. Take notes. Look for internships in the ares that appeal to you.

812-237-4138


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 7

SOLVE YOUR OWN PROBLEMS High school students usually have a parent close by to help with a sticky situation. In college, with parents being sometimes hours or even oceans away, students have to learn to solve their own problems. For example, if you get sick, mom will not be around to help you get better.

LEARN TO MANAGE IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS Immunization records, banks statements, student loan documents, utility bills, housing contracts and other valuable information is in your care now. College may be about school, but in order to survive you’re going to need to learn to manage the paperwork of your life.

PRIORITIZE YOUR TIME You control your schedule. No more reporting for first period in the early morning, and there are no curfews and class isn’t mandatory (although some professors count absences). Responsibility falls entirely on you, making the need for prioritization and time management very important.

RESP ONSI BILIT Y REST S ENT IRELY ON YOU


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 8

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Prep is key to job after graduation ERNEST ROLLINS Special to the Statesman

Top Degrees in Demand BachelorÕ s

MasterÕ s

Doctorate

Business

Business

Engineering

Engineering

Engineering

Computer Sciences

Computersciences

Computer Sciences

Sciences

Sciences

Business

Liberal Arts

Human and Social Sciences

Communications

Education

For ISU alumna Jessica Squires, her final year at Indiana State University was punctuated by anxiety over post-graduation employment. “I was thoroughly convinced that I wouldn’t get a job when I graduated,” Squires said. The main reason for her concern was the state of the job market. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the unemployment rate stands at 8.3 percent, a rate that was “essentially unchanged in July” 2012. Driven slightly by those feelings of anxiety, Squires focused on early preparation. It involved conversations with professionals in her field of study, resume and portfolio

building and developing a network. Her prudence was rewarded with an employment opportunity weeks after graduation. “[For senior students, the] strongest piece of advice is to start early, a lot of students delay,” Powers said. “[It is] very important to start early on in the senior year.” However, that advice does not stop at the upperclassmen, Powers said. Incoming freshmen can get a jumpstart on the process by clarifying career goals early on and begin to identify part-time jobs that will aid them towards that goal. One important skill to build

CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

Residential Life would like to say

‘ Thank You!’’

to everyone who volunteered their time to help during Move-In! Located below Rhoads Hall

812-237-3993 or toll-free 888-824-3920 Open: Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 9

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 is networking - developing a group of people who can aid in a variety of ways. Powers added that through networking potential employees learn about jobs in advance of them being advertised to the public. Powers added that networking can start as early as the freshman year. Students can volunteer in their career field, or take advantage of community service opportunities to build networks. Developing networks proved to be a useful skill for Squires. It was at a job fair where she met her future employer. “I didn’t even apply for this job,” Squires said. “I talked to Dan at the job fair in February and kept in contact with him after that. Then he called me out of the blue one day for an interview for an opening.” Squires’ success seems to follow recent hiring trends. Powers said the ISU Career Center said there has been an improvement in the number of companies recruiting college graduates for employment. “We’ve seen an improvement in the last year,” Tracy Powers said. “Nationally there was a stronger increase in recruiting college students.”

Powers said the Career Center has seen strong employment opportunities in the health and service industry. An increasingly aging population maybe the drive for demand in healthcare. According to July 2012 statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the nation observed increases in manufacturing jobs (+25,000), professional and business services (+49,000), computer systems jobs (+7,000), food services and drinking places (+29,000) and health care jobs (+12,000). According to the NCAE the rate for individuals 25 years and older holding a bachelor’s degree or higher stood at 4.1 percent for July and the top bachelor degrees in demand are Business, Engineering, Computer Science, Sciences, Liberal Arts, Communications and Agriculture and Natural Resources.

“Networking can start as early as freshman year.” Tracy Powers

The Light House Mission Are you required to volunteer somewhere for one of your classes? Do you like to spend time helping others? If you answered YES to either of these questions, then Call or Visit The Light House Mission 1450 Wabash Avenue Terre Haute, IN 812-232-7001

• “Find your place at ISU” • The Freshman Leadership Coalition • The Forest Student Section • SGA Senate For more information, please email sga@indstate.edu or visit HMSU 621


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 10

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ISU introduces CCR: a new type of resumé

JESSICA NEFF

Staff editor

Indiana State University has introduced a new spin on the traditional resumés that students create for potential employers. With a document called the co-curricular record, students can show what they’ve done outside the classroom during their years as a student at ISU. “The co-curricular record is a documented certification of involvement in organizations, [oncampus] work, community service and attendance at events,” Associate Dean of Student Engagement and Leadership Development Brooks Moore said. “The program was launched this past spring.” The idea stemmed from ISU President Dan Bradley’s goal to help students with job searches, graduate schools and campus scholarships and awards, Associate Vice President of Student Affairs Nolan Davis said. “It also acts as a momento for students to remember what they were involved with while at college, long after graduation … Most students have poor resumés due to incorrect information.” Davis leads the strategy for developing the cocurricular record and oversees the work of a committee that has undertaken the project as part of Service events will be on the CCR to demonstrate unity and the ISU Strategic Plan.

Project Manager Michael Snyder and Applications System Manager Kevin Smith are working to ensure that the data about student’s activities is maintained and stored in a manner that is accessible and documentable via the cocurricular record. Student Affairs has control of the entire document but a goal for the program is to provide all departments on campus with the ability to contribute information to the document, Davis said. The co-curricular record’s team has access to all information that is turned in to “My Banner Self Service Links” on the MyISU Portal and a subset of the data provided that applies to the overall goal of the co-curricular record is included, he said. “We attempt to document the most important or valuable experiences outside the classroom [in the co-curricular record],” Davis said. “Not much work is required for students; it will be predominantly automatic. However, at some point students will be able to request to add information electronically.”

hardwork (Photo courtesy of ISU Communication and Marketing).

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

Welcome Back to all New and Returning Students and Staff

From your friends at the University Honors Program. Visit us at Pickerl Hall or online at www.indstate.edu/honors


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 11


Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 12

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ccr/continued from page 10 A number of universities offer similar sorts of information to students, but nothing as comprehensive as ISU’s, Davis said. Much like a transcript, the co-curricular record can be either “official” or “unofficial.” “Students can access the unofficial co-curricular record online and can request the official transcript by going to www.indstate.edu/ccr and following the directions online,” Moore said. The unofficial record is not stamped by the university and is available for the students’ own use; for example, it can be taken to the Career Center and the personnel working there can transfer the information provided into a resumé, Davis said. “The official [record] is one that may need to be attached to paperwork being sent to an employer, scholarship applications, graduate school, etc. It can also be shared with family to inform them of the activities and other involvements that the students participated in while on campus.” The co-curricular record became available to students Dec.15 and advertising began March 1, he said. “We will also be starting a poster campaign which will include posters and fliers. We will have giveaways at campus events and we are having designs put on the T-shirts for Sycamore Sunday.”

Marketing campaign materials from the ISU co-curricular record strategic plan initiative represent the information that students can find on an “official” copy of their co-curricular record. Students can obtain a copy of their record, which is a detailed version of the activities they’ve involved themselves in at ISU, by contacting the registrar’s office.


www.indianastatesman.com

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 13

Indiana State University

is taking the next step to becoming more sustainable.

Teach It

39 faculty members conduct research or teach about sustainability. 22 courses deal with environmental and sustainability issues.

Live It

ISU has signed on to the Presidents’ Climate Commitment and has committed to becoming carbon neutral by 2050. Our Carbon Footprint Analysis shows that we are at 53% of our 1990 carbon emission levels.

Embrace It

ISU believes it’s important to let everyone have a chance to become involved in sustainability. Whether it’s with Earth Day, The Energy Competition, Recyclemania, or the Environmental club.

PROUD TO BE

GREEN Learn more about what Indiana State University is doing at www.isusustainability.org


NOTE F ROM T HE SGA PRESIDENT Hey Sycamores, I’d like to welcome you all to another awesome school year at Indiana State University. My name is André Brousseau, and I will be serving you as the president of the Student Government Association for the 20122013 school year. SGA has many great things in store for the entire student body, and we look forward to making this coming school year the best it can possibly be. As SGA, we serve as the voice of the student body to the administration, the faculty, and the staff here at Indiana State, and we aim to serve you as best we can. Do you want to get involved with supporting ISU Athletics? SGA can help you with that, and provide the means to do so. Do you like free gear? SGA has it. How about free food and entertaining events? Yeah, SGA does all that too. More importantly, do you want to become a better leader and develop your skills to become a better professional? Do you want to have a representative body that supports your academic concerns? How about an organization that solely represents you as the student, and faces the major issues on campus head-on? Well fellow Sycamores, the Student Government Association does all of that.

