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THE UPPERSTAGE OCTOBER 18 - NOVEMBER 13

Original artwork by Kyle Ragsdale.

THE ONEAMERICA MAINSTAGE NOVEMBER 19 - DECEMBER 24

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Investing in our community takes center stage OneAmerica® is proud to support organizations that share our commitment to creating a vibrant community. For more than 20 years, we’ve been the season sponsor at the Indiana Repertory Theatre — one of the most youth-centric professional theaters in the United States. Each year, more than 40,000 students and teachers visit the IRT through youth education programs. Professional live theater inspires discovery, creativity and innovation, and we’re delighted to play a role in introducing young people to this experience. Learn more about us at www.OneAmerica.com.

OneAmerica® is the marketing name for the companies of OneAmerica. © 2016 OneAmerica Financial Partners, Inc. All rights reserved.

C-28537 08/02/16


When planning your financial future, don’t act alone... Let us help you set the stage.

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SEASON SPONSOR 2016 - 2017

THANKS

to a World Class Sponsor For over four decades, the Indiana Repertory Theatre has brought actors, friends, families, and community members together to enjoy great entertainment and performances. We are proud to continue our support of the IRT as a key cultural organization in Indianapolis. We hope that you will enjoy the 2016-2017 Season. —Scott Davison, President and CEO

Clients at Center Stage At the IRT, you have the best seat in the house to view excellence on stage. At Faegre Baker Daniels, clients are front and center for excellent experiences. Our lawyers and consultants adopt the client’s point of view and provide high-quality service in the courtroom, at the negotiation table and everywhere in between.

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OUR MISSION & VISION

CONTENTS

MISSION Live theatre connects us to meaningful issues in our lives and has the power to shape the human experience. The mission of the Indiana Repertory Theatre is to produce top-quality, professional theatre and related activities, providing experiences that will engage, surprise, challenge, and entertain people throughout their lifetimes, helping us build a vital and vibrant community.

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VISION The Indiana Repertory Theatre will be a life-long destination of choice for people of all ages and backgrounds seeking enjoyable and meaningful experiences. Using theatre as a springboard for both personal reflection and community discussion, our productions and programs will inspire our neighbors to learn about themselves and others. As an arts leader in the state of Indiana, the IRT invites collaborations with other top-quality community institutions, with the goal of making Indiana a vibrant home of cultural expression, economic vitality, and a diverse, informed, and engaged citizenry.

AS AN INSTITUTION, WE VALUE: SUSTAINING A PROFESSIONAL, CREATIVE ATMOSPHERE The professional production of plays that provide insight and celebrate human relationships through the unique vision of the playwright • Professional artists of the highest quality working on our stages in an environment that allows them to grow and thrive • Our leadership role in fostering a creative environment where arts, education, corporate, civic, and cultural organizations collaborate to benefit our community. PRUDENT STEWARDSHIP OF OUR RESOURCES Our public-benefit status, where the focus is on artistic integrity, affordable ticket prices that allow all segments of our community to attend, and community service • Fiscal responsibility and financial security based on achieving a balanced budget • Growing our endowment fund as a resource for future development and to ensure institutional longevity. INCLUSIVENESS The production of plays from a broad range of dramatic literature addressing diverse communities • The involvement of all segments of our community in our activities • Using theatre arts as a primary tool to bring meaning into the lives of our youth, making creativity a component of their education • The employment of artists and staff that celebrates the diversity of the United States. HERITAGE AND TRADITION Our role as Indiana’s premiere theatre for more than 40 years, recognized by the 107th Indiana General Assembly in 1991 as “Indiana’s Theatre Laureate.” • The historic Indiana Theatre as our home, as a cultural landmark, and as a significant contributor to a vital downtown • Our national, state, and local reputation for 40+ years of quality creative work and educational programming • Our board, staff, volunteers, artists, audiences, and donors as essential partners in fulfilling our mission.

Mission & Values

6 Leadership 9 Profile 10 Staff 12 Board of Directors 18 Finding Home: Indiana at 200 32 Company bios for Finding Home: Indiana at 200 38 Interview with Tim Grimm 40 A Christmas Carol 48 Company bios for A Christmas Carol 62 Donor Listing

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CONTACT US IRTLIVE.COM TICKET OFFICE: 317.635.5252 ADMIN OFFICES: 317.635.5277 140 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46204

SEASON 2016 - 2017

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Doris Duke Foundation, as well as numerous grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and Shakespeare for a New Generation. Among the memorable productions Janet has directed on the IRT’s stages are The Glass Menagerie (1999), Ah! Wilderness (2002), The Drawer Boy (2004), Looking over the President’s Shoulder (2008), The Diary of Anne Frank (2011), James Still’s The House That Jack Built (2012), and To Kill a Mockingbird (2016). Celebrating the IRT’s 45-year legacy this season, she directs A Christmas Carol.

LEADERSHIP: JANET ALLEN EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Creating world-class professional theatre for Central Indiana audiences of all ages has remained a career-long passion for Janet Allen. She began at the IRT in 1980 as the theatre’s first literary manager–dramaturg. After four years in New York City, she returned to serve ten years as associate artistic director under mentors Tom Haas and Libby Appel. She was named the IRT’s fourth artistic director in 1996, and last season celebrated her 20th season in that role. In 2013, she was named the IRT’s executive artistic director. During Janet’s tenure, the IRT has significantly diversified its education services to both adults and children, expanded its new play development programs, solidified its reputation as a top-flight regional theatre dedicated to diverse programming and production quality, and established the IRT as a generous content partner with organizations throughout central Indiana. Janet’s passion for nurturing playwrights has led to a fruitful relationship with James Still, the IRT’s playwright-in-residence for 19 years, and the creation and production of 15 new works, the Indiana Series, that examine Hoosier and Midwestern sensibilities (seven of them by James Still). Her collaboration with playwrights has brought the theatre prestigious grants from the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Joyce Foundation, and the 6

Janet studied theatre at Illinois State University, Indiana University, and Exeter College, Oxford. As a classical theatre specialist, she has published and taught theatre history and dramaturgy at IUPUI and Butler University. Janet’s leadership skills and community service have been recognized by Indianapolis Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 Award, the Network of Women in Business–IBJ’s Influential Women in Business Award, Safeco’s Beacon of Light in Our Community Award, a Distinguished Hoosier Award conferred by Governor Frank O’Bannon, Girls Inc.’s Touchstone Award for Arts Leadership, and the Indiana Commission on Women’s Keeper of the Light Torchbearer Award. She is a proud alum of the Stanley K. Lacy Leadership program (Class XIX) and the Shannon Leadership Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and is a 2013-14 Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Arts Fellow. In April 2015 Janet was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and received a Medallion Award for significant national contributions from the Children’s Theatre Foundation of America. Janet is a member of the Indianapolis Woman’s Club and Congregation Beth-El Zedeck. She lives in an historic house built in 1855 in the downtown Chatham Arch neighborhood with her husband, Joel Grynheim, their two daughters, her mother, and two lovely mutts.


In 2016, Suzanne was honored to serve as a panelist for Shakespeare in American Communities in cooperation with Arts Midwest. Suzanne is active in the community, having been the treasurer of Irish Fest for nine years, a member of the board of directors and treasurer of the Day Nursery Association for seven years, and a past treasurer of Indy Fringe.

LEADERSHIP: SUZANNE SWEENEY

Suzanne is a graduate of the College of William & Mary (undergraduate) and Indiana University (M.B.A.). She started her career as a CPA; prior to coming to Indianapolis, Suzanne worked in finance for more than 10 years, living in such varied locales as Washington, D.C. ; Dallas, Texas; Frankfurt, Germany; Honolulu, Hawaii; and even working for three months in Auckland, New Zealand (where, yes, she went bungee jumping). Suzanne is an alum of the Stanley K. Lacy Leadership Program (Class XXXI). Suzanne lives in the Old Northside, with her 13-year-old son, Jackson, and their foxhound rescue dog, Gertie.

MANAGING DIRECTOR Suzanne is an 18-year veteran of the IRT, managing every administrative area within the theatre at one time or another during that period. Serving as the managing director is the capstone to her career here. Her main responsibility had been to serve as the chief financial officer of the theatre, running the business office, human resources, and information technology functions. As the CFO, she helped to steer the organization thorough 15 years of balanced budgets (and 15 audits!). She also served as the interim managing director for 18 months in 2004-2005. Suzanne is continuing the work of helping to implement a structured and inclusive fundraising effort, including moving the theatre more proactively into planned giving, as well as expanding its marketing efforts and creativity. She is excited to be moving into year four of this leadership role of the organization she loves.

Left: Paula Hopkins and Ryan Artzberger in the IRT's 2016 production of To Kill a Mockingbird. Photo by Zach Rosing. Right: Rob Johansen and Marcus Truschinski in the IRT's 2016 production of The Mystery of Irma Vep. Photo by Zach Rosing.

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New Harmony Project, Eugene O’Neill Playwrights Conference, the Colorado New Play Summit, the Lark in New York, Launch Pad at UC–Santa Barbara, Perry-Mansfield New Works Festival, Telluride Playwright’s Festival, New Visions/New Voices, Fresh Ink, and Write Now at the IRT. Three of his plays have received the Distinguished Play Award from the American Alliance for Theatre & Education, and his work has been produced throughout the United States, Canada, China, Japan, Europe, South Africa, and Australia. Other theatres that have produced James’s plays include the Kennedy Center, Denver Center, Geva, Cornerstone Theater Company, Ford’s Theatre, People’s Light & Theatre, the Barter, Pasadena Playhouse, Portland Stage, the Station, the Asolo, Company of Fools, the Children’s Theater Company of Minneapolis, Metro Theater Company, B-Street Theatre, Tricklock, Vermont Stage Company, the Round House, American Blues, Illusion Theater, and the Mark Taper Forum.

LEADERSHIP: JAMES STILL PLAYWRIGHT-IN-RESIDENCE During James’s 19 years as playwright-in-residence, IRT audiences have seen his plays April 4, 1968: Before We Forgot How to Dream, The House That Jack Built, I Love to Eat: Cooking with James Beard, The Velveteen Rabbit, The Heavens Are Hung in Black, Interpreting William, Iron Kisses, Looking over the President’s Shoulder (twice), The Gentleman from Indiana, Searching for Eden, He Held Me Grand, And Then They Came for Me: Remembering the World of Anne Frank (thrice), Amber Waves, and The Secret History of the Future. He has also directed many productions at the IRT, including The Mystery of Irma Vep, Red, Other Desert Cities, God of Carnage, Becky’s New Car, Rabbit Hole, Doubt, Bad Dates, Plaza Suite, The Immigrant, and Dinner with Friends, as well as his own I Love to Eat, Looking over the President’s Shoulder (2001), and Amber Waves. This season the IRT produces his new play Miranda and he directs Dial “M” for Murder.

Recent premieres at other theaters include the Denver Center Theatre production of Appoggiatura, which was a nominee for Outstanding New Play for the Henry Awards at the Colorado Theatre Guild. Appoggiatura is the second play in the family trilogy that began with the award-winning The House That Jack Built. The final play in the trilogy is Miranda, commissioned by Illusion Theater in Minneapolis. Also premiering recently was The Widow Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, DC. James’s short play When Miss Lydia Hinkley Gives a Bird the Bird has appeared in several festivals around the country and was a finalist for the Heideman Award from Actors Theatre of Louisville. New plays in the works include (A) New World, as well as an adaptation of the classic Black Beauty commissioned by Seattle Children’s Theatre. James also works in television and film and has been nominated for five Emmys and a Television Critics Association Award; he has twice been a finalist for the Humanitas Prize. He was a producer and head writer for the series PAZ, the head writer for Maurice Sendak’s Little Bear, and writer for the Bill Cosby series Little Bill. He wrote The Little Bear Movie and The Miffy Movie as well as the feature film The Velocity of Gary. James grew up in Kansas and lives in Los Angeles.

James is an elected member of the National Theatre Conference in New York, and a Kennedy Center inductee of the College of Fellows of the American Theatre. Other honors include the Todd McNerney New Play Prize from the Spoleto Festival, William Inge Festival’s Otis Guernsey New Voices Award, the Orlin Corey Medallion from the Children’s Theatre Foundation of America, and the Charlotte B. Chorpenning Award for Distinguished Body of Work. His plays have been nominated four times for the Pulitzer Prize, and have been developed and workshopped at Robert Redford’s Sundance, the 8 Christina D. Harper, Tracey N. Bonner, Nick Vidal, and Nia Simmons in IRT's 2015 production of April 4, 1968: Before We Forgot How to Dream. Photo by Zach Rosing.


Indiana Theatre, which was renovated to contain three performance spaces (OneAmerica Stage, Upperstage, and Cabaret) and work spaces, reviving this historic downtown entertainment site. To keep ticket prices and services affordable for the entire community, the IRT operates as a not-for-profit organization, deriving more than 50% of its operating income from contributions. The theatre is generously supported by foundations, corporations, and individuals, an investment which recognizes the IRT’s mission-based commitment to serving Central Indiana with top-quality theatrical fare. PROGRAMS

INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE PROFILE HISTORY

Since the Indiana Repertory Theatre was founded in 1971, it has grown into one of the leading regional theatres in the country, as well as one of the top-flight cultural institutions in the city and state. In 1991 Indiana’s General Assembly designated the IRT as “Theatre Laureate” of the state of Indiana. The IRT’s national reputation has been confirmed by prestigious grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lila Wallace–Reader’s Digest Fund, the Theatre Communications Group–Pew Charitable Trusts, the Shubert Foundation, and the Kresge Foundation; and by a Joyce Award from the Joyce Foundation. The IRT remains the largest fully professional resident not-forprofit theatre in the state, providing 120,000 live professional theatre experiences for its audience last season. These experiences included 40,000 students and teachers from 56 of Indiana’s 92 counties, making the IRT one of the most youth-oriented professional theatres in the country. A staff of more than 100 seasonal and year-round employees creates nine productions exclusively for Indiana audiences. Actors, directors, and designers are members of professional stage unions. The IRT’s history has been enacted in two historic downtown theatres. The Athenaeum Turners Building housed the company’s first eight seasons. Since 1980 the IRT has occupied the 1927

• The OneAmerica Season includes nine diverse productions from classical and contemporary repertoires, including Eli Lilly and Company presents A Christmas Carol and James Still's Miranda. • New Play Development The IRT offers Write Now, a prestigious national workshop for adult playwrights writing for young audiences; and Young Playwrights in Process (YPiP), a playwriting contest and workshop for Indiana high school and junior high students. • Community Gathering Place Located in a beautiful historic landmark, the IRT offers a wide variety of unique and adaptable spaces for family, business, and community gatherings of all types. Call Amanda Lyons at 317.916.4805 for more information. • Volunteer Opportunities The IRT depends on the generous donation of time and energy by volunteers; call 317.916.4805 to learn how you can become involved. • Meet the Artists Regularly scheduled pre-show chats, post-show discussions, and backstage tours offer audiences unique insights into each production. • Student Matinees The IRT continues a long-time commitment to student audiences with school-day student matinee performances of all IRT productions. These performances are augmented with educational activities and curriculum support materials. This season Eli Lilly and Company presents A Christmas Carol, The Cay, and Stuart Little offer extensive opportunities for student attendance. • Educational Programs Auxiliary services offered include visiting artists in the classroom, study guides, pre- and postshow discussions, and guided tours of the IRT’s facilities. • Classes From creative dramatics to audition workshops to Shakespeare seminars, the IRT offers a wide array of personal learning opportunities for all ages, including our Summer Conservatory for Youth. Call 317.916.4842 for further information. 9


INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE STAFF EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Janet Allen

ARTISTIC General Manager Jane Robison Production Manager Brian S. Newman Resident Dramaturg Richard J Roberts Company Manager Hillary Martin Manager of Outreach Programs Milicent Wright Playwright-in-Residence James Still COSTUME SHOP Costume Shop Manager Guy Clark Lead Draper Jessica Hayes Draper Stepanie Eubank Costumers Christi Parker Judith Skyles Wardrobe Supervisor Rich Taylor

Shop Assistant Kelsey Sikes ELECTRICS Master Electrician Beth A. Nuzum Assistant Master Electrician Elizabeth Smith Electrician Matt Griffin PAINT SHOP Charge Scenic Artist Claire Dana Assistant Charge Scenic Artist Jim Schumacher PROPERTIES SHOP Properties Manager Geoffrey Ehrendreich Properties Carpenter Christina Buerosse Properties Artisan Rachelle Martin Wilburn SCENE SHOP Technical Director Chris Fretts Assistant Technical Director John Bennett

Shop Foreman Kyle Baker Master Carpenter Betty Rupp Carpenters Seth Randall-Tapply David Sherrill Deck Manager Matt Shives SOUND Resident Sound Designer Todd Mack Reischman Lead Sound Engineer Maggie Hall Sound Engineer Jason Tuttle STAGE MANAGEMENT Production Stage Manager Nathan Garrison Stage Manager Joel Grynheim Assistant Stage Manager Erin Robson-Smith Production Assistants Brittany Cowgill Claire Stark Sarah Geis

INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE PART-TIME STAFF & ASSOCIATES ARTISTIC Dramaturgy Intern Jesica Courtney Teaching Artists Chelsea Anderson Andrew Black Karaline Feller Callie Burk Hartz Ronn Johnstone Kathi Ridley-Merriweather Beverly Roche Milicent Wright

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COSTUME SHOP Dressers Whitney Klein Brittany Kugler

Scenic Painters Lee Edmundson Jason J. Gill Callie N. Haven

ELECTRICS Electricians Lee Edmundson Kate Smith

SCENE SHOP Carpenters Lee Edmundson Richard Landon Christopher Strain

PAINT SHOP Scenic Artists Robyn Kahn-Cleland Particia L. Money

Scenery & Paint Intern Danielle Graves


MANAGING DIRECTOR

FINANCE Director of Finance Greg Perkins

ADMINISTRATION Receptionist / Administrative Assistant Seema Juneja Executive Assistant Randy Talley

Assistant Controller Danette Alles

Suzanne Sweeney

Administrative Support Specialist Suzanne Spradlin Beinart DEVELOPMENT Director of Development Jennifer Turner Associate Director of Major Gifts Lindsey Horan Institutional Giving Manager Elisabeth Lesem Donor Relations Manager Maggie Barrett Schlake Development Systems Brady Clark EDUCATION Director of Education Randy D. Pease Youth Audience Manager Ann Marie Elliott

MARKETING Program Advertising Manager Dave Charrlin | New Moon Advertising Marketing Intern Caitlin Flowers EDUCATION Education Intern John Collins FINANCE ASSOCIATES External Auditors Crowe Horwath LLP

Payroll & Benefits Specialist Jennifer Carpenter INFORMATION SYSTEMS Director of Information Systems Dan Bradburn MARKETING Director of Marketing & Sales Brandee Bryant Marketing Communications Manager Carolyne Holcomb Audience Development Manager Elizabeth Petermann Graphic Designer Amber Mills Junior Designer & Digital Media Coordinator Alexis Morin OUTREACH Group Sales & Teleservicing Manager Doug Sims Assistant Teleservicing Manager Aaron Henze

Legal Counsel Heather Moore PATRON SERVICES Assistant House Managers Haley Annis Pat Bebee Terri Bradburn Rebecca Eccles Rene Fox Marilyn Hatcher Bill Imel Sarah James Sherry McCoy Gail McDermott-Bowler

Teleservicing Representatives Tom Detmer Nancy McCarthy Dustin Miller Mark Vogel PATRON SERVICES Operations Manager Robert Steele Ticket Office Manager Margaret Lehtinen Assistant Ticket Office Manager Jessie Streeval Ticketing Systems Specialist Molly Wible House Manager & Special Events Coordinator Amanda Lyons Customer Service Representatives Jessica Meister Katie Paolacci Jacob Peterman Katie Phelan Elizabeth Watts Eric Wilburn Group Sales Manager Kimberly Reeves Building Services Dameon Cooper Gaylord Gaulden Dave Melton

Sherry Nielsen Melanie Overfield Deborah Provisor Phoebe Rodgers Kathy Sax Karen Sipes Sheila Smith Maggie Ward Heather Welling Bartenders Gayle Durcholz Sandra Hester-Steele Nancy Hiser Susan Korbin Tina Weaver

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS CHAIR

SECRETARY

Michael J. Harrington

Nadine Givens

VICE CHAIR | CHAIR ELECT

TREASURER

-Eli Lilly and Company

Thomas C. Froehle Jr. -Faegre Baker Daniels

-PNC Wealth Management

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Daniel C. Emerson -Indianapolis Colts

Amy Griman

-Fifth Third Bank

MEMBERS Don Robinson-Gay -BMO Harris Commercial Banking

Sharon R. Barner -Cummins, Inc. Frank Basile -Community Volunteer

Amy Kosnoff -Community Volunteer

Gerald Berg -Wells Fargo Advisors

Sarah Lechleiter -Community Volunteer

Carl W. Butler -Angie’s List, Inc.

Deborah Loughrey -Community Volunteer

Ann Colussi Dee -Duke Realty

Jeff MacKay -Indianapolis Power & Light Co.

Gary Denney -Eli Lilly and Company, Retired

Andrew Michie -OneAmerica Financial Partners, Inc.

Michael P. Dinius -Noble Consulting Services, Inc.

Lawren K. Mills -Ice Miller LLP

Richard D. Feldman -Franciscan St. Francis Health

Timothy W. Oliver -JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA

James W. Freeman -OneAmerica Financial Partners, Inc.

Brian Payne -Central Indiana Community Foundation

Ron Gifford -Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Tammara D. Porter -Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP

David Whitman* -Community Volunteer

Michael N. Heaton -Katz Sapper & Miller

Peter N. Reist -Oxford Financial Group

William O. Williams II -UnitedHealthcare

Brenda Horn -Ice Miller LLP

Susan O. Ringo -Community Volunteer

Heather Wilson -Frost Brown Todd

Jill Lacy -The Lacy Foundation

BOARD EMERITUS Robert Anker* Rollin Dick Berkley Duck* Dale Duncan* Michael Lee Gradison* Margie Herald David Klapper David Kleiman*

E. Kirk McKinney Jr. (in memoriam) Richard Morris* (in memoriam) Jane Schlegel* Jerry Semler* Jack Shaw* William E. Smith III* Eugene R. Tempel* * Past Board Chairs

Wayne Schmidt -Schmidt Associates Michael Semler -Cushman & Wakefield Mark Shaffer -KPMG LLP Jacqueline Simmons -Indiana University Mike Simmons -T2 Systems Jennifer Vigran -Second Helpings, Inc. Amy Waggoner -Salesforce L. Alan Whaley -Ice Miller LLP

MICHAEL J. HARRINGTON BOARD CHAIR Welcome to the IRT! On behalf of the IRT’s Board of Directors and staff, I want to thank you for joining us for another world-class performance created right here at Indiana's leading fully professional theatre. Whether you’ve been part of the IRT family for years or you are here for the first time, we’re glad to see you! As we celebrate our 45th season, we also want to thank you for continuing to support the IRT’s service to the people of Indiana. Your attendance, your gifts, and your good will are crucial components in our ongoing stability. With your participation, the IRT can continue its longtime role as a pillar of the state’s performing arts scene, an important downtown magnet, and a valuable community partner. Enjoy the show!

–Michael J. Harrington 12


TOURS FOR PEOPLE WHO HATE TOURS! COME TAKE A TRIP WITH ACTOR-MUSICIANS TIM GRIMM & JAN LUCAS!

THE TRIPS INISHFREE TRIP TO IRELAND: MAY 2 - 11: MAYO, GALWAY & CLARE COUNTIES JUNE 5 - 14: CORK, KERRY & CLARE COUNTIES TURNING POINT TOUR: JUNE 17 - 25: THE NETHERLANDS

THE DETAILS We travel in small groups, 20 for Ireland, 15 for the Netherlands. Both tours offer nine days of sights and sounds the typical tourist never sees: music every night in Ireland, culture and history in NL, and gorgeous sightseeing in both!

QUOTES FROM PAST PARTICIPANTS “ It seemed more like a wonderful vacation with friends who were showing us their homeland.” “Actually being in the places that inspired some of Tim’s songs, visiting some of the performance venues and hearing the songs performed on site added a special memory." “In many ways it seemed like we had a more authentic experience of the country. We especially enjoyed meeting, talking with and learning about interesting facets of life from folks who were not in the tourist business.”

BOOK OR FIND MORE INFORMATION AT TIMGRIMM.COM


Join Us FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2017 IRT'S CELEBRITY RADIO SHOW The city's most hilarious fundraising event!

FOR MORE INFO OR TO GET TICKETS, VISIT IRTLIVE.COM/RADIOSHOW

THANK YOU TO THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS, ORGANIZATIONS AND CORPORATIONS WHO MADE THE CREATION AND PRODUCTION OF FINDING HOME: INDIANA AT 200 POSSIBLE. WE APPRECIATE THEIR COMMITMENT TO SUPPORTING NEW WORK FOR OUR INDIANA AUDIENCES. JANET ALLEN & JOEL GRYNHEIM SUSIE & JOEL BLUM THE MARGOT L. AND ROBERT S. ECCLES FUND, A FUND OF CICF ELI LILLY AND COMPANY TOM & JENNY FROEHLE MICHAEL & JUDY HARRINGTON DONALD & TERI HECHT BRUCE HETRICK & CHERI O’NEILL BRENDA HORN INDIANA ARTS COMMISSION

SARAH & JOHN LECHLEITER DAVID & LESLIE MORGAN NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS CARL NELSON & LOUI LORD NELSON, PH.D. COURTNEY SALE & SEAN MANNING JANE & FRED SCHLEGEL SIMMONS FAMILY FOUNDATION, A FUND OF CICF CHERYL & JIM STRAIN CHERYL & RAY WALDMAN ALAN & ELIZABETH WHALEY


Barnes & Thornburg is proud to support the Indiana Repertory Theatre. Your commitment to the arts has left us speechless.

Uncommon Value

ATLANTA CHICAGO DALLAS DELAWARE INDIANA LOS ANGELES MICHIGAN MINNEAPOLIS OHIO WASHINGTON, D.C.

btlaw.com


This is our standing ovation. Today’s IRT performance was rehearsed, well planned and took an incredible amount of talent to bring to life. At Citizens Energy Group, we recognize the dedication required to deliver quality work. We strive to provide excellent customer service and believe that being involved in the community is an ensemble effort.

Bravo on an excellent season!

CitizensEnergyGroup.com


Carys Kresny, education director for South Bend Civic Theatre, teaches an acting exercise to Madison Primary Center students on Feb. 29. South Bend Tribune photo/ROBERT FRANKLIN

Show your support

for the arts the next time you purchase or renew your license plate!


UPPERSTAGE OCT 18 - NOV 13

REVIEWS? FACEBOOK/TWITTER: #irtlive EMAIL: reviews@irtlive.com

ARTISTIC

Director_________________PETER AMSTER Scenic Designer_____________ ROBERT MARK MORGAN Costume Designer____________________ANN SHEFFIELD Lighting Designer_________________MICHAEL LINCOLN Sound Designer________________ TODD MACK REISCHMAN Additional Music & Lyrics____ JACKSON GRIMM & JAN LUCAS Assistant Director & Dramaturg________RICHARD J ROBERTS Curators_______________________________ JANET ALLEN PETER AMSTER TIM GRIMM JAN LUCAS RICHARD J ROBERTS COURTNEY SALE JAMES STILL Stage Manager___________________ JOEL GRYNHEIM Assistant Stage Manager___________ ERIN ROBSON-SMITH Casting________________________CLAIRE SIMON CASTING

ARTS PARTNERS

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Season Sponsor

SEASON 2016 - 2017

Lead Support MARGOT L. AND ROBERT S. ECCLES ARTS AND CULTURE FUND, A FUND OF CICF

Associate Sponsor

Family Series Sponsor

Supporters

m a k i n g t h e a rts h a p p e n


JANET ALLEN

Executive Artistic Director

SUZANNE SWEENEY

Managing Director

THE CAST Ensemble________________ DAVID ALAN ANDERSON LAUREN BRIGGEMAN MARK GOETZINGER TIM GRIMM AARON KIRBY JAN LUCAS MICHAEL JOSEPH MITCHELL GAIL RASTORFER KIM STAUNTON DELANNA STUDI Fiddle____________________________ KATIE BURK Bass___________________________ CONNOR GRIMM Guitars, Banjo, Octave Mandolin_________JACKSON GRIMM

The performance will last approximately two hours and 40 minutes with one intermission.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Special Thanks to James H. Madison, Professor Emeritus of History at Indiana University Bloomington. Special Thanks to Barbara Shoup, Indiana Writers Center, the Indiana Historical Society, and Indy Reads. Vocal Arrangements: David Weber Lighting Design Assistant: Derek Keifer Dance Captain: Lauren Bertram Excerpt from Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut ©Kurt Vonnegut LLC. Used by permission. *Actors and stage managers in this production are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States. The director is a member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, a national theatrical labor union. The scenic, costume, lighting, and sound designers are represented by United Scenic Artists Local 829, IATSE. Photography and recording are forbidden in the theatre. The videotaping of this production is a violation of United States Copyright Law and an actionable Federal Offense.

