__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

NOV | DEC 2018 | VOL 54 | NO 6 PRINT POST APPROVED PP100007333

2018 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS EXTRA ACOUSTIC SOLUTIONS LIGHTING IN THE EDUCATION SECTOR + MORE


tba

5/4/05

10:58 am

Page 3

pantone 297

cmyk c 50% m00% y 00% k 00%

Corporate Member

pantone 299

cmyk c 85% m19% y 00% k 00%


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

3

I N FO L I N K - B P N

CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

T

HIS YEAR MARKS A MILESTONE IN MANY AREAS. ONE OF THOSE IS OUR SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS, WHICH AFTER 12 YEARS OF RECOGNISING AND REWARDING THE AEC INDUSTRY FOR ITS EFFORTS, IN 2018 HAVE FINALLY COME OF AGE. The reason I say that is two-fold. Firstly, after many years, these awards have very much become part of the social calendar of the architecture and design sector. I know this as many have commented to me how important it was not only to be nominated for our awards, but also how significant their peers in the industry found the fact they were nominated in the first place. Secondly, and perhaps in a somewhat more shallow sense, the relocation of the awards to The Star in Sydney marked a beginning of the Sustainability Awards journey into a far more public, and dare I say, glamorous universe, and one that allows the gravitas of this event to be fully and loudly celebrated by all those involved. Anyone who was there this year would be well aware that now our awards have hit a critical mass from which the only way is up – straight to the stratosphere that is. And this is not just for reasons of vanity or glib promotion. One look at how much the need for sustainability has permeated all industries provides a lucid vista into its pivotal societal importance.

Just as one example from as late as this week, professional services giant PwC pledged to source 100 percent renewable electricity for its global operations and to offset all emissions accounted for by flights taken by employees for business purposes. The multinational company, which has operations in 158 countries and more than 236,000 employees, recently joined The Climate Group’s RE100 initiative to source 100 percent clean power for its global operations – an aim it has committed to achieve by 2022 across its 21 main territories, which account for 88 percent of its revenue streams. “We believe business has a key role to play in solving societal challenges alongside other stakeholders,” PwC’s global chairman Bob Moritz says, adding that, “This commitment is for us a recognition of the need to accelerate the pace of change, and individual business commitments, collectively, will make a critical difference to that.”

ON THE COVER: THE WINNER OF THE PUBLIC + URBAN DESIGN CATEGORY AT THE 2018 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS, KRAKANI-LUMI OR ‘RESTING PLACE’ IS A STANDING CAMP SET IN THE TASMANIAN BUSHLAND; THE RESULT OF YEARS OF COLLABORATION BETWEEN ARCHITECT TAYLOR + HINDS, THE ABORIGINAL LAND COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA AND THE TASMANIAN ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY. THE CAMP IS LOCATED ALONG AN INDIGENOUS CULTURAL WALK WITHIN THE WUKALINA/MT WILLIAM NATIONAL PARK.

INDUSTRY

AWARDS

04 Habitus House of the Year

16 A behind-the-scenes look at the

PEOPLE

2018 Sustainability Awards and all the winners from the night

08 Dr. Daniella Ottmann – Bond University’s new sustainability expert

DETAIL

12 The school with no classrooms

This is where sustainability currently sits across the broader corporate sector and as such, is the reason why we, as a company that reports on a part of industry that contributes up to 35 percent of all landfill waste, want the issue of sustainability to become the central theme of everyone’s daily business routine.

16

But we still have some way to go yet.

SPECIFY

BRANKO MILETIC

36 Lighting and the

modern classroom

CORRECTION: IN THE SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER ISSUE STORY ON PAGE 52 BY PRUE MILLER, ‘COLOUR BY DESIGN WITH A VIEW TO LIGHTNESS’, WE OMITTED TO MENTION THAT THE LADY CILENTO HOSPITAL DESIGN WAS ACTUALLY A JOINT VENTURE BETWEEN FIRMS LYONS AND CONRAD GARGETT. THE ‘BRIGHT GREEN CHEERFUL FACADE’, THE ‘TREE HOUSE CONCEPT’, ‘BIRD SCULPTURES’ AND THE DESIGN CONCEPT OF THE ROOF GARDENS ARE ALL CONCEPTS DEVELOPED BY CORBETT LYON, AND HIS FIRM LYONS.

