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HEADS UP! June, 2011

E Coaching Magazine


Contents

 Meet Steve Franklin-New Director of Education for Indiana Soccer  Final Shot-Vince Ganzberg-Director of Education for Indiana Soccer  “When You Whisper”  Indiana National Youth License  Sample Camp Curriculum for youth players  TOPSoccer Symposium  FIFA Women’s World Cup 2011 TV schedule  Indiana Soccer Coaching Opportunities  Congrats to both Lauren Cheney and Lori Lindsey


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Greetings to you, the members of Indiana Soccer. My name is Steve Franklin, and I am the new Director of Education (in waiting) that has the task of taking over from Vince Ganzberg. Now I realize what might have been going through the minds of Mike Freitag, Bill Guthridge, and Jimmy Dykes years ago. These three replaced the legendary coaches Jerry Yeagley (Indiana University Soccer), Dean Smith (UNC Basketball) and Connie Mack (Philadelphia Athletics – MLB). It is not an easy position to be in, but a challenge I look forward to. Most of you may know me from the sidelines at IUPUI where I have served as the Head Men’s Soccer Coach for the past 16 years. During my tenure I had the fortunate task to build a program not once, not twice, but three times as we moved from the NAIA level to the NCAA D-II ranks (1995-97) and the from the D-II ranks into the NCAA D-I arena (1998-present) on the men’s side, while starting our women’s program from scratch in December of 1997. Prior to my arrival in Indianapolis, I had the fortunate pleasure of working under Jerry Yeagley from 1993-95. I learned a number of valuable lessons along the way, none more important than the need to give back to the game—a “pay it forward” if you may. My teams led the universities efforts in community service projects – building homes for Habitat for Humanity; packing food at the Gleaners Food Bank; volunteering at Riley’s Children’s Hospital to name a few. I also had the pleasure of working with Vince Ganzberg in the Community Stars program and in the Urban Soccer Development Program. That’s when the fire began to burn to find another challenge in this sport. I cannot begin to start my legacy with Indiana Soccer without paying tribute once again to the vision, the ideas, countless hours on the road and commitment that Vince has put towards his own legacy here in Indiana. Because of this, Indiana Soccer is the benchmark for other US Youth Soccer State Associations. He has been an innovator, a leader and finally the authority as to how to educate our youth in soccer. I personally believe we at Indiana Soccer should strive to develop players at all levels of play be it the recreational, the travel or premier player. We should be focusing not only on building and improving their technical skills, but also on their confidence and athleticism. In addition, we should also adhere to a “catching them doing good” theory, thus building their self-esteem and sense of teamwork. I believe one of my primary focuses should be a committed effort to developing coaches to the highest level through a quality instructional program. We need to not only educate new younger coaches, but also find ways to inspire our veteran coaches to have a thirst to learn more. The game is always evolving and while we aren’t trying to re-invent the wheel, we are trying to find new and improved methods to “paint a picture” in the minds of our youth to insure those “a-ha!” moments. It will also be my mission to try to aggressively expand soccer opportunities to areas that are traditionally underserved – principally the inner city and the more remote rural areas. Indiana has a number of small towns where kids are throwing down t-shirts to mark out goals in the back yard or park, and then playing small sided soccer games on their own. We don’t want to suffocate the


creativity or passion, but simply educate those around them who will coach them – hopefully developing them to become the next Landon Donavon or Abby Wambach. Finally, I ask you to try and accomplish three things in the coming months: 1) support the US Women in their effort to win a third World Cup in Germany and the US Men in the Gold Cup by watching their efforts and increasing our television viewership; 2) purchase a copy of Coleen Hacker’s “Catch Them Being Good” (less than $10 on Amazon) and explore all that is right in coaching soccer players of all ages, and 3) take a kid to a live professional match. Give them something to dream about. Without the dream, the desire to develop will never bloom. I’d like to thank Executive Director Dave Guthrie, Vince Ganzberg and the entire selection committee (Don Rawson, Steve McCullough and Allen Bodenstein) for appointing me as the new Director of Education. I look forward to working with you, my fellow coaching peers, in serving the members of Indiana Soccer.


