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AT YOUR SERIVCE MONTHLY MEMBER NEWSLETTER AUGUST 2013

Page 1


AT YOUR SERVICE

CONTENTS 2

InRLA STAFF

3

HOUR RESTRICTIONS FOR TEEN WORKERS

4

ALLERGIES AWARENESS HEIGHTENED

5

CIFOR RELEASES FOODBORNE ILLNESS RESPONSE GUIDELINES

6

AH&LA GUEST SERVICE GOLD

6

YOUR RESPONSE MATTERS: 2012 ECONOMIC CENSUS: PAST DUE

8

SUPPORT InRLA ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

CONNIE VICKERY InRLA Governmental Affairs Director

7

InRLA GALA: CELEBRATING AS AN INDUSTRY

PATRICIA MCGUFFEY Governmental Affairs Director

9

ARE YOU TAKING ADVANTAGE OF "FICA TIP CREDIT"?

10

AH&LA UPDATES

MIRANDA GUERRINI InRLA Education Manager

13

InRLA BOARD MEMBERS

EMILY WALDRON InRLA Administrative Assistant

14

SMITH TRAVEL RESEARCH MONTHLY REPORT

JOHN LIVENGOOD InRLA President

PATRICK TAMM Incoming InRLA President DEBRA SCOTT InRLA Chief Operations Officer TOM JOHNSON InRLA Chief Financial Officer

STEPHANIE HIGGINS InRLA Director of Events STACY QUASEBARTH InRLA Director of Communications

INDIANA RESTAURANT & LODGING ASSOCIATION 200 S. Meridian St. Suite 350 Indianapolis, IN 46225 www.InRLA.org

COVER PICTURES: Photos from InRLA events throughout the year including Beautification Day, John Livengood Receiving the Will Koch Award, and a team picture from our annual At Your Service Open Golf Outing.

2013 InRLA DISTRICT MEETINGS Meet… • InRLA President & CEO John Livengood • Incoming InRLA President & CEO Patrick Tamm Converse about... • Affordable Care Act • Unemployment/Food & Beverage Taxes • Local Issues and Your Concerns • And more... For questions and event updates, visit InRLA.org or call 800.678.1957.

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Aug. 5 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. 26 Aug. 27 Aug. 28

2:30- 4:30 p.m. 2:30- 4:30 p.m. 2:30- 4:30 p.m. 2:30- 4:30 p.m. 2:30- 4:30 p.m. 2:30- 4:30 p.m. 2:30- 4:30 p.m. 2:30- 4:30 p.m.

Lafayette (Arni’s) Bloomington (Indiana Memorial Union) Indianapolis (Harry & Izzy's North) Merrillville (Radisson Star Plaza) South Bend (LaSalle Grill) Jeffersonville (Buckhead Mountain Grill) Evansville (Courtyard Evansville East) Fort Wayne (Holiday Inn IPFW)


Back to School Means Change in Hour Restrictions for Teen Workers The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on August 20 that more than 2 million youth aged 16 to 24 gained employment between April and July 2013, the month when summer jobs are highest. The percentage of youth employed in July 2013 was 50.7 percent, an increase from last year's rate of 50.2 percent. The bureau also reported that the unemployment rate among this group was 16.3 percent in July 2013, the third consecutive annual decline and down 3 percentage points from its July peak of 19.1 percent in July 2010. From April to July 2013, the number of employed youth (16 to 24 years old) increased by 2.1 million to 19.7 million and Sales at U.S. restaurants and bars is expected to reach a record $461.3 billion this year, a 3.8 percent gain from 2012, the National Restaurant Association in Washington estimates. Even with the U.S. unemployment rate stuck above 7 percent for a 55th straight month in June, the economy has regained 6 million jobs in recent years. That means more jobs for restaurant workers. The industry added 75,000 employees in June, including 52,000 for food service and drinking places, leading all groups, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Some teens work just through the summer, but with the increase in sales, you may be retaining those teens through the fall and winter. Be aware that the work hours for teens change when school starts up. For 14 and 15 year olds, hours change after Labor Day. Although Indiana teen labor laws are designed to mirror federal labor laws, there are some differences for 16 and 17 year olds. Through our Education First program, we have prepared the following combined review to display the strictest laws applicable. http://www.indianarestaurants.org/DocLib/Document125.pdf. Also available through Education First are combined Parental Permission/Intent to Employ cards that facilitate opening lines of communication with Parents and Schools. For more information on Education First visit http://www.indianarestaurants.org/ EducationFirst.asp