Andre Brousseau Page24

I strongly encourage you to become involved on campus, whether through SGA, Greek Life, intramural or club sports, the homecoming committee, the student newspaper, and so on. Indiana State has so much to offer young professionals such as yourselves, and you’ve taken the most important step by coming to this great institution. Now take the next step and get involved. You won’t just find something to do. You’ll find some of the greatest and most exciting challenges of your life to date, many new skills that will help you throughout your college experience and once you’re in the “real world,” and you’ll find some lifelong friends. As I said, Indiana State has many great things to offer you as students. Only one question remains: are you willing to make yourself and your university better by taking ISU up on those offers? Thank you, and Go Trees!

Best Regards, André


www.indianastatesman.com

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 15

University launches Center for Health, Wellness and Life Enrichment Dave Taylor ISU Communications and Marketing Indiana State University has established a Center for Health, Wellness, and Life Enrichment to help address the needs of medically underserved areas of the state while expanding the university’s commitment to interprofessional education. The center is one of eight programs selected for funding as part of the university’s $5 million Unbounded Possibilities initiative designed to support innovative programs that set Indiana State apart from other colleges and universities. “The center will provide students opportunities for new experiences in interprofessional education, which is especially vital for them as they prepare to serve residents in rural and medically underserved populations,” said Leamor Kahanov, professor and chair of the department of applied medicine and rehabilitation and co-director of the center. “Students will work not only with health care professionals but also with specialists in such areas as recreation, nutrition, business administration and nonprofit leadership so that they gain an understanding of what real-world experiences are like.” The center’s objectives include: • Providing health, wellness and life-enriching services through community engagement and service

learning• Preparing future professionals to work in an interprofessional environment• Diversifying institutional revenue streams• Producing educational, outcome, action and translational research • Ensuring sustainability through non-profit and philanthropic outreach Faculty from all the departments in the College of Nursing, Health, and Human Services are participating along with select faculty from other programs. Area schools and health care providers will also play a vital role in the center’s work, Kahanov said. “The center would not be able to survive without both internal and external participation,” she said. “School systems and health care facilities will facilitate patients and/or other individuals coming to the center to receive services. Internal collaboration between colleges and departments will provide faculty-guided experiences to students who will operate the center.” Kahanov said the center will bring together a variety of existing community outreach programs and develop new ones to meet the unique challenges of providing health and human services to underserved populations, rural as well as urban.

The center will address the medical needs of the community while providing opportunities for service learning (Photo courtesy of ISU Communication and Marketing).


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 16

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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 17

The average annual salary is $120,450. According the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment is expected to grow nine percent from 2010 to 2020. A bachelor’s degree is required and more than five years experience in another business or financial occupation. The average annual salary for a pharmacist is $112,160. At Indiana State University an undergraduate can major in the university’s pre-pharmacy program. Most future pharmacists have to attend at least two years of college to be eligible for pharmacy school. A Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) professional requires four years to complete. Post-graduate training is optional. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics pharmacists were expected to see increased employment of 17 percent from 2008 – 2018.

The average annual salary is $130,490. Aspiring lawyers spend about seven years in college with three years beyond their undergraduate degree. Law school candidates must take the LSAT (Law School Admission Test) which measures reading comprehension, logical reading and analytical reasoning. The test can be repeated for an improved grade with a limit of no more than three tests in a two-year period. After law school, graduates must take a bar examination in order to begin law practice in a given jurisdiction.

The average annual salary is between $161,750 - $204,670 . A bachelor’s degree in either biology or chemistry is often a requirement for admission to dental school. However, some schools offer a predental program. Upon completion of a degree, students also have to pass the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) before they can attend dental school and complete a Dental Degree Program. Then, the candidate must become licensed which is typically done by the National Board Dental Examinations and the licensing board.

The average annual salary is $126, 190. Typically, entry-level marketing manager positions require just the completion of a bachelor’s degree, but a master’s degree can open up more opportunities for graduates. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expect opportunities for marketing managers to grow through 2016.

The average annual salary is $118, 070. A commercial pilot license is required. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, prior to earning a pilot’s license the student pilot needs a minimum of 250 hours of flying time. In addition, a physical examination and written exam must be passed.

The average annual salary is $116,860. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, from 2010 to 2020 it is expected that the employment of sale managers will grow by 12 percent. Entry-level positions typically require a bachelor’s degree with between one to five years of experience in a related occupation.

The average annual salary is $114,460. Air traffic controllers must complete an air traffic management degree from a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certified school. In addition, the candidate must have a qualifying score on the FAA preemployment test and complete a training course at the FAA Academy.

The average annual salary is $168,650 - $234,950. Students often study for 11 years (four years of college, four years of medical school, and three years working in a hospital) before their training is complete. Specialty doctors can work up to eight years before being fully trained. Undergraduates are recommended to study science related courses such as biology and chemistry. Some colleges offer pre-medicine. Undergraduates must take the Medical College Admission Test and score well to be eligible for med-school admission. Upon completion of med-school, students spend between three to seven years in medical residency before taking the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) to obtain a license to work.

The average annual salary is $176,550. The minimum education for most chief executive officer positions is a bachelor’s degree. Majors such as business administration or public admistration are good pursuits for students. Those interested in an industry specific position such as health care should take those specific majors. Many pursue a master’s degree in business administration as well whether prior to or after employment in a managerial position. Several years of prior management experience is often required. Most CEOs start at a lower-level management position and gain experience before working their way up to CEO.


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 18

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Food project helps city

A buschel of locally grown produce. (Photo courtesy of ISU Communications and Marketing)

Staff Writer

ISU Communication and Marketing

Small and medium-size farmers face multiple obstacles when trying to bring food products to market, but beginning next year they will have a new resource. The Wabash Valley Food Hub will work to expand the local foods market in West-Central Indiana and East-Central Illinois. The nonprofit, member-driven organization is being developed through Indiana State University’s Rural-Urban Entrepreneurship Development Institute (RUEDI). The local food hub project is one of many across the nation, as communities nation-wide strive to meet the ever-increasing demand for locally-sourced foods. Last December, a local foods panel discussion hosted by Terre Foods Cooperative attracted an overwhelmingly large crowd - a testament to the growing interest in locally-produced foods in our region. “Our research has shown that there is a gap in the market for local foods in the Wabash Valley as well as a sizeable number of producers who have the desire to expand their operations,” said Steven Pontius, professor of geography and director of the RUEDI. With no existing organization dedicated to coordinating the local foods market, Pontius saw an opportunity. “With the food hub project, we will reduce barriers to market entry for farmers and producers, and make sourcing local foods a real option for local businesses and institutions,” he said.

“The primary purpose of the food hub project is to reduce as many barriers as possible and allow the market to work more efficiently,” said Jason Saavedra, principal at J3 Concepts, a consulting firm hired to assist the RUEDI with launching the organization. “Typically, it’s just not feasible for a buyer to deal with 30 or 40 local farmers to get the supply they need. A food hub addresses this issue because, instead, the buyer can deal with one entity - the food hub - to get its local produce, meats and other food products.” The food hub will work with local small and medium-sized farmers as well as local producers of value-added food products. The organization will be membership-based and will be selfsustaining once launched. It is being organized with funding from ISU’s Unbounded Possibilities (UP) initiative, aprogram through which the university is pursuing institutional distinction. The project will have the support of an advisory committee that includes a number of constituents in the local foods market, including Jim Luzar of the Vigo County Purdue Extension office. “I am looking forward to working with the food hub to support our local farmers,” Luzar said. “There are a number of resources that Purdue Extension can contribute to ensure that it succeeds.” J3 Concepts will conduct stakeholder meetings after harvest time to gather input on what local producers and consumers need.


