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THE UPPERSTAGE OCTOBER 17 - NOVEMBER 12 THE ONEAMERICA MAINSTAGE SEPTEMBER 19 - OCTOBER 14

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For more than 40 years, the Indiana Repertory Theatre has brought together actors, friends, families and neighbors to enjoy great entertainment and unique performances. We are proud to continue our support of the IRT and its significant cultural contributions. We hope that you will enjoy the 2017-2018 Season.

—Scott Davison, OneAmerica chairman, president and CEO

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OUR MISSION & VISION MISSION Live theatre connects us to meaningful issues in our lives and has the power to shape the human experience. The mission of the Indiana Repertory Theatre is to produce top-quality, professional theatre and related activities, providing experiences that will engage, surprise, challenge, and entertain people throughout their lifetimes, helping us build a vital and vibrant community. VISION The Indiana Repertory Theatre will be a life-long destination of choice for an ever-expanding audience of all ages and backgrounds seeking enjoyable and meaningful experiences. Using theatre as a springboard for both personal reflection and community discussion, our productions and programs will inspire our neighbors to learn about themselves and others. As an arts leader in the state of Indiana, the IRT's goal is to make Indiana a dynamic home of cultural expression, economic vitality, and a diverse, informed, and engaged citizenry.

AS AN INSTITUTION, WE VALUE... SUSTAINING A PROFESSIONAL, CREATIVE ATMOSPHERE The professional production of plays that provide insight and celebrate human relationships through the unique vision of the playwright • Professional artists of the highest quality working on our stages in an environment that allows them to grow and thrive • Our leadership role in fostering a creative environment where arts, education, corporate, civic, and cultural organizations collaborate to benefit our community. PRUDENT STEWARDSHIP OF OUR RESOURCES Our public-benefit status, where the focus is on artistic integrity, affordable ticket prices that allow all segments of our community to attend, and community service • Fiscal responsibility and financial security based on achieving a balanced budget • Growing our endowment fund as a resource for future development and to ensure institutional longevity. INCLUSIVENESS The production of plays from a broad range of dramatic literature addressing diverse communities • The involvement of all segments of our community in our activities • Using theatre arts as a primary tool to bring meaning into the lives of our youth, making creativity a component of their education • The employment of artists and staff that celebrates the diversity of the United States. HERITAGE AND TRADITION Our role as Indiana’s premiere theatre for more than 40 years, recognized by the 107th Indiana General Assembly in 1991 as “Indiana’s Theatre Laureate.” • The historic Indiana Theatre as our home, as a cultural landmark, and as a significant contributor to a vital downtown • Our national, state, and local reputation for 40+ years of quality creative work and educational programming • Our board, staff, volunteers, artists, audiences, and donors as essential partners in fulfilling our mission.

CONTENTS 5 Mission & Values

7 Profile 10 Leadership 14 Staff 16 Board of Directors 18 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time 24 Mickey Rowe 26 Company bios for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time 38 The Originalist 47 Company bios for The Originalist 56 Donor Listing REVIEWS?

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TICKET OFFICE: 317.635.5252 ADMIN OFFICES: 317.635.5277 140 West Washington Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46204

PHOTO POLICY

Due to union agreements, photography and audio recording are prohibited in the theatre. The videotaping of this production is a violation of United States Copyright Law and an actionable Federal Offense. 5


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performance spaces (OneAmerica Mainstage, Upperstage, and Cabaret) and work spaces, reviving this historic downtown entertainment site. To keep ticket prices and services affordable for the entire community, the IRT operates as a not-for-profit organization, deriving more than 50% of its operating income from contributions. The theatre is generously supported by foundations, corporations, and individuals, an investment which recognizes the IRT’s mission-based commitment to serving Central Indiana with top-quality theatrical fare. PROGRAMS

INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE PROFILE

HISTORY

Since the Indiana Repertory Theatre was founded in 1971, it has grown into one of the leading regional theatres in the country, as well as one of the top-flight cultural institutions in the city and state. In 1991 Indiana’s General Assembly designated the IRT as “Theatre Laureate” of the state of Indiana. The IRT’s national reputation has been confirmed by prestigious grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lila Wallace–Reader’s Digest Fund, the Theatre Communications Group–Pew Charitable Trusts, the Shubert Foundation, and the Kresge Foundation; and by a Joyce Award from the Joyce Foundation. The IRT remains the largest fully professional resident not-for-profit theatre in the state, providing more than 100,000 live professional theatre experiences for its audience last season. These experiences included 38,000 students and teachers from 53 of Indiana’s 92 counties, making the IRT one of the most youth-oriented professional theatres in the country. A staff of more than 100 seasonal and year-round employees creates nine productions exclusively for Indiana audiences. Actors, directors, and designers are members of professional stage unions. The IRT’s history has been enacted in two historic downtown theatres. The Athenaeum Turners Building housed the company’s first eight seasons. Since 1980 the IRT has occupied the 1927 Indiana Theatre, which was renovated to contain three

• The OneAmerica Season includes nine diverse productions from classical and contemporary repertoires, including Eli Lilly and Company presents A Christmas Carol and James Still's Appoggiatura. • New Play Development The IRT offers Write Now, a prestigious national workshop for adult playwrights writing for young audiences; and Young Playwrights in Process (YPiP), a playwriting contest and workshop for Indiana high school and junior high students. • Community Gathering Place Located in a beautiful historic landmark, the IRT offers a wide variety of unique and adaptable spaces for family, business, and community gatherings of all types. Call Margaret Lehtinen at 317.916.4880 for more information. • Opportunities The IRT depends on the generous donation of time and energy by volunteer ushers; call 317.916.4880 to learn how you can become involved. • Meet the Artists Regularly scheduled pre-show chats, post-show discussions, and backstage tours offer audiences unique insights into each production. • Student Matinees The IRT continues a long-time commitment to student audiences with school-day student matinee performances of all IRT productions. These performances are augmented with educational activities and curriculum support materials. This season Eli Lilly and Company presents A Christmas Carol, Romeo and Juliet, and The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse offer extensive opportunities for student attendance. • Educational Programs Auxiliary services offered include visiting artists in the classroom, study guides, pre- and post-show discussions, and guided tours of the IRT’s facilities. • Classes From creative dramatics to audition workshops to Shakespeare seminars, the IRT offers a wide array of personal learning opportunities for all ages, including our Summer Conservatory for Youth. Call 317.916.4842 for further information. 7


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Origami model by Brian K. Webb.

At Printing Partners, we look at the bigger picture. To us, print is more than simply putting ink on paper. It’s the act of transforming your thoughts, feelings and hard work into something tangible. Similarly, organizations like the Indiana Repertory Theatre aren’t just organizations, but educational journeys to a broadened mindset and an open heart. And we’re proud to support it.

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Among the memorable productions Janet has directed on the IRT’s stages are The Glass Menagerie (1999), Ah! Wilderness (2002), The Drawer Boy (2004), Looking Over the President’s Shoulder (2008), The Diary of Anne Frank (2011), James Still’s The House That Jack Built (2012), and To Kill a Mockingbird (2016). Celebrating the IRT’s 46-year legacy this season, she directs A Christmas Carol and Looking Over the President’s Shoulder.

LEADERSHIP: JANET ALLEN EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Creating world-class professional theatre for Central Indiana audiences of all ages has remained a career-long passion for Janet Allen. She began at the IRT in 1980 as the theatre’s first literary manager and dramaturg. After four years in New York City, she returned to serve ten years as associate artistic director under mentors Tom Haas and Libby Appel. Named the IRT’s fourth artistic director in 1996, she is now in her 22nd season in that role. In 2013, she was named the IRT’s executive artistic director. During Janet’s tenure, the IRT has significantly diversified its education services to both adults and children, expanded its new play development programs, solidified its reputation as a top-flight regional theatre dedicated to diverse programming and production quality, and established the IRT as a generous content partner with organizations throughout Central Indiana. Janet’s passion for nurturing playwrights has led to a fruitful relationship with James Still, the IRT’s playwright-in-residence for 20 years, and the creation and production of 16 new works— the Indiana Series—that examine Hoosier and Midwestern sensibilities (seven of them by James Still). Her collaboration with playwrights has brought the theatre prestigious grants from the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Joyce Foundation, and the Doris Duke Foundation, as well as numerous grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and Shakespeare for a New Generation. 10

Janet studied theatre at Illinois State University, Indiana University, and Exeter College, Oxford. As a classical theatre specialist, she has published and taught theatre history and dramaturgy at IUPUI and Butler University. Janet’s leadership skills and community service have been recognized by Indianapolis Business Journal’s “40 Under 40” Award, the Network of Women in Business–IBJ’s “Influential Women in Business” Award, Safeco’s Beacon of Light in Our Community Award, a Distinguished Hoosier Award conferred by Governor Frank O’Bannon, Girls Inc.’s Touchstone Award for Arts Leadership, and the Indiana Commission on Women’s “Keeper of the Light” Torchbearer Award. She is a proud alum of the Stanley K. Lacy Leadership program (Class XIX) and the Shannon Leadership Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and is a 2013-14 Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Arts Fellow. In 2015 Janet was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and received a Medallion Award for significant national contributions from the Children’s Theatre Foundation of America. In July 2017 Janet was named an Indiana Living Legend by the Indiana Historical Society. Janet is a member of the Indianapolis Woman’s Club and Congregation Beth-El Zedeck. She lives in an historic house built in 1855 in the downtown Chatham Arch neighborhood with her husband, Joel Grynheim, their two daughters, and a lovely canine mutt.


Learning Indiana) for seven years, and a past treasurer of IndyFringe. Suzanne is a graduate of the College of William & Mary (undergraduate) and Indiana University (M.B.A.). She started her career as a CPA; prior to coming to Indianapolis, she worked in finance for more than 10 years, living in such varied locales as Washington, DC; Dallas, Texas; Frankfurt, Germany; Honolulu, Hawaii; and even working for three months in Auckland, New Zealand (where, yes, she went bungee jumping). She is a proud alum of the Stanley K. Lacy Leadership Program (Class XXXI). Suzanne lives in the Old Northside with her 14-year-old son, Jackson, and their foxhound rescue dog, Gertie, and spends some of her downtime in Palatine, Illinois, with her partner, Todd Wiencek. Opposite: Kim Staunton and Lauren Briggeman in the IRT's 2016 production of Finding Home: Indiana at 200. Photo by Zach Rosing.

LEADERSHIP: SUZANNE SWEENEY

Below: Rob Johansen and Elizabeth Laidlaw in the IRT's 2016 production of The Three Musketeers. Photo by Zach Rosing.