Final Shot Vince Ganzberg Indiana Soccer Director of Education To start, I would like to personally thank all of you that made my nine plus years here an enjoyable experience. I can’t thank the board of Indiana Soccer (formerly Indiana Youth Soccer) for giving me the opportunity to lead coaches, players, parents, and volunteers. I will single out Don Rawson, Dan Kapsalis, and Dave Guthrie who figured out a way to bring me home while going through a tough time in my personal life. Your decision to bring back home to Indiana healed me in many ways. Your loyalty and friendship will always be treasured. I would also like to thank Sarah Cantwell, who is a hall of famer in my book, for being the face and voice of this state association. Your dedication to not only Indiana Soccer and to children is often unseen by many but not those who truly know what goes on inside the building on Herbert Lord Road. I would also like to thank Angel, who is the director of competition for putting up with me and all of my ideas. To the coaching education staff, Olympic development staff, community soccer committee and coaching committee members, kudos for all you do! I would also like to thank my fellow colleagues within US Youth Soccer for their support, humor (Mully and BIG C), and friendship. While I have been complimented by many, it is I who give homage and thanks to all of the players, coaches, parents, and volunteers who make youth soccer in Indiana a reality. My final article will be my final shot to imprint some ideas with regard to player development and continued growth to the game for our great state. While I am sure that some of my comments will end up on a blog, where people hide behind fictitious but rather humorous names, I will offer some ideas for the future of Indiana Soccer. Idea #1 Double age groups for league play There is a saying “If you always do what you did, you will always get what you got, and always feel how you felt”. For years players have been grouped by single age groups. This happens for a lot of reasons but mainly because of this has been the norm for the past 10 plus years. It also occurs because of egos of parents and coaches. The other reason is because how State Cups are offered only for single age groups. There was a time, when youth soccer was in its infant stages that players were in double age groups to make teams. This had to be done mainly due to the numbers of children playing soccer. Because of this I feel we developed quicker. I believe the time has come again to have clubs structure their players in double, maybe even triple age groups for the purposes of player development. This is the way it is done on the “streets” isn’t it? When a pickup game is organized, players may be grouped somewhat by age and size but if there is an exceptional young player then let them play with the older kids. Novice players then they figure out how to get better. Imagine if you as a club director of coaching could have a pool of players between the ages of 9-11/12, 11/12-14, and 15 and up as opposed to having to place them on teams right away? You may be able to develop players within your club as opposed to having players come in from others. From last gaze, a player doesn’t have an “expiration date” on their forehead. Due to younger players having parents who have a soccer playing


background, we are getting a somewhat more mature “soccer” player. By getting rid of single age groups, you now allow players who are ahead of the learning curve the opportunity to play with older players. Conversely, you also allow a player who is not developing quite as fast the opportunity to play with players of the same ability. Get rid of “strict” team rosters and allow clubs the opportunity to group the players by abilities so all have a sense of belonging to a group. This by the way is the element that most human beings seek throughout life. In our current model, we “cut” players and have them seek other opportunities. Many times, after the age of 12, that answer is to leave the game altogether. Leagues can then offer a U10, U12, U14, U16, and U19 divisions but allow clubs flexibility to move players week to week (club pass concept). This would be a change due to parents and coaches egos and their desire to have “teams”. It is absolutely true that players want to be on teams and have a sense of belonging. This can be achieved by simply having a core of players play with each other throughout the season but also allowing for an occasional child the opportunity to try getting out of or into their comfort zone. A state association can still have a single age group format for cups and tournaments. For the state, presidents, and challenge cups, just have the “cup freeze” date be at the time of kickoff. The transfer rules, however, would have to be amended by the National Championship Series of US Youth Soccer. Tournaments, which we all know are revenue sources for clubs can also offer single age group divisions. Clubs would simply organize their pool of players into a tournament roster. While some may call this a radical approach to improving youth soccer, I truly have believed for quite a few years this is the way Indiana should show the rest of the country how it is done. Idea #2 Amend Small Sided Games for league play My first task as the director of education for Indiana Soccer in 2002 was to organize small sided games for travel/select league play. “Thank you very little”! The emails I received right off the bad almost made me wonder why I wanted to come back to this great state. Well, it has been nine years since my first document and while clubs may not be winning at the younger age group levels when they go to out of state tournaments, the base overall of players has improved. The whining, for the most part, has ceased and children have actually survived! Currently U9 and U10’s play 6v6 and U11 and U12’s play 8v8. The time has come to go to odd numbers instead of even for league play. I would recommend that the future of small sided games in Indiana be 7v7 for U9 and U10’s and 9v9 for U11 and U12’s. Odd numbers offer a better playing shape and for the U11 and U12 age groups the 9v9 model is an easier transition to the 11 aside game. I have always been a proponent of odd numbers instead of even for these age groups because of these two reasons.