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Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 20

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Duke Bennett: ISU has strong relationship with city Jessica Neff Staff editor

Mayor Duke Bennett has lofty goals for the community of Terre Haute and its relationship with Indiana State University. Everyone will benefit from getting involved in building that relationship, Bennett said. Giving back to the community is “something my parents and others have taught me,” he said. He instills this same ideal into his children who are “engaged in the community” he said. And giving back he has, through his goals of growing relationships locally, statewide and federally, Bennett is ensuring that the progress of the people in the Terre Haute community remains priority. “We have lost 25 percent of our income due to the housing cap,” Bennett said. “Our goal is to bring good jobs here so people are able to raise their families.” There are two groups of students that are very important to Bennett right now. “The groups are the students that stay [in Terre Haute] because they find something they like and those who are looking for the best job. We target the second area because [Terre Haute] has four to five businesses who are hiring but they can’t find qualified workers,” he said. “We want the students who are newly-graduated to go to these businesses.” ISU and the city of Terre Haute have a great working relationship because ISU employs large numbers of people, he said. “The development of downtown has been due to the partnership with ISU to recruit students and residents,” Bennett said. “We both will have gains in success [due to the projects].” ISU is a great university because it is reasonably priced and students get a good education, he said. “The more success that each [entity: ISU and Terre Haute] has; the more [the success] benefits each other, especially financially,” Bennett said.

Terre Haute has always been home to Bennett but politics was not his first profession; he built up to his current position as mayor through other experiences in his life and his family’s support. Bennett worked at a high tech software company for 15 years until it went out of business; then he was hired as an information technology director at Hamilton Healthcare, where he worked for 12 years. “I have always had a passion for politics,” Bennett said. “I had different ideas for the city.” These ideas drove him to run for mayor in 2003 initially, where he lost the campaign. However, it did not frustrate him; he won in the 2007 campaign. Although his family does not like being in the public eye at all times, Bennett said, it comes with the office. “My wife likes the social aspect of it,” he said with a chuckle. “However, none of us like the ‘dirty politics.’ I won’t do negative campaigning; my philosophy is vote me in or vote me out.” Bennett says his leadership style was influenced by former mayor and Terre Haute North teacher Pete Chalos who piqued Bennett’s interest in politics. He chose to run for mayor because he likes being the “executive manager” and “serving people while making decisions.” Chalos believed government thrives when the private sector is strong, Bennett said, and involving smart business people in government is far more beneficial than supporting career politicians. Bennett believes his own experience in the private sector helped him establish a baseline in the financials of the city. “I love having direct control over where I can focus the necessary funds,” Bennett said, and it’s that idea that inspired him to run for mayor. Another piece of advice that he picked up was the idea to “chase that dream.”

“I’ve tried [chasing my dreams] and it’s something that I’ve always advised to others,” Bennett said. Bennett believes students can find rewards by involving themselves in politics, but he warns agains running for office for the wrong reasons. “Don’t do it to be somebody important; help other campaigns, be honest and ethical, sell yourself Bennett in a resumé and do things to build your resumé. You may be young but show your passion,” he said. “I have passion for this job and serving people; I also have to be progressive and find ways to improve and be more efficient. Finally, I have to be honest with people.” Staying above the “dirty politics” is a main priority, Bennett said, and he does this by being honest and ethical in his decisions. “I try to be positive all the time but I know I can’t please everyone,” he said. Bennett, now in his second term, was the first Republican in 70 years to be elected mayor of Terre Haute. The office of mayor is not term limited and Bennett’s views are that as long as he can continue being helpful, he will keep running. He is not looking at the next term yet because “I’ve got plenty of work until then,” he said.


www.indianastatesman.com

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 21

ICHE approves new higher ed funding formula The Indiana Commission for Higher Education’s new performance-based funding formula can potentially impact state funding at public universities. State universities had been receiving money from the Commission based on a funding formula that allocated 5 percent of the $1.2 billion higher education budget based on institutional performance. With the change this week, in 2013-14 the formula for the allocations increases to 6 percent and is scheduled to increase to 7 percent by 2014-15. Listed below are the revised indicators that will impact Indiana State University: Degree Completion Metrics: Overall Degree Completion – (Affects all institutions) - Calculates the change in degrees conferred over a three-year period rolling average - For resident students only - Applies to one-year certificates and associate degrees conferred at tw-year institutions - Applies to bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees conferred at four-year institutions At-Risk Student Degree Completion (Affects all institutions) - Calculates the change in degrees conferred over a three-year period rolling average - For resident students only - Only those students who were eligible for Pell money when they graduated from the institution - Applies to bachelor’s degrees conferred at four-year

institutions Progression Points: Student Persistence Incentive – (Affects all nonresearch campuses) - Calculates the change in headcount over a three-year period rolling average - Applies to all resident undergraduate students - Progress point accumulation requires the student to complete all credits at the same institution. Dual credit courses and transfer credits are not eligible for the incentive. - For four-year non-research campuses, number of students who successfully complete 30 and 60 credit hours Productivity Metrics: On-time Graduation Rates – (Affects all institutions) - Calculates the change in FTE over a three-year period rolling average - Applies only to resident, undergraduate, first time, full-time students - Measures the graduation rate for institutions based on type of campus - For four-year institutions, the graduation rate achieved in four years Institution Defined Productivity Metric - (Affects all institutions) - Each institution will provide one productivity metric linked to their strategic plan - Institutions will provide their recommended metric to the Indiana Commission for Higher Education in January 2012

- The Commission will review the proposed productivity metrics and discuss with the institutions in order to reach an agreement on individual metrics - Productivity metric should focus on reducing cost of attendance for students

ICHE Funding A l ocation - 5 percent ($61M) 2013 - 6 percent ($73M) 2014 - 7 percent ($85M) 2015

Looking to get involved at Indiana State? Apply to become a member of the Sycamore Ambassadors. The Sycamore Ambassadors are a group of students selected to foster connections between alumni and students by inspiring them to be involved in the life of Indiana State University. Sycamore Ambassadors are actively involved at the University and encourage school spirit and participation in campus life by serving as official hosts at ISU events.

Learn more at www.indstate.edu/alumni.

125th Anniversary Be inspired. Stay Connected. Get Involved. Did you know that by completing 12 course hours you are automatically a member of the ISU Alumni Association?

Learn more about your membership at www.indstate.edu/alumni.


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 22

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Kersey: Great things in store for Terre Haute

Jessica Neff

Staff editor

Before he was an Indiana State University student, Clyde Kersey never imagined he would pursue a career in politics. Now at age 75, Kersey has dedicated the last 16 years of his life representing Terre Haute and his alma mater in the Indiana State Legislature. “I started [college] in 1967; this was a period of a lot of protest, a lot of demonstrations, and so on,” he said. “There were a number of professors that kind of set the stage for my involvement in politics.” Those influencers include former ISU professors Don Layton and Bob Clouse. “There was an abundance of teachers when I graduated in 1971 … as I go around the state, and even when I go around the country, I am constantly running into teachers that graduated from ISU,” Kersey said. “I think ISU is one of the best universities in the country in terms of

teacher preparation.” The Hoosier native attended high school in Fontanet and served in the Air National Guard for seven years before enrolling at ISU where he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in social science education with the objective of becoming a teacher. Upon graduating, Kersey landed a job as an economics teacher at Terre Haute North Vigo High School and spent his entire 30-year teaching career there. It was also during that period that Kersey became involved with Terre Haute politics. At first, he began working on others’ local campaigns. Then he was encouraged to run for a seat in the city council. Working as a teacher gave him the opportunity to establish a base of students, teachers, administrators and political connections to support him in the race, he said. After two failed runs, he was elected to

county council in 1986, where he served for ten years. Eventually, he felt a higher calling and pursued the Indiana State House of Representatives District 43 office with the support of local unions, educators and senior citizens. For the last 16 years, Kersey has brought the interests of District 43, which includes downtown Terre Haute, ISU and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, to the Indiana State Legislature. Since his election, Kersey has also been a member of several important committees. “I have been very privileged to serve on Ways and Means, which is the financial committee of the Indiana legislature,” Kersey said. “We’re the ones who put the budget together every two years. It’s a long, drawn-out process and we bring in all the agencies. For example, all of the universities come in and present their budgets.”

isu grad/page 23

District 43 Indiana State House Representative Clyde Kersey has served in his office for the past 16 years. (Photo courtesy of ISU Communication and Marketing).