Combined Combined Review Review of of Federal Federal and and Indiana Indiana Teen Teen Labor Labor Laws Laws for for Foodservice Foodservice Employers Employers This information is not inclusive. Check with federal and state labor officials for more information.

rev. 2/05 Sponsored by: Restaurant & Hospitality Association of Indiana 317-673-4211 • 800-678-1957 info@indianarestaurants.com

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES

• The minimum permissible work age is 14. • For teens 14-17 who are scheduled for at least six consecutive hours, either two, 15 minute paid breaks or a 1/2 hour unpaid break is required. • At age 18, teenagers may work at any job and for any number of hours with the exception of handling or serving alcohol beverages. • Teens 14-17 must have adult supervision after 10:00 p.m.

• Every employer must secure an employment certificate (work permit) before he allows any minor under 18 years of age to work for him at any time. • This includes minors not enrolled in a regular school term. • High School graduates under the age of 18 are not required to have employment certificates. • The work permit must be kept on file as long as the youth is employed. • A work permit is non-transferable and may be used at no more than two locations within the same enterprise, as long as the enterprise complies with the hour restrictions for the particular age. • Notice of Teen Hour Restrictions must be posted (state form 158R5 no longer required).

LABOR LAWS FOR MINORS AGED 16 & 17 Prohibited Work • May NOT operate power-driven shearing or bakery machinery. • May NOT operate circular saws, band saws and guillotine shears. This includes operating, setting up, adjusting repairing, or cleaning power-driven slicers. • May NOT be employed in establishments where the principal business is the sale of alcohol beverages. • MAY NOT operate pizza dough rollers EXCEPT dough rollers that meets certain safety criteria. • MAY NOT operate motor vehicles, act as an outside helper or ride outside the cab of a motor vehicle, EXCEPT 17-year-olds MAY drive on the job no more than two trips in a work day that are not time sensitive (such as pizza delivery) within a 30-mile radius under additional strict restrictions. Hours and Days of Work Restrictions • A minor who is 16 or 17 and presents to the employer a written exception issued by the school that the child attends, or a home schooled registration number and permission from the parents may be permitted to work between 7:30 AM and 3:30 PM. • Minors 16 and 17 years of age who are not enrolled in a regular school term, have graduated from high school, or completed an approved vocational education program are exempt from the hour restrictions. Minors Aged 16 Hour Restrictions • 8 hours per day/30 hrs per school week • 40 hours per school week* • No work after 10 PM on a night followed by a school day • No work after 12 midnight on nights not followed by a school day* • 9 hours per day during a non-school week* • 48 hours per week during during a non-school week* • No work before 6 AM • No work after 12 midnight • No more than 6 working days per week Minors Aged 17 Hour Restrictions • 8 hours per day/30 hrs per school week • 40 hours per school week* • No work after 10 PM on a night followed by a school day • No work after 12 midnight on nights not followed by a school day* • May work up to 11:30 p.m. on a night followed by a school day* • May work up to 1 a.m. on two non-consecutive nights followed by a school day per week* • 9 hours per day during a non-school week* • 48 hours per week during during a non-school week* • No work before 6 AM • No work after 12 midnight • No more than 6 working days per week * Requires written permission of parents on file with employer.

LABOR LAWS FOR MINORS AGED 14 & 15 Prohibited Work • May NOT cook over open flames • May NOT bake, including any part of the baking process (weighing, mixing, putting products in pans or trays) • May NOT clean, maintain or repair cooking equipment such as grills, deep-fat fryers and steam tables if the equipment surface exceeds 100oF. • May NOT use rotisseries, broilers or pressurized equipment that operate at extremely high temperatures. • May NOT work in freezers or meat coolers. • May NOT operate, set up, adjust, clean, oil or repair power-driven food slicers and grinders, food choppers and cutters, and bakery-type mixers. • May NOT operate power lawn mowers, power hedge or weed trimmers. • May NOT work with ladders, scaffolds or similar equipment. • May NOT work in or around a boiler or engine room. • May NOT ride in a motor vehicle provided by the employer (such as being transported to an off-site catering function). • May NOT load or unload trucks or conveyors (including conveyor type ovens). Allowed Duties • May perform prep work. • May operate dishwashers, toasters, dumbwaiters, popcorn poppers, milkshake blenders, coffee machines, devises used to maintain food temperatures. • May operate microwave ovens that do not have the capacity to warm above 140 oF. • May cook using electric or gas grills that do not have open flames. • May cook using deep fryers that are equipped with and utilize devices that automatically lower and raise baskets. Hours and Days of Work Restrictions • Minors 14 or 15 years of age may never work on a school day during regular school hours. • Labor day to June 1-no work before 7 AM or after 7 PM • June 1 to Labor Day - no work before 7 AM or after 9 PM (7 PM if followed by a school day) • 3 hours on a school day • 18 hours per week during a school week • 8 hours per day on a nonschool day • 40 hours per week during a nonschool week • 14 or 15 year olds expelled, not enrolled by court order or for religious reasons (ex: Amish) are exempt from the 3 hours a day / 18 hours a school week, but not exempt from the additional requirements.