MANAGING DIRECTOR

Suzanne is a 19-year veteran of the IRT, managing every administrative area within the theatre at one time or another during that period. Serving as the managing director is the capstone to her career here. Her main responsibility had been to serve as the chief financial officer of the theatre, running the business office, human resources, and information technology functions. As the CFO, she helped to steer the organization thorough 15 years of balanced budgets (and 15 audits!). She also served as the interim managing director for 18 months in 2004-2005. Suzanne is continuing the work of maintaining a brilliant team whose members expertly manage all of the administrative areas. She is excited to be moving into year five of this leadership role of the organization she loves, alongside her mentor and friend Janet Allen. In 2016, Suzanne was honored to serve as a panelist for Shakespeare in American Communities in cooperation with Arts Midwest. Suzanne is active in the community, having been the treasurer of Irish Fest for nine years, a member of the board of directors and treasurer of the Day Nursery Association (now Early 11


been nominated four times for the Pulitzer Prize, and have been developed and workshopped at Robert Redford’s Sundance, the New Harmony Project, Eugene O’Neill Playwrights Conference, the Colorado New Play Summit, the Lark in New York, Launch Pad at UC–Santa Barbara, Perry-Mansfield New Works Festival, Telluride Playwright’s Festival, New Visions/New Voices, Fresh Ink, and Write Now at the IRT. Three of his plays have received the Distinguished Play Award from the American Alliance for Theatre & Education, and his work has been produced throughout the United States, Canada, China, Japan, Europe, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

LEADERSHIP: JAMES STILL PLAYWRIGHT-IN-RESIDENCE

During James’s 20 years as playwright-in-residence, IRT audiences have seen his plays Miranda; April 4, 1968: Before We Forgot How to Dream; The House That Jack Built; I Love to Eat: Cooking with James Beard; The Velveteen Rabbit; The Heavens Are Hung in Black; Interpreting William; Iron Kisses; Looking over the President’s Shoulder (twice); The Gentleman from Indiana; Searching for Eden; He Held Me Grand; And Then They Came for Me: Remembering the World of Anne Frank (thrice); Amber Waves; and The Secret History of the Future. He has also directed many productions at the IRT, including Dial “M” for Murder, The Mystery of Irma Vep, Red, Other Desert Cities, God of Carnage, Becky’s New Car, Rabbit Hole, Doubt, Bad Dates, Plaza Suite, The Immigrant, and Dinner with Friends, as well as his own I Love to Eat, Looking over the President’s Shoulder (2001), and Amber Waves. This season the IRT produces his plays Appoggiatura and Looking Over the President’s Shoulder, and he directs The Originalist. James is an elected member of the National Theatre Conference in New York, and a Kennedy Center inductee of the College of Fellows of the American Theatre. Other honors include the Todd McNerney New Play Prize from the Spoleto Festival, William Inge Festival’s Otis Guernsey New Voices Award, the Orlin Corey Medallion from the Children’s Theatre Foundation of America, and the Charlotte B. Chorpenning Award for Distinguished Body of Work. His plays have 12

Other theatres that have produced James’s plays include the Kennedy Center, Denver Center, Geva, Cornerstone Theater Company, Ford’s Theatre, People’s Light & Theatre, the Barter, Pasadena Playhouse, Portland Stage, the Station, the Asolo, Company of Fools, the Children’s Theater Company of Minneapolis, Metro Theater Company, B-Street Theatre, Tricklock, Vermont Stage Company, the Round House, American Blues, Shattered Globe, Illusion Theater, and the Mark Taper Forum. Recent premieres at other theatres include the Denver Center Theatre production of Appoggiatura, which was a nominee for Outstanding New Play for the Henry Awards at the Colorado Theatre Guild. Miranda premiered at Illusion Theater in Minneapolis just before its IRT production. The Widow Lincoln premiered at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, DC, marking the 150th anniversary of President Lincoln’s death. James’s short play When Miss Lydia Hinkley Gives a Bird the Bird has appeared in several festivals around the country after its premiere with Red Bull Theatre in New York. New plays include an adaptation of the classic Black Beauty commissioned by Seattle Children’s Theatre, and a new play called (A) New World. James also works in television and film and has been nominated for five Emmys and a Television Critics Association Award; he has twice been a finalist for the Humanitas Prize. He was a producer and head writer for the series PAZ, the head writer for Maurice Sendak’s Little Bear, and writer for the Bill Cosby series Little Bill. He wrote The Little Bear Movie and The Miffy Movie as well as the feature film The Velocity of Gary. James grew up in Kansas and lives in Los Angeles. Arya Daire and Jennifer Coombs in IRT's 2017 production of Miranda. Photo by Zach Rosing.


Prior to his role at CTC, Ben spent five years in California’s Bay Area, dividing his time between Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Bay Area Children’s Theatre. At Berkeley Rep he created innovative community engagement programs to build and diversify audiences, and he facilitated youth development and leadership through the company’s Teen Council and representation at national conferences. Celebrating the work of young artists, he produced five festivals of plays written, directed, designed, and performed by Bay Area teens. At the Bay Area Children’s Theatre, he served as a director and interim artistic director, developing three world premiere musicals adapted from children’s literature, creating a new student matinee program, and overseeing a successful move into a new theatre building and campus.

LEADERSHIP: BENJAMIN HANNA ASSOCIATE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Ben is a director, new play developer, educator, and community engagement specialist whose passion for multigenerational theatre has influenced his work across the country with companies such as Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Children’s Theatre Company, Penumbra Theatre, Seattle Children’s Theatre, Steppingstone Theatre, and the Bay Area Children’s Theatre. In all of his myriad roles, Ben is guided by the belief that access to high-quality theatre helps build creative, empathetic people and healthy communities.

In his native Minnesota, Ben was privileged and honored to serve on the education staff of Penumbra Theatre Company, the nation’s leading African American theatre, where he helped to expand their education and outreach offerings. His proudest accomplishments during his four years with the company include growing the nationally recognized Summer Institute for Activist Artists into a three-year multidisciplinary social justice theatre training program, developing a multigenerational quilting circle, and helping to create and facilitate a racial equity training program through the company’s RACE workshop series. Ben holds a degree in theatre arts from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. He grew up on a small rural farm and fell in love with theatre at the age of eleven. He continues to create for his new favorite audience: his five nieces and nephews. Ben is excited to make his home in Indianapolis, to learn from the amazing team of artists and administrators at IRT, and to get to know (and no doubt love) this new and diverse community. Antonio King and Lex Lumpkin in IRT's 2017 production of Stuart Little. Photo by Zach Rosing.

Ben is thrilled to begin his first year on the leadership team at Indiana Repertory Theatre. He joins IRT following the completion of a prestigious 18-month Theatre Communications Group Leadership University Award. This highly competitive grant, administered by TCG and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supported his artistic associate position at the Children’s Theatre Company in Minneapolis, the nation’s largest theatre for young audiences. During his tenure at CTC, Ben directed in-house productions and took shows across the globe, as far afield as South Africa; he played a key role in fundraising, management, education, and strategic planning processes; and he helped guide the organization in addressing historical inequities and ensuring that the company’s work reflected the diversity of the local community. 13


INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE STAFF EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR JANET ALLEN ARTISTIC Associate Artistic Director Benjamin Hanna General Manager Jane Robison Production Manager Brian S. Newman Resident Dramaturg Richard J Roberts Company Manager Hillary Martin Manager of Outreach Programs Milicent Wright Playwright-in-Residence James Still COSTUME SHOP Costume Shop Manager Guy Clark Lead Draper Jessica Hayes Draper Stephanie Eubank Costumers Christi Parker Judith Skyles Wardrobe Supervisor Rachel Taylor

Shop Assistant Jason Gill ELECTRICS Master Electrician Beth A. Nuzum Assistant Master Electrician Elizabeth Smith Electrician Matt Griffin PAINT SHOP Charge Scenic Artist Claire Dana Assistant Charge Scenic Artists Jim Schumacher Robyn Vortex PROPERTIES SHOP Properties Manager Geoffrey Ehrendreich Properties Carpenter Christina Buerosse Properties Artisan Rachelle Martin Wilburn

Master Carpenter Betty Rupp Carpenters Seth Randall-Tapply David Sherrill Deck Manager Matt Shives SOUND Resident Sound Designer Todd Mack Reischman Audio Engineer Maggie Hall Audio Video Engineer Alec Stunkel STAGE MANAGEMENT Production Stage Manager Nathan Garrison Stage Manager Joel Grynheim Production Assistants Justess Hurst Claire Stark Rebecca Roeber

SCENE SHOP Technical Director Chris Fretts Assistant Technical Director John Bennett Shop Foreman Kyle Baker

INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE PART-TIME STAFF & ASSOC ARTISTIC Teaching Artists Chelsea Anderson Andrew Black Emily Bohn Callie Burk Hartz Ronn Johnstone Beverly Roche Milicent Wright

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ELECTRICS Electricians Lee Edmundson Jonathan Harden PAINT SHOP Scenic Painter Lee Edmundson

SCENE SHOP Carpenters Lee Edmundson Richard Landon Christopher Strain STAGE MANAGEMENT Run Crew Crystal Johnson


MANAGING DIRECTOR SUZANNE SWEENEY ADMINISTRATION Receptionist / Administrative Assistant Seema Juneja Executive Assistant Randy Talley Administrative Support Specialist Suzanne Spradlin Beinart

FINANCE Director of Finance Greg Perkins

Teleservicing Representatives (cont.) Victoria Smith Matt Kennicutt

Assistant Controller Danette Alles

PATRON SERVICES Operations Manager Robert Steele

Payroll & Benefits Specialist Jennifer Carpenter INFORMATION SYSTEMS Director of Information Systems Dan Bradburn

DEVELOPMENT Director of Development Jennifer Turner Associate Director of Major Gifts Lindsey Horan Institutional Giving Manager Eric J. Olson Donor Relations Manager Maggie Barrett Schlake Development Systems Brady Clark

MARKETING Director of Marketing & Sales Danielle M. Dove

EDUCATION Director of Education Randy D. Pease Youth Audience Manager Sarah Geis

OUTREACH Group Sales & Teleservices Manager Doug Sims

Marketing Communications Manager Carolyne Holcomb Audience Development Manager Elizabeth Petermann Graphic Designer Amber Mills Junior Designer & Digital Media Coordinator Alexis Morin

Assistant Teleservices Manager Jeff Pigeon

Manager of Public Operations Margaret Lehtinen Assistant Ticket Office Manager Jessie Streeval Tessitura Administrator Molly Wible House Manager Erin Brown Assistant House Manager Heather Uuk Customer Service Representative Jacob Peterman Gift Shop & Customer Service Representative Eric Wilburn Group Sales & Customer Service Representative Kimberly Reeves

Building Services Dameon Cooper Dave Melton

Teleservices Representatives Tom Detmer Frederick Basnight

IATES MARKETING Marketing Associate Caitlin Flowers EDUCATION Education Intern Evy Burch FINANCE ASSOCIATES External Auditors Crowe Horwath LLP Legal Counsel Heather Moore

PATRON SERVICES Assistant House Managers Pat Bebee Terri Bradburn Marilyn Hatcher Billy Imel Norma Johnson Sherry McCoy Gail McDermott-Bowler Melanie Overfield Deborah Provisor Phoebe Rodgers Kathy Sax

Karen Sipes Maggie Ward Heather Welling

Bartenders Gayle Durcholz Sandra Hester-Steele Nancy Hiser Susan Korbin Tina Weaver

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS CHAIR

SECRETARY

Tom Froehle

Jill Lacy

VICE CHAIR | CHAIR ELECT

TREASURER

-Faegre Baker Daniels

Nadine Givens

-PNC Wealth Management

-The Lacy Foundation

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Michael J. Harrington -Eli Lilly and Company

Mark Shaffer -KPMG LLP

MEMBERS

* Past Board Chairs

TOM FROEHLE BOARD CHAIR

Welcome to the IRT! On behalf of the IRT’s Board of Directors and staff, thank you for joining us for another outstanding performance created right here at Indiana’s leading professional theatre. Great theatre sparks conversations, thoughtful questions, and ideas that reflect on and carry into our lives, workplaces, and communities. Whether you’ve been part of the IRT family for years or are a first-time visitor, we are glad you are with us! As we celebrate our 46th season, we also want to thank you for supporting the IRT’s mission to bring world-class theatre to adult and youth audiences across the state. Your attendance, your gifts, and your good will are critical to our ongoing ability to serve the people of Indiana. With your participation, the IRT can continue its longtime role as a pillar of the state’s performing arts scene, an important downtown magnet, and a valuable community partner. Enjoy the show, and we look forward to seeing you again soon! –Tom Froehle 16

Tammara D. Avant

Brenda Horn

Wayne Schmidt

Sharon R. Barner

Rebecca King

Michael Semler

Gerald Berg

John Kline

Mike Simmons

Amy Kosnoff

Jennifer Vigran

Sarah Lechleiter

Amy Waggoner

Jeff MacKay

L. Alan Whaley

Andrew Michie

David Whitman*

Lawren K. Mills

William O. Williams II

-Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP -Cummins, Inc.