EDITOR BRANKO MILETIC EDITOR@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU ASSISTANT EDITOR STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC CONTENT PRODUCERS BONNIE VAN DORP PRUE MILLER NATHALIE CRAIG ANDRE TAMMES CARLO STA BARBARA

42 Acoustic solutions for 12

DESIGNERS JULIA GEE TRACEY YEE LOUIS WAYMENT

CLIENT SUCCESS MANAGER STUART GEACH PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2035 STUART.GEACH@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER ADRIAN WILSON PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2037 MOBILE: +61 (0)417 779 215 ADRIAN.WILSON@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

DIGITAL CONTENT CO-ORDINATOR YVONNE GRICE PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2029 YVONNE.GRICE@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

the education sector

46 Product Showcases

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN LEVEL 1, 50 MARSHALL STREET, SURRY HILLS NSW 2010 PHONE: +61 (0)2 9368 0150 WWW.ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES CALL CUSTOMER SERVICE: 02 9018 2029 ISSN 1039-9704

Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,071 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION MARCH 2016

© Copyright Architecture & Design 2016. All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

PRINTED BY BLUESTAR PRINT 83 DERBY STREET SILVERWATER, NSW 2128 PHONE: 02 9748 3411


NOV / DEC 2 0 1 8

4

INFOLINK - B P N

habitus house of the year

The Region’s Finest: A Decade Of Design

LEFT: Hahei House, Studio 2 Architects. Photography by Simon Devitt ABOVE: IT House, Andra Matin. Photography by Mario Wibowo BELOW: Horizon House, Hill Thalis Architecture + Urban Projects. Photography by Brett Boardman

F

or 10 years, Habitus has been unwavering in its mission: to seek out the very best in architecture and design in the Indo-Pacific region, celebrating our design, our way.

Across its various mediums – including print, digital, social media, industry seminars and more, our sister publication Habitus reports on the ideas that compel the architecture and design community, the issues it faces, the innovation that thrusts us all forward, and the successes that await. Habitus House of the Year is a new initiative celebrating outstanding residential design in the Indo-Pacific Region. Each year, the September issue will launch the initiative with a bumper issue announcing the 25 best recently completed examples of how designers across the region live through design. The selection brings together a diverse array of residential projects that span from New Zealand to Australia to Singapore to Thailand and beyond. Homes by established heavyweights will appear alongside those by emerging prodigies to

create a snapshot of where regional design has arrived, and what’s waiting around the corner. Following the preliminary selection of 25 leading projects picked by the Habitus team, an independent jury of architects and industry grandees nominate their choice for the Habitus House of the Year, Exemplary Integration of Environment and Outstanding Interior Architecture accolades. According to Habitus editor Holly Cunneen, “All the projects embrace the values of their owners and the broader culture of site and community.” “From the lay of the land to climatic conditions, landscaping to internal products, the selected winner of Habitus House of the Year will demonstrate designing beyond the known: the known processes, the known forms, and the known approaches to design.” n


/RAPID LIGHT TALKS /RAPID LIGHT TALKS /RAPID LIGHT TALKS

27/ MARCH/ 2019/

      

           –                         

#LIGHTSPACEDESIGN



MELBOURNE CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTRE www.lightingdesignsummit.com.au

IL1812_LSD.indd 1

10/25/18 2:20 PM


ADVERTISING FEATURE – KEYSTONE LININGS

KEY-DESIGNA PANELS: BRINGING ARCHITECTS’ VISION TO LIFE BY KEYSTONE LININGS

L

OCATED IN THE HEART OF THE FINANCIAL DISTRICT OF SYDNEY’S CBD, NO. 1 MARTIN PLACE IS AN INNOVATIVE, FLEXIBLE SPACE DESIGNED TO CATER FOR A RANGE OF EVENTS AND FUNCTIONS. WITH AN EXPANSIVE FLOOR SPACE AND AN AUDIO SYSTEM THAT IS SEGREGATED IN MANY ZONES, THIS SPACE CAN ACCOMMODATE MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS AT THE SAME TIME. The office building, owned by the Charter Hall Group, consists of 24-levels which offers unmatched access to Sydney’s best restaurants, hotels, retails and public transport links. The two-level fit-out contains an amazing feature ceiling, which includes over 9 kilometres worth of pine dowel, suspended at various lengths from routed Key-Ply plywood panels. Keystone’s Michael Robbins explained that his team were approached in the early stages to help bring to life such a ground-breaking concept.

“Keystone Linings and Acoustics worked with Adriano Pupilli Architects and Siren Design at the concept stage creating a working prototype using the natural timbers chosen for both the dowels and the white triangular ceiling,” says Robbins. “Once reviewed and the final designs were completed by the architects, Graphite Projects were chosen as the preferred builder and from there Keystone worked closely with both architects and builder to help deliver the state-of-the-art project. “There’s not necessarily one experience and one use. In it’s entirety, it’s a flexible space,” says Matthew Ryall - Architect, Adriano Pupilli Architects.

on the walls and all the bespoke joinery, there’s a lot of warmth in here now.” Other notable features include a large digital screen which intersected through the two levels, providing a vivid contrast to the natural timber “which activated the space” according to Siren Design Creative Director Venesa Buljubasic. Keystone specialise in linings and acoustic solutions and frequently work on custom jobs such as the 1 Martin Place ceiling system. Contact the team to discuss your ideas and let us help you bring them to life.

Charter Hall’s Regional Portfolio Manager, Warwick Mayed revealed that one of the key elements were to bring the life of Martin Place into the space. “Bringing in natural elements like the timber you see on The Portico ceiling, the timber

For more info visit: designcor.com.au


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

7

I N FO L I N K - B P N

PEOPLE


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

8

I N FO L I N K - B P N

People

Bond Uni appoints INTERNATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY EXPERT to its ranks

“I also plan to deepen my expertise in bio-climatic design strategies, creative co-design with communities and healthful architecture and materials.”