Allergies Awareness Heightened in Today’s Restaurants ServSafe debuts new food allergy training course

While the recent settlement between the Department of Justice and Lesley University clarified that the ADA does not require every place of public accommodation that serves food to the public provide gluten-free or allergenfree food, most restaurant operators are aware that food allergy issues are increasing across the nation. Allergy issues have increased by 18% over the last 10 years, and half of all allergy fatalities occur outside the home. Estimates indicate that there are 15 million people in the United States alone that have at least one food allergy. In the restaurant industry, there is no room for error when it comes to food allergen awareness for staff and patrons. Just to be clear, this is not about a food sensitivity, intolerance or a lifestyle decision. With an allergic reaction, the immune system perceives a specific food protein as a threat and attacks it. For example, if you're lactose intolerant, consuming a dairy product can give you nasty digestive symptoms. But if you're allergic to dairy, the offending food may cause hives, throat swelling, difficulty breathing, low blood pressure, or even anaphylactic shock. The nonprofit advocacy group Food Allergy Research & Education, known as FARE, reports that every three minutes an acute allergic food reaction sends someone for emergency care, resulting in more than 175,000 such medical visits per year, far higher than once thought. A common misconception is that a little bit of an allergen won't hurt. In fact, the body may react violently to even a trace amount. Because there is no cure for food allergies, avoiding allergens and quick treatment of symptoms is the only recourse. ServSafe Allergen Training ServSafe, already established as the foodservice industry's go-to program for providing required food handler certifications, recently launched a new online food allergen training and website. The program provides operators with invaluable information on how to create a safe environment for those with allergies, and also how to increase knowledge among kitchen staff about cross-contact (different than cross-contamination), alternative methods and clear menu labeling. The NRA developed ServSafe Allergens with FARE, which it has worked with for years on food allergen training and Page 4

awareness. "The National Restaurant Association has been working diligently over the years to responsibly address the issue of food safety in restaurants, including food allergens," said William Weichelt, Director of ServSafe for the National Restaurant Association. "We are excited to partner with FARE on ServSafe Allergens to educate our restaurants and their employees, helping our members accommodate their guests' food allergies or other dietary requirements." The ServSafe Allergens course is designed to help both front-of-the-house staff and back-of-the-house operations better understand how to accommodate the growing number of guests with food allergies. The course is a highly interactive, avatar-led training program. It's designed to address several course objectives and ultimately help raise the food allergen awareness of the individual taking the course and the restaurant where they work. The course objectives are: · define the terms food allergy and food allergen · recognize the symptoms of a food allergy · identify the differences between a food allergy, a food intolerance and other food-related diseases · identify ways to prevent avoid cross-contact in the front of house and back of house · communicate with guests who have food allergies · describe how to handle any allergen special orders in the front of house and back of house · recognize allergen information on food labels. I Took the Course, You Should Too… The ServSafe Allergen course is an avatar-led training, pretty cool, and should appeal to video game savvy employees. Instead of just clicking the next button, interactively you click on doors to move from space to space in a restaurant – dining room, kitchen and break room (although I’ve never seen a break room as comfortable as in this restaurant). The course gives practical advice in handling allergies from the moment a customer identifies an allergy. This course is a must for managers and any employees you designate to handle customers who announce they have an allergy. Learn more about ServSafe Allergens at www.servsafe.com/allergens.


CIFOR Releases Foodborne Illness Response Guidelines A new guide offering suggestions to the industry on how to respond to foodborne illness outbreaks has been issued by the Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response, or CIFOR, in partnership with food industry representatives, consulting companies, government agencies, and CIFOR Council representatives.

to return to work, employee history of contact with others diagnosed in spreading illness through food “When there is an outbreak of foodborne illness, the government and the food industry are of one mind,” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said. “We have to find the cause and stop the outbreak. These guidelines and the continued work of CIFOR demonstrate key partnerships and our daily shared commitment to food safety and the health of consumers in the United States.”