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FINDING FINDING HOME BY JANET ALLEN, EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

I’m a Hoosier by choice, not by birth, but I have lived the majority of my life here. I have long been fascinated by the ways in which the Hoosier character is unique, how topography and history and migration combine to create a viewpoint that seems born of this place. Finding Home: Indiana at 200 started as a dream: how might we explore, theatrically, two centuries of the Hoosier experience? I remember a conversation, some five years ago, with John Herbst, president of the Indiana Historical Society, and James Still, IRT’s playwright-in-residence. John urged us to create a Bicentennial event, a new landmark in our Indiana Series: 14 plays (six by James) chronicling Indiana literature and history, exploring what it means to put down roots here. I knew early on that I wanted our Bicentennial production to contain music. In our diverse and digital world, music transmits emotion and character in ways that seem ineffable and essential to place and feeling. Tim Grimm’s combined skills as a singer-songwriter and actor, and his long association with the IRT, made him absolutely the right collaborator. He and his wife, Jan Lucas, who has also graced our stage many times, live on 80 acres in Bartholomew County, where they grow hay, raise animals, and tend a bounteous farm garden, all while making glorious music and theatre. They live many of Indiana’s best values of family, land, sustainability, and generosity. Their insights and instincts have been integral to the development of this piece. Originally, Tim and I, with IRT’s dramaturg, Richard Roberts, thought we’d approach a single writer to create this work. Our criteria were simple: someone whose writing life was

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based in Indiana, who held a keen interest in the questions of place. James Still’s other commitments made him unavailable. Perhaps not surprisingly, the other folks we approached were also too busy with their own work to take on a task of this magnitude and, perhaps, folly. Then one day Tim said, casually, “Why don’t we ask lots of Indiana writers to contribute pieces?” This idea was a game changer, capturing the essence of what we hadn’t quite realized we were after: a mosaic of the many divergent views of a place and its people. We made lists of Indiana writers we admired. We asked Barbara Shoup, the executive director of the Indiana Writers Center, and Travis DiNicola, then the executive director of Indy Reads, to suggest more writers. We came up with a list of about 40. There is no question that our list was not exhaustive; we could have invited many more. We were undaunted, even delighted, by the fact that few of them had written for the theatre. This project has been a wonderful introduction to some amazing writers: journalists, essayists, fiction writers, screenwriters, poets (we have three Indiana Poets Laureate!), theologians, and yes, even playwrights. So not only the subject matter but the writing styles provide us with an array of perspectives and means of containing story. In summer 2014, Tim, Richard, and I spent several delightful hours with our friend Jim Madison, the state’s preeminent historian (see page 26), creating lists of historic moments, people, and places that could provide the writers with inspiration. Some of these we knew about; others were hidden gems that, once Jim shared them, we immediately wanted to put on stage. We also invited the writers to pitch their own ideas.


When we compiled the writers’ responses, we were astounded by not only the breadth of their ideas, but also their passion and ingenuity. A surprising number were eager to write about the Klan in Indiana. Several wanted to write about socialist Eugene V. Debs. The subject matter ranged wide, and we delighted in some of the lesser known moments that writers brought to the table. We rarely considered what was missing; we were interested in what provoked this diverse group, what they viewed as important or memorable or necessary to explore in this Bicentennial year. This last year has been about refinement. As with all art making, the path has been circuitous, and dotted with discoveries. We now have 30 writers from all over the state: women, men, African American, Latino, Jewish, Catholic, Quaker, Mennonite. Rural and urban voices. Young and old voices. Indiana natives and Indiana transplants. This isn’t a piece with one point of view; rather, its viewpoints are multitudinous, just as people of differing backgrounds, cultures, races, ages, and genders see the world, and their place in it, differently. About 8 months ago we added director Peter Amster to the creative team, a genius at the intersection of vignette, music, and emotional through-line. We’ve done two workshops with actors to begin to learn the performance dynamics of the pieces. We’ve edited, rearranged, asked writers to change formats, removed characters, added characters, and rearranged again. We have been blessed with the generosity of funders who are as excited about our endeavor as we are.

Because of that generosity, and the sheer wealth of material, we have created not one but two evenings, dubbed Blue and Gold after the Indiana state flag. Each evening is a complete experience unto itself; they can be seen in either order or alone. Think of it like going to concerts by your favorite musician and hearing different sets on different nights. Or going to an art museum: if you go to the left, you will see wonderful things; to the right, you will see equally wonderful but different things! We will make it easy for you to come back if you wish; watch for your follow-up email after today’s performance. We’d love to share the complete panoply of the writing with you. It’s an amazing journey. Finally, we have collected 13 performers from all over the country and from a variety of racial and cultural backgrounds. They bring broad insights to this diverse work. Eight of them are Hoosiers by birth or choice. All four members of the Grimm Family Band are performing, a gift of scheduling and dedication. A bounty of post-show discussions will variously feature Jim Madison, Nelson Price (WICR’s Hoosier History Live!), and many of those 30 writers. We are collaborating with the Indiana Historical Society, Indiana Humanities, and Spirit & Place to expand the circle of discussion. Check our website, irtlive.com, for more opportunities at libraries and elsewhere. This is a production born of a simple impulse: how can we learn more about our past, through the lens of great artists, in order to better engage with our future. Happy Birthday, Indiana!

The Grimm family farm in Bartholomew County. Photo by Amber Mills.

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BEING HOOSIER BY PETER AMSTER, DIRECTOR

I am not a Hoosier. I was born in New York and have lived most of my life in Chicago and Florida and Michigan. I have worked at IRT for more than two decades, directing a show almost every year. And every time I come to Indy, it feels like a homecoming. I consider Indiana Rep my artistic home, because of the wonderful, generousspirited, validating people who work here, and because the audiences are smart, discerning, adventurous, and appreciative of the enormous financial and personal risk and concerted effort that live theatre requires. So, maybe I’m an intermittent Hoosier.

breadth of information and depth of feeling. There was celebration and condemnation, deep exploration and quick portraiture, high seriousness and high comedy. But mostly there was love—for the place that so many of my friends call home. I have learned much on this journey, about Hoosiers I didn’t know (Princess Mishawaka, Rachel Peden, D. C. Stephenson, and Janet Guthrie, to name just a few); and surprising details about Hoosiers I thought I knew (James Dean, John Dillinger, Eugene V. Debs, and James Whitcomb Riley, among many others).

When Janet Allen invited me to direct this exploration of the history and culture of Indiana on the occasion of its 200th birthday, I felt like it was an opportunity to dig deeper, to learn more, about the place I call home for about a month every year. The poems, monologues, scenes, and songs that came pouring in from all over the state offered an extraordinary

This process has deepened my respect and admiration for my Indiana friends in so many ways. One small way: the origin of the word Hoosier is lost in time. There are many conjectures (you will hear some of those in today’s show), but nothing definite. That’s a mystery and ambiguity that Hoosiers seem to be happy to live with. I admire that. It would drive New Yorkers nuts.

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Connor Grimm, Jan Lucas, Tim Grimm, and Jackson Grimm. Photo by Amber Mills.


ORIGINAL SONGS

SONGS OF FINDING HOME "Ballad of William Henry Harrison" by Tim Grimm & Jan Lucas

"Heart Land" by Tim Grimm

"Cover These Bones" by Tim Grimm

"Hoosier Cannonball" by Tim Grimm

"Deer Lick Creek" by Tim Grimm

"Indiana" by Tim Grimm

"Ernie Pyle" by Tim Grimm & Jackson Grimm

"Jag Tanker Stanna" by Tim Grimm

"The 500 Blues" by Tim Grimm & Jan Lucas

"The Sweet Corn Swing" by Jackson Grimm & Jan Lucas

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200 YEARS IN THE MAKING TIM GRIMM

ROBERT MARK MORGAN

As a born and bred Hoosier who aims to recognize this state’s beauty and flaws, I’m thrilled to be working on this production. A good songwriter is an historian, an actor, an editor, a listener, and a director. Having worked in the theatre for most of my life, many of these attributes are (I hope) second nature. People often ask me whether I prefer acting or music? The truth is I love them both, and feel lucky to be able to go back and forth. The theatre is an environment ripe for collaboration, and therein lies the biggest difference. A songwriter’s world is rather solitary. Finding Home allows me to share skill-sets with an amazing array of artists. I’ve also been lucky to write some of this material with family band members—and, in a couple of instances, to hand over writing duties to them when I was busy working on something else. It’s been very important to me, through these songs, to honor what it means to be human here in Indiana over the past 200 years.

Attempting to design a set for a show that encompasses 200 years of Indiana history was, at first, a little daunting ... and then became more daunting. With the show comprised of an amalgamation of different Indiana pieces written by different Indiana writers each covering a different time period in Indiana history, the design needs to support all of it and, in a way, represent none of it, all at the same time. We also made a conscious attempt to have the set serve the show in a simple way, providing ourselves with nothing more than what is needed and nothing less than what is necessary. What I hope we’ve come up with is a rich visual tapestry that represents Indiana and, at the same time, steps back from being a focal point as you walk in the theatre—it’s simply the piece of cloth on which these stories are woven together.

ORIGINAL MUSIC

MICHAEL LINCOLN

LIGHTING DESIGNER A lighting designer usually looks for gestures in the lighting that pull all the other design elements of a production together. In addition to this, the challenge for Finding Home is to design a hyper-flexible system that will accommodate two evenings with more than 60 short scenes and songs that may take place anywhere on stage—and make each unique. Fortunately we have a great deal of new equipment purchased for the Upperstage this past summer, including new LED color-changing technology and moving lights. With the aid of this equipment, I’m hoping I can meet the challenge of Finding Home!

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SCENIC DESIGNER

ANN SHEFFIELD

COSTUME DESIGNER The daunting task of covering 200 years of clothing styles for this wide-sweeping production began with trying to locate a common core between the words, the character, and the individual actor. Under the guidance of our director, Peter Amster, I first leaned into the contemporary world to discover a base costume for each actor—one that would complement both the actor’s persona and the Indiana landscape. These looks established, Peter and I had lengthy discussions covering every nuance of each scene— trying to anticipate the key ingredients (or garments) that would support and elucidate the story and the role each actor is playing. The challenging nature of this episodic, non-linear story-telling became as much about editing as filling in the blanks. You will note that some of the characters inhabit fully fleshed-out costumes, while with others the look is achieved with more of a gesture—sometimes merely the addition of a cap. We hope we have struck the right chord.


Preliminary paint elevation by scenic designer Robert Mark Gordon.

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WHAT'S A HOOSIER? BY JAMES H. MADISON, AUTHOR & HISTORIAN

We’re an interesting people, we Hoosiers. Some think us a simple people, living on a boring, flat land, thinking small thoughts, eating white bread. We should be charitable to such ignorance, since we struggle ourselves to understand who we are. How can we possibly explain ourselves to Californians or New Yorkers? That’s why it’s so important that on this IRT stage we see ourselves—whether we are Hoosiers with roots deep in the state, or newcomers from distant places. Song, poetry, and dialogue suggest answers to the question “What’s a Hoosier?” Some answers are uplifting, some tragic, some mythical, some even possibly true. Such complexity makes us a fascinating people. Hoosiers are a people of tradition. Many of us find our home in traditions that give us a sense of belonging to a larger community of like-minded people. Such traditions have always mixed with change. Pioneers did not want to live in cold log cabins, die in childbirth, or travel muddy trails. They wanted change, even as they built traditions.

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Indiana’s greatest pioneer, Abe Lincoln, exemplified that thirst for a different world. From the Corydon elm tree in 1816 to cornfields, churches, and log cabins, Hoosier pioneers created a way of life they passed on to later generations. They came to value individual freedom. They distrusted government, even as they demanded that government remove Indians, sell the settlers land, and bring democracy. Over the years, some Hoosiers eagerly sought new ways: pioneers building canals, women seeking the right to vote, African Americans seeking a hotel room in a segregated place, reformers creating consolidated schools, young men tinkering with automobiles. Every generation had innovators pushing to knock down boundaries. Gene Debs challenged basic assumptions about capitalism. So did Madam C. J. Walker. Freethinkers condemned organized religion. Alfred Kinsey questioned notions of gender and sexuality.

Actor/musicians Jan Lucas and Tim Grimm. Photo by Amber Mills.


Hoosiers could stick to traditions that were outmoded to the point of provincialism. Some waited for the return of 1950s-type manufacturing jobs or the end of daylight savings time. Some thought Indiana’s ban on Sunday alcohol sales should stand forever, while the ban on cigarette smoke in restaurants should be rescinded. Some were slow to acknowledge the presence of Hispanics or Muslims. Some waited for another Milan basketball miracle. Some Hoosier traditions caused tragedy. Our largest shame came in the 1920s, when the Ku Klux Klan marched toward a religion and patriotism that looked backward to times that never were. Traditions of Hoosier hospitality contain a multitude of contradiction and myth. Most regrettable are divisions by race, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality. Indiana’s tradition of racial segregation is particularly fierce. Segregation may have allowed the flowering of Indiana Avenue music and Crispus Attucks High School, but there was always the darkness of separate and unequal. Always there was change, relentless and nearly impossible to predict. Who at the state’s centennial in 1916 could have imagined Japanese auto factories sprouting in Indiana cornfields? Who could have imagined Hoosier kids playing soccer when everyone knew hands and feet were meant for basketball? Who could have imagined pedestrian and bike trails on unused railroad beds? Who, a century ago, could have imagined restaurants serving food from Latin America or Asia? Even so, pork tenderloin sandwiches have endured, a secular Hoosier communion wafer, with the breaded pork ranging far beyond the bun. By the late twentieth century, more Hoosiers challenged Indiana’s traditions and asserted the necessity for more rapid response to a changing world. Some said we needed to expect more of our government. Indiana’s tradition of small government has meant, for example, that many twenty-first century children haven’t had a level playing field when it comes to infant mortality, education, or job possibilities. Taxes have remained low, and so sometimes have government services. Private philanthropy has flourished, but is it enough? The natural environment has suffered too with hesitancy to employ government power to regulate water, air, and soil pollution. What would Gene Stratton-Porter think of us, delaying so long what she knew must be?

Painting by Thomas Hart Benton.

Hoosiers have often made smart choices in responding to change. They created the most abundant cornfields in the world, the most productive manufacturing assembly lines, the best basketball teams, and, in our 100th year, the nation’s greatest state parks. They also once claimed that only white men should vote, that the Ku Klux Klan was a great Christian reform movement, and that canals were a better investment than railroads. Times have changed. Log cabins and spinning wheels are gone. Gone too is much of the agrarian Indiana celebrated in James Whitcomb Riley’s poetry, T. C. Steele’s landscapes, and the state song, “On the Banks of the Wabash.” Such magical marks of the past persist in memory, scattering through the winds of change. More than most Americans, Hoosiers are blessed to hear voices that came before, the kinds of voices you will hear on this IRT stage. These stories help us to live in dialogues of past, present, future. They help us find our Indiana homes.

James H. Madison is the Thomas and Kathryn Miller Professor Emeritus of History at Indiana University Bloomington. Parts of this essay are adapted from his book Hoosiers: A New History of Indiana (2014), which served as the inspiration for a four-part documentary series, Hoosiers: The Story of Indiana, produced by WFYI for Indiana PBS stations.

Hoosiers A New History of Indiana

James H. madison

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THE WRITERS DEBORAH ASANTE

RAY E. BOOMHOWER

artistic director, Asante Children’s Theatre

Indiana historian, editor, biographer

INDIANA AVENUE “It fascinates me to explore the past and examine the repercussions it has on our lives today. Years ago I was commissioned by Storytelling Arts of Indiana to research and tell a story celebrating the history of Indiana Avenue. My contribution holds remnants of that story.”

LEW WALLACE “For the past thirty years I have written about notable people from Indiana, and could find no one better to represent the Hoosier ideal than the state’s own Renaissance man, Lew Wallace—soldier, diplomat, lawyer, politician, and author.”

BENNETT AYRES

MAURICE BROADDUS

playwright & museum educator

urban fantasy author (The Knights of Breton Court trilogy) & editor (Dark Faith & Streets of Shadows)

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD “We’re drawn to George DeBaptiste just as we’re drawn to fictional heroes like Bilbo Baggins or Guy Montag: underdogs facing down invincible foes because they must. In DeBaptiste’s case, it actually happened in our world. And in our state.”

JOHN FREEMAN “In the shadow of the Black Lives Matter movement, I see John Freeman’s story playing out time and time again on so many levels even today.”

ANDREW BLACK

DAN CARPENTER

Indianapolis-based playwright & playwriting teacher at the Indiana Writers Center

freelance writer & former Indianapolis Star columnist

COLE PORTER “I admire Cole Porter’s creative brilliance. His real-life struggle to integrate his sexual identity into his sense of self helped inspire this short play.”

JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY & EUGENE DEBS YOUNG ABE LINCOLN “Learning that the Hoosier Poet and the workers’ champion were drinking buddies proved irresistible. So did this anecdote about our greatest president’s first oratorical triumph.”

JENNIFER BLACKMER

Ball State University theatre professor & winner of the PEN/Laura Pels Award for Emerging American Playwright ELI LILLY GEORGE H. A. CLOWES “I love exploring issues of science and technology in the theatre, so I connected quickly with two of Indiana’s pioneering forces in science and medicine.”

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CATHY DAY

Ball State University professor of creative writing STRIKE STEW “Once upon a time, Indiana was a mecca for workingclass people like my family. I submitted this piece because I wanted to add a common Hoosier woman’s experience into our state’s history.”


ANNE GARCÍA-ROMERO

playwright, theatre studies scholar, assistant professor of theatre at University of Notre Dame PRINCESS MISHAWAKA “I’m bicultural. My work often explores the intersection of Latino and Anglo worlds. So I was drawn to the bridge between Native American and Anglo cultures in Princess Mishawaka’s life.”

TOM HORAN

playwright-in-residence at the Phoenix Theatre, sound designer, Ball State University theatre professor JANET GUTHRIE DIANA OF THE DUNES “I often write about historical subjects in my plays and leapt at the chance to tackle some local lore.”

DAVID HOPPE

LUCRECIA GUERRERO

writer, editor, playwright

ALBION FELLOWS BACON “Bacon was a social reformer, known for her work improving housing standards in Indiana. I was drawn to her deep compassion for those less fortunate than herself.”

JOHN DILLINGER “This monologue is drawn from a complete play, Dillinger. I’m fascinated by the weird ways celebrity affects us. In a short time, John Dillinger arguably became America’s first multi-media star—a character whose image trumped his life of crime.”

teacher of creative writing & author of Chasing Shadows & Tree of Sighs

PHILIP GULLEY

Quaker pastor & writer HOOSIER IDENTITY “Being a Quaker pastor doesn’t pay much, so I write to earn a living—and because the thought of working for someone else fills me with dread. I’m a lifelong Hoosier who contemplates moving far, far away every time the state legislature meets.”

ANGELA JACKSON-BROWN

Ball State University English professor, writer FLOSSIE BAILEY “I was a child when I first heard the song ‘Strange Fruit,’ so when I had the opportunity to write about the incident that inspired that song, I knew I had to take it”

KAREN KOVACIK

BRUCE HETRICK

IUPUI public relations professor

Indiana Poet Laureate 2012-2013, professor of English at IUPUI

DEER LICK CREEK MASSACRE “When I moved to Pendleton, I chanced upon a simple stone marker in Falls Park. It says, ‘Three white men were hung here in 1825 for killing Indians.’ I had to know more, and discovered this race-based, first-in-the-nation, justicefor-all story.”

HOAGY CARMICHAEL “It really struck me how the Jazz Age in Indiana coincided with the rise of the Klan. While not without racism, jazz promoted interactions between whites and blacks even as so many other arenas—schools, churches, unions, workplaces—maintained a strict color line.”

The Grimm family farm in Bartholomew County. Photo by Amber Mills.

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THE WRITERS NORBERT KRAPF

Indiana Poet Laureate 2008-2010

MICHAEL MARTONE

author of more than a dozen books & professor of writing at the University of Alabama

BACK IN INDIANA “I taught at Long Island University; while visiting family in Indiana, I observed how different places affect character and attitude. After retiring here, I wrote this poem about returning home. You can see the last section in a stained-glass window at the Indianapolis Airport, Gate A20.”

ALFRED KINSEY “I grew up in Fort Wayne. My story ‘Alfred Kinsey, Alone after an Interview, Dreams of Indiana’ is from my first book, Alive and Dead in Indiana. It is my meditation on homesickness.”

SARAH LAYDEN

Butler University professor & fiction writer

RYAN WHITE THE INDIANAPOLIS CLOWNS “Memory and how it’s shaped fascinates me, and Ryan White is embedded in my memory of growing up. I knew little about the Clowns, but wanted to learn, to remember them.”

MADGE OBERHOLTZER MAY WRIGHT SEWALL “I have long been fascinated by the role of women in history. The similarities between the rise of Klan Grand Dragon D. C. Stephenson and the rise of fascist dictatorships in Europe, in the same era, make Madge’s story even more resonant.”

novelist, English lecturer at IUPUI, former sports & education reporter

JIM LEONARD

SUSAN NEVILLE

ANGELO PIZZO

playwright & television writer-producer

film writer, producer, director

COMEDY OF ERRS “I wrote this short play in New Harmony, where it’s easy to walk around and think. That helps clear my head, and gives me a stronger sense of what the story is rather than just staring at words on the page.”

INTEGRATING IU BASKETBALL “From age 5 to 10 every day after school I went to watch the IU basketball team practice. I wanted to capture the essence of both my passion and the thorny relationship between race and basketball in our state’s past.”

JAN LUCAS

DONNA L. REYNOLDS

actor, musician, writer

communications consultant & writer

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON “I am, in fact, a descendant of William Henry Harrison, and I have visited Grouseland, his home in Vincennes. It was a natural fit to write about him, and I had great fun imagining a conversation I might have with him.”

KU KLUX KLAN “In re-imagining an old family story, I was intrigued with society’s ongoing struggles to welcome and accept the ‘other,’ and individuals’ efforts to peacefully reconcile differences, whether in a marriage, a state, or a country.”

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SCOTT RUSSELL SANDERS

author of more than twenty books of fiction & nonfiction, including Hunting for Hope & Divine Animal RACHEL PEDEN “As an emeritus professor of English at IU, I have spent my adult life in Monroe County, where Rachel Peden wrote insightfully about life and land.”

SANDY EISENBERG SASSO

rabbi emerita, Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; director, Religion, Spirituality, and the Arts (Butler & CTS); adult & children’s author SHAPIRO’S KOSHER FOODS “Max and Anne Shapiro were members of Beth-El Zedeck. Our family often ate at their restaurant. When I learned how Louis Shapiro responded to the Klan, I knew I had to write that story.”

KURT VONNEGUT

legendary author born & raised in Indianapolis FROM CAT’S CRADLE (1963) “I don't know what it is about Hoosiers. But wherever you go there is always a Hoosier doing something very important there.”

SHARI WAGNER

Indiana Poet Laureate 2016-2017; author of The Harmonist at Nightfall: Poems of Indiana MADAME C. J. WALKER TIPPECANOE BATTLEFIELD GENE STRATTON-PORTER DIANA OF THE DUNES “I’m currently writing a book of poems in the voices of people from Indiana history whose passions give them a mythic dimension.”

DAN WAKEFIELD

JAMES STILL

best-selling author of Going All the Way, set in Indianapolis in 1954

JAMES DEAN WILLIAM CONNER PRINCESS MISHAWAKA “I’m drawn to history’s enigmas and mysteries…. Writing about the unexplainable is humbling. For me, history isn’t exotic, it’s stuff that happened to people who were, in their own personal ways, trying to figure out how to live in the messy worlds they were born in.”

BASKETBALL MEMOIR “I got my start writing about basketball for the Shortridge Daily Echo, which made up for being too slow to make the team. I write memoir, movies, TV, journalism, spirituality—it all began with Indiana basketball.”

IRT playwright-in-residence

The Grimm family farm in Bartholomew County. Photo by Amber Mills.

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THE COMPANY DAVID ALAN ANDERSON ENSEMBLE

IRT audiences have seen David in Fences, What I Learned in Paris, Julius Caesar, The Mountaintop, The Whipping Man, Radio Golf, Looking over the President's Shoulder, A Christmas Carol, and many others. He was nominated for Chicago’s Jeff Award for The Mountaintop at the Court Theatre. Other regional credits include the Guthrie Theater; CenterStage; Denver Theatre Center; Actors Theatre of Louisville; the Idaho, Pennsylvania, and Lake Tahoe Shakespeare festivals; and many more. Directing credits include The Color of Justice and Most Valuable Player on the IRT Upperstage and Two Trains Running and Topdog/Underdog at the Phoenix Theatre. He is a company member with the Penumbra Theatre. David has received a Creative Renewal Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis and a Lunt-Fontanne Fellowship sponsored by theTen Chimneys Foundation, and he has been honored by the Circle City Links for his achievements in the arts.

LAUREN BRIGGEMAN ENSEMBLE

Finding Home is Lauren’s second production at the Indiana Repertory Theatre, and she could not be more thrilled. Last season she made her IRT debut as Jean Louise in To Kill a Mockingbird. Other favorite productions include Acid Dolphin Experiment, Typhoid Mary, and Seminar at the Phoenix Theatre; Hamlet with Acting Up Productions; Othello and The Taming of the Shrew with Heartland Actors Repertory Theatre; and Cabaret Poe with Q Artistry. “I would like to thank Janet and Peter for this opportunity, and Sally and her family for all of their love and support.”

KATIE BURK FIDDLE, VOCALS

Katie is a musician and artist from Indianapolis. She received her B.F.A. in painting in 2003 from Ball State University. While working as a local artist, her neighbor introduced her to old-time music and the jam scene. Soon after, she moved to Hawaii, where she joined a band as the fiddle player to learn jazz, bluegrass, and the blues. Since returning to Indiana, Katie has toured across the country as a member of the Whipstitch Sallies and the Half Step Sisters, who placed third on A Prairie Home Companion’s National Duet Competition in 2012. For over a decade, Katie has enjoyed teaching art and music to students of all ages. She currently teaches violin, piano, guitar, and voice at Guitarworks in Greenwood.

MARK GOETZINGER ENSEMBLE

This is Mark’s 34th season at the IRT, with roles in more than 80 productions. Some of his favorites include Yogi Berra in Nobody Don’t Like Yogi, the title role of The Drawer Boy, Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (2009), Dr. Watson in Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Hucklebee in The Fantasticks, Dr. Gibbs in Our Town, Charley in Death of a Salesman, Old Tom Martin in The Gentleman from Indiana, Albany in King Lear, Rev. Brown in Inherit the Wind, Mr. Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, Milton Perry in The Immigrant, Uncle Sid in Ah, Wilderness!, Heck Tate in To Kill a Mockingbird (1997), and Luther Billis in South Pacific, as well as dozens of Cabarets.

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CONNOR GRIMM ENSEMBLE & BASS

Connor has been playing music much of his life and has performed in various bands and orchestras. He began electric bass seriously seven years ago and is a member of the “new-grass”band the Hollow Hills. Formerly known as the Underhills, they were official showcase artists at the Midwest Region International Folk Alliance. Connor has toured Europe with Tim Grimm and will be playing with the Grimms in Europe and the United States in 2017.

JACKSON GRIMM ENSEMBLE, GUITARS, BANJO, OCTAVE MANDOLIN, VOCALS

Jackson graduated this past May from Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North Carolina, where he was steeped in the rich musical culture of the region. While at school, Jackson studied with professors of old-time music, bluegrass, and jazz, was a member of both the school’s jazz ensemble and bluegrass bands, and started writing his own songs. He recorded a six-song EP (The Airtime Sessions) under his own name earlier this year, with plans to record a full-length album in the near future. He also plays in the Grimm Family Band

TIM GRIMM ENSEMBLE, SONGWRITER/COMPOSER, GUITAR, VOCALS

Tim has appeared in numerous productions at the IRT, including God of Carnage, Interpreting William, Art, Dinner with Friends, State of the Union, Amber Waves, and An Almost Holy Picture; he has composed music for To Kill a Mockingbird, The Grapes of Wrath, and Inherit the Wind, and (with Jason Wilber) for Amber Waves and He Held Me Grand. At the Phoenix Theatre he has directed The Handler and acted in Bluff and Pure Prine. Other regional credits include Asolo Rep, Victory Gardens, Steppenwolf, Cleveland Play House, Center Stage, the Goodman, and Madison Rep. He appeared in two seasons of NBC’s Reasonable Doubts; his film credits include Clear and Present Danger, The Express, and Backdraft. An award-winning singer-songwriter with several recordings, Tim tours much of the United States and Europe with his music. He co-developed the stage-concert piece Wilderness Plots that was filmed for PBS. Tim and his wife, Jan Lucas, lead tours of Ireland and the Netherlands each year. www.timgrimm.com

AARON KIRBY ENSEMBLE

Aaron is thrilled to make his IRT debut! Based in Chicago, his favorite theatre credits include Red (Jeff Nomination: Actor in a Leading Role), Geezers (Jeff Nomination: Actor in a Leading Role), Good People, The Drawer Boy, The American Clock, and Beautiful Dark at Redtwist Theatre; Peter and the Starcatcher at Drury Lane; Cicada for Route 66; Luna Gale (understudy) at the Goodman Theatre; The Altruists for Two Lights; Cyrano for House; Hamlet and Much Ado about Nothing for Trinity Shakespeare; and Dark Play or Stories for Boys at Collaboraction (Jeff Award: Actor in a Supporting Role). TV credits include Chicago Fire and Shameless. Aaron earned his M.F.A. at Wayne State University. “Much love to Emma, the fine folks at Stewart Talent, friends, and family!”

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THE COMPANY JAN LUCAS ENSEMBLE, WRITER, HARMONICA, & VOCALS

Jan has previously been seen on the IRT stage in The Mousetrap, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Christmas Carol, The Gentleman from Indiana, Inherit the Wind, He Held Me Grand, Sister Carrie, Dinner with Friends, and Amber Waves. Other regional credits include the Phoenix in Indianapolis and the Goodman. Steppenwolf, and Remy Bumppo in Chicago. She has been seen in countless TV commercials. She tours with her husband Tim Grimm, performing Americana roots music all over the United States and throughout most of western Europe. Every year, along with touring their own music, they lead music-focused tours to Ireland and to the Netherlands.

MICHAEL JOSEPH MITCHELL ENSEMBLE

Michael makes his IRT debut. Most recently he played Oberon and Theseus in A Midsummer Night’s Dream at First Folio Theatre, and Hillel Levin in Assassination Theater for Russell Lane and MBC Chicago. Other credits include The Winter’s Tale and The Merchant of Venice at First Folio Theatre, Old Wicked Songs at Provision Theater, Hamlet at Oak Park Festival Theatre, Signs of Life at Victory Gardens, Making God Laugh at Fox Valley Rep, Scrooge in A Christmas Carol at Drury Lane Oakbrook, Freud (and standby for Freud and Lewis) in Freud’s Last Session at Mercury Theater, The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? at Remy Bumppo, Underneath the Lintel at City Lit Theatre, and The Invasion of Skokie and Voyeurs de Venus at Chicago Dramatists, where he is an artistic associate. He has been seen regionally at Syracuse Stage, Asolo Rep, and BoarsHead Theater. TV and film credits include Chicago Fire, Falsely Accused, and Scrooge & Marley.