-Wells Fargo Advisors

Keith A. Bice

-Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP

Mary Beth Claus -IU Health

Ann Colussi Dee -Duke Realty

Gary Denney

-Eli Lilly and Company, Retired

Michael P. Dinius

-Noble Consulting Services, Inc.

Richard D. Feldman

-Franciscan Health Indianapolis

James W. Freeman

-Retired, OneAmerica Financial Partners, Inc.

Ron Gifford

-Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Ricardo L. Guimarães -Dow AgroSciences

Michael N. Heaton

-Katz Sapper & Miller

Holt Hedrick

-Calumet Specialty Products Partners L.P.

-Ice Miller LLP -Leadership Indianapolis -CNO Financial Group, Inc. -Community Volunteer

-Community Volunteer

-AES US Services and IPL -OneAmerica Financial Partners, Inc. -Ice Miller Strategies LLP, Ice Miller LLP

Michael Moriarty

-Frost Brown Todd, LLC

-Schmidt Associates

-Cushman & Wakefield -Jupiter Peak, LLC -Second Helpings, Inc. -Salesforce

-Ice Miller LLP

-Community Volunteer

-UnitedHealthcare

Heather Wilson

-Frost Brown Todd LLC

Timothy W. Oliver

-JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA

Brian Payne

-Central Indiana Community Foundation

Peter N. Reist

-Oxford Financial Group

Susan O. Ringo

-Community Volunteer

Don Robinson-Gay

-BMO Harris Commercial Banking

BOARD EMERITUS * Past Board Chairs

Robert Anker* Rollin Dick Berkley Duck* Dale Duncan* Michael Lee Gradison* (in memoriam)

Margie Herald David Klapper David Kleiman* E. Kirk McKinney Jr. (in memoriam) Richard Morris* (in memoriam)

Jane Schlegel* Jerry Semler* Jack Shaw* William E. Smith III* Eugene R. Tempel*


CONTRIBUTE YOUR OLD CAR TO THE IRT Donate a vehicle to the IRT and we will sell it at auction. The proceeds will benefit the Theatre, and you can qualify for a tax deduction. We don’t just accept automobiles, you can donate any of the following: Boats | Motorcycles | Motor Homes | Snow Mobiles | Farm Equipment | More! Zach Kenney, Teagan Rose, and David Folsom in IRT's 2015 production of The Great Gatsby. Photo by Zach Rosing.

MORE INFO: LHORAN@IRTLIVE.COM | 317.916.4833


ONEAMERICA MAINSTAGE SEPTEMBER 19 OCTOBER 14

REVIEWS? FACEBOOK/TWITTER: #irtlive EMAIL: reviews@irtlive.com

ARTISTIC

Director_________________ RISA BRAININ Scenic Designer_________________RUSSELL METHENY Costume Designer____________________DEVON PAINTER Lighting Designer___________________ MICHAEL KLAERS Sound Designer________________ TODD MACK REISCHMAN Projection Designer__________________ KATHERINE FREER Original Music______________________MICHELLE DIBUCCI Movement Coordinator______________MARIEL GREENLEE Dramaturg________________________RICHARD J ROBERTS Stage Manager________________ NATHAN GARRISON*

Co-Produced with Syracuse Stage Syracuse, NY

Artistic Director__________________ ROBERT M. HUPP Managing Director__________________ JILL A. ANDERSON

ARTS PARTNERS

m a k i n g t h e a rts h a p p e n

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SEASON SPONSOR

SEASON 2017 - 2018 ASSOCIATE SPONSOR


JANET ALLEN

Executive Artistic Director

SUZANNE SWEENEY

Managing Director

THE CAST Christopher________________________MICKEY ROWE Siobhan____________________________ELIZABETH LEDO Ed______________________________ ROBERT NEAL Judy____________________________CONSTANCE MACY Voice 1, Mrs. Shears, et al.______________GAIL RASTORFER Voice 2, Roger Shears, et al.______________ ERIC PARKS Voice 3, London Policeman, et al.____ LANDON G. WOODSON Voice 4, Rev. Peters, et al._______DAVID ALAN ANDERSON Voice 5, Punk Girl, et al.___________ MEHRY ESLAMINIA Voice 6, Mrs. Alexander, et al._________MARGARET DALY

SETTING Swindon & London, Great Britain The Present

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time was first presented by the National Theatre, London, at the Cottesloe Theatre on August 2, 2012, and transferred to the Gielgud theatre, West End, London, on March 12, 2013. The play opened in the USA at the Ethyl Barrymore Theatre on October 5, 2014. This play is presented by kind permission of Warner Bros. Entertainment. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York. The IRT would like to extend a very special thanks to the Humane Society of Indianapolis and their staff for their help with Logan, our canine actor. Julia Hren: Assistant to the Director Rob Johansen: Fight Choreographer Nancy Lipschultz: Dialect Coach Actors and stage managers in this production are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States. The director is a member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, a national theatrical labor union. The scenic, costume, lighting, sound, and projection designers are represented by United Scenic Artists Local 829, IATSE. Due to union agreements, photography and audio recording are not permitted in the theatre. The videotaping of this production is a violation of United States Copyright Law and an actionable Federal Offense.

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LOOKING BEYOND

BY JANET ALLEN, EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Welcome to IRT’s 46th season! Our curatorial goal is to surprise you, excite you, provoke you, and yes, entertain you, through a mix of plays that we’ve selected for their variety of impacts. Sometimes that desired impact is to send you back into your lives with burning questions and conversations; sometimes it’s to expand your perspective; sometimes it’s to make you breathless with the power of human possibility. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time does a bit of all these. On the surface it’s a thriller about an odd neighborhood tragedy. It’s clearly about a child, but it’s also about adults. As it unfolds, we find, like in many well-crafted stories, that there are many other surprising things at stake that take us into the heart of primal human relationships. Most important of these is the relationship between parents and their child, but also important are the relationship between neighbors, the relationship between children and their teachers, the relationship between the community of care and those for whom care is needed. Mark Haddon crafted this story first into an award-winning novel—his first novel for adults, but also read widely by children—which was then faithfully adapted to the stage. The story is told in the first person, so the nature of that central character is revealed slowly by what he says and does, not by what he is called or how he is characterized by others. This is a particularly winning storytelling device that immediately draws us to that central character. We root for him from the first second of the play, and we are inextricably swept along in his journey. And his journey is a profound one: starting in his neighborhood, it expands out in time and space, but also inwardly, as he takes risks and finds courage, experiences fear and longing, and finally, realizes a sense of accomplishment. 20

In the book, Christopher, our self-narrator, is unusual and straightforward. Haddon offers us no explanations or names for his circumstances. We quickly begin to name them for ourselves—autism, Asperger’s— because these are terms that we now accept to explain certain kinds of human behaviors. But the play asks us not to explain, not to diagnose, but to experience. What does it feel like to be Christopher? What does it feel like to be his father or mother? How do we judge/overlook/marginalize people who are different? The beauty of a theatre experience like this is that it is so utterly life-affirming—and what could possibly be a better way to open a season? Welcome and enjoy.


TRUTH & COMPASSION BY RISA BRAININ, DIRECTOR

When I first read The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, I was blown away by the beauty of the language. Like the book, the stage adaptation is a gorgeous piece of writing: simple and yet poetic. The 15-year-old Christopher Boone tells his own story with the help of his life-changing teacher, Siobhan, and a diverse group of lively and colorful characters. I am particularly drawn to that kind of theatricality, where an ensemble creates the world around the main character, and leads us through his experience. I can tell you that creating the design for this show with our wonderful team, and finding a great company of actors who can pull this off, was pure joy.

Christopher is a truth teller, and his way of seeing the world is unique. In these polarized times when the very concept of “truth” is under fire, I find Christopher’s candor very refreshing. His reactions are unencumbered by politics, prejudices, or preconceptions—he just tells it like it is. His frank honesty encourages every person he meets to reexamine his or her motives, thoughts, and actions. This clash of ideas immediately exposes how very fragile he is (and all of us are), while gently reminding us to practice compassion above all else. It is a play for our times. We all love this piece and can’t wait to share it with the audiences at IRT.

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FLUIDITY OF TIME & SPACE RUSSELL METHENY SCENIC DESIGNER

The set for The Curious Incident is designed as a space for light and moving images to play, shift, and change the physical and emotional atmosphere of the space, and to enhance the actors' characters, dialogue, and actions. The playwriting is incredibly fluid, with many layered locations and time changes, and the dialogue is verbally visual. Director Risa Brainin and the design team storyboarded

the entire play with the scenic model to help define the essential scenic, light, sound, and costume elements, and the flow of these elements with the actors. Although the set feels essentially spare, there are elements of real detail for certain scenes that will appear to enhance the emotional connection between the ensemble cast and the audience.

MICHAEL KLAERS LIGHTING DESIGNER

We're very used to thinking about light as an environment that characters live in and move through. Light can help tell the story of where and when we are in a play, and what the world thinks about the characters. As we’ve been working on this play, I’ve been thinking about light as a sensory experience by itself. Even before it illuminates the

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space around us, we all experience light as a raw sensory perception. We often ignore, sometimes just tolerate, and only occasionally enjoy the colors and flickers and textures of light itself before it begins to do its job of revealing or obscuring.

Preliminary set rendering by scenic designer Russell Metheny.


DEVON PAINTER COSTUME DESIGNER

The challenge of this show is to create the individuals that Christopher encounters with small gestures to delineate each character. Each member of the ensemble plays a significant role in Christopher's story, as well as a myriad

of supporting roles, all of which need quick representation to define him or her. I chose a neutral palette for the ensemble—almost “a world of teachers” from which individual characters could then appear when needed.

Preliminary costume sketches by designer Devon Painter for characters in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.

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MICKEY ROWE ACTING & AUTISM I am so honored to get to play Christopher Francis Boone and represent the autistic community at the incredible and beautiful Indiana Repertory Theatre and Syracuse Stage, directed by Risa Brainin. You may ask yourself, what is an autistic doing working at a traditional theatre company? I often ask myself that question. But I believe that in theatre, my “weakness”is one of my strengths. If you see me walking down the street, I most likely have headphones on. I nearly always wear a blue T-shirt—Vneck so nothing touches my neck. And I don’t wear coats or jackets when it’s cold out, which drives my wife crazy. I was late to speak, but I invented my own incredibly detailed sign language to communicate. I had speech therapy all through elementary school and occupational therapy all through middle school.

BARISTA: (Any barista response.) ME: Oh yeah? Is it nicer when it’s busy or when it’s slow? Have a great rest of your day!

I am also legally blind—autism is often linked with vision or hearing problems—so I can’t perform very well in cold readings. If given a few days before an audition, I always memorize sides so I don’t read them off the page. I enlarge scripts so they are twice as big, just like all of my textbooks and tests were enlarged in school. I will often secretly record the first read-through of a play on my cell phone, hidden in my pocket, so that I can learn my lines and study the script by listening; my eyes give out after about 15 minutes of looking at a page. But because I know this, I get off book damn fast—often before the first rehearsal.

Always stick to the script. It makes things infinitely easier.

Autistics use scripts every day. We use scripting for daily situations that we can predict the outcome of, and stick to those scripts. My goal as an autistic is to make you believe that I am coming up with words on the spot, that this is spontaneous, the first time the conversation has ever happened in my life; this is also my job on stage as an actor.

These all may seem like reasons why I should never be an actor. But acting is a dichotomy. A tension between what is safe and what is dangerous. What is known and what is unknown. What’s mundane and what’s exciting.

For instance, at a coffee shop: ME: Hi, how are you doing today? (Smile.) Can I please have a small coffee? Thank you so much! (If it seems like more conversation is needed) Has it been busy today? 24

Or playing Edmond in King Lear: … Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom, and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me? For that I am some twelve or fourteen moon-shines Lag of a brother? ... It’s really no different. They’re lines I’ve learned, that I say often, but I’m making you believe they are mine, particular to this specific moment.