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 23

ISU grad/contInUed from page 22 Also a member of the labor and education committees, both of which are considered to be the most active in the Indiana House, Kersey said he prefers to be in the middle of things. “It’s really difficult to balance your schedule out to be at all those meetings, but I enjoy it,” he said. “That’s where everything’s happening and I want to be a part of it.” During his time in office, Kersey has pushed for the approval of various ISU renovation projects, including the new School of Education in University Hall, the new Scott College of Business, and his personal favorite, the Student Recreation Center. “Taking a project from the very beginning, when it’s just an idea, and following it all the way through to its completion: that’s the exciting part about being in the legislature,” he said of his involvement in the recent

renovations. Kersey will run against Republican opponent John Cunningham in the general election this November for his seat in the Indiana House of Representatives. He hopes to continue his role as a politician in order to address current legislation such as the new Right to Work law, recent Indiana education reform, and the cut in funding for the Senior Choice Program that has allowed senior citizens to remain home for three or four years before moving to a nursing home. He also hopes to continue improvements and renovations throughout ISU and Terre Haute. “If you like Terre Haute now, you’re really going to like Terre Haute in a few years,” Kersey said. “I think we’re going to continue to make tremendous progress.”

Kersey speaks to members of the Indiana Congress before the vote on Right to Work (submitted photo).


NOTE F ROM T HE ISU POLICE CHIEF Dear Students, On behalf of our Public Safety Department, I am happy to welcome you to Indiana State University. Whether you are a returning “veteran” student or just beginning your academic career here, I am sure you will find ISU to be an outstanding place to learn, study and live. As with any other University, however, it is a sad fact that crimes do occur on our campus. It is the mission of the Department of Public Safety to work with the University Community to minimize the number and severity of those crimes and provide a safe environment for us all to live, learn and work.

Bill Mercier Page 14

Our Department consists of 24 fully trained police officers who have police jurisdiction not only on campus but throughout the State of Indiana. We provide police service to the campus community 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with at least three officers on duty at any given time. We can be reached by calling 911 from any campus telephone, including the emergency “blue light” telephones located across campus or by calling (812) 237-5555 from any non-campus phone, including cell phones. The Department of Public Safety also works closely with the Office of Residential Life and many other University offices to provide programming and raise awareness on such issues as crime prevention, alcohol and other substance abuse, sexual assault prevention, relationship violence issues and many other topics. If you are interested in obtaining more information on these or other topics or would like us to provide a specific prevention program for your group, please contact our office. The Public Safety web site is also a great source for campus safety information. By going to www.indstate.edu/publicsafety and clicking on 2011 Annual Security and Fire Report you can obtain detailed information about University safety policies, Department safety services and recent crime and fire statistics. By clicking on Emergency Response Plan at our web site and scrolling to Section 700 of that plan you can find out about procedures to be followed in the event of incidents such as fires, chemical spills, active shooters, tornados and many other emergency situations. Bill Mercier Director of Public Safety

F

CHIE


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 25

Public Safety tips for school year walk alone on campus, especially at 1. Never night. let someone know where you are going 2. Always and when you will be back. lock the door to your residence hall room 3. Always and never let anyone into your residence hall that you do not know. Remember, your residence hall is your home. Treat it that way.

is the most common crime on this 4. Theft campus. Don’t leave items unattended anywhere.

you are 21 years of age and choose to consume 5. Ifalcohol, do so responsibly. Alcohol abuse can make you an easy victim of crime. If you are under 21, remember that use of alcohol is a violation of both State Law and University Regulations. These laws and regulations are enforced at ISU.

are prohibited on campus, even if you 6. Firearms have a permit. up to get emergency notificaions by clicking 7. Sign on “Get Rave” on the Public Safety website. It’s free and a great way to stay informed.


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 26

A common name used to describe the Human and Health Services Building located on Fifth Street across from the entrance of Jones and Hines Hall. It houses classrooms, ISU athletic offices, basketball and racquetball courts, swimming pool, saunas and two gyms used primarily for volleyball and some club activities.

A website developed by the university for students and faculty. Blackboard gives students access to important class information such as grades, assignments, list of courses organized by semester. Some professors require students to upload content via Blackboard or take quizzes and exams on the site. Blackboard is accessed by typing the keyword ‘blackboard’ in your web address box (once connected to ISU network) or at http://blackboard.indstate.edu A balance tied to the Sycamore ID card allowing students to make food purchases off campus at participating sites.

The HMSU restaurants, convenience store and copy center located in the Hulman Memorial Student Union building are “The Commons.” It is a place where students and faculty go to not only share food but meet and socialize.

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Lounges are adjacent to The Commons on the first floor of HMSU, and a wide variety of entertainment options include board games and televisions.

This refers to the Degree Audit Reporting System. It allows you to track degree progress by highlighting completed and incompleted requirements. Access to DARS can be done at anytime through the student tab of MYISUPortal. It is a useful tool especially when it comes for courses registration. Named after Ed and Mary Dede , the Dedes (pronounced Dee Dee) are three areas within the HMSU designed for the hosting of various events and activities.

A day of community service, once in the fall and in the spring, involving students and faculty. It was named after Fred Donaghy and was initiated in 1976.

This stands for Free Appliction for Federal Student Aid, a form required by the government for application to any federal education aid program. The Federal School code for Indiana State University is 001807.


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This refers to the building located at the corner of 7th and Cherry streets where the Scott College of Business now resides.

This refers to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, a federal law which gave students access to their education records, an opportunity to seek to have the records amended, and some control over the disclosure of information from the records. With several exceptions, schools must have a student’s consent prior to the disclosure of education records. This federal law also gave studnets 18 years old or older, or students of any age if enrolled in any post-secondary educational institution, the right of privacy regarding grades, enrollment, and even billing information, unless the school has specific permission from the student to share that specific type of information with the parent.

The student’s source for university information. A student can check e-mail, register for courses, look at account balances and even track on-campus employment history.

Indiana State University’s Student Recreation Center.

This refers to the Student Recreation Center site located on Ninth Street. Events such as Tandem and Trike Derby are held on the track at the site.

One week of activities in April that includes a tandem bicycle race.

The towers are the twin structures located on the east side of campus on Seventh Street. It was once the home of the Scott College of Business and the College of Education. The buildings were vacated and now await demolition.

LIncoln Quads, commonly referring to as the Quads, is a residence hall complex on the north end of campus. Don’t confuse this residence hall with the grassy quad located by the Condit House on the south side of campus.

Tilson Auditorium is located inside Tirey Hall, but the names are often interchanged. Located next to the grassy quad, Tilson Auditorium is the site for stage productions, guest lectures, concerts and Greek events. This refers to the four freshmen dorms between Fourth and Fifth streets. The towers are made up of Cromwell, Blumberg, Rhoads and Mills Hall.

University Hall is the home of the Bayh College of Education.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 27


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 28

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Buettner advises students on life at ISU JOSEPH PAUL

Reporter

Indiana State University honors student Renee Buettner has made the most of her time at ISU, studying nursing, involving herself in various organizations and approaching her third year as a peer advisor. Such involvement is commonplace for Buettner. While attending Althoff Catholic High School in Belleville, Ill., she participated in 13 extracurricular activities including the drama club, bands, choirs, French club and student ambassadors, all the while remaining within the top ten percent of her class. Choosing the right university for her study posed a difficult decision, Buettner said. After researching ISU and various other colleges in the area, she found herself being drawn to the Wabash Valley campus. “After a visit in the dead of winter with ten inches of snow on the ground, I realized that it was one of my top two favorites,” she said of ISU. “I knew if I liked it in the dead of winter, then there would not be any issue liking the atmosphere of the campus in the fall or spring.” The final decision came at the end of her senior year in high school when Buettner received the ISU President’s Scholarship. “I knew ISU would be my fit,” she said. During an honors meeting at her freshman orientation was when Buettner said she knew she wanted to become involved. Ever since, she has worked as a peer advisor guiding students just like herself through the honors process. “Ultimately, we are there as a source for whatever the incoming students need,” she said. “After doing this for two years, and getting ready for my third, there have been many friendships made between myself and my advisees as well as many questions answered.”