Called “Foodborne Illness Response Guidelines For Owners, Operators and Managers of Food Establishments,” the guidelines are the result of nearly five years of data collection that will help industry members take an active and educated role in responding to an outbreak and subsequent investigation by health officials. The information offers voluntary guidance from experts in the food industry, as well as local, state and federal regulatory and non-regulatory public health agencies.

U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, agreed, saying: “Both industry and government have a shared responsibility for the safety of our nation's food supply. By outlining and clarifying specific roles and responsibilities during each outbreak, we develop greater trust and accountability among stakeholders and consumers.”

The guidelines, available now on the CIFOR web site, http:// www.cifor.us/projind.cfm, provide recommendations on how to help outline, clarify, and explain industry’s recommended role in a foodborne illness outbreak investigation. Some of the key points include:

“The National Restaurant Association is proud to have played an active role in developing this resource in partnership with state, local and federal public health officials and other industry stakeholders,” she said. “[This is] an important tool for restaurant owners and operators, and reflects our industry’s commitment to protecting the public health.”

• Traceability of food orders and determining an outbreak’s starting source • Communication and how to deal with employees, regulatory agencies and customers collecting information relevant to a foodborne illness • Tools to use, such as employee work history, employee and customer health symptom reporting • Distributor and supplier information • Dealing with media responses in event of an outbreak • Medical employee vaccination history, medical approval

Dawn Sweeney, the NRA’s president and CEO, also commended the council for creating the guidelines.

According to Frank Ferko, a member of the council and former CIFOR chairman, the guidelines’ primary focus is to offer operators who don’t have guidelines in place the opportunity to create industry procedures where none exist. “This is a way for the industry to be involved and play a role in minimizing the potential for foodborne illness outbreaks,” Ferko, director of distribution food safety and quality assurance for U.S. Foods, said. “We pushed hard for this, to be

STORY CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE...

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CIFOR RELEASES FOODBORNE ILLNESS RESPONSE GUIDELINES STORY CONTINUED... a part of this. If regulators are out there investigating an incident, they may be doing or looking at the wrong things. We saw that we could play a role in improving things.” According to Ferko, he and the other council members felt it was important for the industry to have a say on how best to respond and have an impact on illness outbreaks. “There isn’t really anything else out there that speaks to the industry on how to protect against a foodborne illness outbreak,” he said. “This really came out of the CDC looking at investigations that were done well after the fact and hadn’t been done very well. It was more about getting information rather than addressing the impact of an outbreak. The industry’s role is to be able to provide information to regulators so they can know where the source of an outbreak is.” Note: The CIFOR Foodborne Illness Response Guidelines are intended to serve as a voluntary reference for owners, operators and managers of food establishments in preparing for and/or involvement in foodborne disease outbreak investigations. The Guidelines are not intended to be allinclusive or to anticipate and address every conceivable situation.

Implement TRAINING Achieve CERTIFICATION

13-04484

www.ahlei.org/guestservicegold

RESPONSE TO THE 2012 ECONOMIC CENSUS IS PAST DUE The 2012 Economic Census, the U.S. Government’s official five-year measure of American business and the economy, is currently underway. For those businesses that have responded to the Economic Census, we thank you; for those businesses that were mailed a form but have not yet responded to this mandatory survey, we urge you to do so as soon as possible. Report online at: http://www.econhelp.census.gov Thank you again for taking part in the 2012 Economic Census, your response makes a difference!

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PLEASE JOIN US A S W E C O M E T O G E T H E R T O C E L E B R AT E O U R I N A U G U R A L Y E A R A N D T O R E C O G N I Z E O U T S TA N D I N G I N D U S T R Y L E A D E R S AT T H E 2 0 1 3

INDIANA RESTAURANT

&

LODGING ASSOCIATION GALA

CELEBRATING INDUSTRY LEADERS & JOHN LIVENGOOD’S 23 YEAR CAREER & RETIREMENT TICKETS $150 per person The Indiana Restaurant & Lodging Association is rounding its first year of successfully merging the restaurant & lodging industries into one strong organization.

TABLES OF TEN $1,250 InRLA Member $1,500 Non-Member $25 of each ticket sold will be applied to the InRLA Good Government Fund

We will come together to celebrate our inaugural year

and is not deductible as a charitable or business expense.

at the InRLA Gala on September 24th, 2013. This will also be the stage to recognize John Livengood

Hotel Room Block

and his 23 years of representing our industry

at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown

as he begins a new chapter in his retirement.