B

ond University’s Abedian School of Architecture has strengthened its environmental credentials with the appointment of an international expert in sustainable architecture and urban design, Dr. Daniela Ottmann, to the role of associate professor of Architecture.

Ottmann has extensive teaching, research and consultancy experience in Europe, the Middle East, Australia, Africa and China. Her research interests focus on ecologically sustainable architectural and urban design strategies for future cities, new materials for bio-climatically sound buildings and research on affordable, modular, digitally-prefabricated housing, co-housing and slum-upgrading. She began her career in architecture in Bavaria and Berlin, Germany and set up the German University of Technology’s Architecture Department in Oman, as well as working in Dubai and throughout the Arabian

Peninsula as an architect on large-scale developments and master-planning projects. One of Ottmann’s greatest passions is to establish new knowledge though research, and she has been published in numerous international publications. She is currently finalising an Australian Urban Design Research Centre (AUDRC) project for the Western Australian Government on sustainable and affordable timber modular housing for seniors and the disadvantaged in Fremantle. At Bond University, Ottmann will be conducting interdisciplinary research with her Psychology, Neuroscience and other Health Sciences & Medicine colleagues to explore the relationship between wellbeing and architecture, by identifying causes of ‘sick building syndrome’ and establishing means of designing ‘healthy buildings’. Ottmann, who holds an Engineering Doctorate from Germany’s University of Essen-Duisburg and a Masters of Architecture from Berlin/

Brandenburg Technical University (BTU), says, “I am really looking forward to exploring the merging of sustainable materials and construction methods with new developments in advanced fabrication that Bond is involved in, including natural fibre and low emission concrete composites and 3D weaving robotics.” “I also plan to deepen my expertise in bio-climatic design strategies, creative co-design with communities and healthful architecture and materials.” “Buildings are organisms that surround us and elements like perception of space, sustainable materials, natural lighting, ventilation and temperature have a massive impact on our health, wellbeing and quality of life,” she says. “I am passionate about architecture and urbanismand enjoy nurturing the next generations of architects, so they can enjoy a fulfilling career and make meaningful contributions to societies that will stand the test of time.” n


WINNERS ANNOUNCED

View the results online now, go to: trustedbrandsarchitectureanddesign.com.au Full coverage of results in next issue


advertising feature – EASYCRAFT

Meeting Modern Building Requirements with Interior Linings

T

he Australian design and construction industry is growing rapidly, and is predicted to expand by a further 8.2% in the coming year alone. Though this growth period is driving competition and profits skyward, it also presents designers with a host of new challenges. This includes increased demand for fast, efficient, and cost-effective construction, in addition to high standards of quality and performance. Careful and informed specification of all aspects of construction – including interior wall and ceiling linings – can help meet these demands.

Understanding interior linings The term “interior linings” describes the exposed, finished surfaces of walls and ceilings in internal spaces. The range of materials typically used for such surfaces in residential or commercial buildings is broad, and material selection depends on performance and functional requirements and the desired aesthetic. In Australia, the three most commonly used interior linings are plasterboard, timber boards, and timber panels.

Key performance requirements Like any other construction component, interior linings must meet the performance requirements set out by the National Construction Code (NCC) in terms of resistance to fire and moisture and thermal and acoustic insulation. The NCC groups the fire performance level of materials into four categories: Group 1 through to Group 4, with materials in the former being the most resistant and materials in the latter being the least. Most

building types require interior linings to have at least a Group 2 or Group 3 classification. Thermal resistance is expressed as an “R-value”, with a higher R-value indicating a higher level of effectiveness. Minimum R-value requirements are specified in the Building Code of Australia (BCA). Resistance to moisture is also essential; interior linings play a central role in protecting building interiors from moisture-related damage, which can cause major structural issues in extreme cases.

meanwhile, require ongoing maintenance and treatment, which can be prohibitively expensive and inconvenient for end users.

Easycraft easy For more than 30 years, Easycraft has been the leading Australian provider of high performance, stylish interior walls and ceiling panels. During this time easyVJ, a range of MDF decorative wall linings, has emerged as one of the company’s most popular products – and with good reason. Ideal for wall and ceiling linings, easyVJ features a modern v-groove design that matches the style of traditional timber joint planks and is suitable for vertical, horizontal, and diagonal use in residential and commercial applications alike. Far surpassing the performance of plasterboard and timber panels and boards, easyVJ complies with all fire and acoustic requirements of the NCC and gives designers and specifiers an unparalleled level of freedom and flexibility.