Buettner Buettner has taken advantage of many other opportunities at ISU. As president of the Presidential Scholars Association, she hosts meetings every month to plan events, such as the Fall Retreat at ISU’s Field Campus. She is also a member of the Honors Council and a class representative for the Student Nurses Association. While going to school and being involved, Buettner has picked up a few good ways to manage her time, including the use of a daily planner. “If I don’t write it down, it usually doesn’t happen,” she said. Buettner is excited to see what is yet to come. “It has definitely been an adventure,” she said. “I couldn’t be more excited to keep moving forward with new ideas and faces for the 2012-2013 school year.” Students interested in the honors program can become involved through orientation and once-a-month campus events, Buettner said. Some annual events include the Welcome Back event, which is during the first or second full week of class and is held at Wolf Field, where pizza and games are offered. Another event is the honors Halloween party, where students are encouraged to dress up.

BUETTNER/PAGE 30


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Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 30

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Buettner/continued from page 28 Buettner said she thinks very highly of the honors program and faculty, and encourages first-year students to try it out. “The faculty alone makes you feel like you are one of a kind and have a potential all of your own,” she said. Professor Greg “Bierly, the president of our honors program, knows most of the honors students by name and never makes you feel like you are a burden on his time, no matter the questions or conversations you may have.” Buettner advises students to “get to know your professors and the honors faculty,” she said. “They are a wonderful resource and extremely helpful in about any situation.” Buettner said she had the opportunity to form a solid career plan with the help of some professors and fellow students, including Bierly, Betsy Frank and the honors faculty. “Between talking with [Frank] and my other nursing mentors, I have a better idea of how I want to pursue my goal,” she said. “I feel that after this year I will walk out of ISU with my head held high in confidence in myself thanks to the people I have worked with at ISU.”

Buettner found time for an interview with the Statesman between 12-hour shifts at the St. Louis Children’s Hospital, where she is currently participating in a student externship on the oncology floor. She was paired with a nurse who now mentors her during every shift. “[The mentor] is there to essentially teach me how to be a nurse and get experience while I am still in school,” she said. Buettner plans to eventually become a nurse practitioner, specializing in pediatric oncology. “I love working with children,” she said. “Most of these kids are just thankful to be alive and living to their fullest, no matter how sick they are.” Upon graduating, she hopes to find a job working with patients in a hospital setting and waiting for a couple years before pursuing further education, she said. Her other plans include the possibility of an education at the doctorate level to become a professor, and even getting married and starting a family. “Right now, though,” said Buettner, “my Even with her busy schedule, Buettner still has time to relax around the fountain goal is to find a job out of graduation and work for a few years and see where life with friends (Photo submitted by Renee Buettner). takes me.”

Look your best. The Indiana Statesman Three Times a Week Monday-Wednesday-Friday


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 31

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Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 32

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SUCCESS F ROM DAY ONE r a d n e l a c s t n e A thlet ic ev 12-13 Pages a c y S : t r a p a s n Geneoraret sio then and now m Page 4 Immunipzraetpioanrsed: ? Are yogues 5-6 Pa


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 2

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NEW COUNTRY, NEW TEAM, NO PROBLEM Ernest Rol ins Special to the Statesman

I must have looked silly standing there on the sidewalk outside Indianapolis International Airport, watching my heavy breaths condense in the cold January air. “Sanka, what you smoking?” “I’m not smoking. It’s just my breath.” The above scene from the 1990s Disney movie ‘Cool Runnings’ popped in my head. I thought of myself as Sanka, a 6’1”, skinny Caribbean native who left the summer-like conditions of the tropics in search of the opportunity to compete in a sporting event in a strange country. It will be another few years and successes before I am approached by producers wanting to script my life for the big screen, I thought. But across the ocean I came to etch another chapter in my life’s novel, a chapter punctuated by two things; my status as a student-athlete and as an international student at Indiana State University. Being an international student is not easy, even for someone like me whose native language is English. One of the greatest anxieties for new international students is wondering whether we’ll be understood and accepted. For me, a large part of reaching that goal was being able to communicate effectively. My communication abilities were poor in my first few months at ISU. I was repeatedly asked if I spoke English. In Barbados (where I am from) we have a strong dialect filled with local slang and a quick rate of speech. At times the difficulties I had in expressing myself were very frustrating, but looking back now I can’t help but laugh. One time I tried to tell a professor I was leaving for Rose-Hulman on Friday for a meet but my professor thought I said I needed a map to Rose-Hulman and the kind professor proceeded to draw me a detailed map with directions to the school. In time I overcame this hurdle by slowing my speech and concentrating on enunciating my words. By working on my communication skills I was able to build relationships with new people. At times I’ve noticed international students sticking together, skeptical to mingle with people of a different culture. That is fine, but don’t rule out trying to interact with the locals. On the other hand, “locals” need to have patience. If the positions were reversed they would want the same courtesy. By breaking these communication barriers you’ll open more opportunities to share cultures while learning and growing together. I was recruited for the triple jump and the long jump on the men’s track and field team. One lesson I learned was that the life of a successful, Division I student-athlete can only be achieved through hard work. It has probably been said in every coach’s pep talk and cliché sports movie but it’s the truth. It is not easy being a studentathlete. You are not entitled to anything, and a lot is expected of you. Approach this life in a half-assed manner and you will be ripped to shreds whether it be by the opponent or the NCAA. The life of a typical student-athlete is filled with varying levels of the following: morning classes, evening workouts, homework and study sessions, balancing diets, supplemental training, pre-game preparations, game times, post-game cool downs, long bus trips, make-up work, tests rescheduling, training room visits, work scheduling, sacrifices of leisure and vacation time, victories, losses, tears, cheers, breakdowns, injuries and rest. The surface has only been scratched about how hectic your life can become. However, I stand as living proof that if you work hard, stay organized and keep an open mind, life as student athlete and an international student can be full of rewards.


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Welcome to your freshmen year at Indiana State

ISU Alumni and current students reflect on their first year at the university THOMAS BEELER

Reporter With each incoming freshmen class at Indiana State University there are always differences between the old and new generations, whether it be clothing style, music selection or even the contents of one’s backpack. Within the last year we have seen more technology work its way into classrooms and lecture halls that require a computer as part of the course. For example, the iPad has recently been replacing supplies of the past, such as noteboks and calculators. ISU aviation management 2011 alumni, Ethan Malavolti, took a look back to his freshmen year and reviewed the differences. “My freshmen year, I would throw on my running clothes because I was a student athlete, but jeans and a t-shirt was the norm back then,” Angela Martin, head coach of the women’s track and field team and ISU alumni, said. Malavolti said there is a difference in his appearance between now and his freshman year. He said he used to dress in more comfortable clothes and more professionally rather than trying to show off. Nichole Walker, English major and current student at ISU, agrees with Malavolti and would rather dress more comfortably by wearing her pajamas to class. Scenes from Fall Welcome 2009 (Photo courtesy of ISU Communications and Marketing).

Questions about Financial Aid? Visit the Office of Student Financial Aid’s updated website for:

Detailed Policies Deadlines FAQ And much more Check out http://www.indstate.edu/finaid Today!

Also her backpack usually contains her notebook laptop. Malavoti said that in the past she carried notebooks, laptops, class books, pens, pencils, calculator, and planner. Martin began at ISU in 1997 and graduated in 2002. She said that her backpack contained nothing more than a notebook and pencil, compared to now where she sees her athletes carrying a laptop and iPad. She said headphones were uncommon when she would go from class to class, but some students would have tape recorders to record professors. Also, E-mail was a new technology in 1997, compared to the use of iPads and iPods being common in this generation.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 5


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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4 “Freshmen year was fun just for the fact of hanging out with people from my floor, everything centralized,” Malvolti said. “Just being around people was nice and it was easy to study too because people that were in my class were close.” “Professors, RA’s and APA’s did give me advice freshmen year,” he said. “They told me what routes to take, what classes to take for what I wanted to do. Sometimes it was good advice and sometimes I thought I should have taken another route.” Walker mentions her study habits have changed within the past three years, She said she studies hard and spends more time in the books. Move-in weekend has changed according to Martin. Her freshmen year, students would grab their keys to the dorm rooms and move stuff in. Now there is more help for students carrying their items up to their rooms while other people are outside helping to direct the flow of traffic as students and parents move in. Also, now there are three days to move in rather than just Saturday and Sunday. ISU’s campus has changed as well. Martin spoke of “The Wall” in front of Mills Hall where students would go hangout between

and after classes. It has been torn down now. Students would also hang out in front of their dorms, sitting outside and greeting people. The fountain dance, when the fountain is shutoff for the night and a dance is held, is still a running tradition for all students to attend and have fun. Current students and earlier generations have many differences but many traditions remain the same.