GAIL RASTORFER ENSEMBLE

Gail made her IRT debut 13 years ago as Rosalind in As You Like It. Regional credits include The Heidi Chronicles, The Game’s Afoot, and You Can’t It with You at Asolo Rep; Ten Chimneys and In the Next Room: or the vibrator play at Cleveland Play House; Noises Off at Clarence Brown Theatre; and The Mousetrap at Maltz Jupiter Theatre. Chicago credits include Chicago Shakespeare Theater, the Goodman, Northlight Theatre, First Folio Theatre, the Chicago Theatre, Chicago Dramatists, and American Blues Theater. Gail recently completed her first one-woman show, The Unfortunates by award-winning playwright Aoise Stratford, for SoloChicago. Television credits include Chicago Fire, Crisis, Boss, Chicago Code, and many national commercials selling everything from insurance to vacuums. A proud union member, she serves on the Chicago board of SAG-AFTRA. www.gailonline.net

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KIM STAUNTON ENSEMBLE

Kim made her IRT debut in Fences. She has been a guest company member at the Denver Center Theatre Company for 14 seasons, and was an inaugural Lunt-Fontanne Fellow at Ten Chimneys Foundation. Regional credits include Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Arizona Theatre Company, Portland Stage Company, Ebony Repertory Theatre, South Coast Repertory, Center Theatre Group/Kirk Douglas Theatre, Colorado Shakespeare Festival, Seattle Repertory Theatre, Syracuse Stage, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, and many more. She has performed in numerous productions on and off Broadway. Film credits include First Sunday, Changing Lanes, Heat, Dragonfly, Bark, Holy Man, Deceived, and Amos & Andrew. Television appearances have included guest starring roles on Eleventh Hour, Army Wives, The Nine, Bones, Strong Medicine, Judging Amy, Law and Order, City of Angels, New York Undercover, and TNT’s original movie Glory and Honor. Kim is a native of Washington, D.C., and a graduate of the Juilliard School.

DELANNA STUDI ENSEMBLE

DeLanna made her IRT debut in Interpreting William. She is known for the films Edge of America, The Only Good Indian, and Blessed. Solo stage credits include What’s an Indian Woman to Do? and Kick which both garnered rave reviews. She was in the national tour of August: Osage County. The New York Times described her performance in the Critic’s Pick Informed Consent as “moving gravity.”DeLanna worked for two seasons at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. TV credits include Shameless, General Hospital, and Z Nation. Her recent project (partnered with the Kenan Institute for the Arts) And So We Walked: An Artist’s Journey Along the Trail of Tears is the recipient of the 2016 MAP Fund Grant, the Cherokee Preservation Foundation Grant, and the Autry National Center’s Butcher Scholar Award.

TAKE THE BAND HOME WITH YOU! THE GRIMMS WITH KATIE BURK CDs FEATURING THE SONGS FROM FINDING HOME: INDIANA AT 200 ARE AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP FOR JUST $15! OPEN DURING INTERMISSION AND AFTER THE SHOW. DON'T MISS THIS LIMITED TIME OFFER!

ORIGINAL SONGS FROM INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE’S PRODUCTION OF THE GRIMMS WITH FINDING KATIE BURKHOME: INDIANA AT 200

THE GRIMMS WITH KATIE BURK

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THE COMPANY PETER AMSTER DIRECTOR

This is Peter’s 20th production at the IRT, including The Great Gatsby, The Hound of the Baskervilles, The Game’s Afoot, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The 39 Steps, The Heavens Are Hung in Black, Our Town, The Gentleman from Indiana, Pride and Prejudice, Arcadia, Abe Lincoln in Illinois, and She Loves Me. He has been nominated for Chicago’s Jefferson Award for his direction of Once on This Island, The World Goes Round, and The Rothschilds at Apple Tree Theatre, and Pride and Prejudice at Northlight Theatre. Other Chicago credits include Steppenwolf, the Court Theatre, and the Goodman. Regional credits include the Utah Shakespeare Festival, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Cleveland Play House, Syracuse Stage, and Asolo Repertory Theatre. Peter has directed and choreographed operas for the Lyric Opera of Chicago, Chicago Opera Theatre, Skylight Opera, and Light Opera Works. He has taught theatre, opera, and performance studies at Northwestern University, CalArts, LSU, DePaul University, and Roosevelt University.

ROBERT MARK MORGAN SCENIC DESIGNER

Rob has designed The Giver, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, An Iliad, and Dracula at the IRT. He has designed for the theatre, theme parks, and museums. His work has been seen onstage nationally at Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota, the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Cincinnati Playhouse, Studio Arena, Cleveland Play House, San Jose Repertory Theatre, Denver Center Theatre Company, Alliance Theatre in Atlanta, Barrington Stage, Marin Theatre Company, Magic Theatre, and American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco. Rob is on the design faculty at Washington University in St. Louis. www.morgansetdesign.com

ANN SHEFFIELD COSTUME DESIGNER

Ann’s work at the IRT has included scenery for Red, Other Desert Cities, Interpreting William, The Drawer Boy, The Last Night of Ballyhoo, Cyrano de Bergerac, The Rivals, and Six Characters in Search of an Author; costumes for Our Town, Othello, and 1992’s Twelfth Night; and both scenic and costume designs for Doubt, Ghosts, Candida, The Cocktail Hour, Hedda Gabler, and 1990’s Julius Caesar. Her designs have been seen at South Coast Repertory Theatre, Arizona Theatre Company, Los Angeles Playwrights’Arena, the Laguna Playhouse, Buffalo’s Studio Arena Theatre, the La Jolla Playhouse, Goodspeed Opera House, Walnut Street Theatre, Ford’s Theatre, Oklahoma Festival Ballet, and the Children’s Theatre Company of Minneapolis. Ann has a long association with award-winning designer Tony Walton, assisting him on the Broadway productions of Anything Goes, Waiting for Godot, Grand Hotel, and The Will Rogers Follies. A graduate of the Yale School of Drama, Ann is head of design for the Department of Theatre and Dance at California State University, Fullerton.

MICHAEL LINCOLN LIGHTING DESIGNER

Michael has designed more than 30 productions at the IRT, including A Christmas Carol, April 4, 1968, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Who Am I This Time?, A Little Night Music, The House That Jack Built, God of Carnage, The 39 Steps, Becky’s New Car, This Wonderful Life, The Piano Lesson, Old Wicked Songs, Arcadia, The Immigrant, Ah, Wilderness!, The Glass Menagerie, Hedda Gabler, and Benefactors, among others. Highlights of his career include the Broadway productions of Copenhagen, More to Love, and Skylight, as well as off-Broadway designs including Mr. Goldwyn, The Bubbly Black Girl Sheds Her Chameleon Skin, Defying Gravity, Bunny Bunny, and Swingtime Canteen. In addition to the IRT, Michael has had long associations with the Alley Theatre, Cleveland Play House, Studio Theatre DC, Santa Fe Opera, and Los Angeles Ballet. He is artistic director of the Ohio University Theater Division. www.michaellincoln.net

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TODD MACK REISCHMAN SOUND DESIGNER

During the last 15 seasons as resident sound designer Todd has created effects and music for many IRT productions. He has worked in theatres all around the country, both on stage and off, since the age of 10. Away from the theatre Todd works with a variety of musical collaborators recording and performing around town. Although he has led a fun and full life, Todd still has yet to swim with a Flemish giant.

RICHARD J ROBERTS ASSISTANT DIRECTOR & DRAMATURG

Richard has been resident dramaturg for 19 of his 27 seasons with the IRT. He has also been a dramaturg for the New Harmony Project and Write Now. He has directed the IRT’s productions of Bridge & Tunnel, The Night Watcher, Neat, Pretty Fire, The Giver (2009), The Power of One, and Twelfth Night, as well as four editions of A Christmas Carol; later this season he directs The Cay. Other directing credits include Actors Theatre of Indiana, the Phoenix Theatre, Edyvean Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis Civic Theatre, IndyShakes/Wisdom Tooth, Butler University, and Anderson University. Richard studied music at DePauw University and theatre at Indiana University. In 2003 he was awarded a Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

JOEL GRYNHEIM STAGE MANAGER

This is the 92nd production Joel has stage managed over 27 years at the IRT. He resides in an historic home in downtown Indianapolis where he works as a stay-at-home dad. He shares that home and his life with Janet Allen and their two daughters, Nira and Leah.

ERIN ROBSON-SMITH ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER

Since moving to Indiana in 2009, Erin has grown to love the Hoosier state. She’s especially proud to work on a show that celebrates her adopted state’s history. Favorite productions include And Then They Came for Me at IRT; Sometimes a Great Notion, How to Disappear Completely and Never be Found, and Frost/Nixon at Portland Center Stage; Metamorphoses, Frozen, and Copenhagen at Artists Repertory Theatre; and Lonesome West and Number Three at Third Rail Repertory Theatre. She spent the summers of 2008 and 2009 working with the JAW Festival at Portland Center Stage. “For my three little Hoosiers: Hazel, Beatrice, and Edith.”

CLAIRE SIMON CASTING

Based in Chicago, Claire Simon, C.S.A., has worked with the IRT on casting more than 30 productions, including The Mousetrap, The Great Gatsby, The Game’s Afoot, The Mountaintop, The Crucible, The House That Jack Built, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Fallen Angels, The Diary of Anne Frank, Romeo and Juliet, The Heavens Are Hung in Black, Our Town, Inherit the Wind, Pride and Prejudice, and many more. Other regional credits include Syracuse Stage, Indiana Festival Theatre, Lyric Opera, Milwaukee Rep, New Theatre, Paramount, Writers Theatre, Broadway in Chicago’s Working, and the Tony Award–winning Million Dollar Quartet. TV credits include Empire, Sense8, Chicago Fire, Chicago PD, Crisis, Betrayal, Detroit 1-8-7, Boss, Mob Doctor, and Chicago Code. Film credits include Divergent, Contagion, Unexpected, and Man of Steel. Claire won an Artios Award this year for casting the pilot of Empire, and previously for Season 1 of Fox’s Prison Break.

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TIM GRIMM ACTOR-SINGER-SONGWRITER Tim Grimm has acted in more than a dozen shows at the IRT, including God of Carnage, Interpreting William, Art, Dinner with Friends, State of the Union, Amber Waves, and An Almost Holy Picture. He has created and performed original music in To Kill a Mockingbird, Inherit the Wind, and The Grapes of Wrath, and wrote music for He Held Me Grand and Amber Waves. Tim’s songs are featured in Finding Home, and he performs in the show with his wife, Jan Lucas, and their sons, Jackson and Connor Grimm.

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WHICH CAME FIRST FOR YOU, MUSIC OR ACTING? I got started in acting in sixth grade in Mrs. Rolfing’s class at McKinley Elementary School in Columbus, Indiana. She believed in the educational power of reading aloud—literature, history. Some of those pieces were sort of dramatic, and I got the bug. I did the usual shows in middle school and high school, and then at Earlham College I minored in theatre and did a lot of plays. I went through the M.F.A. program at Michigan, moved to Chicago, and did theatre work for a couple of years. Then I landed the pilot for the TV version of Steel Magnolias. Even though it never went to series, the pilot itself was a pretty visible project because of the cast: Elaine Stritch, Polly Bergen, Cindy Williams, Sally Kirkland—and who’s this young guy? That got me an agent. Then right before I moved to LA, Jan and I met. We had sort of brushed against each other in the Chicago acting scene, then we shot a Kellogg’s cereal commercial together. We had a long-distance relationship for about a year, and then Jan moved out there. WHAT WERE YOUR BEST HOLLYWOOD EXPERIENCES? Working for two full seasons on Reasonable Doubts with Marlee Matlin and Mark Harmon was a highlight. As an actor in LA, to be able to work for two solid years on something is pretty remarkable. And both Mark and Marlee are highly professional people who take their work seriously. You show up, you do the work, you respect each other—and that was a good lesson for me, because that was early in my time in LA.

and I had more time on my hands, so every summer I’d put on my hat and be a hay farmer. I was able to spend more time on the property that we still love and cherish. But over the last few years, I’m traveling so much more with music, both in the states and in Europe—plus, ideally, one or two plays a year—so the time I’m able to spend on the land is significantly diminished. HOW DID MUSIC BECOME A MAJOR FORCE IN YOUR LIFE? I played the guitar a bit in high school, but I really didn’t get serious with it until much later. It was triggered by moving back to Indiana, and really coming back home in a sense. I was trying to make a connection with my past, remembering time with my grandfather on his farm when I was a kid. I had this romantic notion when we moved back to the land that I would look to the wisdom of the elders around me, these old retired farm couples who kept a neat and tidy place, and had a love and a reverence for the place where they lived. The ideas were knocking on my doorstep, bouncing around in my brain, things that I had to get out, and it seemed like a good form for me to pick up the guitar and basically tell stories though song. And that led me to start to write, to find a voice.

In terms of film it’s hard to beat Clear and Present Danger. I had eleven weeks on that movie, which is a lot. Multiple locations, Mexico, around the States. It was a treat. And it’s sort of an honor to work with Harrison Ford. He was a gentleman. He doesn’t want to be in the spotlight all the time. He does his work, pursues his craft—at the highest level—and then he goes home and has a real life.

WHAT DOES YOUR ONGOING CONNECTION WITH THE IRT MEAN TO YOU? When we first moved back here, I had a lot of people in LA questioning me. Because I left when I was working—I didn’t leave because I couldn’t find work. And people would say, what the hell are you doing? The IRT became a real outlet for me to continue to pursue my craft. There was a slogan at the theatre at that time, “Great Theatre Made in Indiana.” As a Hoosier born and raised, that made me proud. And as Jan and I continued to work here, it really became in my heart an artistic home. To have a place like IRT, here—not literally at our back door, it’s a 45-minute commute—but to have that working environment here, not only the physical place but all the great people … it’s huge.

WHAT BROUGHT YOU BACK TO INDIANA? We had purchased the land that we live on now. We just loved the setting, and it was near my parents, very near where I grew up. In the summertime, when things get pretty quiet in LA, we would come back to Indiana and stay on the farm. When the kids got to be school age, we got this notion, why not reverse our time? If we moved back here to Indiana for the school year, the kids could go to school here in southern Indiana, and we would be in this remarkable setting in the country, and we could spend part of our down time in LA. That was at least the idea when we first moved. In LA, as an actor, you spend so much of your time and energy looking for the next job. It’s a busy place to live. We got to Indiana,

Left: Actor-singer-songwriter Tim Grimm. Photo by Amber Mills. Right: Tim Grimm and John Henry Redwood in IRT’s 2000 production of Amber Waves.