The shortcomings of traditional linings While plasterboard and timber panels and boards have endured as popular construction materials for years, they are not without their downsides. Plasterboard in particular is highly susceptible to moisture exposure, and prone to deterioration in the face of humid weather, poor maintenance, or incorrect installation processes. Timber panels and boards,

For more information visit: goo.gl/DMLQte


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

11

I N FO L I N K - B P N

DETAIL


NOV/ DEC 2 0 1 8

12

INFOLINK- B P N

DETAIL

South Melbourne Primary School: The school with no classrooms architect: hayball WORDS: Stephanie Stefanovic PHOTOGRAPHY: Dianna Snape

Victoria’s first vertical state school, South Melbourne Primary School, welcomed its first students earlier this year. The building is simultaneously striking and unique. It lacks many of the features synonymous with a traditional school; it’s high-rise, there are no fences and even more curiously, no classrooms.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

13

I N FO L I N K - B P N

DETAIL

H

ow do you have a school without classrooms, you ask? According to Hayball director Ann Lau, the school has been designed to support “learning neighbourhoods” rather than traditional classrooms. “Classrooms have been minimised; there are no formal classrooms in this school,” says Lau. “Each learning neighbourhood will effectively accommodate 75 children with three teaching staff. This is very much about collaborative learning rather than didactic learning. [And] learning can actually take place indoors or outdoors depending on the weather.” What’s more, the building acts as more than just a school. It integrates schooling for 525 primary students with an early learning centre for 44 children, maternal and child health services, multi-use community spaces, multi-purpose sports courts and public domain/ open spaces supporting a healthy and engaged local community. The building spans six storeys, four of which are dedicated to Learning Communities that house approximately 150 students each.

The internal learning environments connect seamlessly with outdoor learning terraces on each level, with single and double-height outdoor rooms and vertical play structures. A series of open stairs with integrated seating and shared gathering spaces link at each level, supporting performances, presentations and discussions. The stairs are designed theatre-style, creating a sort of ‘vertical piazza’ that connects and expands the interior spaces to counter the vertical separation between floors. The stairs represent the activation of every usable space as a teaching zone, according to the architects. Classes can gather on the steps for group activities and front-facing presentations, or they can pull away to quietly read yet still feel part of the greater learning community. On the exterior, a façade of pixellated panels creates a distinct, playful response to the functional requirements of interior program, daylighting, ventilation, shading and screening, presenting a simple expression of rectangular forms arranged over an intricate landscaped base.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

14

I N FO L I N K - B P N

DETAIL

PREVIOUS: A façade of pixellated panels creates a distinct, playful response to the building’s functional requirements. OPPOSITE PAGE: The stairs are designed theatre-style, creating a sort of ‘vertical piazza’ that connects and expands the interior spaces to counter the vertical separation between floors. THIS PAGE: The building acts as more than just a school. It integrates schooling for 525 primary students with an early learning centre for 44 children.

Challenges Such a radical new typology does not come without its challenges. First and foremost was the challenge of creating an integrated model that would allow the school to be used and enjoyed by the entire community, rather than restricting it to the students. Indeed, all facilities are seamlessly connected and accessible to a range of different people, and in theory the facility can operate 24/7, simultaneously functioning as a school and a community hub. This integrated concept is most evident in the lack of fences to the ground plane, making South Melbourne Primary School both physically and metaphorically, a school without fences. The architects also faced the challenge of a confined site, which was the main driving force

behind the decision to create a vertical school. The site is about 1/7th of the size that would normally be provided for a primary school of this size, which meant the architects needed a solution that could support the school’s population while maximising open space and play areas. And not only were the architects dealing with a small site, but they were also dealing with a site located on a flood plain. The site’s proximity to the Yarra River meant that the building had to be constructed about 1.5m higher than ground level to be above the 1/100 year flood level. This was also addressed through the landscape design, which facilitated a graded forecourt to the main entrance level and creatively developed stepped pockets for differentiated play and community use.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

15

I N FO L I N K - B P N

DETAIL

Sustainability features In all of this, the architects were still looking to implement sustainable design principles. Some of the building’s sustainability features include: • D  ouble glazing throughout for energy and acoustic reasons • A  rchitectural design to allow access to natural daylight and maximisation of winter sun penetration • H  ighly-efficient air conditioning and ventilation utilising a chilled water storage system • Occupancy sensors for lighting control • Rainwater collection for toilet flushing • S  mall PV electricity generation array for on-site power generation • B  uilding automation system to control the key functions n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Austral Bricks architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/australbricks James Hardie architectureanddesign.com.au/ Suppliers/James-Hardie-Wall-Floor-Products BlueScope architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/BlueScope-Steel


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

16

I N FO L I N K - B P N

Thank you to our sponsors Event Partner

Interior Architecture

Commercial

Single Dwelling – Alteration or Addition

Education & Research

Public & Urban Design

Emerging Architect of the Year

Green Building

Landscape/Biophillia

Multiple Dwelling

Healthcare

Smart Building

Innovation or Application

Single Dwelling – New

Achievement of Merit

PHOTOGRAPH: ANNIE SPRATT


NOV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

17

I N FO L I N K - B PN

A look behind the curtain The 2018 Sustainability Awards are now well and truly over and the 15 category winners have all received their awards. Soon this year’s awards and associated festivities will be just another fading landmark in the rearview mirror of time and once the upcoming summer fades, planning for next year’s awards will start in earnest. But there was a lot more behind the 2018 entries than just great pictures and happy, smiling faces. Behind all the hyperbole, grins and platitudes there was a lot of hard work, ongoing commitments to sustainability in all its forms, shapes and sizes, and of course there were real people doing extraordinary and environmentchanging work. So for this last issue of 2018, we’d like to show you what was behind the entries and give you a glimpse behind the façade – basically provide a look behind the curtain of the public vista of all of