Additionally if the leagues would ever adopt double age group play this would allow clubs the opportunity to perhaps be more inclusive when it comes to selection. This model would also serve the recreation or “community” clubs better. While small sided games were never mandatory for recreation/community clubs many do organize their players in a variation of the above mentioned formats. The punt rule for U9-U12 should also be amended to be: “The ball can be punted over the midfield line, however, may not land in the opposing penalty box”. A simple phase in plan like was done in 2002 can be implemented to achieve this goal. Idea #3 Create a Future Coaches Program This concept is already being formulated. The concept is to offer a coaching program for 15-22 year olds who have a desire to be a coach or educator. Registrants would be involved in an eight month long program. The program would consist of webinars, live coaching course offerings, being mentored, and ending with a practical coaching experience. A participant would end up after the eight month program with a Youth Module 1, Youth Module 2, TOPSoccer Certificate, and E License. The final piece would include the opportunity for these candidates the opportunity for college credit. The end result would hopefully be to create a larger and more educated base for clubs. The indirect result would be to create better future moms and dads! Idea #4 Reward Clubs that truly have a non-for-profit board To be perfectly honest you couldn’t pay me enough money to be a Director of Coaching for a club that has a traditional board structure. I mean clubs that have presidents, managers of teams, etc. on the board. I completely understand that boards of clubs are made of volunteers who give up their time away from families and loved ones. I think that is fantastic, however due to this most club directors of coaching though operate as if they were running with handcuffs on them. Sure you can run, but not as fast as you could without them on. A typical situation happens when a person volunteers willingly for a board position and then somehow ends up with total power. Some, not all, volunteers for board positions because it may get their child an “edge” within the club. The problem with power and control is that it then becomes about keeping your position and also posturing for your child’s spot on a team. What if clubs structured their boards to have the mayor, congressman, principals, fire and police chief, parks department, bank manager, etc. not affiliated with the club? I bet they wouldn’t get involved in making “soccer” decisions like many of our boards currently do now. Then I think we may see our game grow as well as a base. A home is only as strong as its base. Getting and growing soccer in our state and country is very simple: grow the base. Let Directors of Coaching and coaches make decisions with regard to players. Have the truly non-for-profit board look for ways of growing and promoting the game within their communities. Unleash these board members to find sponsorships so children do not get priced out of the game. I don’t think


children should necessarily play for free, however pretty soon clubs will have a tough time fielding teams given the current economic state of our nation. Imagine if you had a parks department volunteer on your board who sees the value of soccer and they lobby to change under-utilized tennis courts into futsal courts for the children of the community. Who would have thought we would see so many skate board sections in our parks? I am amazed on how many children I see practicing “ollies” and other tricks. They know they are going to fall off their board but they make the choice to try anyway. What if we developed tennis or some basketball courts (need to be careful here) into futsal courts? We may see, heaven forbid, children trying tricks with the ball like what is seen in Brazil, Argentina, and other top soccer playing nations. This can probably be achieved by having board members who are truly there for the growth of the game and not for their child or child’s team. The indirect benefit for clubs would be a potential base of players. Clubs need to also hold a Director of Coaching accountable. They can do this by having the director of coaching report to an executive director, director of soccer operations, or ONE designated board member or coaching committee. Directors of coaching should be evaluated on educating staff, parents, and volunteers, retention of players and coaches, and community involvement (i.e. school programming). If Indiana Soccer rewarded clubs that truly had a non-for-profit board structure I believe the game would grow in many ways. They could be rewarded in a variety of ways. These ideas include: reduction in player registration fees, recognizing clubs that perform at a high level, and a special dinner and recognition at the AGM.