“Freshman year was fun just for the fact of hanging out with people from my floor, everything centralized.” Ethan Malvolti, ISU Alumnus

From the ISU Board of Trustees

ISU students walk through the arch as part of their fall welcome in 2006 (Photo courtesy of ISU Communication and Marketing).


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Health center continues to be resource for students Thomas Beeler

Reporter

The Union Associated Physician (UAP) clinic ISU health center continues to provide ISU students with different medical services. The ISU Health Center is staffed by physicians, nurse practitioners, laboratory and x-ray techs, nurses and support staff. If the healthcare needs of the student cannot be met by the the student can be referred to the main UAP Clinic. One service provided by the center is immunizations. According to the UAP Clinic – ISU Health Center website all students are required to have Measles, Mumps, Rubelle and Tetanus/Diphtheria before attending ISU or any university in the state of Indiana. It is required under Indiana law students will not be allowed to register for a second semester until all immunization requirements are met. “Students are given these immunization shots from diseases that were once widespread,” Bridget Gaddis, a RN in the UAP Clinic said. “The immunization stems them and stopped the spread.” In the case of serious emergencies the center prefer students to call 9-1-1, however, it is not uncommon for the center to field calls about major trauma, unconsciousness, lacerations, seizure disorders and rape. Gaddis added that in events such as those students are required to report them to the center to have on file. In addition, the center provides different types of reasons including health assessments, STD screenings; X-rays of bone and soft tissue injuries, student can pick up packaged medication

and receive educational material to learn about different illness and how to prevent them. Gaddis said health insurance is not a requirement to receive treatment. Students have the option of sel-pay. Any ISU student taking one or more credit hours and present a valid ISU identification card to the center is eligible to receive services. Student can receive men’s and women’s health services if needed. There is a $20 fee for new patients, $15 for established patients and for preventative visits new and established patients is $25. These fees can be paid up front or charged to the student’s account. Gaddis said students should practice good health habits to avoid illnesses on campus. Each year there is an increasing rate of student illness during the cold and flu seasons. Gaddis adde that good health habits includes eating well, regular exercise, drink and rest adequately, managing stress, maintaining good regular hygiene and cough hygiene and frequent hand washing. Prevention is not guaranreed by can curb the contraction and spread of illnesses. For more wellness information, students can contact thecenter at (812)237-3883. For emergencies the number An ISU student is assisted at the ISU Health Center (Photo courtesy is (812)273-5555 Monday – Thursday 8am – 4:30pm and of Communication and Marketing). Friday 8am – 1pm.


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Cheers, screams, chants and whistles filled the air as the active members anxiously awaited to find out which sororities the potential new members would be running to. The excitement was evident for the potential new members as well. We were all giddy with eagerness to run to our new “families” for the next four years. I had been so worried that I would not be accepted into the sorority that I wanted, but when I opened my Bid Day card I was relieved and overjoyed to find Alpha Phi typed inside. Now the waiting was beginning to become unbearable. My recruitment group was toward the middle of the line so we listened while other girls before us reacted to being united with their sisters. Finally, our time had come; we held each other’s hands and waited to be released. “Ready girls…” we were about to be released “One, two, three!” We threw our hands away and bolted to our newfound sisterhoods. I was greeted with jumping, tears and hugs by my new sisters. It was an experience that I will never have again, to be welcomed into a group of people and automatically loved and adored, even before becoming properly acquainted. My college experiences have been enriched by my involvement in Alpha Phi both personally and professionally. One of my sisters suggested I get involved with the Indiana Statesman and it inspired me to try a different education path, and I have appreciated every minute of my decision. Through my work at the Indiana Statesman I have opened up the rest of the Indiana State University community to Greek events. I have written articles about programs, philanthropic events and community service projects that the organizations have hosted or been a part of. My goal is to inform people not involved with Greek life about the different aspects of a sorority or fraternity. Outside of my professional endeavors involving my Greek experience, I have also grown personally. I have become more confident in myself and am willing to stand up for what I believe is right or true. My relationships within Alpha Phi have strengthened and I continue to develop connections every day. I have two little sisters right now and want to have another one at some point. Currently my “littles” are two of the most important people in my life. I adore them and would do anything I could for them. I have certainly developed a strong connection with each of them separately as well as together. I find that it is important to have things that you do with one little sister that are separate from what you do with another, much like the relationships between parents and children should be, but I also do things with them together. I look forward to the future of my involvement in Alpha Phi and the greater Greek community, and have found that my college experience has been far more improved than I could have ever imagined; I have my sisters to thank for the excellent happenings that I have been a part of and I hope that they keep getting better.


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Brief Maria Falzone scheduled to perform “Sex Rules!” Aug. 28 Maria Falzone will be performing her two-hour “Sex Rules!” comedy Aug. 28 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Hulman Center. According to Falzone’s website, she is highly sought after at the college level to perform her comedy skit that promotes and educates students on safe sex. She uses real-life experience and stories from her life that led her into contracting herpes from a friend. After she tested positive, she was forced to honestly look at her attitudes about sex. Using her stories in a funny and

straightforward manner, she aims to actively connect her audience into her message of explaining the rules to greater and safer sex. She actively involves her audience in various skits throughout the show. She also mentions the experiences of the struggle society presents with being gay, transgender or bisexual. Some of Falzone’s keystone moments include placing third in the San Francisco Comedy Competition, being on comedy shows including “Evening at Improve,” “Full Frontal” and “Friday Night.” For more information, visit http:// www.sexrules.org/bio.php.


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Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 14