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ONEAMERICA MAINSTAGE NOV 19 - DEC 24

REVIEWS? FACEBOOK/TWITTER: #irtlive EMAIL: reviews@irtlive.com

ARTISTIC

Director__________________ JANET ALLEN Scenic Designer_________________RUSSELL METHENY Costume Designer___________________MURELL HORTON Lighting Designer_________________MICHAEL LINCOLN Composer & Sound Designer___________ ANDREW HOPSON Choreographer_________________________DAVID HOCHOY Musical Director________________________ TERRY WOODS Dramaturg________________________RICHARD J ROBERTS Stage Manager________________ NATHAN GARRISON*

Season Sponsor

SEASON 2016 - 2017

Title Sponsor

Family Series Sponsor

ARTS PARTNERS Scrooge Gives Back Sponosr m a k i n g t h e a rts h a p p e n

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JANET ALLEN

Executive Artistic Director

SUZANNE SWEENEY

Managing Director

THE CAST CHRISTMAS EVE Narrators____________ THE COMPANY Ebenezer Scrooge____RYAN ARTZBERGER* Bob Cratchit_________ JEREMY FISHER* Fred____________ CHARLES PASTERNAK* Felicity__________AMANDA CATANIA* Portly Gentleman_______ ROBERT NEAL* Sister of Mercy______ MILICENT WRIGHT* Mrs. Cratchit__________ EMILY RISTINE* Belinda Cratchit_______JORDAN PECAR or ALYSSA MARIE GAINES Peter Cratchit____________ ERIC BEST or MILES M. MOREY Tiny Tim__________ GRANT O’MEARA or SOPHAIA PRABHU-HENSLEY Waiter____________SCOT GREENWELL* Marley's Ghost________ CHARLES GOAD* CHRISTMAS PAST Ghost_____________ EMILY RISTINE* Schoolmaster________ ROB JOHANSEN* Postboy___________ SCOT GREENWELL* Fezziwig____________ ROBERT NEAL* Young Scrooge____ CHARLES PASTERNAK* Young Marley________ JEREMY FISHER* Mrs. Fezziwig________CONSTANCE MACY* Millworkers___________THE COMPANY Belle____________ AMANDA CATANIA*

CHRISTMAS PRESENT Ghost___________ MILICENT WRIGHT* Henry Cratchit_________ JACKSON LYLE or TEDDY RAYHILL Betsy Cratchit_______ NINA R. MOREY or CLAIRE ELIZABETH KAUFFMAN Martha Cratchit______AMANDA CATANIA* Lamplighter_______ SCOT GREENWELL* Plump Sister________ CONSTANCE MACY* Roses Sister___________ EMILY RISTINE* Nutley_____________ ROB JOHANSEN* Topper____________ CHARLES GOAD* CHRISTMAS FUTURE Ghost_____________ROB JOHANSEN* Brokers___________ SCOT GREENWELL* CHARLES PASTERNAK* Old Joe____________ CHARLES GOAD* Charwoman_________MILICENT WRIGHT* Laundress________ CONSTANCE MACY* Undertaker___________ ROBERT NEAL* CHRISTMAS DAY Poulterer's Man________ ROB JOHANSEN* Londoners____________THE COMPANY

The performance will last approximately 90 minutes with no intermission.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Dance Captain & Choral Leader: Emily Ristine Understudy for Scrooge: Robert Neal Swings: Chelsea Anderson & Logan Moore Lighting Design Assistants: Jack Bebinger & Michelle Lane Actor/Assistant Stage Manager: Jeremy Fisher * Members of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States. The director is a member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, a national theatrical labor union. The scenic, costume, lighting, and sound designers are represented by United Scenic Artists Local 829, IATSE. Photography and recording are forbidden in the theatre. The videotaping of this production is a violation of United States Copyright Law and an actionable Federal Offense.

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ELI LILLY AND COMPANY IS PROUD TO BE THE TITLE SPONSOR OF A CHRISTMAS CAROL. This remarkable play brings to life a holiday favorite – a classic tale of loss and redemption – played on a beautiful, snow-filled stage, where Dickens’ language and characters spring thrillingly to life. At Lilly, our business is discovering and developing innovative medicines, but our focus is on the lives of real people – improving outcomes for individual patients. And while our role in the community is often measured in terms of jobs and income – important as that may be – we also want to do our part to improve the quality of life for people who live here. For all the changes at Lilly, this won’t change. That’s why Lilly is an enthusiastic supporter of outstanding arts organizations like the Indiana Repertory Theatre – a valuable cultural institution that enhances the quality of life through live theatre, education and entertainment. So, as you enjoy this performance, please join us in our support for the IRT and applauding its outstanding contributions to our community life. John C. Lechleiter Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer Eli Lilly and Company

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Ryan Artzberger last year's A Christmas Carol. Photo by Zach Rosing.


A CHRISTMAS CAROL

FROM THE PAGE TO THE STAGE

CHARLES DICKENS | AUTHOR

TOM HAAS | PLAYWRIGHT

The works of the great English novelist Charles Dickens are not only great literature, they are also cracking good reads, with one-of-a-kind characters and stories that both tug at the heartstrings and leave readers breathless with excitement. But the author’s purpose went beyond mere entertainment; his books were almost always designed to alert his readers to the wretched conditions of England’s poor and destitute. Born in 1812, Dickens suffered an impoverished childhood that provided plenty of grist for tales of debtors’ prison and rat-infested factories. Yet despite this poverty and his lack of formal education, he rose from legal clerk to newspaper columnist to bestselling author by the age of 24. During his lifetime, his books—Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, and many more—were wildly popular, not only in England but also around the world; most are still in print. When A Christmas Carol was published in 1843, the holiday was not widely celebrated in England; the book inspired such a revival that the author became known as Father Christmas. In his later years, Dickens made almost a second career of public readings of this beloved novel. Long before he died in 1870, he was hailed everywhere as the greatest writer of his age.

Tom Haas was artistic director of the IRT from 1980 until his untimely death in 1991. Prior to his association with the IRT, he was artistic director of PlayMakers Repertory Company in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He was associate director at Yale Repertory Theatre and head of the ActingDirecting Program at Yale University, where his students included Henry Winkler, Sigourney Weaver, and Meryl Streep. At the IRT, Tom directed 40 productions, including memorable renditions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Mourning Becomes Electra, The Skin of Our Teeth, The Cocktail Party, Six Characters in Search of an Author, and, of course, A Christmas Carol. IRT audiences also saw his stage adaptations of Frankenstein, Dracula, and The Three Musketeers, as well as the musical Operetta, My Dear Watson and dozens of Cabaret shows. Tom’s adaptation of A Christmas Carol was produced at the IRT annually from 1980 through 1984. The play returned in 1996 and has been a welcome holiday tradition ever since.

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CONNECTION BY JANET ALLEN, EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

“The Lamplighter stopped to think of those he cared for at a distance—and knowing they delighted in remembering him, he padded off in greater hope. Though poor in means, he was rich in heart.” What always fills my heart with joy in watching A Christmas Carol is these hidden, surprising moments of the generosity of characters from whom we least expect it. Often, these characters have very little in the way of material possessions or wealth; what they have instead is a sense of the promise of humanity, of the joy of reaching out to others. The promise of hope. Of connection. Of belief in the goodness of human nature even in miserable circumstances. This is the world that Scrooge, for the majority of the play, is utterly deaf to. He lives instead in seclusion, so that he doesn’t have to hazard the further breaking of his heart. We know, as we watch, that his manner of life is untenable, leading only to disillusion and estrangement. He can’t accept the affection of his nephew, his clerk, even the waiter who serves his solitary meal every night. He has cut himself off from human contact. The allegory of the story exists to remind us, particularly in the bleak midwinter, particularly in a technologically isolating world, that no person “can make his way unaided in the world.” We are interdependent, and our need for social context is enormous and insatiable. There is perhaps no other story so capable of turning our heads this time of year. Turning us back to ourselves and our families, just as the Cratchit family and Fred’s family of friends are bound together in celebration

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of the sheer act of togetherness. If they can do it, so can we; and so, of course, can Scrooge, if he can find his way back to what makes him human: his care for others. Theatre is a particularly wonderful forum for allegory, and Charles Dickens crafted cautionary tales like no other. He created indelible characters and memorable plots all tuned to the act of making us more human. And coming to see his story emblazoned on stage provides families with an opportunity to leave the electronics at home and savor a fully human, live experience together. I return to the making of this play with joy, having not directed it myself since 1998. I’m delighted to help guide this gang of actors—whose collective experience with this tale is powerful and deep—through the work of making it sing for three generations of Hoosiers. From the five-year-olds who are seeing it for the first time, sitting on a parent or grandparent’s lap, in awe and maybe even a little in fear; to the fidgety seventh graders who may be more focused on the day out of school; to the young lovers who may be here for a first date; to the middle-aged businessman, distracted by his cares, who is leaning more toward Scrooge’s way of life than he may know; to the senior citizen who knows Scrooge’s heartbreak and fears similar isolation—all of us gather at the hearth of this tale and, we hope, go away the better for it. All are welcome. All may be powerfully changed.

Right: Ryan Artzberger and Will Mobley in IRT's 2015 production of A Christmas Carol. Photo by Zach Rosing.


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"OF ALL THE GOOD DAYS OF THE YEAR... MURELL HORTON

ANDREW HOPSON

One of the original goals for this design was to create costumes authentic to the period, based on real Victorian clothing rather than fanciful ideas of nostalgia. The clothes for this period (1840s) are industrial—top hats were called stove pipes—and dark, with sharp silhouettes against the beautiful snow (which is so white it makes its own set of rules). But the play also ventures into the past, which has a more dreamy, foggy, candlelit look; and into the future, which is darker and creepier.

The pipe organ has the distinction of being associated with three diverse concepts: religion, theatre, and phantoms. Using an organ as one of the main instruments in A Christmas Carol was an obvious choice. For ghostly sound effects, I ended up using four metal instruments: for Marley, I used a waterphone (an instrument invented— I think—for the movie Aliens); for Christmas Past, I used wind chimes: for Christmas Present, I experimented with harp strings; for Christmas Future, I played a cymbal with a violin bow, and dragged a chain inside a piano.

COSTUME DESIGNER

COMPOSER

MICHAEL LINCOLN

LIGHTING DESIGNER

Well of course, the first thing is the snow. That enormous field of white offers a technical challenge to a lighting designer. It’s harder to create isolated lighting effects; everything just bounces all over the place. But I also have unique opportunities, such as creating silhouettes against the snow. In terms of design, the snow functions very much like a sky drop—it’s a blank canvas on which I can paint any color. This production does not rely on theatrical “effects.” It’s all about the magic created between the actors and the audience. There are always new discoveries to make in the snow. It’s an unnerving yet exhilarating process.

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...ON CHRISTMAS EVE" RUSSELL METHENY SCENIC DESIGNER

It’s ironic, but as a scenic designer the thing I love most is great performances. I love creating an empty space in which great performances happen. That’s what this set is all about: an empty field of snow in which wonderful actors tell a wonderful story. When I see something on stage that is not what it is and looks like something else—that to me is great theatre.

Right: Preliminary sketch by scenic designer Russell Metheny for Scrooge’s office. Left: Rendering by costume designer Murell Horton for Mrs. Fezziwig.

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THE COMPANY RYAN ARTZBERGER EBENEZER SCROOGE

Ryan’s IRT credits include The Three Musketeers, The Mousetrap, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Christmas Carol, The Great Gatsby, The Crucible, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, God of Carnage, Julius Caesar, Fire in the Garden, Romeo and Juliet, Rabbit Hole, Iron Kisses, Our Town, Death of a Salesman, He Held Me Grand, Macbeth, and The Herbal Bed. Ryan is a member of Heartland Actors Repertory Theatre, where he has appeared in The Winter’s Tale, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, The Taming of the Shrew, and Othello. At the Phoenix Theatre he performed in Reasons to Be Pretty. Regional credits include the Shakespeare Theatre and the Studio Theatre in Washington, D.C., Shakespeare Santa Cruz, the Goodman Theatre, Berkeley Rep, Kansas City Rep, the Lookingglass, Great Lakes Theater Festival, the Denver Center, New Jersey Shakespeare, and Playmakers Rep. Ryan is a graduate of Ohio University and the Juilliard School.

AMANDA CATANIA FELICITY, BELLE, MARTHA, et al.

Amanda made her IRT debut in The Three Musketeers. Chicago credits include A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Chicago Shakespeare Theater in the Parks), Measure for Measure (Goodman Theatre), 50 min Romeo and Juliet, as well as multiple staged readings (Shakespeare Project of Chicago). Regional credits include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Sense and Sensibility, As You Like It, The Gentleman from Indiana (Indiana Festival Theatre); A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Clarence Brown Theatre); A Streetcar Named Desire (Cardinal Stage Company); Macbeth, Failure: A Love Story, The Comedy of Errors, Othello, As You Like It, The Rivals (Illinois Shakespeare Festival); Othello, The Comedy of Errors, Charlotte’s Web, The Three Musketeers (Alabama Shakespeare Festival): Catch-22, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, and Much Ado About Nothing (Aquila Theatre Company). Film credits include The United States. Amanda earned her B.F.A. from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and is a proud member of Actors’Equity Association.

JEREMY FISHER BOB CRATCHIT, YOUNG MARLEY, et al.

Jeremy is making his IRT stage debut. Selected regional credits include Pygmalion, Richard III, Measure for Measure, The Merchant of Venice, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead at the Old Globe; Stage Door at Griffin Theater; The Hollow Lands and Coronado at Steep Theater; Ivanov and Sweet Confinement for Sinnerman Ensemble; Odin’s Horse for Infamous Commonwealth; and Hot ’n’ Throbbing at Pinebox Theater. As a youth mentor and teacher, Jeremy has worked with the 52nd Street Project in New York City and Young Actors Theatre in Indianapolis. He holds an M.F.A. from the Old Globe/University of San Diego Dramatic Arts Program and is a graduate of the School at Steppenwolf. “Thanks to Janet for the opportunity. Thanks to family and HKD for the support.”

CHARLES GOAD MARLEY’S GHOST, TOPPER, OLD JOE, et al.

Some of Chuck’s IRT credits include The Three Musketeers, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Christmas Carol, The Great Gatsby, The Miser, Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Driving Miss Daisy, Our Town, Pygmalion, Blithe Spirit, All My Sons, The Fantasticks, and Great Expectations. He is also a founding member of the Phoenix Theatre where he has acted and directed many times. Favorites there include acting in August: Osage County, Gross Indecency, Shipwrecked, and Company, and directing last season’s Buyer & Cellar. Most recently he directed Bonnie & Clyde for Summer Stock Stage and acted in The Winter’s Tale for Heartland Actors Rep. Other local credits include Beyond the Rainbow with Actors Theatre of Indiana, Spamalot with Bobdirex, Welcome to the Monkey House with ShadowApe, The Odd Couple at Brown County Playhouse, and Amadeus with Cardinal Stage. Regional credits include Cincinnati Playhouse, Missouri Rep, and Syracuse Stage. 48


SCOT GREENWELL WAITER, POSTBOY, LAMPLIGHTER, BROKER, et al.

Scot is thrilled to return for his second IRT Carol! Other IRT credits include The Three Musketeers, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. As a company member of Heartland Actors’Repertory Theatre, he has appeared in The Winter’s Tale, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, and Othello, among others. Regional credits include Unnecessary Farce at Actors Theatre of Indiana; The Cockfight Play, The Nether, In the Next Room..., Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, and Freud’s Last Session at Phoenix Theatre; and The Grapes of Wrath, The Santaland Diaries, and Little Shop of Horrors at Cardinal Stage Company. A native of Loogootee, Indiana, Scot is a proud graduate of the University of Evansville’s prestigious theatre program. He has told stories and played characters in schools and libraries throughout the state, as well as at the Children’s Museum. “Thanks to Zack, my friends, and family for unconditional love and support.”

ROB JOHANSEN SCHOOLMASTER, NUTLEY, CHRISTMAS FUTURE, POULTERER’S MAN, et al.

Rob is still trying to find the right words to thank Bryan Payne, Janet Allen, and Bryan Fonseca for honoring him and several of his closest friends with a Theatre MVP Award given by the Indianapolis Foundation and CICF. ”I have never felt such generosity, such an affirmation that I absolutely made the right choice in committing to Indy, and such pride in our great city as I do right now. When I measure the artistic successes I have known in Indy, coupled with the tremendous quality of living our city affords, I wouldn’t trade my place with an actor from any other city.”Rob is back with the Carol after several years of doing the Phoenix Xmas show, where he had a ball writing sketches, doing aerial silks, and acting out human claymation on stage. And after the Carol, Rob will be back at the Phoenix doing How to Use a Knife. “I dedicate this whole theatre season to my Mom, who passed a year ago.”