There is a tension between everything that I am and everything that might be conventional for an actor. This is the same tension that makes incredible theatre. No one wants to see something if it is too comfortable. Every performance should have a tension between what feels easy and what feels risky. When a grand Photo by Mario Lemafa, provided by Mickey Rowe.


MICKEY ROWE IS THE FIRST AMERICAN ACTOR WITH AUTISM TO PLAY THE CENTRAL ROLE OF CHRISTOPHER, AN AUTISTIC, IN THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME. HERE HE SHARES HIS THOUGHTS ON THIS MILESTONE.

looking forward to. (And no, we will not have to change anything about the show to accommodate any special needs—except for enlarging the script to 18 pt. font.) Being in front of an audience of 600 or 2,890 people is very easy for me. The roles are incredibly clear, logical, and laid out. I am on stage; you are sitting in the seats watching me. I am playing a character, and that is what you expect, want, and are paying for. The conversations on stage are scripted, and written much better than the ones in my real life. On the street is where conversations are scary—those roles aren’t clear. piano is gracefully lowered out of a window by a rope onto a flatbed truck, slowly spinning and dangling, the tension in the rope is what everyone is watching. In theatre, the performer is the rope, making the incredible look graceful and easy, making the audience complicit in every thought, every tactical switch. When the rope goes slack, the show is over. I put my dichotomies to work for me. It’s about doing the work and being in control so the audience trusts you to lead them, and then being vulnerable and letting the audience see your soul. The skill, study, and training help create the trust. The challenges make the vulnerability. You need both of them. As an autistic, I have felt vulnerable my entire life; to be vulnerable on stage is no biggie. With autism comes a new way of thinking; a fresh eye, a fresh mind. Literally, a completely different wiring of the brain. A lot of people ask me about how physical the show is. I personally love physical stimulus—especially in the way of choreography and circus skills. About half of autistics really have a hard time with physical stimulus, and the other half crave it and go out of their way to find it. I love it. So Curious Incident won't be a problem for me. I'm really excited to work with the show's movement coordinator Mariel Greenlee; it's one of the parts of the show that I’m most Special thanks to Playbill.com for permission to reprint this article.

Sure, there are lots of things working against me at any given time. According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in seven American children have a developmental disability, and people with disabilities make up the largest minority in the United States. According to the 2010 census, 20 percent of the adult U.S. population has a disability. Yet according to a recent Ruderman Family Foundation Report, less than 1 percent of TV characters have a disability. Even worse, 95 percent of disabled characters are played by able-bodied actors. That rate is even lower when it comes to developmental disabilities like autism. This means all too often that when we learn about autism on TV, in the movies, or onstage, we are learning about autism from others, instead of going straight to the source and learning from autistic adults. But that is why it is even more important that young actors with disabilities see role models who will tell them that “If you are different, if you access the world differently, if you need special accommodations, then theatre needs you! The world needs you!” I am so looking forward to getting the chance to show young disabled people that they can represent themselves honestly on stage and tell their own stories.

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THE COMPANY DAVID ALAN ANDERSON VOICE 4, REV. PETERS, et al.

IRT audiences have seen David in The Cay, Finding Home, Fences, What I Learned in Paris, Julius Caesar, The Mountaintop, The Whipping Man, Radio Golf, Looking Over the President's Shoulder, A Christmas Carol, and many others. He was nominated for Chicago’s Jeff Award for The Mountaintop at the Court Theatre. Other regional credits include the Guthrie Theater; CenterStage; Denver Theatre Center; Actors Theatre of Louisville; the Idaho, Pennsylvania, and Lake Tahoe Shakespeare festivals; and many more. Directing credits include The Color of Justice and Most Valuable Player on the IRT Upperstage and Two Trains Running and Topdog/ Underdog at the Phoenix Theatre. He is a company member with the Penumbra Theatre. David has received a Creative Renewal Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis and a Lunt-Fontanne Fellowship sponsored by the Ten Chimneys Foundation, and he has been honored by the Circle City Links for his achievements in the arts.

MARGARET DALY VOICE 6, MRS. ALEXANDER, et al.

Margaret makes her IRT debut. Recent theatre includes Kate in All My Sons at Repertory Theatre of St. Louis; Sharon in the world premiere of Jen Silverman’s The Roommate at Actors Theatre of Louisville’s Humana Festival; Kay in the American premiere of Alan Bennett’s The Habit of Art at Studio Theatre in DC; Jane Eyre, A Delicate Balance, and The Music Man at the Guthrie; and productions at Baltimore Center Stage, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, American Conservatory Theater, Berkeley Rep, Shakespeare Santa Cruz, Magic Theatre, Cleveland Play House, the American Shakespeare Collective, and many others. Off Broadway: The Mint, Keen Company, and SoHo Playhouse. Select Film/TV: John Wick II, House of Cards, The Blacklist, Elementary, The Following, Taxi Brooklyn, Law & Order, One Life to Live, and Boardwalk Empire.

MEHRY ESLAMINIA VOICE 5, PUNK GIRL, et al.

Hailing from Denver, Mehry is fast on the path to becoming Chicago-based. Most recent credits include First Fairy in a music-infused A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Nanna and Lady Montague in the world premiere of the Q Brothers’ “ad-rap-tation,”I Heart Juliet, with Illinois Shakespeare Festival’s 40th season. Select Denver credits include Kate and Musician in the world premiere of James Still’s Appoggiatura and A Christmas Carol at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts; Shar in The Happiest Song Plays Last with Curious Theatre Company; Kate and Grumio in The Taming of the Shrew with Colorado Shakespeare Festival’s Violence Prevention Tour; and Adelaide in Guys and Dolls, Jolene in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Johnna in August: Osage County, and Mrs. Soames in Our Town with Creede Repertory Theatre.

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ELIZABETH LEDO SIOBHAN

Elizabeth has appeared at the IRT in Boeing Boeing and Arcadia. Chicago credits include Tug of War–Civil Strife, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, and Amadeus at Chicago Shakespeare Theatre; One Man Two Guvnors, The Secret Garden, Tartuffe (Jeff award), The Misanthrope, The Illusion, The Comedy of Errors, and Titus Andronicus at Court Theatre; The Matchmaker, Boleros for the Disenchanted, and three seasons of A Christmas Carol at the Goodman; Bright Half Life, Le Switch, The Homosexuals, and Say You Love Satan at About Face Theatre; Isaac’s Eye and Arms and the Man at Writers Theatre; The Old Curiosity Shop at Lookingglass Theatre; and Homebody/Kabul and Morningstar at Steppenwolf Theatre. Regional credits include Shakespeare at Notre Dame and more than 25 productions with Milwaukee Rep. Elizabeth was a 2016 Lunt-Fontanne Fellow. Her voice-overs can be heard on many commercials and video games and The Twilight Zone “Radio Dramas.” Television credits include Boss, Chicago Fire, and Doubt. She is a graduate of Loyola University Chicago.

CONSTANCE MACY JUDY

Constance’s recent IRT appearances include Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, A Christmas Carol, The Great Gatsby, On Golden Pond, Good People, The Game’s Afoot, Who Am I This Time?, God of Carnage, Lost— A Memoir, The Diary of Anne Frank, Becky’s New Car, and Iron Kisses. She began her professional career at the IRT 27 years ago, and was a co-founder and performer with ShadowApe Theatre Company for a dozen years. She works in regionals throughout the country, but loves her Indianapolis home. She has recently performed locally with Summer Stock Stage, Bloomington’s Cardinal Stage, and Indy Shakespeare Company, and has spent the last 14 summers teaching at IRT’s Summer Conservatory for Youth. Constance was named an Indy Theatre MVP by the Indianapolis Foundation, and is a two-time Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Fellow, as well as a Lunt-Fontanne National Fellow.

ROBERT NEAL ED

Robert has performed in more than 40 productions at the IRT. He is a member of the Indianapolis Shakespeare Company, and has appeared with ShadowApe, the Phoenix Theatre, and Cardinal Stage, as well as the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and the Indianapolis Early Music Festival. In 2012 he reprised his performance in James Still’s I Love to Eat for the James Beard Foundation Awards at Lincoln Center. Regional credits include Syracuse Stage, the Blackstone Theatre, the Bailiwick Repertory Theatre, American Players Theatre, Pennsylvania Center Stage, the Oklahoma and Kentucky Shakespeare festivals, and the Brown County Playhouse, as well as the English American Theatre Festival in Dusseldorf, Germany. TV credits include NBC’s Chicago Fire. Robert’s training is from Penn State (M.F.A.) and the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. He is a recipient of the 2007 Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Fellowship, the 2016 Theatre MVP Grant from the Central Indiana Community Foundation, and is a 2017 Lunt-Fontanne National Fellow at Ten Chimneys where he worked with master teacher Alfred Molina.

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THE COMPANY ERIC PARKS VOICE 2, ROGER SHEARS, et al.

Eric has appeared at the IRT in The Hound of the Baskervilles and Fallen Angels. He lives in Chicago with his lovely wife Cristina Panfilio. He has worked in Chicago with Writers Theatre, Goodman Theatre, Chicago Shakespeare Theatre, Northlight, and Drury Lane–Oakbrook. Regionally he has worked with American Players Theatre, Milwaukee Rep, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Nebraska Shakespeare Festival, and the Utah Shakespearean Festival. Eric holds a B.F.A. from Pacific Lutheran University and an M.F.A. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

GAIL RASTORFER VOICE 1, MRS. SHEARS, et al.

Gail has appeared at the IRT in Finding Home: Indiana at 200 and As You Like It. Regional credits include The Heidi Chronicles, The Game’s Afoot, and You Can’t Take It with You at Asolo Rep; Ten Chimneys and In the Next Room: or the vibrator play at Cleveland Play House; Noises Off at Clarence Brown Theatre; The Mousetrap at Maltz Jupiter Theatre; and Women in Jeopardy at Merrimack Rep. Chicago credits include Chicago Shakespeare Theater, the Goodman, Northlight Theatre, First Folio Theatre, the Chicago Theatre, Chicago Dramatists, and American Blues Theater. Last fall she was nominated for a Joseph Jefferson Award for the one-woman show The Unfortunates by award-winning playwright Aoise Stratford, for SoloChicago. Television credits include Chicago Fire, Crisis, Boss, Chicago Code, and many national commercials selling everything from insurance to vacuums. A proud union member, she serves on the Chicago board of SAG-AFTRA. www.gailonline.net

MICKEY ROWE CHRISTOPHER

Mickey Rowe is honored to be joining this incredible community of Hoosiers at IRT for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. He has been seen in nine productions at the Seattle Opera, five productions at Seattle Children’s Theatre, and many more with Seattle Shakespeare Company, Book-It Repertory Theatre, Washington Ensemble Theatre, the Ashland New Plays Festival, OSF Midnight Projects, and at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Mickey is also artistic director of Arts on the Waterfront, a theatre/philanthropy company working with Homeless Teen Artists, the Trevor Project, the City of Seattle, and Teen Feed. Mickey is a skilled juggler, unicyclist, plate spinner, stilt walker, tablecloth puller, puppeteer, and more.

LANDON G. WOODSON VOICE 3, LONDON POLICEMAN, et al.

Landon is from Passaic, New Jersey. He attended Rutgers University–New Brunswick, where he graduated with a B.A. in religion, then went on to the Mason Gross School of the Arts, where he earned his M.F.A. in acting. Previous credits include Machinal, Topdog/Underdog, and A Raisin in the Sun with Rutgers Theater Company; Repairing a Nation at Crossroads Theatre; Clybourne Park at Chautauqua Theater Company; Bike America at Ma-Yi Theater Company; The Mountaintop at Kitchen Theatre Company; and To Kill a Mockingbird at Syracuse Stage.