SA LIVE & GALA photographY: tim da rin

our shortlisted entries in an attempt to provide a more human dimension to their entries. Of course, not everyone interviewed provided that much or sought after ‘glimpses into their creative souls’ as some of our readers may wish, but, in having said that, all of our shortlisters at the bare minimum alluded to the process by which they came to their final submissions. As editor I thank them, along with all the work they put into entering the actual awards. Therefore following is what could best be described as the ‘unplugged’ or ‘raw’ version of the 2018 Sustainability Awards from the unique perspective and in the words of the 35 shortlisters themselves.

Branko Miletic Editor of Architecture and Design


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

Sustainability Live lights up The Star After six panels, 6 CPD points, 270 delegates, one debate as well as one full day of views, ideas and discussion, the Sustainability Live panels made a great start to our 2018 Sustainability Awards program. Now in its second year, the Sustainability Live panel event proved to be a popular and informative hit with all those who attended and is fastbecoming the premier industry sustainability education event. As assistant editor Stephanie Stefanovic wrote recently in Architecture & Design: We are glad to see that the interest in sustainable building and design has grown since last year, and we are proud to say that we had a fantastic line-up of experts who did a great job delving into this year’s topics, some of which were not easy! A particular highlight this year were the supply chain sustainability and mental health panels, which everyone seemed to really enjoy. So thank you to all of our panelists and moderators, and thank you to our audience. You were all very engaged and had an abundance of questions and comments for our panelists, so much so that there wasn’t enough time to answer them all!

photograph: annie spratt

18

I N FO L I N K - B P N


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

19

I N FO L I N K - B P N


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

20

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Best of Best Of the TheBest Best

EME Design, an award-winning design firm, was started by Luke Middleton around 18 years ago. Middleton’s experience in the design and construction industry spans over 30 years and his sense of curiosity and “Why not?” attitude has fuelled his explorations into sustainable design and green buildings. For Middleton, restraints are liberating and he encourages architects and designers to look beyond their own field to find innovative solutions to challenging design problems. “As professionals we should be leading the way, striving and driving for innovative ways of improving the quality, efficiency, health and resilience of the built environment,” Middleton explains. The restrictions of a heritage home posed the most difficult challenge for this project. For example, Passive Butterfly was to remain at the front of the site, resulting in a south-facing extension that had limited solar access. The project was named after the butterfly roof that was shaped to increase solar gain in winter and protect it in summer. Existing windows were upgraded to triple glazed. Existing walls, floors, ceilings and roofs were upgraded with new

Passive Butterfly EME Design

insulation to ensure air tightness. The Passive Butterfly generates more energy than it consumes, while ensuring occupant comfort and health. Passive Butterfly is a prototype and exemplar in sustainable and holistic retrofits of heritage homes to exponentially improve their long term efficiency and lifespan. It showcases what is possible in terms of a holistic upgrade to Passive House standards. Carefully modelled and tested to ensure year-round comfort, the home uses a passive design approach to ensure vastly improved comfort and super-efficient thermal performance. The heritage home was retained, however existing windows were upgraded to triple glazed. Existing walls, floors, ceilings and roofs were also upgraded with new insulation to ensure air tightness. Now a certified Passive House designer, Middleton notes that a holistic approach is needed to achieve true sustainability. “Architecture that positively engages not only the users, but the community and environment for positive outcomes is ideal,” he explains. “In doing so we can educate people and provide an opportunity to positively impact the urban environment and achieve better health and environmental outcomes for everyone.”


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

21

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Commercial Architecture

Inspiring the urban regeneration of the historic Dalgety & Co building, One Malop Street is a 14-level, A-Grade commercial building in Geelong, Victoria. This redevelopment is WorkSafe Victoria’s new headquarters, housing 700 members of staff and workers from Victoria Police and Allianz Insurance. An exemplar of modern design for tenant wellness, One Malop Street has achieved a Platinum Core and Shell WELL Building Standard Rating. The building is designed to target a 5.5 National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) Energy accredited rating, and a 6 Star Green Star Design and As-Built rating.