FALL 2012 SPORTS SCHEDULE

VOLLEYBALL AUG 24

BUTLER

5:30 PM

AUG 25

DEPAUL

3:00 PM

AUG 25

EASTERN ILLINOIS

5:30 PM

AUG 28

IUPUI

7:00 PM

SEPT 01

LOYOLA

1:00 PM

SEPT 01

SIU EDWARDSVILLE

7:00 PM

SEPT 02

WESTERN ILLINOIS

2:00 PM

SEPT 07

MIAMI

7:00 PM

SEPT 08

TEMPLE

1:00 PM

SEPT 08

CHICAGO STATE

5:00 PM

SEPT 14

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS

8:00 PM

SEPT 15

EVANSVILLE

6:00 PM

SEPT 21

BRADLEY

7:00 PM

SEPT 22

NORTHERN IOWA

7:00 PM

SEPT 28

ILLINOIS STATE

7:00 PM

OCT 05

MISSOURI STATE

8:00 PM

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 13

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SOCCER AUG 24

BUTLER

7:00 PM

AUG 26

IPFW

1:00 PM

AUG 31

EASTERN ILLINOIS

7:00 PM

SEPT 02

MURRAY STATE

1:00 PM

SEPT 07

MONTANA

7:30 PM

SEPT 09

SACRAMENTO STATE

1:30 PM

SEPT 12

INDIANA

7:30 PM

IUPUI

7:00 PM

FOOTBALL

OCT 06

WICHITA STATE

8:00 PM

SEPT 14

OCT 12

DRAKE

7:00 PM

SEPT 16

MIAMI

1:00 PM

SEPT 01

INDIANA

8:00 PM

OCT 13

CREIGHTON

7:00 PM

SEPT 21

NORTHERN IOWA

7:00 PM

SEPT 08

QUINCY

2:05 PM

OCT 19

NORTHERN IOWA

8:00 PM

SEPT 23

LOYOLA

1:00 PM

SEPT 15

DRAKE

2:05 PM

OCT 20

BRADLEY

8:00 PM

SEPT 30

GREEN BAY

1:00 PM

SEPT 22

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE

2:05 PM

OCT 26

ILLINOIS STATE

8:00 PM

OCT 05

CREIGHTON

7:00 PM

SEPT 29

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS

7:00 PM

NOV 02

WICHITA STATE

7:00 PM

OCT 14

ILLINOIS STATE

2:00 PM

OCT 06

MISSOURI STATE

3:05 PM

NOV 03

MISSOURI STATE

7:00 PM

OCT 17

EVANSVILLE

5:00 PM

OCT 13

NORTH DAKOTA STATE

4:00 PM

NOV 09

CREIGHTON

8:00 PM

OCT 21

DRAKE

1:00 PM

OCT 20

WESTERN ILLINOIS

7:00 PM

NOV 10

DRAKE

8:00 PM

OCT 25

MISSOURI STATE

8:00 PM

OCT 27

SOUTH DAKOTA

2:05 PM

NOV 16

EVANSVILLE

7:00 PM

OCT 28

TBA

TBA

NOV 03

ILLINOIS STATE

2:05 PM

NOV 17

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS

7:00

NOV 04

TBA

TBA

NOV 17

YOUNGSTOWN STATE

2:00 PM

CROSS COUNTRY SEPT 07

BRADLEY INVITATIONAL

6:30 PM

SEPT 14

INDIANA INTERCOLLEGIATES

3:30 PM

SEPT 28

NOTRE DAME INVITATIONAL

2:30 PM

OCT 13

PRE-NATIONAL INVITATIONAL

12:00 PM

OCT 27

MVC CHAMPIONSHIPS

12:00 PM

NOV 02

HOOSIER INVITATIONAL

NOV 09

NCAA GREAT LAKES REGIONAL

12:00 PM

NOV 17

NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS

12:00 PM

3:30 PM


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 14

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Program gives student head-start on fall studies ErnEst rollins

Special to the Indiana Statesman

As students file into class this fall for their biochemistry course, Indiana State junior chemistry major Seth Lutjemeyer will have a head start after completing the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience. Instead of spending summer away from campus, Lutjemeyer reported to the biochemistry laboratory on campus performing studies on mushroom tyrosinase. Tyrosinase is an enzyme found in fruits and vegetables and causes the browning of the foods. Lutjemeyer sought to get a better understanding of how the enzyme functions. As a byproduct of his examinations of the enzyme, Lutjemeyer has spent hours learning invaluable lab techniques specific to biochemistry and feels more prepared for his upcoming bio-chemistry course. The SURE program is sponsored by the university and offers students the opportunity to participate in summer research. This summer, the program included 30 ISU students working with faculty members in a variety of research across the natural sciences. “At the beginning, it was a whole new experience,” Lutjemeyer said. “I was skeptical at first but I learned so much now that it’s over and hope to do it again.” Lutjemeyer said the experience built upon knowledge acquired in the classroom. He was interested in taking

part in the program because he wanted to do more hands-on work in chemistry. The SURE program provided just that. Despite having a career plan to attend dental school upon graduation, Lutjemeyer said he has taken a liking to doing research because of the program. “It can be my back-up plan,” Lutjemeyer said. Advised by William Flurkey, ISU chemistry and physics professor, Lutjemeyer conducted three studies on the mushroom tyrosinase during the 10-week program. “This enzyme is involved in browning reactions in fruits and vegetables, so preventing this enzyme from working will theoretically improve food appearance and food quality,” Flurkey said. Flurkey said researchers hoped to understand more about the enzyme, but real-world applications of the research are still in the distant future. The first study was to protect the latent form of the mushroom tyrosinase by adding protease inhibitors. “We are trying to determine if there is a way to preserve the latent form,” Flurkey said. “If we can do that, we can do studies on the dormant form.” The second study looked at activating the enzyme by

using a detergent and then removing that detergent to see if it is possible to return it back to its latent form. “It’s been proposed that once you activate it, it stays active but we are seeing if it is reversible,” Lutjemeyer said. He said they were able to convert some back to latent but less than expected. The third study focused on the separation of active and latent forms of tyrosinase using chromatography methods. “Usually biochemists like to study different forms of enzymes,” Flurkey said. “So it would be nice to be able to separate them so you can study them individually.”

“At the beginning it was a whole new experience. I was skeptical at first but I learned so much now that it’s over and hope to do it again.” Seth Lutjemeyer, junior chemistry major


www.indianastatesman.com

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 15

Professor uses gaming technology to conduct course AUSTIN ARCEO

ISU Communications and Marketing

When representatives from the technology company Apple visited Megan Farnsworth’s school in June, the Indiana State University graduate student was excited when she realized she knew what they were teaching. Just weeks earlier, Farnsworth likely would’ve been meandering the digital wilderness trying to navigate a non-PowerPoint computer program. Farnsworth, who is enrolled in the instructional technology and library media master’s program at Indiana State, learned about a variety of computer programs and technology in a course taught by Yadi Ziaeehezarjeribi, a faculty member in the department of curriculum, instruction and media technology. Before she enrolled in classes at ISU, Farnsworth was unaware of many different programs she could use as a school librarian for grades ranging from kindergarten through 12th grade. After the class taught by Ziaeehezarjeribi, her familiarity with technology, which includes the Internet digital world Second Life, left several of her colleagues “ready to fall over.” “They were just surprised that I knew some of the things they were discovering,” Farnsworth said of the training session. “They think I could help them with some of the technology in the classroom this fall.” While Ziaeehezarjeribi uses a wide variety of technologies in his coursework, his interest in the

evolving digital instruction field extends beyond that. In his research, he focuses on how video games help students develop, and the lessons that gaming enthusiasts can learn. “Video gaming has this storyline, and it has sets of levels that creates competition and also allows students

“All gaming may not be suited for educational purposes but what we find is that games can teach certain activities, allows students to interact ... and propel students toward inquiriy and discovery through appropriate level of challenges.” Yadi Ziaeehezarjeribi, instructor, department of curriculum, instruction and media technology to become more socially oriented and have dialogue and discussion among themselves,” he said. “We are trying to build a bridge between what video games teach us

and how a student can apply them to their teaching and learning environment.” He has approached gaming technology in several ways. He co-wrote a book chapter in 2010 that analyzed the advantages and challenges of incorporating commercial off the shelf video games into classroom curriculum. He cited the example of using the game Sonic the Hedgehog to help teach students to write, as they studied the game’s storyline and consequences that occur through the game. “All gaming may not be suited for educational purposes,” Ziaeehezarjeribi said, “but what we find is that games can teach certain activities, allow students to interact, and become full participants in their environment, and propel students toward inquiry and discovery through appropriate level of challenges.” He also has introduced students to Second Life, a three-dimensional virtual world on the Internet where people create avatars and interact in a variety of ways. People can even engage in commercial enterprises in Second Life.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 16

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Continued From Page 15 Ziaeehezarjeribi has used Second Life in his summer courses. He schedules a time and a particular location in Second Life for students to meet and discuss class projects and share their innovative ideas with other students. Once there, students can see their classmates’ avatars and either talk to each other or communicate via instant messaging. “Rural areas may not have access to high-quality interactive media of learning facilities within their community,” Ziaeehezarjeribi said. “Second Life is a great way to invite a diverse group of learners who don’t normally have access to classrooms or have difficulty traveling, and I think it becomes a 21st century learning environment.” He said people with disabilities can use technology and sites such as Second Life, simulations, tablet computers, mobile technology, and nano technology to interact with others. These technologies provide teachers with creative tools for enhancing student-centered learning for both online and in the classroom. Such platforms are becoming more accepted by educators and students, as gaming becomes more common, he said. “We have to also change our way of teaching our students so they can

become well-skilled individuals who can then transfer their knowledge and skills to their new learning environments or future job market,” he added. “The whole idea is we want to expose our students to as many of elements of the new literacies” as we can. He has continued to do research on the ways in which gaming can provide benefits. When players make mistakes while playing video games, they often just start over, without criticism they may receive in a more public setting, Ziaeehezarjeribi noted. This fall at the International Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) conference in Louisville, Ky., he will present two emerging theoretical pieces a co-developed: a teaching model called the CAIR model, and Video Games as Social Tools for Teaching and Learning, which “allows students to go one step at a time by ‘leveling up’ instead of overwhelming students with sets of actions that they cannot accomplish.” “What we are trying to do is make sure our students are prepared and build their confidence using collaborative skills, and that they are able to transfer their knowledge and skills to their future endeavor in a global economy,” he said.

Yadi Ziaeehezarjeribi conducts classes from his computer in the virtual world of Second Life (Photo courtesy of ISU Communications and Marketing).