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SIMON STEPHENS PLAYWRIGHT

English playwright Simon Stephens is an artistic associate at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith, London, and the associate playwright of Steep Theatre Company in Chicago, where two of his plays, Harper Regan and Motortown, had their U.S. premieres. His other plays include Port (Pearson Award), One Minute (Tron Theatre Award), On the Shore of the Wide World (Olivier Award), Pornography (Scotland Critics’ Award), and Punk Rock (nominated for the TMA Award and the Evening Standard Award). The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time won the 2013 Olivier Award and the 2015 Tony Award for Best Play. More recently, his play Heisenberg premiered OffBroadway, and his adaptation of Brecht and Weill’s The Threepenny Opera premiered at the National Theatre in London.

MARK HADDON AUTHOR

Mark Haddon is a British author of novels, children’s literature, poetry, screenplays, and radio drama. He is known for his series of Agent Z books, one of which, Agent Z and the Penguin from Mars, was made into a Children’s BBC sitcom. He wrote the screenplay for the BBC television adaptation of Raymond Briggs’s story Fungus the Bogeyman, and the BBC television drama Coming Down the Mountain. In 2003, Haddon published The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. The first book that he wrote intentionally for an adult audience, it was successfully marketed to both adult and child audiences. Likewise, it won the Whitbread Book of the Year Award and the Commonwealth Writers Prize in adult categories, as well as the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize. His second adult novel, A Spot of Bother, was published in 2006.

RISA BRANIN DIRECTOR

Risa returns to the IRT where she served as associate artistic director from 1997 to 2000. Her IRT credits include Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Tuesdays with Morrie, Young Lady from Rwanda, Blithe Spirit, One Thousand Cranes, Pygmalion, Noises Off, Macbeth (1999), The Herbal Bed, Mother of the Movement, Talley’s Folly, and To Kill a Mockingbird (1997). Risa served as artistic director of Shakespeare Santa Cruz, associate artistic director for Kansas City Repertory Theatre, and associate company director and resident director for the Guthrie Theater. Other directing credits include plays at Denver Center Theatre Company, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Actors’ Theatre of Louisville, Shakespeare Festival of St. Louis, Kansas City Actors Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Great Lakes Theatre Festival, American Players Theatre, and Repertory Theatre of St. Louis. Risa is the chair of the Department of Theater and Dance at University of California, Santa Barbara, where she is artistic director of LAUNCH PAD, a residency and performance program for new plays. Risa is a graduate of the Carnegie-Mellon University Drama Program.

RUSSELL METHENY SCENIC DESIGNER

Russell has designed more than 40 IRT productions, including A Christmas Carol; April 4, 1968; The Game’s Afoot; Who Am I This Time?; A Little Night Music; The House That Jack Built; Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; God of Carnage; The Heavens Are Hung in Black; Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure; Iron Kisses; The Unexpected Guest; The Gentleman from Indiana; Old Wicked Songs; Searching for Eden; Plaza Suite; Arcadia; The Immigrant; Ah, Wilderness!; and Looking Over the President’s Shoulder (2001). He has also designed for the Studio Theatre, the Great Lakes and Idaho Shakespeare festivals, Asolo Theatre, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Weston Playhouse, Dallas Theatre Center, the Old Globe Theatre, Geffen Playhouse, Missouri Rep, Actors Theatre of Kansas City, the Goodman Theatre, Syracuse Stage, Buffalo Studio Arena, Portland Stage, and Goodspeed Musicals.

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THE COMPANY DEVON PAINTER COSTUME DESIGNER

Devon returns to the IRT, where her past designs include The Three Musketeers, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Miracle Worker (2012), Pygmalion, Noises Off, Abe Lincoln in Illinois, and To Kill a Mockingbird (1998). Regional design credits include Syracuse Stage, the Guthrie Theatre, Milwaukee Rep, Denver Center, Geva Theatre Center, Kansas City Rep, Shakespeare Festival of St. Louis, Actors Theatre, Great Lakes Theatre Festival, Folger Theatre, Studio Theatre, Utah Shakespearean Festival, and the American Players Theatre. New York credits include many productions at the Pearl Theatre, Juilliard, and many other Off-Broadway venues, as well as associate work on Broadway. Her costume designs were exhibited in the book Curtain Call: Celebrating a Century of Women Designing for Live Performance. Devon is a member of United Scenic Artists.

MICHAEL KLAERS LIGHTING DESIGNER

This is a joyful return to the IRT for Michael. His earlier shows here include, among others: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Herbal Bed, Pygmalion, To Kill a Mockingbird, Macbeth, and Noises Off. Regional theatre credits include Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Great Lakes Theater Festival, Shakespeare Festival of St. Louis, Shakespeare Santa Cruz, Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts, Missouri Repertory Theatre, Mixed Blood Theatre, and many others.

TODD MACK REISCHMAN SOUND DESIGNER

During the last 16 seasons as resident sound designer, Todd has created effects and music for many IRT productions. He has worked in theatres all around the country, both on stage and off, since the age of 10. Away from the theatre Todd works with a variety of musical collaborators recording and performing around town. Although he has led a fun and full life, Todd still has yet to swim with a Flemish giant.

KATHERINE FREER PROJECTION DESIGNER

Katherine is a multimedia designer working in theatre, events, and installation. At the IRT, she has created projections for Dial “M” for Murder and The Great Gatsby. Frequent collaborators include Ping Chong, Tim Bond, Liz Lerman, Kamilah Forbes, and Talvin Wilks. Recent designs include Detroit 67 (Chautauqua Theater Company, director Steve Broadnax), The Four Immigrants: An American Musical Manga (TheatreWorks, director Leslie Martinson), Alaxsxa | Alaska (Lincoln Center Education, director Ping Chong), Crane: on Earth, in Sky (Lied Center, director Maija Garcia), Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage, director Peter Amster), Macbeth (Richard Rodgers Amphitheater, director Carl Cofield), The Wholehearted (Z space, director Suli Holum and Deborah Stein), and Poster Boy (Williamstown Theater Festival, director Stafford Arima). Katherine is a Helen Hayes nominee and an Innovative Theater Award nominee. She is a founding member of Imaginary Media.

MICHELLE DIBUCCI ORIGINAL MUSIC

Michelle is a composer for theatre, opera, and dance with more than 35 productions to her credit. Recently she served as music director for the WW1 Centennial Commemoration at the WW1 National Memorial in Kansas City; she will continue this role for the centennial of Armistice Day at the National Cathedral in 2018. Her full-length ballet-opera, Charlotte Salomon: Death and the Painter, received the 2015 Faust Award, Germany’s highest theatre prize, and returns to Musiktheater im Revier in Germany as part of the 2017/2018 season. Her music-theatre work Basetrack Live premiered at the Next Wave Festival at BAM and toured to more than 40 cities across America; it was hailed by the New York Times as “one of the top ten theatrical events of 2014.”A resident of New York City, Michelle has been a professor at the Juilliard School since 1992, teaching in both the music and drama divisions.

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MARIEL GREENLEE MOVEMENT COORDINATOR

Originally from Vestal, New York, Mariel received her B.A. in dance from Point Park University. She has been a dancer with Dance Kaleidoscope here in Indianapolis for twelve years, and she teaches ballet and modern dance locally. She is the resident choreographer for the Phoenix Theater, and has set work for IRT, Dance Kaleidoscope, Indy Summer Stock Stage, the University of Indianapolis, Marian University, Zach Rosing Productions, and Phoenix Rising Dance Company as well as various music videos, competitions, and galas. She was recently chosen as a project choreographer for a Regional Dance America program called the National Choreographers Initiative. Mariel received the Individual Artist Grant from the Indiana Arts Commission in 2007, and in 2010 she was awarded a Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis. “I thank IRT for their continued faith and opportunities to grow, my mentor David Hochoy for his guidance, and my fiancé Virgil Lungu for his love and support.”

RICHARD J ROBERTS DRAMATURG

This is Richard’s 28th season with the IRT, and his 20th as resident dramaturg. He has also been a dramaturg for the Hotchner Playwriting Festival, the New Harmony Project, and Write Now. He has directed the IRT’s productions of The Cay, Bridge & Tunnel, The Night Watcher, Neat, Pretty Fire, The Giver (2009), The Power of One, and Twelfth Night, as well as four editions of A Christmas Carol. Other directing credits include Actors Theatre of Indiana, the Phoenix Theatre, Edyvean Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis Civic Theatre, IndyShakes/Wisdom Tooth, Butler University, and Anderson University. Richard studied music at DePauw University and theatre at Indiana University. In 2003 he was awarded a Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

NATHAN GARRISON STAGE MANAGER

This is Nathan’s 22nd season at the IRT. He has also worked with Center Stage in Baltimore, Utah Shakespeare Festival, and Brown County Playhouse. He received a Creative Renewal Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis in 2005; and he is an inaugural company member of the new Indianapolis Shakespeare Company.

SYRACUSE STAGE OUR CO-PRODUCING PARTNER

Syracuse Stage is Central New York’s premier professional theatre. Founded in 1974 and in its 45th season, Stage has produced more than 300 plays including a number of world, American, and East Coast premieres. Led by artistic director Bob Hupp and managing director Jill Anderson, 70,000 patrons each season enjoy an adventurous mix of new plays and bold interpretations of classics and musicals featuring the finest theatre artists. In addition, Stage maintains a vital educational outreach program that annually serves more than 20,000 students throughout Central New York. Syracuse Stage is a member of the League of Resident Theatres (LORT), the largest professional theatre association in the country.

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"MY WIFE AND I HAVE ENJOYED IRT SEASON TICKETS FOR MANY YEARS BECAUSE THEY FILL OUR CALENDAR WITH EAGERLY ANTICIPATED PERFORMANCES. THE QUALITY AND CLEVERNESS OF WORK DONE AT THE IRT IS SUCH THAT WE HAVE DIFFICULTY IMAGINING BETTER LIVE THEATER – WE HAVE HONESTLY NEVER SEEN A PERFORMANCE WE DID NOT LIKE. THE BEAUTY IS, ONCE THEY ARE ON OUR SCHEDULE ALL WE HAVE TO DO IS WAIT FOR THE NEXT THRILLING PRODUCTION." - RANDY HORTON (LEFT), IRT SEASON TICKET HOLDER & DONOR PHOTO BY AMBER MILLS.


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LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, THE SHOW IS ABOUT TO BEGIN.

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ARTISTIC

Director_____________________JAMES STILL Scenic Designer_____________________REUBEN LUCAS Costume Designer__________________________GUY CLARK Lighting Designer__________BETSY COOPRIDER-BERNSTEIN Sound Designer________________________ JASON TUTTLE Dramaturg________________________RICHARD J ROBERTS Stage Manager______________________JOEL GRYNHEIM

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SEASON SPONSOR

SEASON 2017 - 2018


JANET ALLEN

Executive Artistic Director

SUZANNE SWEENEY

Managing Director

THE CAST Antonin Scalia______________HENRY WORONICZ Cat_________________________AYANNA BRIA BAKARI Brad___________________________JEB BURRIS

SETTING Washington, DC 2012-2013 term of the U.S. Supreme Court

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Actors and stage managers in this production are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States. The director is a member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, a national theatrical labor union. The scenic and lighting designers are represented by United Scenic Artists Local 829, IATSE. Due to union agreements, photography and audio recording are not permitted in the theatre. The videotaping of this production is a violation of United States Copyright Law and an actionable Federal Offense.