One Malop Street Aurecon

Global, multi-disciplinary engineering and infrastructure advisory company Aurecon, collaborating with head contractor Built and architect peckvonhartel, has created an innovative, fit-for-purpose and sustainable building ready for the future. Winner of multiple industry awards, Aurecon serves a wide-ranging client base across a number of markets, in locations worldwide. Aurecon’s integrated service was leveraged for One Malop Street with the firm engaging across many engineering disciplines – including building services, structural, civil, fire safety, ESD, acoustics, audiovisual and wind engineering – for the base building and fit out. One Malop Street was designed

around a number of key principles including human-centred design, urban regeneration, resilience for future climate change and achieving excellence with respect to greenhouse gas emission reductions, and sustainability. “Truly sustainable developments must look at triple bottom line sustainability,” says Jessica Bennett, senior ESD engineer at Aurecon, “[that is] making significant and positive contributions through environmental measures, economic outcomes and social equity.” A number of sustainable design features have been implemented including enhancing the glazing performance of the façade, increasing the number of photovoltaic solar cells on the roof, and sustainable lighting design. Rainwater collection and low-flow fittings improve water management. Special attention was paid to occupant health and comfort with respect to thermal comfort, glare minimisation, biophilia and indoor air quality. The redevelopment has also helped spur the rejuvenation of the Malop Street Precinct. “Sustainable buildings provide education, resilience to rising energy prices and water scarcity, stable and long-term job creation, stronger communities and improved health and wellbeing,” explains Bennett.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

22

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Education & Research

The Macquarie University Incubator by Architectus is the product of a bold vision to establish a space on campus grounds for start-up businesses to evolve and be accelerated into viable commercial entities. Built with a focus on sustainability and the need to respond to the diverse and changing needs of its occupants, The Incubator is a physical hub in which academic research, industry know-how and nascent ideas intersect. Collaboration and innovation are encouraged with flexible layouts that reflect the space’s entrepreneurial spirit while also anticipating future adaptations and functions. The structure itself is distinct, responsive to the gently inclined site and the woodland context, with many notable features that reduce its energy footprint. The Incubator encapsulates many aspects of sustainability including transparency, flexibility, an authentic approach to the use of sustainable materials and passive environmental design. This reflects the holistic approach to sustainable design adopted by Architectus. An industry-leading Australian design studio, Architectus brings together more than 350 architects, interior architects, urban designers and urban planners, and leverages a wealth of specialist expertise across all industry sectors. This wide range of skills and experience allows for a collaborative approach to problem solving, backed by clear strategic thinking and a focus on applying strong research and technology to create functional and elegant solutions.

Macquarie University Incubator Architectus

Led by principal Luke Johnson and architect Nick Elias, the Architectus project team, which also included Angel Zhangi, John Jeffrey, Hope Dryden and Taija Love, has created the exemplar of sustainable design freed from the binds of common practice. The Incubator reflects the team’s intensive collaborative design process that includes defining appropriate sustainability strategies and features, and a close examination of how the space will be used by its occupants. The building’s final form, made nearly entirely out of sustainably sourced engineered timber and easily disassembled and relocated, emphasises flexibility, reuse and reduced energy consumption. Solar access is maximised, resulting in naturally lit spaces during the day. A photovoltaic array on the roof generates energy from the sun. Natural cross ventilation in work spaces improves comfort. For Architectus, good, sustainable design must challenge convention and utilise passive means to achieve its goals. Completed within five months of construction commencing, the Incubator explored sustainable materials and efficient methods of construction, while designing directly in relation to the site and local climatic conditions. The result is high quality, innovative design that balances the needs of its environment and its users, now and into the future.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

23

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Emerging Architect of the Year

Jean Graham Winter Architecture

Many successful practices rely on a name, on a face, to be the brand of their endeavours. For architect Jean Graham, of Winter Architecture, the thought held no appeal.

geographic diversity is a relatively unusual concept, but it works for them, with Graham adding that they may be physically separated, but remain a close unit.

“The word ‘winter’ evokes quiet, cosy, introspective,” says Graham, who although herself the director of Winter Architecture, prefers to be just one identity in a diverse team.

The Port Melbourne House was her first big project – in fact it took three years in concept and design. It was after that completion that she started becoming a recognised name.

“I didn’t want to be the face of the company. I’m not shy, it’s just I don’t really like that image of “hero” architecture, it’s always a team.”

“Emerging? I guess we just haven’t been noticed before. I guess we haven’t been pushing it,” she says.

Her formative years in regional Victoria included a double degree from Deakin in Architecture and Construction Management and then fifteen years as a casual academic.

But that is Graham’s style. Simple, tailored and refined are all tags she is happy with – but oddly she balks at the title of being a ‘sustainable’ architect.

“One thing led to another and I just got a few jobs here and there and all of a sudden I couldn’t work in the firm anymore and I knew I needed to start doing it on my own.”

“I don’t really like to think of it as an ideal, it’s sort of, it should be natural. It should be a part of everything. It should be happening – not like it’s an add on, it [sustainability] should just be integrated.”

Winter Architecture was formed just two years ago, and now has a talented workforce spread across Australia, from Perth to Torquay. The

Perhaps not surprisingly this quiet achiever did not expect to be nominated as an Emerging Architect of the Year.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

24

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Green Building

Designing sustainable and contemporary homes within a historic context is a challenging concept, let alone achieving a 6 Star Green Star rating. “Six stars was not as scary as we might have thought,” says James Wallace from DHA. The project boasts low carbon building materials, but also is renowned for using local building materials in the creation of the row of terrace houses in suburban Bowen, SA. “It’s a design that will stand the test of time,” says Wallace of the classic decorative frontages that made the homes extremely desirable.