Idea #5 Grow and promote the Futsal game! I bet many people do not realize that Indiana Soccer has a Futsal committee. Derek Brown currently serves as the committee chair and is doing a terrific job getting this initiative off the ground. Futsal is a terrific tool to develop players of all abilities. It is a much better development tool than playing soccer with walls. In our state we also have natural venues with school gymnasiums for clubs to offer leagues. An idea for future growth would be to have high school club players offer to volunteer their services to working with younger children in schools. They would not only teach soccer and the game of Futsal but could also tutor these young children in academics. Then clubs can really promote that they are a community serving club which may go a longer way when trying to get non-fee based revenue. The overall purpose though would be to help develop and grow the game throughout the winter and summer months. Final Shot In closing I know that some of these ideas may never become reality within my lifetime. There are many ideas I have but decided to end this piece with only five. For example: I believe that Indiana Soccer should allow elementary and middle schools to register their players and allow them to play in our leagues. Then I think we may finally capture that child who may go to another sport and also retain players past the age of 12. I do


believe that in order for our players and children to stay in the game longer we need to look ourselves in the mirror instead of looking through the window and blaming others. That is how people go from being good to great. This happens at the club level first. I don’t just mean the travel/select clubs but especially the recreation/community clubs. The bulk of our membership is the recreation player who dreams of playing in high school, college, and beyond. I know, I was one of those children. My father started a league in Lawrence that had 100 registered players in its first season. Now the league has grown to over 1000. His mission: To get kids off the street. Pretty simple huh? I never knew when I was playing on the fields at Lawrence Park as an 11 year old that I would someday be asked to lead a state association in this game. There was many times where I felt like a kid trying a new trick on a skateboard. I knew I was going to fall but needed to climb back on the board and try again. There were also times where I felt as frustrated as a moth stuck inside a porch light trying to get out. I could see the opening but just couldn’t reach it. Those times, however, were few and far between. We never know what is in our future. I know that everyone will support and embrace our new director of education, Steve Franklin. I am excited to know that he will be at the helm of the education department and know you will glean from his broad experiences in the game. The word “legacy” has been quite popular lately. I have been asked what I think my legacy has been as the director of education for Indiana Soccer? To be honest, I really don’t know. The jury is probably still out. I do know one thing though that I enjoyed the journey and the many wonderful people I have met and befriended. I won’t miss the 30,000 miles on average per year on my car. I have lost a few friends due to this position and decisions. I have, however, truly been blessed to be given such an honor to serve all of you in this capacity. I do hope my legacy will someday be described as “Someone who trained coaches, parents, and volunteers to see a child’s soul instead of just their faces while playing soccer”. I will still be “around” helping coaches and players throughout the state, region, and country. The soccer world is a very tight circle. This being said, I know it isn’t goodbye, but see you later. God Bless!


Wednesday, June 8, 2011

'When you whisper' ... Reflections on a Hall of Fame coach By Mike Woitalla U.S. Soccer Hall of Fame welcomed Bob Gansler last week. He coached the USA when it qualified for the Italia '90, reaching the World Cup for the first time in 40 years. He won an A-League title in 1997 and an MLS title in 2000. But the 69-year-old Gansler, who now serves as a scout for the U.S. Soccer Development Academy, has deep roots in the youth game. His start in coaching came when as a ninth-grader he made compensation for a gym window he broke by coaching a fifth-grade basketball team. While a college sophomore he coached a high school soccer team. “The way I coached is I played along with them,” he explained in an interview with Charles F. Gardner in the Milwaukee JournalSentinal. “I was the best player, so they listened.” In 1981, Gansler coached the first U.S. national team that qualified for the U-20 World Cup. In 1989, at the U-20 World Cup in Saudi Arabia, Gansler guided the USA to a fourth-place finish, which remains its best finish at that competition. I was able to watch Gansler closely during the 20 days in Saudi Arabia and he made an important impression on me. This was in the Bobby Knight era when a popular school of coaching believed in the hard-ass, screaming, marine-sergeant approach. In Gansler I saw a gentleman coach. A coach who believed respect from the players should be earned and not taken for granted. Never in his long career did I see him scream at his players, abuse or even criticize referees – or hold a grudge against his critics. He was proof that nice guys do not finish last and that high-volume isn’t the best way to convey a message. “The louder you speak, the less you're heard,” Gansler once said. “When you're whispering, you've got their attention.”

(Mike Woitalla, the executive editor of Soccer America, coaches youth soccer for East Bay United in Oakland, Calif. His youth soccer articles are archived at YouthSoccerFun.com.)