Room Block Rate $79

We hope you will join us at this event.

To make reservations call 317.822.3500 Or reserve online at bit.ly/InRLAgala

RECEPTION AT 6:00 PM DINNER AND AWARDS AT 7:00 PM

INDIANAPOLIS MARRIOTT DOWNTOWN 350 W. MARYLAND ST., INDIANAPOLIS

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.In RLA.ORG Page 7


Support Our Associate Members... Use Vendors In the InRLA Buyer's Guide!

Establishing a strong relationship with your local distributors and suppliers is a critical step in making your business a success. Picking the right companies as supplier partners ensures your access to reliable services, consistent supply lines, better delivery, the newest products and the best values. That's why you should use the associate members listed in our InRLA Vendor Directory listed on our website. The InRLA Vendor Directory makes it easy to find the vendor of the products and services you need listed categorically. Go to http://www.indianarestaurants.org/ SearchVendor.asp. The best part is, they want you as a customer. It is in their best interest to have you succeed and prosper. They have shown their commitment to the industry, and your success by joining the InRLA as association members! The better you do, the better they do. It's a simple formula that adds up to recurring business and profits for everyone.

Support them and they will support you!

InRLA Endorsed Providers


Are You Taking Advantage of the “FICA Tip Credit?” By Jim White, Katz, Sapper & Miller If you have employees who receive tips on a regular basis, you may be eligible for the “Credit for Employer Social Security and Medicare Taxes” or better known as the “FICA Tip Credit.” The credit is equal to the employer-paid FICA taxes on income above the minimum hourly wage. Below is an example of how the tip credit works. A server worked 30 hours in one week, was paid an hourly wage of $3.00 and earned (and reported) $350.00 in tips. Step 1: Calculate the server’s total income including tips • 30 hours x $3.00 per hour = $90.00 • $90.00 + $350 tip income = $440.00 (total income) Step 2: Calculate what the server’s income would have been at the minimum wage rate • 30 hours x $5.15 per hour = $154.50 Step 3: Calculate the amount of income over minimum wage • $440.00 - $154.50 = $285.50 Step 4: Multiply the income in excess of the minimum wage by 7.65% (the employer’s portion of FICA taxes) • $285.50 x 7.65% = $21.84 In this example, the employer is eligible for a $21.84 tax credit. Although $21.84 is a small number, if the example is extended from 1 to 10 servers over a 52-week period, the credit jumps to $11,356.80. Jim White is a member of the Tax Department at Katz, Sapper & Miller (www.ksmcpa.com). For more information on how your restaurant can take advantage of the FICA Tip Credit, contact Jim at 317.452.1908 or jwhite@ksmcpa.com. Note: If the employer’s FICA taxes were deducted from income to arrive at taxable income, the amount taken as a credit will need to be added back to taxable income. The end result is that the employer is trading a tax deduction for a tax credit. Also, per the Small Business Work Opportunity Act of 2007, the minimum wage rate used to calculate this credit has been frozen at $5.15 per hour. Any tax advice or opinion herein contained is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, by anyone to avoid the imposition of any federal tax penalties. Page 9


AH&LA Update AH&LA APPOINTS CAPITOL HILL VETERAN TO TOP ADVOCACY ROLE The American Hotel & Lodging Association (AH&LA) announces the appointment of Vanessa Sinders as senior vice president of governmental affairs, effective September 16, 2013. In this role, Sinders will oversee the association’s advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill and with key administration policymakers, and will be responsible for directing the governmental affairs department in the development and execution of key strategies for addressing the key issues facing the lodging industry, including immigration reform, tax, healthcare, and labor. She also will oversee the expansion of the association’s political action committee, HotelPAC, and grassroots program. “I am thrilled to have Vanessa joining AH&LA and directing our advocacy efforts in Washington,” said Katherine Lugar, AH&LA president/CEO. “At a time when the lodging industry is facing a growing number of legislative and regulatory initiatives that are impacting the bottom lines of hoteliers, her vast policy and political experience and proven ability to work in a collaborative manner to drive results are of tremendous value. She will be an outstanding addition to our team, and our members will immediately begin to reap the benefits of her extensive congressional, campaign, and political experience as she takes the association’s advocacy program to the next level.” Sinders comes to AH&LA from her previous position as chief of staff for the Campaign to Fix the Debt, a bipartisan organization advocating for a solution to the nation's long-term debt problems. Prior to that, she was chief of staff for former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown (R), where she directed his legislative, communications, state, and constituent service efforts and managed all office operations in Washington, D.C. and Massachusetts. She was previously policy director for former New Hampshire Senator Judd Gregg (R) and served as an analyst for the Senate Budget Committee.