The Prince’s Terrace Adelaide Defence Housing Australia

The Adelaide-based builder Palumbo was the procurer for the sustainable materials, including sourcing 100-year old bricks from demolition sites and sustainable concrete from Port Adelaide. “It’s very pleasing and I guess a bit humbling,” says Wallace on behalf of the extended team.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

25

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Healthcare

According to architect and director of Crosshatch, Jaime Diaz-Berrio, a key design strategy “was to create a building that respected its environment and was in keeping with its residential context”. “The timber batten screen was an integral design element as it resolved several programmatic and site considerations. It provides solar protection and creates a dynamic skin that changes on approach,” says Diaz-Berrio. “The screen unifies and softens the building’s presence and at night turns it into a lantern that

Wallan Veterinary Hospital Crosshatch

catches your eye as you drive along the High Street.” “The final built form expresses the functional requirements in three simple main volumes and enhances views, light and natural ventilation throughout,” he says. “A strong client relationship enabled us to meet the functional brief while having the freedom and flexibility to challenge the stereotypical ‘hospital’ typology.”


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

26

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Innovation & Application

Some people’s passion is contagious, as is the case of Winya’s Director Greg Welsh. The excitement he feels for the internationally acclaimed e-board is well founded, and he believes this is still the tip of the iceberg as far as potential of the sustainable product goes. For him the role in the company is more than internal – he is an ambassador for the process of recycling office furniture; designing and creating stunning office décor that is in high demand. “We just have to get architects and designers to care about it,” says Welsh, who is not in the least happy to let the majority Indigenous-owned company sit on its considerable laurels.

e-Board Winya

The logic of Winya’s design system is clear – when an office refits, or architects redesign there is a massive waste of resources, with furniture tossed into massive landfills. Winya creates new board from that waste product and re-uses it in new designs. Specifiers cannot improve on the green credentials of an office product actually made from office products. Combined with the considerable and expanding creative team collected at Winya, the product is gaining clientele across the private and public landscape and already includes big names in industry such as Lendlease and the Defence Department.

Highly Commended: The Footprint Compnay The Footprint Calculator The GreenBook


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

27

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 WINNERS

Interior Architecture

“Our aim was to challenge convention and create the perfect fusion of classic design elements inspired by the history of the site, with cutting edge modern technologies. The regeneration, or “re-birth” of the old Wrigley’s factory is at the core of this development – an outstanding piece of Chicagoesque architecture, which beautifully, and respectfully, complements our modern contemporary additions,” says Ed Horton, director of Stable Group. “We have coupled this with the latest in new and emerging technologies, together with what we believe are completely new approaches to energy generation, its delivery and building operations.”

The Burcham Stable Group

“The benefits flowing to the owners and tenants as a consequence of these sustainable initiatives include lower operating costs, better living environments and greater community cohesion,” he says.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

28

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Landscape & Biophilia

Thirty storeys in the air, overlooked by workers peering through hermetically sealed office windows in Melbourne’s CBD, is the vibrant green refuge of The Phoenix Rooftop. Lana Blazanin of Bent Architecture considers the effect of this space on terrestrial passers-by as they glance up into the glass canyon, just to discover an oasis.

Bent Architecture defined the zones with mosaic-tiled raised garden beds, and completed the design with a statement steel arbour.

The 45sqm terrace is a rooftop garden for two city dwelling downsizers who wanted to actually inhabit the space, rather than just look into it.

“The day that was craned onto site was quite spectacular,” recalls Blazanin. “The choice of materials throughout were designed to make you feel you were not many storeys ‘up’. Having natural timbers and permeable paving and even the mosaics make you feel you are amongst greenery,” adds Blazanin, who is keen to share credit with the horticulturist who sourced a wide range of plants that would thrive in this exposed arena.

The three zones and the functionality of the zones were inspired by the clients’ needs that included

The result is what Bent Architecture refers to as a billboard for environmental sustainability.

“It was an amazing job to receive, because the clients were so passionate. It was a very exciting moment for us to be able to contribute in such a way to the cityscape.”

Phoenix Rooftop Bent Architecture

having ‘views out, and being able to have a barbeque and just enjoy the sunshine up there’.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

29

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Multiple Dweling

DHA builds between 300 and 800 homes each year, which allows for some economies of scale, and also for the amortisation of costs involved in 6 star sustainable design. “It will pay dividends - there are real benefits for DHA,” says James Wallace from DHA. He recalls the new designing dictum was often challenging. “Reducing supply chain carbon emissions and embodied carbon was a specific focus for the project team,” he says “Every nail and screw you have to think – how many miles does that have to travel? It’s exciting that we were able to do it. A few moments I thought it was a bit hard, but we pushed through.”