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ART IN/OF/FOR OUR TIME BY JANET ALLEN, EXECUTIVE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

I’m sure it surprises no one that artists are busily attempting to incorporate into their various art forms their responses to the current political conditions of our country and our world. This is a tradition that goes back centuries, even to the beginnings of art making. Playwrights have always been among the artists who most keenly yearn to refract social and political concerns, largely because they make art that is highly social and very temporal. A play requires a gathering of audience members to make it happen, which means a gathering of people leaving the theatre, we hope, ripe for further discussion. Examples are profuse at this moment. Hamilton may be the most vivid example we have currently of political theatre, not only in content but in production methodology. But even people far removed from the politics of the theatre may have read or heard about the controversial production of Julius Caesar produced by the Public Theater in New York City this summer, and the fallout among its funders. The ensuing firestorm in social media debated many issues, including, “What would Shakespeare say” about this volatile production? The Originalist stands among these plays, created by its writer to reflect on and elicit a social-political debate. What interests me so much about this play is the question that lives at its center: In the words of playwright John Strand, from an interview on SCOTUSblog.com, “Is there still a 40

political middle, and what does it cost to meet there?” I think many of us wonder this, no matter what side of the political argument we may lean towards. It’s useful to know that Strand did not intend this play as a biography of Antonin Scalia. He said, “The Originalist is not a bio play, or a documentary, or a law lecture (for which I am utterly unqualified, and which no theatre audience would tolerate, anyway). I wanted to use this combative, almost operatic figure to explore how two people on opposite sides of a political, social, and even legal spectrum can take a step toward one another, begin to listen, learn to hear and respect each other’s argument.” These are very good goals for all of us, as we watch our world become increasingly combative over many issues and ways of life. Justice Scalia was considered one of the most polarizing figures in American political life, before his unexpected death in early 2016. But I promise you that no matter where you fall on the scale of Scalia like/ dislike when you enter the theatre, the course of the play will alter that view, as great experiences in the theatre do. Most of all, it will humanize him, also as the theatre is masterful at accomplishing. We produce this play this year to offer you the experience of great, relevant theatre, but also to encourage your conversation with your fellow theatregoers—as we do our part to encourage a more conversational world.


HARD CONVERSATIONS BY JAMES STILL, DIRECTOR

In some ways, John Strand has written a wonderful “fly on the wall” kind of play, putting us (the audience) in the privileged position of listening in on conversations involving a Supreme Court justice and his law clerks inside the Supreme Court itself—an institution that values and guards its privacy and decision-making process. The play prizes “the art of the argument”—especially the legal argument. I am deeply interested in the law, how it works, and who decides its meaning. I’m particularly interested in how those lawmakers feel about the laws they make—not just what they think and what they can intellectually defend with dazzling brilliance. It’s the ways that Mr. Strand explores what’s deeply personal that makes The Originalist a compelling study of flawed human beings rather than 90 more minutes of C-SPAN. Directing a play on the Upperstage is always a celebration of invention, as it literally requires an ever-evolving change of physical perspective. It feels especially poetic to do The Originalist with that viewpoint in mind. In a sense, doing a play about taking sides on the Upperstage allows for the possibility of looking at the conflicts and arguments literally from multiple points of view.

While I might be suspicious of such smart, passionate, legal-minded thinkers being profoundly and personally changed by the end of a 90-minute play, I have come to believe that these characters do affect each other—but that change may be slower and more subtle than we want to believe. They are each different, from having known one another and risked some hard conversations. Not only do they get to have their say, they also get to listen to the other side have their say. For many years I’ve thought about the hard conversations many of us on all sides of the political spectrum have risked, and not risked. Difficult conversations and debates can pit us one against another. Doing a play that features hard conversations about ethics, morals, law, and the Constitution itself, might be a fresh opportunity to participate in those challenging conversations in a different way. For me, hard conversations are better than silence and isolation. I’m grateful to Mr. Strand for writing a play that invites our engagement, and to you the audience, for being part of the conversation.

The three characters in Mr. Strand’s play are often pitted against each other in a shifting triangle, always making choices about the responsibility of engagement. 41


INSIDE THE SUPREME COURT The Originalist

Final Model | 7-15-2017 | James Still, director | Reuben Lucas, scenic designer

Scene 1

REUBEN LUCAS SCENIC DESIGNER

ege CollCOOPRIDER-BERNSTEIN Conse rvati veBETSY

Visual research for this production quickly narrowed onto the grandeur of the Supreme Court Building and its architecture; ordered, symmetrical, and glistening. This real-world place and how it “feels” was used as inspiration for our fictitious world. It is not a faithful reproduction of any one place, but an elegant combination of modern and historical elements, unifying the differing locations of the play so they can co-exist simply and harmoniously. The physical world of this production is most notably shaped by an immense gilded wall with two large portraits. The portraits are of two of our founding fathers, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton. Scalia had great admiration for The Federalist Papers, of which Madison and Hamilton were authors. As the debate about the founding fathers’ intent for our democracy continues, these fading historical individuals are ever present in this world and, yet, are silent. 42

LIGHTING DESIGNER

The Originalist asks us to question our assumptions about the validity of original ideas as being the best ideas, the only worthy ideas. In our current polarized political climate, I truly find solace in the collaborative environment of the theatre. I look to the playwright’s original ideas for insight, but my own reflections and life experiences often present new ones. I am instantly drawn to the engaging banter between Scalia and his intern, feeling the urge for crisp, sparkling light: the kind of atmosphere that encourages you to laugh freely. In contrast, I have experienced the nightly bedside vigil in a hospice where I sought more intimate and comforting light: even just a glow from the streetlight beyond the window. In this war of ideas, the play also turns to even darker places. The playwright offers us a distinction between the Scalia the justice and Scalia the man. The lighting needs to draw us into this dichotomy as we try to understand his thoughts on how the interpretation of our Constitution has changed, over the decades and centuries.


GUY CLARK COSTUME DESIGNER

In The Originalist, the character of Justice Antonin Scalia refers to the black robe he wears as a costume, a symbolic garment that imbues the wearer with the qualities his audience hopes to find in a judge— wisdom, authority, fairness. Tradition, rather than strict rule, suggests simple black robes as appropriate judicial attire in the United States. Early justices borrowed this tradition from their English counterparts, eschewing the “monstrous wigs” Thomas Jefferson declared made “English judges look like rats peeking through bunches of oakum.” Asked about his robe, Justice Scalia observed, “I guess we could sit in a bus station and not wear robes but business suits or even tank tops, but I don’t think that creates the kind of image you want for the Supreme Court of your country.” Although most justices have adhered to Jefferson’s distaste for monarchial pomp, over the last two hundred plus years a few have embellished their robes. John Jay, the Court’s first chief justice, sported a robe accented with scarlet silk. Sandra Day O’Connor, the first of only four women to serve on the court, added a white lace jabot, and Chief Justice William Rehnquist, inspired by a night at the opera, had gold stripes sewn to the sleeves of his robe. Ever the originalist, Scalia stuck to basic black. JASON TUTTLE SOUND DESIGNER

Justice Scalia was well known for his love of opera, especially Italian opera. The playwright is very specific about the choices of music, and director James Still and I have chosen to honor those choices. Given the nature of the scenic design, and the challenges that the Upperstage places upon all scenic designers, sound plays an important role in helping to reinforce location and time, where the scenery may only be able to provide hints. Opposite: Preliminary computer rendering by scenic designer Reuben Lucas. This Page: Preliminary costume sketches for Antonin Scalia and Cat by designer Guy Clark.

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SUPREME COURT JUSTICE ANTONIN SCALIA BY RICHARD J ROBERTS, RESIDENT DRAMATURG

In his three decades as a Supreme Court Justice, Antonin Scalia’s rigorous legal viewpoint, vivid writing, and larger-than-life personality made him a leader of conservative American opinion—and one of the most controversial figures in the nation. In response to his critics, Scalia said, “A man who has made no enemies is probably not a very good man.” He was born in 1936 in Trenton, New Jersey, to Italian immigrants. His father, a professor of Romance languages at Brooklyn College, was an advocate of formalism in literary theory—that is, the study of literature that focuses on its formal aspects (mode, genre, structure, etc.) without regard to content, authorship, or socio-cultural influences. Known as Nino to his family and friends, he graduated as valedictorian of his class at Xavier High School, a Jesuit military school in Manhattan. He then studied history at Georgetown University, where he was a champion debater and a noted thespian, once again graduating first in his class. He attended Harvard Law School, where he graduated magna cum laude. A devout Roman Catholic, Scalia married Maureen McCarthy; together they would have nine children. He spent six years with a Cleveland international law firm, but left to teach law at the University of Virginia. He worked in the Nixon and Ford administrations, where one of his assignments was to formulate federal policy for the growing cable industry. He served as Assistant Attorney General from 1974 to 1977. He returned to teaching at the University of Chicago, where he was the first official faculty advisor for the Federalist Society, a student organization founded in 1982 to challenge what its members perceive as the liberal bias in American law schools; today the group has 70,000 members nationwide.

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In 1982 Scalia was appointed by Ronald Reagan to be a judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. In 1986, Reagan appointed him to the Supreme Court. The Senate, having just endured a divisive 65-33 battle over the appointment of William Rehnquist as Chief Justice, confirmed Scalia 98-0 with little debate. Scalia’s career on the bench was marked by his conservative ideology. He was a strong advocate for the power of the executive branch. He opposed affirmative action; in fact, he generally voted to strike down any laws that made distinctions by race, gender, or sexual orientation. He opposed abortion and defended the death penalty. On cases of federal authority versus states’ rights, he usually sided with the state. During oral arguments at the Supreme Court, Scalia made more comments and asked more questions—and


"WORDS HAVE MEANING AND THEIR MEANING DOESN'T CHANGE." - ANTONIN SCALIA

provoked more laughter—than any other justice. His dissenting opinions were famous for their blistering, even insulting, language. He said, “I attack ideas. I don't attack people. And some very good people have some very bad ideas. If you can't separate the two, you gotta get another day job. You don't want to be a judge.” Perhaps surprisingly, Scalia was friends with fellow opera lover Ruth Bader Ginsburg, considered one of the Supreme Court’s more liberal justices. In his early years on the court, Scalia made it a point to hire one liberal law clerk each year to keep staff debates lively. He said, “I love to argue. I've always loved to argue. And I love to point out the weaknesses of the opposing arguments…. I feel less comfortable when everybody agrees with me. I say, ‘I better reexamine my position!’”

Scalia’s judicial viewpoint was shaped by originalism: the belief that the interpretation of the Constitution should be based on what it originally meant to the people who ratified it more than 200 years ago. This view opposes the idea of the Constitution as a living document, one that was written by its framers in flexible terms that would allow and even encourage an evolving interpretation as society grows and changes. Scalia believed that “originalism says that when you consult the text, you give it the meaning it had when it was adopted, not some later modern meaning.” As a source for the original intent of the founding fathers, originalists often cite The Federalist Papers, a collection of 85 articles and essays written and published in 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton and James Madison (whose portraits can be seen on the stage set for the IRT’s production of The Originalist) along with John Jay. Alexander Hamilton would become the nation’s first Secretary of the Treasury; James Madison was the primary drafter of the Constitution and eventually the nation’s fourth President; John Jay would be the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The Federalist Papers were written to explain the newly proposed Constitution to the general public, and to promote its ratification. They were widely read and had a great influence on the early US government. During his Supreme Court tenure, Scalia brought the originalist point of view to great prominence in the United States. In February 2016, during a hunting trip, Antonin Scalia died in his sleep of natural causes. During his time on the Supreme Court, Scalia wrote more dissenting opinions than any other Justice. In 2009 he said, “Winning and losing, that's never been my objective. It's my hope that in the fullness of time, the majority of the court will come to see things as I do.”

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WHAT HAPPENED TO THE MIDDLE? A NOTE FROM THE PLAYWRIGHT, JOHN STRAND

Originalism, like many -isms, is a relatively simple concept that only gets complicated when it is put into practice. America’s Founding Fathers crafted the document known as the United States Constitution in 1787. Even with its considerable flaws, it may well be, as the character Justice Scalia declares in this play, “the best thinking about law and justice in the past 300 years.” Originalists such as the real Justice Scalia insist that the Founders’ text is the purest, most reliable source for a fair interpretation of the law as it is applied today. Go back to the original text. As simple as that.

to it, “a shot in the dark”at being right. The justice disagrees. But that law clerk is not concerned only with her justice’s brand of Originalism. She wants to know what happened to the political middle. How did compromise become a dirty word in American politics? How did we become so polarized that we see our political opponents as monsters? Civil discourse has been replaced by a verbal food fight. Why?