AH&LA STATEMENT ON NCSL ONLINE TRAVEL COMPANY TAX RESOLUTION AH&LA supports the unanimous approval by the Executive Committee Task Force on State and Local Taxation of the National Conference of State Legislatures of a resolution noting that states should pass legislation clarifying their tax laws and requiring online travel companies (OTCs) to remit taxes paid on their retail prices: “The lodging industry greatly appreciates state legislators’ recognition that the out-of-state OTCs’ controversial practice of choosing to remit taxes only on their wholesale costs imposes a higher effective tax rate on in-state hotels,” said Katherine Lugar, AH&LA president and CEO. “Hotels simply want a level playing field and to not be subjected to unequal taxation. The passage of today’s resolution by NCSL delegates sends a signal to elected officials in all 50 states that laws need to be clarified to ensure that hotels are not placed at a competitive disadvantage because identical transactions by OTCs receive a different tax treatment. We urge them to ensure that tax policies for both OTCs and hotels are consistent.” Today’s resolution was drafted with three goals in mind: promotion of transparency for consumers; ensuring full collection of revenues and the promotion of equity and fairness in state tax codes; and ensuring efficiency in taxation through statutory impositions and providing clarity for hotel room buyers and sellers. For more information on the taxation of OTCs and the disparity with hotels, visit www.internethoteltax.com. Page 10


MOVE YOUR GROWTH

FORWARD WITH

NEW INCENTIVES JACK IN THE BOX SEED STRATEGY

Jack in the Box Seed Strategy In select Jack in the Box seed markets, growth starts with an acquisition. You can franchise recently opened company restaurants and use these locations as a platform for future market development.

NEW MARKET DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM*: • Royalty fees reduced for up to 5 years • Up to $50,000 in franchise fees waived • Up to 75% of your advertising fees invested in local marketing efforts

SEED MARKETS Tulsa Cincinnati Indianapolis Kansas City

DEVELOPMENT MARKETS

Call Grant Kreutzer, Franchise Development:

858-522-4759

For our local event listing, visit jackintheboxinc.com/franchising/opportunities

Amarillo Champaign Little Rock Louisville Omaha Salt Lake City Wichita ACQUISITION MARKETS Baton Rouge Beaumont Charlotte/Greenville-Spartanburg Nashville

*Per location. Certain restrictions apply. Development fee still applicable. ©2013 Jack in the Box Inc. 9330 Balboa Avenue, San Diego, CA 92123. This is not an offer to sell a franchise. Jack in the Box is a registered trademark of Jack in the Box Inc.

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How much will HEALTH CARE REFORM cost your business T

o Pay or Play, that is the question … at least for the majority of restaurant, C-Store, retail and hospitality businesses today. Whether your health care reform dollars will go toward providing coverage or toward paying fines is up to you, but both can come with a hefty cost for your bottom line.

You’re off the hook! Penalties don’t apply to small employers.

Offering health care benefits cost employers $7,225 per enrolled employee in 2012 according to ADP. How much will not offering those benefits cost your bottom line? If you think the turnover and customer satisfaction are worth the risk (a lot of brands have already found it’s not), follow the infographic flow below to see if — or how much — you’ll end up paying in fines.

Do you have at least 50 fulltime equivalent employees?

NO

$0

YES

n earn a You could eve nce tax credit health insura er than 25 if you have few h average employees wit n $50,000 wages less tha

Did at least one employee receive a premium tax credit or a costsharing subsidy in an Exchange?

Do you offer coverage to your employees?

NO

NO

YES

?

$0

YES Your employees can buy coverage in an online marketplace (Exchange) and receive a premium tax credit

NO

There’s no penalty.

Does your plan pay for at least 60% of covered health care expenses for a typical population?

YES

$2,000

$3,000

(# full-time equivalent employees – 30)

# employees receiving a tax credit

You’ve got to cough up $2K annually for every full-time employee after the first 30, for not providing coverage

Not providing affordable coverage will cost you $3K annually for every employee receiving a credit.

x

YES

x

fine is The maximum full-time $2,000 x (# s – 30). yee plo equivalent em

Do any employees have to pay more than 9.5% of their family income for the employer coverage?

NO

$0 lties Not so fast! These pena the growth increase each year by . in insurance premiums

You did it! You’re giving your team affordable coverage, so there’s no penalty!