CONSTANCE MACY MRS. FEZZIWIG, PLUMP SISTER, LAUNDRESS, et al.

Constance debuted at the IRT in 1990 as a member of the Junior Works company. Recent appearances include The Great Gatsby, On Golden Pond, The Hound of the Baskervilles, Good People, The Game’s Afoot, Who Am I This Time?, God of Carnage, Lost—A Memoir, The Diary of Anne Frank, Holes, Becky’s New Car and Iron Kisses. This is her ninth turn in A Christmas Carol, a tradition she dearly loves. Constance is also a frequent performer with Cardinal Stage Company in Bloomington, and was a co-founder and performer with ShadowApe Theatre Company for a dozen years. Other favorite local performances include narrating the music of Harry Potter with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra at Conner Prairie, playing Paulina in Heartland Actors Rep’s production of Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale in White River State Park, and reading from banned books at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library. She teaches acting at IRT’s Summer Conservatory for Youth, and her own teachers have included David Hyde Pierce and Olympia Dukakis. Constance was named an Indy Theatre MVP by the Indianapolis Foundation, and is a two-time Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Fellow as well as a Lunt-Fontanne National Fellow.

ROBERT NEAL PORTLY GENTLEMAN, FEZZIWIG, UNDERTAKER, et al.

This is Robert’s 16th season with the IRT, where he has performed in more than 30 productions. He is a company member of Heartland Actors Repertory Theatre, where this summer he directed The Winter’s Tale. Other local theatres include ShadowApe, the Phoenix Theatre, and Cardinal Stage; he has also performed with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and the Indianapolis Early Music Festival. In 2012 he reprised his role as James Beard in James Still’s I Love to Eat for the James Beard Foundation Awards at Lincoln Center in New York City. Regional theatre credits include Syracuse Stage, the Blackstone Theatre, the Bailiwick Repertory Theatre, American Players Theatre, Pennsylvania Center Stage, the Oklahoma and Kentucky Shakespeare festivals, and the Brown County Playhouse, as well as the English American Theatre Festival in Dusseldorf, Germany. Television credits include NBC’s Chicago Fire. Robert’s training is from Penn State (M.F.A.) and the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. He is a recipient of the 2007 Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Grant and the 2016 Theatre MVP Grant from the Central Indiana Community Foundation. 49


THE COMPANY CHARLES PASTERNAK FRED, YOUNG SCROOGE, BROKER, et al.

Charles has appeared at the IRT in The Three Musketeers, The Mousetrap, and The Two Gentlemen of Verona. His regional credits include Titus Andronicus at Clarence Brown Theatre; the title role in Macbeth at Sierra Repertory Theatre; two seasons with Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, where his roles included Hotspur and Octavius; Much Ado about Nothing at Shakespeare Theatre New Jersey; four seasons with Shakespeare Santa Cruz, where his roles included Romeo and Henry V; Romeo and Juliet and The Three Musketeers at the Denver Center; Creditors at Ensemble Theatre Santa Barbara; and The Merchant of Venice and Romeo and Juliet at Shakespeare Center Los Angeles. Charles is artistic director of the Los Angeles-based Porters of Hellsgate Theatre Company.

EMILY RISTINE MRS. CRATCHIT, CHRISTMAS PAST, ROSES SISTER, et al.

Emily recently appeared as Queen Anne in IRT’s The Three Musketeers. Other favorite roles include Diana in Next to Normal, Kate Monster in Avenue Q, Helen in The Gentleman from Indiana, and Hope in Urinetown: the Musical. Emily is a founding member and artistic director of Summer Stock Stage, where she has spent her last 13 summers directing musicals with young performers. While her professional career started at Disney, Emily has been in local productions at the Phoenix Theatre and Beef & Boards, and has sung with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. Emily works as a studio singer recording for Music Theater International, does radio and television commercial work, directs regional theatre, and teaches acting at Butler University.

MILICENT WRIGHT SISTER OF MERCY, CHRISTMAS PRESENT, CHARWOMAN, et al.

This is Milicent’s tenth season of A Christmas Carol. Other IRT appearances include five one-woman shows—The Power of One, Pretty Fire, Neat, The Night Watcher, and Bridge & Tunnel—as well as To Kill a Mockingbird, The Crucible, Julius Caesar, A Woman Called Truth, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Mother of the Movement, and Hard Times. At the Phoenix she has enjoyed Dontrell Who Kissed the Sea; Love, Loss, and What I Wore; and …And Her Hair Went with Her; next summer she returns there in a new play, Human Rites. She has also been seen in Twelfth Night for HART; Doubt for Cardinal Stage; and Stonewall Jackson’s House at the Human Race Theatre. Milicent is the IRT’s manager of outreach programs and a resident teaching artist in the IRT’s Summer Conservatory for Youth. She has done youth programming for the Asante Children’s Theatre and Young Audiences of Indiana, and adult classes for Indianapolis Civic Theatre. Milicent was a 2011 Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Fellowship recipient and a 2015 award recipient from the Center for Leadership and Development.

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YOUNG ACTORS

ROLES ARE PLAYED BY TWO ALTERNATING TEAMS OF ACTORS

RED TEAM ERIC BEST

Edison School of the Arts | 8th Grade

JORDAN PECAR

Sycamore School | 6th Grade

JACKSON LYLE

Mary Bryan Elementary School | 5th Grade

CLAIRE ELIZABETH KAUFFMAN

Pleasant View Elementary School | 4th Grade

GRANT O’MEARA

Park Tudor School | 5th Grade

GLORIA CARUANA | YOUNG ACTOR SUPERVISOR

GREEN TEAM

ROLE

MILES M. MOREY

PETER CRATCHIT et al.

ALYSSA MARIE GAINES

BELINDA CRATCHIT et al.

TEDDY RAYHILL

HENRY CRATCHIT et al.

NINA R. MOREY

BETSY CRATCHIT et al.

SOPHAIA PRABHU-HENSLEY

TINY TIM et al.

Home School | 8th Grade

Merle Sidener Gifted Academy | 7th Grade

International School | 5th Grade

Home School | 6th Grade

Home School | 7th Grade

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THE COMPANY JANET ALLEN DIRECTOR

Janet has been the IRT’s artistic leader for 21 seasons. Among the 19 IRT productions she has directed are To Kill a Mockingbird, On Golden Pond, Who Am I This Time?, The House That Jack Built, The Diary of Anne Frank, Looking over the President’s Shoulder (2008), The Drawer Boy, Ah, Wilderness!, and The Glass Menagerie. (see full bio on page 8)

RUSSELL METHENY SCENIC DESIGNER

Russell has designed more than 40 IRT productions, including April 4, 1968: Before We Forgot How to Dream, The Game’s Afoot, Who Am I This Time?, A Little Night Music, The House That Jack Built, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, God of Carnage, The Heavens Are Hung in Black, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Iron Kisses, The Unexpected Guest, The Gentleman from Indiana, Old Wicked Songs, Searching for Eden, Plaza Suite, Arcadia, The Immigrant, Ah, Wilderness!, and Looking over the President’s Shoulder (2001). His most recent work includes The Tempest and Dial “M” for Murder for the Great Lakes and Idaho Shakespeare festivals and The Matchmaker and Both Your Houses for Asolo Theatre. He has also designed for the Studio Theatre, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Weston Playhouse, Dallas Theatre Center, the Old Globe Theatre, Geffen Playhouse, Missouri Rep, Actors Theatre of Kansas City, the Goodman Theatre, Syracuse Stage, Buffalo Studio Arena, Portland Stage, and Goodspeed Musicals.

MURELL HORTON COSTUME DESIGNER

Murell is the winner of the 2007 Irene Sharaff Young Master Award for Costume Design. He has received seven Helen Hayes nominations for Outstanding Costume Design, for productions of The Government Inspector, The Liar, Edward II, Lorenzaccio, Hedda Gabler, Camino Real, and the world premiere of Wallenstein. He recently designed the world premiere of Metromaniacs by David Ives at the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, DC. He has designed for the Houston Grand Opera, New York City Opera, the Guthrie Theater, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, the Shakespeare Theatre Company in D.C., Balitimore’s Center Stage, Denver Center Theatre, the Juilliard School, the Acting Company, the Pearl Theatre, Cleveland Play House, Philadelphia Theatre Company, the Delaware Theatre Company, the Berkshire Theatre Festival, Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey, and Madison Repertory Theatre. Murell is represented by the Gersh Agency in New York City.

MICHAEL LINCOLN LIGHTING DESIGNER

Michael has designed more than 30 productions at the IRT, including, Finding Home: Indiana at 200, April 4, 1968, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Who Am I This Time?, A Little Night Music, The House That Jack Built, God of Carnage, The 39 Steps, Becky’s New Car, This Wonderful Life, The Piano Lesson, Old Wicked Songs, Arcadia, The Immigrant, Ah, Wilderness!, The Glass Menagerie, Hedda Gabler, and Benefactors, among others. Highlights of his career include the Broadway productions of Copenhagen, More to Love, and Skylight, as well as offBroadway designs including Mr. Goldwyn, The Bubbly Black Girl Sheds Her Chameleon Skin, Defying Gravity, Bunny Bunny, and Swingtime Canteen. In addition to the IRT, Michael has had long associations with the Alley Theatre, Cleveland Play House, Studio Theatre DC, Santa Fe Opera, and Los Angeles Ballet. He is artistic director of the Ohio University Theater Division. www.michaellincoln.net

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ANDREW HOPSON COMPOSER & SOUND DESIGNER

Andrew is an associate professor of sound design in the Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance at Indiana University. He has designed or written the scores for shows at such theatres as the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Utah Shakespearean Festival, Actors Theatre of Louisville, American Repertory Theatre, American Players Theatre, Cincinnati Playhouse, Pioneer Playhouse, Cleveland Play House, Victory Gardens, Harvard University, and the Indiana Repertory Theatre, where he was resident sound designer for five years. In 2004 his New York debut, Trying, was rated one of the best off-Broadway shows of the year. In film, he has scored the documentaries Birth of Legends, The Battle of Comm Avenue, Hockey’s Greatest Era 1942-1967, The Frozen Four, and Utah’s Olympic Legacy. He has produced, engineered, or performed on more than 40 CDs, ranging from stories for children to collections of modern American piano works. He is a member of United Scenic Artists, local 829, and the Unites States Institute of Theatre Technology.

DAVID HOCHOY CHOREOGRAPHER

Artistic director of Dance Kaleidoscope since 1991, David has created choreography and/or movement for more than a dozen productions at the IRT and co-directed Ain’t Misbehavin’ and As You Like It. He has danced with numerous national companies, including the Martha Graham Dance Company, where he was a soloist and rehearsal director. He has taught dance classes and workshops around the world, and spent two years on the faculty at Texas Christian University prior to his appointment at DK. He has choreographed productions at the Indianapolis Civic Theatre, Phoenix Theatre, and Edyvean Repertory Theatre, as well as Arizona Opera and Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. He was artistic director of the Green Shows at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, where for ten summers DK performed as resident dance company. He has received awards from the Indiana Arts Commission, the Arts Council of Indianapolis, the Center for Leadership Development, Indy Men’s Magazine, University High School, and the Choo-San Goh and Robert McGee Foundation. Most recently he was named an Indiana Living Legend by the Indiana Historical Society. In 2016 he and Dance Kaleidoscope were named recipients of the Governor’s Arts Award by the Indiana Arts Commission.

TERRY WOODS MUSICAL DIRECTOR

At the IRT, Terry has musical directed several shows, including The Gifts of the Magi, He Held Me Grand, I Do! I Do! and several editions of A Christmas Carol. He has musical directed Les Misérables, Hairspray, Singin’ in the Rain, Hello, Dolly!, and many other shows at Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre. Recently he has worked with Actors Theatre of Indiana on Forever Plaid, My Way, and A Year with Frog and Toad. He has performed nationally at Walt Disney World as a musician and puppeteer and also at the Sheraton New Orleans in the “French Quarter Follies.” He has traveled in the United States with several tours including One Mo’ Time and throughout Europe with West Side Story. He has appeared on stage in 1776 at Indianapolis Civic Theatre and in Evita and Sugar Babies at Gateway Playhouse on Long Island. He costumed The Marvelous Land of Oz for the Indianapolis Children’s Museum, as well as several shows for Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre.

RICHARD J ROBERTS DRAMATURG

Richard has been resident dramaturg for 19 of his 27 seasons with the IRT. He has also been a dramaturg for the New Harmony Project and Write Now. He has directed the IRT’s productions of Bridge & Tunnel, The Night Watcher, Neat, Pretty Fire, The Giver (2009), The Power of One, and Twelfth Night, as well as four editions of A Christmas Carol; this season he was assistant director for Finding Home and he directs The Cay. Other directing credits include Actors Theatre of Indiana, the Phoenix Theatre, Edyvean Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis Civic Theatre, IndyShakes/Wisdom Tooth, Butler University, and Anderson University. Richard studied music at DePauw University and theatre at Indiana University. In 2003 he was awarded a Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

NATHAN GARRISON STAGE MANAGER

This is Nathan’s 21st season at the IRT. He has also worked with Center Stage in Baltimore, Utah Shakespeare Festival, Brown County Playhouse, and Heartland Actors Repertory (HART).

53


OVATION SOCIETY THE FUTURE IS IN YOUR HANDS For 45 Seasons, the IRT has been privileged to provide Indiana with world class theatre. Arranging a planned gift to the IRT will help ensure that the theatre you know and love can continue to thrive for generations to come. Including the IRT in your long-term financial plans gives you the flexibility to manage your assets in a way that makes financial sense to you and your family, while providing future funds to support the continued success of one of Indiana’s great cultural institutions, the IRT. There are a variety of ways you can choose to include the IRT in your estate planning. Our staff is happy to work with you and your financial advisor, tax professional or family attorney to determine how a planned gift can help meet your financial and charitable goals. Please let us know if you have already made arrangements for a planned gift so that we can add you as a member to our growing Ovation Society! Ready to create your legacy at the IRT? Want more information about making a planned gift? Contact Lindsey Horan, Associate Director of Major Gifts lhoran@irtlive.com | 317.916.4833 Top to bottom: David Alan Anderson and Erika LaVonn in IRT's 2015 production of What I Learned in Paris. Hillary Clemens in IRT's 2015 production of The Great Gatsby. Rob Johansen and Marcus Truschinski in the IRT's 2016 production of The Mystery of Irma Vep. Dalyn Stewart and Piper Murphy in IRT's 2015 production of Peter Rabbit and Me. Darrie Lawrence and Constance Macy in IRT's 2015 production of On Golden Pond. David Alan Anderson and Grayson Molin in IRT's 2015 production of The Giver. All Photos by Zach Rosing.


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OVER 40,000 STUDENTS EXPERIENCE LIVE THEATRE AT THE IRT EACH SEASON Without the Alan and Linda Cohen Education Fund, almost half of those students would not have been able to attend. Join the hundreds of donors who make live theatre experiences possible for students across the state, donate to the Cohen Education Fund today! "A student told me he couldn’t pay for the trip because his family doesn’t have a lot of money right now. I told him that the IRT had helped cover the cost. His eyes lit up and he kept saying 'thank you!' throughout the day." -An Indiana Teacher

Paula Hopkins and Jan Lucas in the IRT's 2016 production of To Kill a Mockingbird. Photo by Zach Rosing.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SUPPORTING STUDENT MATINEES, CONTACT: MAGGIE BARRETT SCHLAKE: MBARRETT@IRTLIVE.COM | 317.916.4830


Embracing a passion for excellence.