Complications arise as soon as I disagree with you as to what the Founders meant. We know what they wrote. The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are tasked with interpreting the law, not making it. A vast army of lawyers and lower court judges join in the effort, ongoing for more than two centuries. Interpretation, Scalia’s law clerk in this play states, must always have some element of guesswork

This play, however, is not exclusively about Justice Scalia, real or fictional. It is not a bio play or a docudrama, although excerpts from some of the justice’s dissents and opinions are included here. But the play does use the character Scalia to get to this question: What does it cost us to suppress our fear and distrust, take a step toward the middle, and sit down with the monsters?

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Why not ask the most polarizing figure in American political life, Antonin Scalia?


THE COMPANY AYANNA BRIA BAKARI CAT

Ayanna Bria is making her IRT debut. She recently graduated with a B.F.A. in acting from the Theatre School at DePaul University. Since graduating, she has participated in numerous readings and workshops in Chicago, such as the 2017 Fornés Playwriting Workshop, IGNITION Festival at Victory Gardens, and Stories of Us play reading at Visión Latino, just to name a few. She is very excited to be kicking off her career as a professional actress, and is currently represented by Stewart Talent. “I’d like to thank my amazing parents, Baba Adisa and Mama Josi, for their countless years of encouragement, love and dedication. Asante Sana!”

JEB BURRIS BRAD

Last season at the IRT Jeb played D’Artagnan in The Three Musketeers. Other credits include Love’s Labor’s Lost at Great Lakes Theatre and Idaho Shakespeare Festival; The Comedy of Errors at Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival; Pride and Prejudice, The Game of Love and Chance, Othello, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Travesties, Romeo and Juliet, and Much Ado about Nothing at American Players Theatre; Shakespeare in Love, Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, The Tempest, King John, Love’s Labor’s Lost, Titus Andronicus, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Glass Menagerie, and Richard III at the Utah Shakespeare Festival; Romeo and Juliet at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; and Romeo and Juliet and Julius Caesar at Sacramento Theatre Company. Jeb earned his B.A. from Ball State University and his M.F.A. from Illinois State University, and trained with the Royal Shakespeare Company and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in the U.K. “Love to Melisa, always.”

HENRY WORONICZ ANTONIN SCALIA

At the IRT, Henry has directed The Three Musketeers and acted in The Mousetrap, Red, An Iliad, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Young Lady from Rwanda, and King Lear; later this season he directs Romeo and Juliet. Regional acting and directing credits include Actors Theatre of Louisville, American Conservatory Theatre, American Players Theatre, Arden Theatre Company, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Boston Shakespeare Company, Center Stage, Delaware Theatre Company, Hong Kong Repertory Company, La Jolla Playhouse, Meadow Brook Theatre, Syracuse Stage, the Shakespeare Theatre, and the Alabama, Illinois, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Utah Shakespeare festivals. He was seen on Broadway in Julius Caesar with Denzel Washington. Television credits include Seinfeld, Cheers, Third Rock from the Sun, Star Trek, and Law & Order. At the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, he was a resident actor/director from 1984 to 1991 and artistic director from 1991 to 1995. Henry also served as executive producer at Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival from 2008 to 2009, the head of M.F.A. Acting at Illinois State University from 2009 to 2012, and a visiting professor in the Department of Theatre at IU Bloomington from 2014 to 2017.

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THE COMPANY JOHN STRAND PLAYWRIGHT

John Strand is a playwright, journalist, drama critic, and author. His plays include Our War, Tom Walker, The Miser (an adaptation of Molière’s comedy that comments on the Reagan years), Three Nights in Tehran (about the Iran-Contra affair), Charity Royal, and his Charles MacArthur Award–winning Lovers and Executioners (Arena Stage); An Italian Straw Hat (South Coast Repertory); Lorenzaccio (Lansburgh Theatre); Lincolnesque (Burstein Family Stage); Highest Yellow, The Diaries, and Otabenga (Signature Theatre); and The Cockburn Rituals (Woolly Mammoth Theatre). Strand has received multiple playwriting commissions from South Coast Repertory, Arena Stage, Shakespeare Theatre, and Signature Theatre. He was named Playwright of the Year by Broadway Play Publishing. His novel Commieland was published in 2013. The Originalist premiered in 2015 at the Arena Stage in Washington, DC.

JAMES STILL DIRECTOR

This season James celebrates 20 seasons as the IRT’s playwright-in-residence, and the company will produce his plays Appoggiatura and Looking Over the President’s Shoulder. James has directed many productions at the IRT, including Dial “M” for Murder, The Mystery of Irma Vep, Red, Other Desert Cities, God of Carnage, Mary’s Wedding, Becky’s New Car, Rabbit Hole, Doubt, Bad Dates, Old Wicked Songs, Plaza Suite, The Immigrant, and Dinner with Friends, as well as his own I Love to Eat, Amber Waves, and Looking Over the President’s Shoulder (2001). IRT audiences have also seen James’s plays Miranda, April 4, 1968: Before We Forgot How to Dream, The Velveteen Rabbit, The House That Jack Built, I Love to Eat, The Heavens Are Hung in Black, Interpreting William, Iron Kisses, The Gentleman from Indiana, Searching for Eden, He Held Me Grand, Amber Waves, And Then They Came for Me: Remembering the World of Anne Frank, and The Secret History of the Future. (complete bio on page 10)

REUBEN LUCAS SCENIC DESIGNER

Reuben's designs have been seen on stage at the Denver Center Theatre Company, National Theatre Conservatory, Theatre Aspen, Indiana Festival Theatre, Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre, Curious Theatre Company, and others. He is the head of the graduate scenic design program at Indiana University in Bloomington where he continues his freelance design career as well. Before Indiana University, he was a Chicago-based freelance associate scenic and exhibit designer on museum and theatre projects at various national companies. Additionally, he served as the resident scenic design associate at the Denver Center Theatre Company for four years. Reuben received his M.F.A. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is a member of United Scenic Artists Local 829.

GUY CLARK COSTUME DESIGNER

A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College, Guy manages the Indiana Repertory Theatre costume shop. During his 23-year career in professional theatre, he has created costumes for many original Broadway productions, including The Phantom of the Opera, Cats, and The Lion King. In 2007, Aretha Franklin commissioned him to design and build a dress for her performance at that year’s Grammy Awards ceremony, and the following year, he created the two gowns she wore to President Obama’s inaugural balls. At the IRT he has designed costumes for Stuart Little, The Mystery of Irma Vep, Peter Rabbit and Me, The Giver, The Velveteen Rabbit, Red, The Mountaintop, And Then They Came for Me, An Iliad, The House That Jack Built, God of Carnage, I Love to Eat, Fire in the Garden, and Mary’s Wedding.

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BETSY COOPRIDER-BERNSTEIN LIGHTING DESIGNER

This is Betsy’s 40th production at the IRT, including To Kill a Mockingbird (2016), The Mystery of Irma Vep, On Golden Pond, The Giver (2015 and 2009), And Then They Came for Me (2014), An Iliad, Jackie and Me, Julius Caesar, Mary’s Wedding, Love Letters, Macbeth, The Power of One, Romeo and Juliet (2004), and 10 seasons as associate lighting designer for A Christmas Carol. She has also recently designed King Charles III for the Cardinal Stage Company and many productions for the Indianapolis Opera, most recently The Barber of Seville. With her husband, Chef Alan Bernstein, Betsy owns Alan’s Catered Events; they have created sumptuous fare for a wide array of events in the Indianapolis area since 1993.

JASON TUTTLE SOUND DESIGNER

Jason has been working professionally for almost 20 years as a sound designer, sound editor, mixer, and any other sound job you can think of. His credits include more than 30 musicals and plays in Los Angeles (Sacred Fools, the Actor’s Gang, the Rubicon), as well as films and television shows from 20th Century Fox, Dreamworks, ABC, Discovery, and the History Channel. Recently, at IRT, he designed Stuart Little and was associate sound designer for Dial “M” for Murder.

RICHARD J ROBERTS DRAMATURG

This is Richard’s 28th season with the IRT, and his 20th as resident dramaturg. He has also been a dramaturg for the Hotchner Playwriting Festival, the New Harmony Project, and Write Now. He has directed the IRT’s productions of The Cay, Bridge & Tunnel, The Night Watcher, Neat, Pretty Fire, The Giver (2009), The Power of One, and Twelfth Night, as well as four editions of A Christmas Carol. Other directing credits include Actors Theatre of Indiana, the Phoenix Theatre, Edyvean Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis Civic Theatre, IndyShakes/Wisdom Tooth, Butler University, and Anderson University. Richard studied music at DePauw University and theatre at Indiana University. In 2003 he was awarded a Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

JOEL GRYNHEIM STAGE MANAGER

This is the 94th production Joel has stage managed over 28 years at the IRT. He resides in an historic home in downtown Indianapolis, sharing that home and his life with Janet Allen and their two daughters, Nira and Leah.

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Careful planning, talent and passion are on display at today’s performance. At Citizens Energy Group, we understand the value of working hard behind the scenes to deliver quality on a daily basis. We strive to replicate that ensemble effort in our work and are proud to support the productions that bring live theatre to our community. Congratulations to the cast, crew and theater staff on a job well done!

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THANK YOU TO OUR 2017 SPONSORS! WE CAN'T WAIT TO SEE YOU IN 2018!

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Bravo! Barnes & Thornburg applauds the Indiana Repertory Theatre for its commitment to the arts. Take a bow, you’ve earned it! Uncommon Value

ATLANTA CHICAGO DALLAS DELAWARE INDIANA LOS ANGELES MICHIGAN MINNEAPOLIS OHIO WASHINGTON, D.C. btlaw.com


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arts.IN.gov

You can show your support for the arts and make an investment in the cultural future of our state at the same time. The arts create schools that are exciting places for learning and discovery. Students that participate in the arts, both in school and after school, demonstrate improved academic performance and lower dropout rates1. Funds raised from license plate sales are currently used to supplement funding for the Indiana Arts Commission’s arts education program, Partnering Arts, Communities and Education (PACE). The Arts Trust license plate may be purchased at any Bureau of Motor Vehicles branch or online at bmv.IN.gov

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South Bend Tribune photo/ROBERT FRANKLIN Catterall, J.S., Dumais, S.A. & Hampden-Thompson, G. (2012)


OVATION SOCIETY: CREATE A PERSONAL LEGACY AT THE IRT For 46 seasons, the IRT has been privileged to provide our community with professional, world-class theatre. You can play a vital role in supporting the next 46 seasons by making an estate gift to the Theatre. From a simple bequest to more complicated charitable trusts, there are a variety of ways you can include the IRT in your estate plans. Our staff is happy to work with you and your financial advisor, tax professional or family attorney to determine how a planned gift can help you meet your financial and charitable goals. Include the IRT in your estate plans and help ensure one of Indiana’s great cultural institutions continues to thrive for generations to come. Have you already included the IRT in your plans? Please let us know so that we can recognize you in the Ovation Society!

WANT MORE INFORMATION? READY TO CREATE YOUR LEGACY?

Contact Lindsey Horan, Associate Director of Major Gifts: lhoran@irtlive.com | 317.916.4833 Michael Joseph Mitchell in the IRT's 2016 production of Finding Home: Indiana at 200. Photo by Zach Rosing.


THE SUPPORTING CAST

INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE DONORS

WHAT IF YOU SAW ONLY HALF THE PLAY? Ticket revenue covers just half of what it costs to produce world-class professional theatre at the Indiana Repertory Theatre. The IRT gratefully acknowledges the remarkable support we receive from our generous and committed donors whose contributions ensure that the show does go on!