C

ompletely lost? Check out our Ultimate Guide to Health Care Reform eBook for everything you need to know about the Affordable Care Act, helpful terms and definitions, and how your business can prepare. Source: The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Inc. Magazine

Page 12


InR LA OFFICERS & BOARD MEMBERS

I N D I A N A R E S T A U R A N T & LODGING ASSOCIATION

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Phil Ray Marriott Indianapolis Downtown, Indianapolis VICE CHAIR John Benjamin A Pots and Pans Production Indianapolis VICE CHAIR Rob Evans Focus Hotels, Carmel TREASURER Mark McDonnell LaSalle Grille, South Bend NRA DIRECTOR Wes Stouder Penguin Point Franchise, Warsaw AH&LA DIRECTOR Jeffrey Brown Schahet Hotels, Inc., Indianapolis EXEC COMMITTEE Craig Huse St. Elmo Steak House, Indianapolis Michael Conner Peachtree Hotel Group, Monrovia Michael Crafton 360 Services, Indianapolis DISTRICT 1 Russ Adams Strongbow Inn, Valparaiso Carolyn Cochran White Lodging Corp., Merrillville

Charles LaMotte White Lodging Corp., Merrillville

Brian Comes Hyatt Regency Indianapolis, Indianapolis

John Xenos Monarch Beverage, Indianapolis

Dave Montrose White Lodging Corp., Merrillville

Bob Gatto Texas Roadhouse, Indianapolis

Jim Zink, Jr Zink Distributing, Indianapolis

DISTRICT 2 Vicki Farmwald Hacienda Mexican Restaurants Inc., South Bend

Pat Hurrle RNDC, Indianapolis

DISTRICT 8 Lennie Busch One World Enterprises, Bloomington

Carl Hill Konover Hotel Corp., Warsaw Todd Stearns Stanz Foodservice Inc., South Bend DISTRICT 3 Bruce Dodge Apple Sauce Inc., Ft. Wayne Mark Luttik Hilton Ft. Wayne, Ft. Wayne DISTRICT 4 Brad Cohen Arni’s Inc., Lafayette

Richard Letko Hilton Garden Inn, Indianapolis John Mirabal Capital Grille, Indianapolis Martha Hoover Cafe Patachou, Indianapolis Tim Jones Bob Evan’s Restaurants, Fishers Randy Shields McDonald’s, Fishers Regina Mehallick R Bistro, Indianapolis

Greg Ehresman Triple XXX Family Restaurant, West Lafayette

Ryan Rogers Bonefish Grill, Avon

Richard Ghiselli Purdue Hospitality & Tourism Mgmt, West Lafayette

Erik Stukenberg Treat America Food Services, Indianapolis

Karen Hirsh-Cooper Homewood Suites Lafayette, Lafayette DISTRICT 6 Scott Wise A Pots and Pans Production, Indianapolis Robert Viox Belterra Casino Resort & Spa, Belterra DISTRICT 7 Rob Chinsky Penn Station East Coast Subs, Indianapolis

Richard Lux Lux Restaurants, Indianapolis Mark Newman Indiana Office of Tourism Development, Indianapolis

Craig Truelock Huse Inc., Bloomington Joe Vezzoso French Lick Springs Resort Hotel, French Lick Andy Rogers Brown County Hotels & Restaurants, Nashville Tim Worthington Spring Mill Inn, Mitchell DISTRICT 9 John Frenz Montana Mike’s, Vincennes George Brinkmoeller Sherman House Restaurant & Inn, Batesville Bruce Byrd Residence Inn Columbus, Columbus Interested in serving on the Board of Directors? Contact Debra Scott at DScott@LMVconsulting.com or call 317.673.4211 or 800.678.1957 toll-free.

Dan Waller Schahet Hotels Inc., Indianapolis Peter Meyer Hilton Downtown Indianapolis, Indianapolis

Page 13


Smith Travel Research Monthly Report July 2013 Tab 2 - Multi-Segment

By compiling over 500 educational establishments’ key calendar dates into one easy-to-read report, RRC Associates, in Indiana Hotel & Lodging Association partnership with DestiMetrics, has developed a way for you to quickly view and prepare for future leisure demand, anticipate seasonal travel shifts and spot market opportunities. For more information on the SCHOOL BREAK REPORT, please contact For the month of: July 2013 Brittany Baldwin at brittany@str.com or 615.824.8664 x3384. Current Month - July 2013 vs July 2012 Occ % 2013