Post your response to the public Youth Soccer Insider blog. See what others are saying on the Youth Soccer Insider blog. FEEDBACK: Send comments to letters@socceramerica.com. Please include your first and last name and hometown. Wednesday, June 8, 2011


National Youth License 2011

Indiana Soccer, along with US Youth Soccer, is pleased to offer the National Youth License course this winter. The curriculum of the course is based in proper educational methods for coaching children twelve years old and younger. Coaching Coordinators, Directors of Coaching, Coaches, and Administrators involved with children’s soccer should attend the course. *This course is also good for CEU’s with US Soccer. A total of 8 CEU’s are given upon successful completion of the course. Dates: July 25-29th, 2011. You must attend all dates in order to complete this course. A detailed schedule for the course is below. Location: The course will be held at the Indiana Soccer Office. Address: 5440 Herbert Lord Road Indpls, IN 46216 Website: www.soccerindiana.org Accommodations: Candidates arrange for their own lodging. What to Bring: You will participate in this course on the field. Please bring proper (indoor and outdoor) shoes and proper attire to play in. Please bring your own ball. You will be given the course manual, t-shirt, and other handouts. Please bring your own notebook for notes. Course Description: This course is a tested course and you will be evaluated 3 ways. Written, Verbal and Coaching Practical. Indiana Youth Soccer will provide the players in each age group (U6/U8 & U10) for the practical testing. Each coach will be videotaped during a practice session and evaluated prior to testing. Meals: Lunch will be provided for you. Costs: The course fee is $600.00 Checks or Visa/MasterCard will be accepted. Course application will be available online. The application is also included in this document. Applications can be mailed to: Indiana Soccer 5440 Herbert Lord Road Indianapolis, IN 46216 This course usually fills up quickly, so do apply right away. Please do not hesitate to contact the Indiana Soccer office (Vince Ganzberg) at 1-800-347-4972 extension 101 for questions or to apply. You can also email at vince@soccerindiana.org To apply online, visit the Indiana Youth Soccer website at: www.soccerindiana.org


See Schedule and Application Below

July 25th-29th 2011 Date

Five Day NYL Schedule Start

Finish

Topic

DAY 1

July 25thAY Day e

Please do wear the new gear as assigned

30 min

5:30

6:00

Registration – Turn in Laws Exam

45 min

6:00

6:45

Orientation and Opening Lecture

30 min

6:45

7:15

Jean Piaget

30 min

7:30

8:00

Guided Discovery Learning Theories

30 min

8:00

8:30

(Expansion, Slanty Line, Flow) -Review Coaches Connection Spot-Light -Developing Your Coaching Philosophy -Review and Assign Groups Topics -Review Methodology Exam, Field Practical Exam, Oral Presentation and Assign Topics, U12 Model Session

30 min

8:30

9:00

Observation Form, NYL Feedback Forms and Lesson Plans

15 min

8:30

8:45

Staff Review Law Exam with Candidates

1 hour

8:45

9:45

U6 Lecture

DAY 2-26th

U6 Field with Candidates #2 1 hour

10:45

11:45

(Candidates Practice)

1 hour 30 min

11:45

1:15

LUNCH


1 hour

1:15

2:15

Ethics

1 hour

2:15

3:15

Youth Fitness

1 hour

3:30

4:30

U6 Field Practical

1 hour

4:45

5:45

U6 Practical Video Review

1 hour

8:00

9:00

U8 Lecture

45 min

9:15

10:30

U8 Field with Candidates #1

DAY 327thDAY e

U8 Field with Candidates #2 1 hour

10:30

11:30

(Candidates Practice)

2 hour

11:30

1:30

LUNCH

15 min

1:30

1:45

Street Soccer Lecture (Play Day) (Go to PPT# 13)

1 hour

2:00

3:00

Candidates Field Street Soccer and Review

1 hour 30 min

3:00

4:30

U8 Field Practical

1 hour

4:45

5:45

U8 Practical Video Review

1 hour

8:00

9:00

U10 Lecture

45 min

9:15

10:00

U10 Field with Candidates # 1

DAY 4-28th Four

U10 Field with Candidates # 2 1 hour

10:00

11:00

(Candidates Practice)

1 hour

11:00

12:00

Youth Goal Keeping

2 hour

12:00

2:00

LUNCH Turn in Methods Exam, Coaching Philosophy, Coaches Connection Spotlight Nomination

1 hour

2:00

3:00

Group Presentations

1 hour 30 min

3:00

4:30

U10 Field Practical


1 hour

4:45

5:45

U10 Practical Video Review

1 hour 30 min

8:00

9:30

Oral Exam

1 hour

9:45

10:45

Club Development

1 hour

10:45

11:45

U12 Lecture

1 hour 15 min

11:45

1:00

LUNCH

1 hour

1:00

2:00

U12 Model Session

1 hour 30 min

2:15

3:45

Practical Coaching Exam

15 min

3:45

4:00

Closing Ceremonies (on the field)