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 17

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Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 18

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WEEK OF WELCOME CALENDAR WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22 ISU Information Booth Mission Improvable

Dede Plaza Tilson Auditorium

7:30 AM - 1:00 PM 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM

THURSDAY, AUGUST 23 Commuter Pit Stop Bingo

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11:00 AM - 2:00 PM I 7:00 PM -00 10: M P

FRIDAY, AUGUST 24 Rec estF First Late Night Dance Faculty Exhibition Reception

Recreation enter C HMSU, Dede II & III University Art Gallery

6:00 M P -00 11: M P 10:00 PM - 2:00 AM 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

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1:00 PM - 12:00 AM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 25 Block Party


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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 19

Professional versus social Greek organizations Jessica Neff

Staff editor

Social fraternities and sororities tend to have more media around them to demonstrate the lifestyles of the Greek community. However, what many students do not realize is that the Greek letters do not always represent the highly publicized social communities; they also are used for the professional fraternities and sororities. Professional Greek organizations are usually based around students with a common major or a shared interest that can be turned into a career path. “Social and professional Greek organizations are all registered student organizations,” associate dean of student engagement and leadership development,” associate dean of student engagement and leadership development, Brooks Moore said. “Social fraternities provide comprehensive learning and experiences whereas professional fraternities have an intentional emphasis on a major or endeavor.” Professional fraternities provide opportunites for students to grow in their chosen field of study, he said. “Male and female members of professional fraternities are usually able to be involved together in the same organization.”

However, there are some exceptions. For example, Sigma Alpha Iota is a music-based group and all members must be female. “Just like there is a difference between all of the social fraternities and sororities, there is a difference to all professional fraternities,” president of Indiana State University’s chapter of Alpha Eta Rho, Jami Higdon, said. “Our chapter [Iota Rho] of Alpha Eta Rho is unique even among our brother chapters of Alpha Eta Rho Nationals.” At the Iota Rho Chapter, we like to be active in the community and also give our members a fun place to hang out with other people that have a love of aviation; we conduct community service projects and have many social events every semester, she said “We are not limited to aviation majors or even just pilots. We enjoy having members from all backgrounds that share our enthusiasm for aviation.” Students can be members of both social and professional Greek organizations, student activities assistant director, Tracy Machtan said. “We have many members that are in both social and professional fraternities.

Social Greek members watch spring 2012 Tandem Race (Photo courtesy of ISU Communication and Marketing).

professional/page 20


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professional/continued from page 19 I am only in a professional fraternity and not a social one because I believe the networking and exposure to my career field is better for me in the future,” Higdon said. “There are many high ranking people in the professional world that were members of different social fraternities. Those contacts can help greatly after graduation.” Social fraternities and sororities are umbrella organizations and each has to “answer” or “report” to a higher organization, Moore said. For example, social fraternities are responsible to communicate with the Interfraternity Council and sororities are a part of the larger Panhellenic Association. “I believe the biggest difference [between social and professional Greek organizations] is maybe the publicity. Professional fraternities are not as widely known as the social fraternities,” Higdon said. “People believe that only members of a certain industry can join a professional fraternity, or that maybe they only concentrate on professionalism.” Both types of Greek organizations go through a “recruitment period” in which they try to entice other students to join their community. Then once the recruitment time is over, new members go through classes that teach them about the organization, the rules, regulations, rituals, etc. “Once the pledges have satisfactorily completed the pledge process they are voted in as active members of Iota Rho and Alpha Eta Rho Nationals,” Higdon

said. This process is similar in all Greek organizations but the new members have different names and the classes differ with each program. “I think both types of fraternities are necessary for our students to have a choice. Both social fraternities and sororities and professional fraternities serve their set purpose,” Higdon said. “But, in a professional fraternity we can concentrate on guiding our members and helping them in aviation now while our students are still in school.” This past weekend Higdon took a trip with many other Alpha Eta Rho chapters to New members of the Alpha Lambda Delta professional fraternity wait to FedEx's world hub in Memphis, be initiated into the chapter (Photo courtesy of ISU Communication and Tennessee. Marketing). “We were able to tour the whole facility and meet many All organizations provide students with high ranking employees there, some who were even opportunities of being involved on campus, Alpha Eta Rho members in school,” she said. Moore said. “There are over 210 registered student For students to join Alpha Eta Rho, they would organizations at ISU; someone will find something need to come to the meetings on Thursday nights at on campus that will interest [him/her].” 7:00 p.m. in the John T. Meyers Technology Center, room 105.

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Wednesday, August 22, 2012 • Page 21

Sports, fraternities and sororities helps development

Team PIKE/ZETA tandem team competing in the Spring week 2012 tandem race (Photo courtesy of ISU Communications and Marketing).

our mo y s a r la u g e r As

Austin Arceo ISU Communicaton and Marketing When Indiana State University researchers Will Barratt and Mark Frederick embarked on deciphering how college students are learning, what they found left them astonished. Collegiate athletes and students in fraternities and sororities developed the most during their university years - especially when compared to most of their peers. “This is serendipitous data,” Barratt said. “We did not go looking for athletes or those in the Greek system.” Barratt and Frederick surveyed thousands of college students across the country from 2005 to 2010 to determine student growth and development during their four years in college. The University Learning Outcomes Assessment, also known as the UniLOA, measures self-reporting on areas employers, professors and others deem critical, including critical thinking, self-awareness, communication and diversity, among others. Barratt and Frederick were able to quantify that college students in a structured, highly engaged environment achieve higher rates of self-reported holistic development than students not involved in such activities. Those uninvolved students develop at a rate much similar to their peers not taking college courses. “We weren’t surprised that learning and development occurred in these students, but rather, with the degree of learning and development that occurred,” Frederick said. “Research in higher education has consistently supported the argument that engagement and involvement promotes growth, so to that end, our results support the earlier findings. But with our work, we can

r n in g

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now quantify the growth that occurs from that engagement and involvement and our surprise centers on the degree of growth.” Barratt and Frederick have already worked with several universities and other organizations, including fraternities and sororities, to provide guidance for student programming based on the results. Yet they caution that it is not meant to serve a universal, catch-all approach. “I think campuses need to understand their students’ growth, and the experiences that lead or don’t lead to student growth,” Barratt said. “This pattern may be different on a Division-I and a Division-III campus. Every campus needs its own data.” This summer, Barratt and Frederick also unveiled a new plan they call a “metatheodel,” or a combination of student developmental models and theories, that they combined with the results of the UniLOA survey to create a plan to help students develop in college. The basis of the model starts with the understanding that, as a result of standardized primary and secondary schooling, first-year college students arrive on campuses “far from a state where refined skills of self-management and independence should be assumed,” they wrote in an overview of the model.

Continued on page 22


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 22

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Continued from page 21 “What a beautiful model we have that exists in higher education because it would support meeting all those unique needs on the part of students within the structure that already exists,” Frederick said. Students partner with a “significant other,” or a mentor to help in their development as they evolve from a dependent state where the mentor works closely with the student, to an independent state before finally reaching the “state of interdependence” where they can take on leadership positions and maintain a state of independence while also working with others. “It doesn’t appear to be a really sophisticated approach,” Frederick said. “However, it hits on all the points that we’ve been talking about in what we’ve learned over the last six years.” The significant other’s role would be similar to a mentoring position in certain organizations or extracurricular activities, such as an athletic coach or a team captain. While students receive an education through their classes and other coursework, Barratt and Frederick hope that the new plan provides additional lessons for students to develop additional skills highly sought by employers, they said. “A highly educated citizenry is more than just people who have skills in one targeted area, and higher education has bought into that notion for decades...,” Frederick added. “At the same time, they’re getting this other insistence to get students out in four years because that cuts their cost. We have to find a way to combine the two.”

They have already met with several state and national education officials in Indianapolis and Washington, D.C. They are still getting the message out, as no university or organization has implemented the newly designed metatheodel. The results have already turned heads, not the least of which are the UniLOA creators themselves. “I have not been a fan of collegiate athletics nor a fan of fraternities and sororities,” Barratt said. “The data has made me change my mind. I’m now a believer.”

“I have not been a fan of collegiate athletics nor a fan of fraternities and sororities. The data has made me change my mind. I’m now a believer.” William Barratt, professor, department of educational Leadership William Barrat, professor of the department of Educational Leadership (Photo courtesy of ISU Communications and Marketing).


Wednesday August 22, 2012 • Page 24

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ISU Survival Guide - August 22, 2012