ADR

2012

2013

Percent Change from July 2012

RevPAR 2012

Occ

ADR

RevPAR

Occ

Room Avail

Room Sold

2013

2012

United States

71.1

69.9 112.18 107.80

79.73

75.35

1.7

4.1

5.8

6.7

0.8

2.5

63.2

Indiana

66.9

67.2

82.91

80.30

55.43

53.96

-0.5

3.2

2.7

2.5

-0.2

-0.7

57.3

Indianapolis, IN

67.2

66.0

89.64

85.33

60.28

56.28

2.0

5.0

7.1

6.1

-0.9

1.0

61.4

Fort Wayne MSA Gary MSA South Bend-Mishawaka, IN-MI Elkhart-Goshen, IN Lafayette, IN Kokomo, IN Evansville-Henderson MSA Bloomington, IN Terre Haute, IN

60.0 79.2 68.1 67.6 70.7 68.8 60.5 62.4 59.0

67.8 82.1 64.5 66.5 65.2 74.1 59.3 61.1 59.6

75.15 84.40 85.98 73.23 74.41 69.45 77.47 91.58 67.21

73.72 81.05 84.38 70.61 75.03 68.00 75.25 88.53 66.03

45.11 66.85 58.58 49.51 52.60 47.75 46.88 57.10 39.66

49.96 66.52 54.43 46.98 48.95 50.38 44.66 54.08 39.33

-11.4 -3.5 5.6 1.6 8.4 -7.2 2.0 2.1 -0.9

2.2 -1.6 -2.3 0.0 0.0 - US 0.0 2.8 -4.3 2.0

-9.5 -5.0 3.3 1.6 8.4 Dollar -7.2 4.8 -2.3 1.0

50.5 66.3 51.4 52.2 57.6 60.6 55.0 60.0 53.7

1.9 -9.7 4.1 0.5 1.9 7.6 3.7 5.4 -0.8 7.5 Currency: 2.1 -5.2 2.9 5.0 3.4 5.6 1.8 0.8

Year to Date - July 2013 vs July 2012 Occ % Room Sold

Room Rev

2013

ADR 2013

2012

Occ

ADR

RevPAR

Room Rev

Room Avail

Properties Room Sold

Census

Rooms

2013

2012

Census

Sample

2.5

63.2

62.2 109.95 105.68

69.46

65.75

1.5

4.0

5.6

6.5

0.8

2.3

52804

30263

4923540

3513742

-0.7

57.3

57.1

82.73

83.45

47.41

47.62

0.4

-0.9

-0.4

-0.6

-0.1

0.3

965

658

84560

65108

1.0

61.4

60.6

90.50

94.19

55.56

57.09

1.3

-3.9

-2.7

-3.5

-0.8

0.5

275

220

31408

27226

-9.5 -5.0 3.3 1.6 8.4 -7.2 4.8 -2.3 1.0

50.5 66.3 51.4 52.2 57.6 60.6 55.0 60.0 53.7

50.1 65.4 47.6 48.6 57.7 59.6 55.7 59.6 56.6

72.50 79.29 83.76 69.93 80.61 70.39 77.72 97.47 67.01

72.11 76.74 81.06 67.68 81.09 68.04 75.09 94.17 65.63

36.60 52.60 43.04 36.53 46.45 42.66 42.78 58.51 36.01

36.15 50.18 38.58 32.86 46.82 40.53 41.80 56.13 37.16

0.7 1.5 8.0 7.6 -0.2 1.8 -1.1 0.7 -5.1

0.6 3.3 3.3 3.3 -0.6 3.5 3.5 3.5 2.1

1.3 4.8 11.6 11.2 -0.8 5.3 2.3 4.2 -3.1

3.4 3.6 9.1 11.2 0.6 5.3 3.6 0.3 0.1

2.1 -1.1 -2.2 0.0 1.4 0.0 1.2 -3.7 3.3

2.9 0.3 5.6 7.6 1.2 1.8 0.0 -3.1 -2.0

85 67 47 36 28 12 51 26 25

53 51 38 25 24 9 36 16 19

6501 5807 4213 2346 2503 894 4400 2069 2140

4707 4439 3528 1783 2284 745 3532 1519 1877

Page 14

2012

Participation

Percent Change from YTD 2012

RevPAR

-7.8 -1.1 5.2 5.4 7.5 USD -5.2 7.9 1.1 2.8

Sample

Source 2013 Smith Travel Research, Inc./STR Global, Ltd.

2013


Page 15


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