DAY 5-29thy Five


Sample youth camp curriculum Monday-Dribbling 9:30-10:00 a.m.-Welcome, introduce skill of the day (staff demonstrate), and warm up (Vince) 10:00-10:45 a.m.-Dribbling Games (see below)-divide groups and staff. Stations are 5-7 minutes each 10:45-11:15 a.m.-Contest of the day-Fastest Dribbler! Players are sorted by grades. 11:15-11:40 a.m. Small Sided tournament-Divide into 3v3 or 4v4 teams. Play 8 minute games. No ties-last team to score wins! 11:40-11:45 a.m. announce that tomorrow is best soccer t-shirt day (encourage them to make their own) Soccer focus: Dribbling and fast footwork Station #1 Dribbling Players all have their ball and dribble. Players are told that when the word “stop” is heard, they should be no closer than 5 yards from the next player. Increase the distances. Progress to introducing the “skill of the day” Skill of the night will be “The Brazilian” (dribbling move)

Station #2 Backyard Game-Yard Dribble Players are given vests, cones, etc. to lay on the ground. Players are instructed to dribble to each vest performing different turns, moves, etc. as they approach each object on the ground. Integrity is also introduced in this lesson. Players will be asked to go around, by, next to a specific number of objects. They need to be honest when asked if they have achieved the number desired by the coaches. This is also an opportunity to discuss the importance of being honest even when an objective is not reached. Station #3 3v1 Dribble Make a square of 10x10. Three players each have a ball. One player does not. The one player that does not have a ball tries to touch someone’s ball with their feet. When they have touched it three times, they then get the player’s ball. See which player gets their ball touched the least (integrity).

Character focus: Integrity (honesty)


Station #4 Three and out Players are in groups of three. One player is in goal. The other two play against each other 1v1. When one of the field player scores three goals, they are now the goalkeeper. The goalkeeper now plays against the other field player.


Tuesday-Passing 9:30-10:00-Welcome, Introduce skill of the day (staff demonstration), and vote for craziest t-shirt. 10-10:45-Stations (see below)-divide groups and staff. Stations are 5-7 minutes each 10:45-11:30 Small Sided tournament-Divide into 3v3 or 4v4 teams. Play 8 minute games. No ties-last team to score wins! 11:30-Noon-“Big” Sided teams Announce that tomorrow will be the best soccer hat day!

Station #1 Passing “Bridges” Players get with a partner. One player has a ball, the other does not. The player without the ball goes and stands with their legs apart. The player with the ball dribbles around and then passes the ball between the standing player’s legs. Standing players are allowed to, after a period of time, criss cross (like a jumping jack) to make it more challenging. Progress to the Skill of the day which is “the perfect push pass” Station #2 Backyard Game-Soccer Golf Players spread out objects, cones, vests, etc. Players can play in pair or individually. Players are instructed to pass the ball and either hit the object or have it stop completely on a vest. Players keep their own score and challenges.

Station #3 “Storm The Castle” This is a small sided game of 3-4 players each. Each team has objects to try and knock down. When they are successful they get a point. The team with the most points wins. Respect is now introduced. The players will be asked how they felt after they lost. Teams shake hands after each round and say “good game”.


Station #4 “The Bikini Bottom” This can also be the contest of the day as well. Players line up on an end. When coach says “go”, the players pass the ball using only one touch and try to get the ball to a designated line without going over. The player who has their ball closest to the line without going over wins. Play Gold, Silver, and Bronze for each round. Vary the distances.

Wednesday-Finishing

9:00-9:15 a.m.-Welcome, Introduce skill of the day (staff demonstration), and vote for craziest t-shirt. 9:15-9:30 a.m.-Warm-up (Vince) 9:30 a.m.-10:15 a.m Contest of the day-Distance shooting. Divide by age group. 10:15-10:55 a.m. Small Sided tournament-Divide into 3v3 or 4v4 teams. Play 8 minute games. No ties-last team to score wins! Announce that tomorrow will be the best soccer ball day! Soccer focus: Striking the ball Station #1 Divide team into two teams. Each team goes to a half. Use an odd number of balls, like 5. The objective of the game is to strike the ball into the other team’s yard. Each team wants to have a clean yard when time is called by the coach. The team that has the fewest balls on their side when time is called gets a point. Play to a certain amount of points or for time. Variation: Require a pass to be made to a teammate before the ball can be struck back to the other half. Responsibility theme is addressed. Players are asked how responsible they are at home and why it is important to help out by being responsible at home. Example: cleaning your yard at home, room, etc.