REPERTORY SOCIETY $1500+ | JULY 1, 2017 - AUGUST 28, 2017 PLAYWRIGHT CIRCLE $10,000+

Bob & Toni Bader Leo G. Bianchi & Jill A. Panetta Michael Dinius & Jeannie Regan-Dinius Tom & Jenny Froehle The Judy and Michael Harrington Family Foundation, a fund of CICF David I. & Betty Klapper Sarah & John Lechleiter Dr. & Mrs. William Macias Jackie Nytes & Michael O'Brien Wayne & Susan Schmidt DIRECTOR CIRCLE $5,000 - $9,999

David & Jackie Barrett Susie & Joel Blum Rollie & Cheri Dick David & Ann Frick Nadine & Alvin Givens Ann Hinson Bill & Nancy Hunt Carl Nelson & Loui Lord Nelson Mr. Stephen Owen & Dr. Cheryl Torok Owen Mel & Joan Perelman Noel & Mary Phillips* Dr. Eric Schultze & Dr. Marcia Kolvitz Dr. Christian Wolf & Elaine Holden-Wolf ARTIST CIRCLE $3,000 - $4,999

Mary Findling & John Hurt Dick & Brenda Freije Donald & Teri Hecht 56

Richard & Elizabeth Holmes John & Liz Jenkins John & Susan Kline Steve & Bev Koepper Richard & Mary Kortokrax Scott & Amy Kosnoff Kevin Krulewitch & Rosanne Ammirati* Dr. & Mrs. Dan & Martha Lehman John & Laura Ludwig David & Leslie Morgan Mr. & Mrs. Kimball Morris Bob & Dale Nagy Dr. Christine & Mr. Michael Phillips N. Clay & Amy Robbins Jerry & Rosie Semler Cynthia & William Smith III Joe & Jill Tanner Gene & Mary Tempel John & Kathy Vahle PATRON CIRCLE $1,500 - $2,999

Janet Allen & Joel Grynheim Anonymous Tammara D. Porter Avant & Jesse Avant Trudy W. Banta Sharon R. Barner Frank & Katrina Basile Keith A. & Heather Bice Dan Bradburn & Jane Robison Craig Burke & Diane Cruz-Burke Alan & Linda Cohen Cowan & King, LLP Susan M. Cross Daniel & Catherine Cunningham

Ann & Kenneth Dee Dr. Brian Dillman & Erin Hedges* Drs. Richard & Rebecca Feldman Brian & Lorene Furrer Phyllis & Ed Gabovitch Dorothea & Philip Genetos Robert Giannini Ron & Kathy Gifford Ricardo & Beatriz Guimaraes Dr. & Mrs. James Hamby Michael N. Heaton Brenda S. Horn Randolph & Rebecca Horton The Indianapolis Fellows Fund, a fund of The Indianapolis Foundation Daniel T. Jensen & Steven Follis Arthur & Jacquelyn King Joe & Deborah Loughrey Donald & Ruth Ann MacPherson The Alice Greene McKinney and E. Kirk McKinney, Jr. Fund, a fund of CICF Sharon R. Merriman Dod & Laura Michael Michael D. Moriarty Stephen & Deanna Nash Nancy & John Null Larry & Louise Paxton Bob & Kathi Postlethwait Phil & Joyce Probst Ken & Debra Renkens Marya & Tony Rose Chip & Jane Rutledge Francisnelli Santos & Brian S. Newman Charles & Jenny Schalliol


REPERTORY SOCIETY CONT. $1500+ | JULY 1, 2017 - AUGUST 28, 2017 PATRON CIRCLE, CONT. $1,500 - $2,999

Marguerite K. Shepard, M.D. Michael & Cynthia Skehan Cheryl & Bob Sparks Robert & Barbara Stevens

Suzanne Sweeney & Todd Wiencek Jennifer C. Turner Dorothy Webb Rosalind Webb & Duard Ballard Carol Weiss Alan & Elizabeth Whaley

Cliff & Molly Williams Ken & Peggy Williams Bob & Dana Wilson John & Linda Zimmermann *Denotes a sustaining member

DONOR GUILDS ANNUAL CAMPAIGN GIFTS $1500+ | JULY 1, 2017 - AUGUST 28, 2017 DRAMA GUILD $650 - $1,499

Andrea Best Jesse L. & Carolynne Bobbitt Vince & Robyn Caponi Brady Clark Dr. & Mrs. John J. Coleman III Daniel P. Corrigan Dave & Donna Kaiser R. Keith & Marion Michael John & Carolyn Mutz Robert & Alice Schloss Dr. James & Linda Trippi Barbara S. Tully* Frederick & Jacquelyn Winters THEATRE GUILD $250 - $649

John & Eileen Ahrens* Anonymous (2)* Walter Bartz* Constance C. Beardsley* Barbara & Christopher Bodem* Mary T. Bookwalter & Jeffery Stant

Charles Boswell Alice Brown Melanie Brown & Amy Harbin* Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Brown Clarence L. & Carol Casazza Keith & Brenda Coley Don & Dolly Craft David Crites & Joan Tupin-Crites Karen Dace* Paul & Carol DeCoursey* Phillip & Caroline Dennis* Ditech Inc. John & Cynthia Dozier* Darrell & Thecla Gossett Emily F. (Cramer) Hancock* Alexandra & Justin Harris* Lindsey & Tom Horan Steven & Mary Koch* Mark & Teresa Lubbers Dr. & Mrs. Peter Marcus* Patrick Marlatt* Anne & Ken Marnocha

William & Margo Martin MidAmerica Health Dr. Frederick & Alice Milley Rev. Mary Ann Moman* Kent & Elaine Morrison* Ray & Kimberley Peck Gary & Pam Pedigo* Dr. Nenetzin Reyes* Steve Schlangen* Dr. Jill Shedd* Richard & Kimberly Shields Kevin & Amy Sobiski* Ross & Rosemarie Springer Luke Stark* Alice Steppe & Patrick Murphy Nela Swinehart* Robert & Barbetta True* Jim Wade Susan Weatherly* Dan Wheeler & Susan Wakefield* Dr Frank & Christine Wilson Reba Boyd Wooden* *Denotes a sustaining member

57


THE SUPPORTING CAST

INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE DONORS

JAMES STILL SOCIETY Thank you to those donors who are supporting James Still’s 20th season as IRT Playwright-in-Residence. As a member of the James Still Society, you are demonstrating your dedication to new play development and celebrating storytelling. In order to qualify for the Society, donors must be new to the IRT this season, or have increased their contribution by an amount listed below. MANUSCRIPT CIRCLE $500+

Trudy W. Banta David & Jackie Barrett Keith A. & Heather Bice Craig Burke & Diane Cruz-Burke Alan & Linda Cohen Daniel P. Corrigan Tom & Jenny Froehle Ron & Kathy Gifford Nadine & Alvin Givens Ricardo & Beatriz Guimaraes Ann Hinson Randolph & Rebecca Horton Daniel T. Jensen & Steven Follis Dave & Donna Kaiser Richard & Mary Kortokrax Scott & Amy Kosnoff Lacy Foundation Sarah & John Lechleiter John & Laura Ludwig Mark & Teresa Lubbers Sharon R. Merriman MidAmerica Health David & Leslie Morgan Mr. & Mrs. Kimball Morris Carl Nelson & Loui Lord Nelson Jackie Nytes & Michael O'Brien Mr. Stephen Owen & Dr. Cheryl Torok Owen Noel & Mary Phillips Cynthia & William Smith III

TRIBUTE GIFTS IN HONOR OF JANET ALLEN Hilary Givens M.S. Woods Real Estate, LLC 58

Joe & Jill Tanner John & Kathy Vahle Jim Wade Alan & Elizabeth Whaley DIALOGUE CIRCLE $250 - $499

Frank & Katrina Basile Mary T. Bookwalter & Jeffery Stant Alice Brown Dr. & Mrs. John J. Coleman III Richard & Elizabeth Holmes William & Margo Martin Ray & Kimberley Peck Frederick & Jacquelyn Winters CHARACTER CIRCLE $100 - $249

Jo-Ann Andrews David & Nikki Barrett Kristi Beyer Dr Marc & Ann Bilodeau Robert & Julie Burns James & Sharon Cross Dr. Antoinette Dobson Mark Dodds Julie & Matthew Dollins Christopher Douglas Marni R. Fechtman Sara Garland Laura M. Hays Donald & Teri Hecht

Dr. Donna Hudson Laura Hutson Nicholas Ide & Audra Baumgartner Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Jahnke Patricia A. Kinney Steve & Bev Koepper Gerald Malone Esperanza Martinez-Mier Kellie McCarthy James Miller John & Carolyn Mutz Brian & Gail Payne Valerie & Andrea Petro James & Julia Richter Jane Rothbaum Donor Advised Philanthropic Fund Nanci Sears-Perry Alice Steppe & Patrick Murphy Jeffrey Stratton Sue Sudhoff Gregg & Judy Summerville Laura Tagliani Randy Talley Elaine Wagner & Family Rosalind Webb & Duard Ballard Dr Frank & Christine Wilson Jan Woodruff


OVATION SOCIETY The Ovation Society is an exclusive program that recognizes donors that have made a legacy gift to the IRT. The IRT truly appreciates those individuals whose gift will ensure that the Theatre can continue to provide meaningful and inspirational experiences for future generations of Hoosiers. Gary Addison Janet Allen & Joel Grynheim Bob & Patricia Anker Frank & Katrina Basile Ron & Julia Carpenter John R. Carr (in memoriam) John & Mary Challman Rollie & Cheri Dick Nancy & Berkley Duck Dale & Karen Duncan Meg Gammage-Tucker David A. & Dee Garrett (in memoriam)

Michael Gradison (in memoriam) Emily F. (Cramer) Hancock Bruce Hetrick & Cheri O'Neill David Kleiman & Susan Jacobs Frank & Jacqueline La Vista Donald & Ruth Ann MacPherson Stuart L. Main Michael R. & Sue Maine Sharon R. Merriman David & Leslie Morgan Richard & Lila Morris Deena J. Nystrom

Marcia O'Brien George & Olive Rhodes (in memoriam) Robert V. Robinson & Nancy J. Davis Jane & Fred Schlegel Jerry & Rosie Semler Michael Suit (in memoriam) Gene & Mary Tempel Jeff & Benita Thomasson Christopher J. Tolzmann Alan & Elizabeth Whaley John & Margaret Wilson

CORPORATE, FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT ANNUAL CAMPAIGN GIFTS $250+ | JULY 1, 2017 - AUGUST 28, 2017 CORPORATE

Apex Benefits Group Barnes & Thornburg LLP BMO Harris Bank Eli Lilly and Company Hilliard Lyons Indiana University Health OneAmerica Financial Partners Oxford Financial Group, Ltd.

PNC Printing Partners Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP FOUNDATIONS

Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation Christel DeHaan Family Foundation The Glick Family Foundation

The Margot L. and Robert S. Eccles Fund, a fund of CICF GOVERNMENT

Arts Council of Indianapolis Indiana Arts Commission Shakespeare in American Communities, a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest

IN-KIND/TRADE GIFTS ANNUAL CAMPAIGN GIFTS $250+ | JULY 1, 2017 - AUGUST 28, 2017

Candlewood Suites

Eco-Kinetic

National Institute of Fitness & Sport

THE ALAN AND LINDA COHEN EDUCATION FUND Eli Lilly and Company 59


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IRT STAGE DOOR RESTAURANTS

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CERULEAN RESTAURANT 15% OFF excludes beverages restrictions may apply

some restrictions apply night of performance only

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PRESENTS

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Oxford proudly supports the Indiana Repertory Theatre. Oxford is independent and unbiased — and always will be. We are committed to providing business owners wholly independent and unbiased financial counsel, families generational estate planning and institutions forward-thinking investment strategies.

THOUGHTFUL. INSIGHTFUL. COMMITTED. 317.843.5678  WWW.OFGLTD.COM/IRT CHICAGO  CINCINNATI  GRAND RAPIDS  INDIANAPOLIS  TWIN CITIES

IRT Program: "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" & "The Originalist"  

2017-2018 Season

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