The Christel DeHaan Family Foundation is proud to support the Indiana Repertory Theatre.

Our contribution is also provided in honor of the children and families of Christel House. www.christelhouse.org


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THE SUPPORTING CAST INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE DONORS WHAT IF YOU SAW ONLY HALF THE PLAY? Ticket revenue covers just half of what it costs to produce world-class professional theatre at the Indiana Repertory Theatre. The IRT gratefully acknowledges the remarkable support we receive from our generous and committed donors whose contributions ensure that the show does go on! *Denotes a sustaining member

REPERTORY SOCIETY

($1500 +) | JULY 1, 2016 - OCTOBER 4, 2016

PLAYWRIGHT CIRCLE $10,000+

ARTIST CIRCLE $3,000 - $4,999

Bob & Toni Bader Mr. Leo Bianchi & Dr. Jill A. Panetta Michael Dinius & Jeannie Regan-Dinius Nancy & Berkley Duck Dan & Ginny Emerson Tom & Jenny Froehle Mr. & Mrs. Charles & Susan Golden Michael & Judy Harrington Sarah & John Lechleiter Jackie Nytes & Michael O'Brien Sue & Bill Ringo Wayne & Susan Schmidt David P. Whitman & Donna L. Reynolds Dr. Christian Wolf & Elaine Holden-Wolf DIRECTOR CIRCLE $5,000 - $9,999

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A.J. Allen & Kathy Maeglin Mary Findling & John Hurt Dick & Brenda Freije Donald & Teri Hecht Richard & Elizabeth Holmes John & Liz Jenkins David Kleiman & Susan Jacobs John & Susan Kline Steve & Bev Koepper Scott & Amy Kosnoff Kevin Krulewitch & Rosanne Ammirati* Dan & Martha Lehman David & Leslie Morgan Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Nagy Dr. Christine & Michael Phillips Becca & Jonathan Polak Bob & Kathi Postlethwait N. Clay & Amy M. Robbins Dr. Eric Schultze & Dr. Marcia Kolvitz Cynthia & William Smith III Cheryl & Jim Strain Gene & Mary Tempel PATRON CIRCLE $1,500 - $2,999

Janet Allen & Joel Grynheim Anonymous Hon. Sharon R. Barner Benjamin & Ashley Blair Vince & Robyn Caponi Susan M. Cross Daniel & Catherine Cunningham Ann & Kenneth Dee

Drs. Richard & Rebecca Feldman Jim & Julie Freeman Brian & Lorene Furrer Rick Fuson Phyllis & Ed Gabovitch Mr. Jim Gawne Robert & Jo Ann Giannini Michael N. Heaton Jane Herndon & Dan Kramer Bruce Hetrick & Cheri O'Neill Ted Hingst William & Patricia Hirsch Brenda Horn Randolph & Rebecca Horton DanielT. Jensen & Steven Follis Mike & Pegg Kennedy Phil & Colleen Kenney Arthur & Jacquelyn King Gary Knott & Colette Irwin-Knott Kurt & Judy Kroenke Joe & Deborah Loughrey John & Laura Ludwig John & Barbara MacDougall Jeff & Patricia MacKay Donald & Ruth Ann MacPherson Sharon R. Merriman Dod & Laura Michael Andrew & Amy Michie Michael D. Moriarty Anne Nobles & David L. Johnson Brian & Gail Payne The Pletzer Endowment Fund, a fund of Legacy Fund Phil & Joyce Probst


JULY 1, 2016 - AUGUST 31, 2016

REPERTORY SOCIETY CONT.

($1500 +) | JULY 1, 2016 - OCTOBER 4, 2016

PATRON CIRCLE CONT. $1,500 - $2,999

Tim & Karen Seiler Marguerite K. Shepard, M.D. Reuben & Lee Shevitz Jacqueline Simmons &Tom Schnellenberger Michael & Cynthia Skehan Suzanne Sweeney &ToddWiencek Joe & JillTanner JenniferTurner John & KathyVahle DorothyWebb

Myrta Pulliam Peter & Karen Reist Ken & Debra Renkens Karen & Dick Ristine Mr. & Mrs. Charles O. & Jane Rutledge Francisnelli Santos & Brian S. Newman Charles & Jenny Schalliol Tom & Barbara Schoellkopf

DONOR GUILDS

RosalindWebb & Duard Ballard CarolWeiss Alan & ElizabethWhaley Cliff & MollyWilliams Ken & PeggyWilliams Bob & DanaWilson HeatherWilson Jim & JoyceWinner

ANNUAL CAMPAIGN GIFTS ($250 +) | JULY 1, 2016 - OCTOBER 4, 2016

* Denotes Sustaining Member DRAMA GUILD $650 - $1,499

Jesse L. & Carolynne Bobbitt Brady Clark Dr. Brian Dillman & Erin Hedges* Drs. Eric Farmer &TateTrujillo Robert Hunchberger & Kathy Callahan Keith & Marion Michael John & Carolyn Mutz Robert & Alice Schloss Dr. James & LindaTrippi Barbara S.Tully* John & Linda Zimmermann THEATRE GUILD $250 - $649

John & Eileen Ahrens* Constance C. Beardsley* Barbara & Christopher Bodem* Doug & Brenda Chappell William S. Coleman Jr. Keith & Brenda Coley

Martha Cronkhite* Karen Dace* Paul and Carol DeCoursey* Phillip & Caroline Dennis* Ditech Inc. Garry & Glenda Frey Julie Funk Emily Hancock* Alexandra & Justin Harris* Angela & Douglas Harris* Lindsey &Tom Horan Ron & Shannon Jones Dave & Donna Kaiser Steven & Mary Koch* Paul & Lana Kruse Roger & Janet Lang Dr. & Mrs. Peter Marcus* Patrick Marlatt* Melissa Maulding Rev. Mary Ann Moman* Kent & Elaine Morrison*

Mr. Electric Al & Debbie Parrish* Steve & Quin Paul* Scott & Susan Putney Dr. Jill Shedd* Kevin & Amy Sobiski* Ross & Rosemarie Springer Stillpoint Family Chiropractic Nela Swinehart* Robert & BarbettaTrue* Steve &TeresaVincent SusanWeatherly* DanWheeler & SusanWakefield* Allen R.Wilkie Kathryn Page & PeterWitczak* Reba BoydWooden* Patrick & Rebecca Zirnheld* Patrick & Rebecca Zirnheld*

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THE SUPPORTING CAST INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE DONORS OVATION SOCIETY The Ovation Society is an exclusive program that recognizes donors that have made a planned gift to the IRT. The IRT truly appreciates those individuals whose gift will ensure that the Theatre can continue to provide meaningful and inspirational experiences for future generations of Hoosiers. Gary Addison Ron & Julia Carpenter John & Mary Challman Cheri & Rollie Dick Nancy & Berkley Duck Dale & Karen Duncan Meg Gammage-Tucker David A. & Dee Garrett Michael Gradison Emily Hancock

Bruce Hetrick & Cheri O'Neill David Kleiman & Susan Jacobs Frank & Jacqueline La Vista Donald & Ruth Ann MacPherson Stuart L. Main Michael R. & Sue Maine David & Leslie Morgan Richard & Lila Morris Deena Nystrom Marcia O'Brien

Robert V. Robinson & Nancy J. Davis Jane & Fred Schlegel Jerry & Rosie Semler Gene & Mary Tempel Jeff & Benita Thomasson Christopher J. Tolzmann Alan & Elizabeth Whaley John & Margaret Wilson

CORPORATE, FOUNDATION, & GOVERNMENT

ANNUAL CAMPAIGN GIFTS ($250 +) | JULY 1, 2016 - OCTOBER 4, 2016

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IN-KIND/TRADE GIFTS 9 on Canal Candlewood Suites

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FOUNDATIONS

Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation Christel DeHaan Family Foundation The Glick Family Foundation The Glick Fund, a fund of CICF Lilly Endowment, Inc. F.R. Hensel Fund for Fine Arts, Music, and Education, a fund of The Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF Affiliate

GOVERNMENT

Arts Council of Indianapolis Indiana Arts Commission National Endowment for the Arts

ANNUAL CAMPAIGN GIFTS ($250 +) | JULY 1, 2016 - OCTOBER 4, 2016 Eco-Kinetic WFYI

Eli Lilly and Company Indiana Arts Commission


THE ALAN AND LINDA COHEN EDUCATION FUND

ANNUAL CAMPAIGN GIFTS ($250 +) | JULY 1, 2016 - OCTOBER 4, 2016

We are enormously grateful to the Cohens for this visionary gift which directly benefits students attending all of our many student matinees this season and in future seasons as well.With the support of this fund, the IRT is able to underwrite ticketing four our young audiences. Eli Lilly and Company Jim & Mary Russell The Glick Fund, a fund of CICF

F.R. Hensel Fund for Fine Arts, Music, and Education, a fund of The Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF Affiliate

Dr. Frank Wilson

CONTRIBUTE YOUR OLD CAR TO THE IRT Donate a vehicle to the IRT and we will sell it at auction. The proceeds will benefit the Theatre, and you can qualify for a tax deduction. We don’t just accept automobiles, you can donate any of the following: Boats | Motorcycles | Motor Homes | Snow Mobiles | Farm Equiptment | More! Zach Kenney, Teagan Rose, and David Folsom in IRT's 2015 production of The Great Gatsby. Photo by Zach Rosing.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: LHORAN@IRTLIVE.COM | 317.916.4833


THE COMMUNITY WE’VE BECOME STARTED TAKING SHAPE A CENTURY AGO. THE COMMUNITY WE’LL BE IN 100 YEARS

STARTS WITH YOU.

Share your vision for the future of Central Indiana at CICF.org/BeIN.

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IRT SPECIAL OFFERINGS TEA TALKS

HAPPY HOUR

Post-show discussions and complimentary tea and cookies. Discussion speakers include cast, crew, and special guests. Following our 2nd Sunday performances (2:00 pm performances)

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Indoor Track • NBA-size Basketball Court • Olympic Lifting & Powerlifting Platforms • Personal Training • Group Training • Bod Pod and Fitness Assessments

TRY US FOR 7 DAYS FREE 317 •274 •3432

nifs.org

Over 70 group fitness classes each week including:


OFFICIAL CATERERS A FINE SELECTION FOR YOUR EVENT AT THE IRT

Amy von Eiff | 317.575.9514 12955 Old Meridian Street, Suite 104, Carmel, IN 46032 www.acutabovecatering.com

Betsy Cooprider-Bernstein | 317.396.5310 5635 East County Road 450 N., Brownsburg, IN 46219 www.alancaters.com

Antonia Zunarelli | 317.236.1874 140 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204 www.indianaroof.com

Jessica Pontius | 317.924.3389 950 South White River Parkway West Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46221 www.hoaglincatering.com

Jaquie Hensley | 317.283.2776 9840 North Michigan Road, Carmel, IN 46032 www.jacquiesgourmetcatering.com

2502 East 52nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46205 www.mbpcatering.com

Mary Beth Poe | 317.636.4444

Debbie Lambert | 317.636.7607 10 North Illinois Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204 www.webergrillrestaurant.com

Our community outreach programs, sponsored by the Navient Foundation, support organizations and programs that address the root causes which limit financial success for all Americans. This season, the Navient Foundation is proud to support the Indiana Repertory Theatre as the Student Matinee Sponsor of The Cay and the Production Partner for Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner. As the nation's leading loan management, servicing and asset recovery company, Navient helps customers navigate the path to financial success. The company supports the educational and economic achievements of more than 12 million Americans. A growing number of public and private sector government clients rely on Navient for proven solutions to meet their financial goals. Today, many Americans rely on financial support to further their education and improve their chances of financial success. We work hard every day to educate our clients and customers to help them through financial challenges so they can achieve their desired financial results. We at Navient share an affinity for the arts and an appreciation for the hard work, passion and emotion that goes into it, as well as the positive influence it can have on people’s lives. Navient and its over 1,500 employees in the Central Indiana area are dedicated to giving back to and supporting our community through amazing programs like those offered by IRT. Enjoy the show.


IRT STAGE DOOR RESTAURANTS

DISCOUNTS FOR IRT SEASON TICKET HOLDERS ONLY. BUY NOW! 317.635.5252

ADOBO GRILL 10% OFF, EXCLUDING ALCOHOL 110 E Washington St | 317.822.9990

CERULEAN COMPLIMENTARY GLASS OF SPARKLING CHAMPAGNE & ARTISAN CHEESE PAIRING 339 S Delaware St | 317.870.1320

COLTS GRILLE 20% OFF, EXCLUDING ALCOHOL 110 W Washington St | 317.631.2007

HARD ROCK CAFE FREE APPETIZER, EXCLUDING JUMBO COMBO 49 S Meridian St | 317.636.2550

OCEANAIRE COMPLIMENTARY APPETIZER WITH THE PURCHASE OF AN ENTREE (RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY) 30 S Meridian St | 317.974.0400

PALOMINO $10 OFF 49 W Maryland St, Suite189 317.974.0400

PEARINGS 15% OFF 6 W Washington St | 317.608.6456

RUTH'S CHRIS 10% OFF, EXCLUDING ALCOHOL (DOWNTOWN ONLY) 45 S Illinois St | 317.633.1313

TASTINGS 20% OFF, SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY (NIGHT OF PERFORMANCE ONLY) 50 W Washington St | 317.423.2400

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WEBER GRILL 10% OFF, EXCLUDING ALCOHOL 10 N Illinois St | 317.636.7600


SIGN TODAY TO GET WAIVED APP & ADMIN FEES

SAVE $200!

*

*Restrictions apply, offer subject to change.

LUXURY LIVING ON THE CANAL 10 MINUTE WALK TO CAMPUS AND DOWNTOWN

FULLY FURNISHED | ALL-INCLUSIVE | ROOFTOP INFINITY POOL | ON-SITE RESTAURANT & COFFEE HOUSE 24-HOUR FITNESS CENTER | ROOFTOP PET PARK | COMMUNITY LOUNGE

335 WEST 9TH STREET | INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46202 | 855.698.6610

9onCanal.com

/9onCanal

@9onCanal

@9onCanal

DON'T FORGET TO CHECK OUT IRT'S GIFT SHOP! LOCATED IN THE TICKET OFFICE AND OPEN THROUGH INTERMISSION. IRT SEASON TICKET HOLDERS RECEIVE 10% OFF! Indiana Treasures Goods Crafted by Local Artists Chocolates Unique Gifts


Oxford proudly supports the Indiana Repertory Theatre.

Oxford is independent and unbiased — and always will be. We are committed to providing families generational estate planning and institutions forward-thinking investment strategies.

CHICAGO ✦ CINCINNATI ✦ GRAND RAPIDS ✦ INDIANAPOLIS ✦ TWIN CITIES 317.843.5678 ✦ WWW.OFGLTD.COM/IRT

Profile for Indiana Repertory Theatre

IRT Program: "Finding Home: Indiana at 200" & "A Christmas Carol"  

2016-2017 Season

IRT Program: "Finding Home: Indiana at 200" & "A Christmas Carol"  

2016-2017 Season

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