Station #2 Backyard Game-Goal to Goal Two-Three players can play this game. Each player sets up a goal with cones, towels, etc. Two players play against each other. The game is very simple. Each player gets to shoot at the other player’s goal. Each player is in goal with the only rule is that you can’t use your hands to stop the ball..

Character focus: Responsibility


Station #3 Get Outta Here! On team attack the left goal, and the others the right goal. If a ball goes over a sideline or end-line everyone is “outta there”! If a team scores they stay on and the other team swaps two players in ASAP. The coach throws balls in quickly as possible as demanded by the game. The coach doesn’t say anything when throwing balls in, they control who is out! Progressions: Play 1 v 1 then 2 v 2

Station #4 Numbers Set up is like Station #3. Coach calls a number and the number called determines how many players run on the field and score. The players run around the goal they are defending first and then enter the field. The coach plays a ball in as they are rounding the goal.


Thursday-Coach’s Choice 9:30-10:00-Welcome, introduce jugging (staff demo) and vote for best soccer ball! 10:00-10:45 a.m. “Soccer Dance” (see below) 10:45-11:30-Small Sided tournament-. Small Sided tournament-Divide into 3v3 or 4v4 teams. Play 8 minute games. No ties-last team to score wins! 11:30-Noon “Big” Sided games Closing and announce that tomorrow will be “Best clean joke of the day” Soccer focus: Fast footwork This session will be done to music. “Soccer Dance” Warm-up 1) Different movements w/feet around the ball. a) Dancing movements; b) touchups; c) sole back and forth; d) knee-knee-butt-head 2) Pick up ball, throw to feet and catch, 3) Pick up ball, throw to outside of foot (Coke commercial), 4) Ball between feet, lift legs to head hold ball then catch ball on ground Progress to different soccer moves to music with the ball. 1) Bells (pendulum) 2) Backyard rolls 3) Sole rollovers 4) Stepovers 5) Figure 8 Dribble 6) “V” 7) “Brazilian” 8) Rock and Roll 9) Banana Split move 10) Maradona After these 10 moves are done to music, then break into small sided games. Players receive extra points when they perform one of the 10 moves.


Friday-FUN!

9:45-10:10- Street Games10:15-10:30-4v4 Semi Finals 10:30-11:00-Skills competition (Figure 8’s, In and Out Dribbling, Cutting and Turning) 11:00-11:15-1v1 competitions 11:15-11:30-Best “clean” Joke of the day! 11:30-11:45-Small Sided Game Finals


Indiana Soccer and US Youth Region II TOPSoccer Sympsosium TOPSoccer is a community-based training and team placement program for athletes with disabilities, organized by youth soccer association volunteers. The program is designed to bring the opportunity of learning and playing soccer to any players, age 8 and older, who have a mental or physical disability. Our goal is to enable the thousands of young athletes with disabilities to become valued and successful members of the US Soccer family. Date: August 12-14th, 2011 The Annual Region II Symposium is sure to have something of interest for coaches, administrators, and parents alike. In addition, the TOPSoccer Coaching Course will also be offered on Sunday, August 14. The course will be taught by Utah Youth Soccer Assistant Technical Director, Rick Flores. Rick is also the co-author of the TOPSoccer Certification Manual. A detailed symposium scheduled will be posted at www.soccerindiana.org by June 1. Contact Joy Carter for reservations at joy@soccerindiana.org or (800)347-4972.


TV Schedule for the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup The following is ESPN’s U.S. television schedule for the event. All times are listed in Eastern Time. GROUP STAGE Sunday, June 26 – Germany vs. Canada – Berlin – 12 PM ET, ESPN Sunday, June 26 – Nigeria vs. France – Sinsheim – 9 AM ET, ESPN2 Monday, June 27 – Mexico vs. England – Wolfsburg – 12 PM ET, ESPN Monday, June 27 – Japan vs. New Zealand – Bochum – 9 AM ET, ESPN Tuesday, June 28 – USA vs. North Korea – Dresden – 12:15 PM ET, ESPN Tuesday, June 28 – Colombia vs. Sweden – Leverkusen – 9 AM ET, ESPN Wednesday, June 29 – Brazil vs. Australia – Monchengladbach – 12:15 PM ET, ESPN Wednesday, June 29 – Norway vs. Equatorial Guinea – Augsburg – 9 AM ET, ESPN Thursday, June 30 – Germany vs. Nigeria – Frankfurt – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN2 Thursday, June 30 – Canada vs. France – Bochum – 12 PM ET, ESPN Friday, July 1 – New Zealand vs. England – Dresden – 12:15 PM ET, ESPN Friday, July 1 – Japan vs. Mexico – Leverkusen – 9 AM ET, ESPN Saturday, July 2 – North Korea vs. Sweden – Augsburg – 8 AM ET, ESPN2 Saturday, July 2 – United States vs. Colombia – Sinsheim – 12 PM ET, ESPN Sunday, July 3 – Australia vs. Equatorial Guinea – Bochum – 8 AM ET, ESPN2 Sunday, July 3 – Brazil vs. Norway – Wolfsburg – 12:15 PM ET, ESPN Tuesday, July 5 – France vs. Germany – Monchengladbach – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN Tuesday, July 5 – New Zealand vs. Mexico – Sinsheim – 12:15 PM ET, ESPN2 Tuesday, July 5 – England vs. Japan – Augsburg – 12:15 PM ET, ESPN Tuesday, July 5 – Canada vs. Nigeria – Dresden – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN2


Wednesday, July 6 – Equatorial Guinea vs. Brazil – Frankfurt – 12 PM ET, ESPN Wednesday, July 6 – Sweden vs. USA – Wolfsburg – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN Wednesday, July 6- North Korea vs. Colombia – Bochum – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN2 Wednesday, July 6 – Australia vs. Norway – Leverkusen – 12 PM ET, ESPN2 QUARTERFINALS Saturday, July 9 – Game 25 – 1A vs. 2B – Wolfsburg – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN Saturday, July 9 – Game 26 – 1B vs. 2A – Leverkusen – 12 PM ET, ESPN Sunday, July 10 – Game 27 – 1C vs. 2D – Augsburg – 7 AM ET, ESPN Sunday, July 10 – Game 28 – 1D vs. 2C – Dresden – 11:30 AM ET, ESPN SEMIFINALS Wednesday, July 13 – W25 vs. W27 – Frankfurt – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN Wednesday – July 13 – W26 vs. W28 – Monchengladbach – 12 PM ET, ESPN THIRD PLACE MATCH Saturday, July 16 – L29 vs. L30 – Sinsheim – 11:30 AM ET, ESPN2 FINAL Sunday, July 17 – W29 vs. W30 – Frankfurt – 2:45 PM ET, ESPN


Indiana Soccer Coaching Course Opportunities To register for courses, please visit the Indiana Soccer website: http://www.soccerindiana.org/service/coaching_courses.aspx Course offerings Coaching Education is free for all members of Indiana Soccer. Members include those that coach/play for an Indiana Soccer affiliated club or has a child(ren) that plays for an affiliated Indiana Soccer club. If you have a question as to your status, please email the Director of Education or look on our website for a listing of clubs.

Policy change: Starting July 2011, Indiana Soccer will require a $100 deposit for all E and D License courses. Coaches will have their deposits refunded after they complete the course. The deposit payment will be a part of the registration procedure. If you are not a member, there is a fee for coaching education. TOPSoccer "Buddy Program"-Indiana Soccer office-June 11th, 2011 "Pelada" movie viewing-Indiana Soccer office-June 11th, 2011 "Youth Module 1"-Fort Wayne, IN June 16th, 2011 "Youth Module 2"-Fort Wayne, IN June 18th, 2011 "D" License Course-Mishawaka, IN Bethel College-June 17th-19th and 24th-26th course has been cancelled. "E" License Course-Indianapolis-Indiana Soccer Office-June 24-26th Course is full USSF/US Youth National Youth License-Indianapolis-Indiana Soccer Office-July 25-29th National Youth License flyer and registration form "E" License Course-Jasper-July 29-31st "D" License Course-Indianapolis-Indiana Soccer Office-July 29-31st and August 5-7th "E" License Course-Batesville-August 6th and 7th "E" License Course-Fishers-August 19-21st


Indiana Represented at FIFA 2011 World Cup! Congratulations to Lauren Cheney and Lori Lindsey in being selected to represent the USA in Germany this summer!

Indiana’s Lauren Cheney

Indiana’s Lori Lindsey


Picture of the Month

Even the great players miss penalty kicks!


Heads Up June 2011