The Prince’s Terrace Adelaide Defence Housing Australia

Highly Commended Clyde Mews Six Degrees Architects


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

30

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Public & Urban design

The opportunity to be involved in the Tasmanian project now known as krakani lumi was one that Taylor & Hinds sought. After seeing a story about the early concept on TV, Matt Taylor made the moves to be involved and contacted the Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania. “We struck up a conversation with them,” says partner Poppy Hinds of the start of a relationship that would last six years. “We did analyses of other projects, but there was nothing like this – it is a different language architecturally.” The standing camp can be found on the rim of the Bay of Fires in Tasmania and consists of a series of pavilions where folks on the wukalina guided walk can rest. From a design and construction point of view the location and sanctity of the land itself added dimensions of challenges. “It came out of a lot of research and talking with the Aboriginal Land Council and traditional methods of construction - it evolved over quite a while,” says Hinds. “It [the design] was refined as the project went on.”

krakani lumi Taylor & Hinds Architects

“The helicopter day was really exciting. Overnight it went from a series of footings, to huts throughout the landscape,” recalls Hinds. “It was really, really exciting.” An added bonus to helicopter construction is the ability to tweak orientation at the very last second, allowing a perfect aspect to the detail of the native bushland. Builders experienced in this area were sourced from Devonport. “They were sensational. They’d done remote work for the Department of Parks and Wildlife, and they weren’t at all scared of choppering in the huts. They actually camped on the site during construction.” krakuni lumi will have a long impact on design, while having very little impact on the land, the flora or fauna. After six years of hard work, the team at Taylor & Hinds are receiving recognition of their remarkable and sustainable work. “Sustainable design is fundamental to the way we work in the practice, so to be acknowledged at this level is great.”


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

31

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Single Dwelling (Alteration or Addition)

Passive Butterfly by EME Design, a south facing extension transformed into a passive house with a distinct sculptural butterfly roof, came to life in 2016. The challenge began when the client wished to upgrade an Armadale heritage home to Passive House standards - a difficult task given that most heritage homes lack insulation and airtightness, and are not built with thermal comfort in mind.

Passive Butterfly EME Design

The solution was a holistic upgrade that utilised careful modelling and testing during the design process to ensure year-round comfort and superefficient thermal performance. The striking, asymmetrical butterfly roof design provides drama but also functionality as it allows sun to enter the light-starved extension by optimising solar access. Passive Butterfly pushes the boundaries of sustainable design and is an exemplar of how holistic retrofits of heritage homes can exponentially improve their long-term efficiency and lifespan. Australia has many listed and unlisted heritage homes that are high in energy consumption and uncomfortable to live in. Passive Butterfly proves that inefficiently performing homes of the 19th and 20th centuries can be upgraded holistically to be super-efficient and net-positive in energy, sustainably designed and environmentally conscious.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

32

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Single Dwelling (New)

Drumkerin Mahalath Halperin Architects

Drumkerin by Mahalath Halperin Architects is a sustainability showcase located in the heart of Armidale. The product of a desire to downsize, the architect’s new home, which sits within an already established permaculture garden, was an opportunity to apply best practice in passive solar, energy efficienct and sustainable house design. The result is a new ‘forever’ home, reflecting the lifestyle of the occupants, and built to respond to the changing local climate. Conceived as a way to take greater personal responsibility of our impact on the environment, Drumkerin exhibits the perfect balance of ideas, design, and technology.

One of more daring aspects of the design was the decision not to include any major heating/cooling infrastructure. This was a calculated risk factoring in the warming Armidale climate and shortening winters, achieved by including passive design features that negated the need for major heating and cooling. Smart use of Phase Change materials, and air cooled by the water tank, contribute to a house that requires no active cooling, minimal heating, and uses very little energy. The results speak for themselves; while the house officially achieves a 6.4 star NatHERS rating, in practice, for much of the year the house operates as a 10 star rated house.

The architect behind Drumkerin, Mahalath Halperin has been living and working in Armidale since the mid-1980s. Embracing architecture as a discipline combining art and science, Halperin soon became more involved with sustainability and sustainable design. Halperin’s practice adopts a holistic approach to sustainability that reflects a way of life revolving around design, lifestyle, garden and the environment. After many years designing other people’s houses, Drumkerin addresses many of the ‘green’ issues explored during Halperin’s career. “[This project was] an opportunity to try lots of new ideas and implement sustainability without having to convince the client as we were the clients ourselves,” says Halperin.

Another key consideration for Halperin was demonstrating systems and practices that are readily replicable without requiring costly trades of skills. For example, core-filled concrete block was selected for the internal thermal mass walls partly because it does not require specialist trades or skills (such as rammed earth). Drumkerin is about good architecture that elegantly combines sustainability with practical design and aesthetics. “[Sustainable building] is currently a niche market and shouldn’t be,” explains Halperin. “It is simply about approaching the design as a whole system, rather than looking independently at the separate items and issues.”


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

33

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Smart Building

8 Chifley Square is a 6 Star Green Star Office Design v2 certified office tower in the financial heart of Sydney’s CBD that stands tall due to its iconic presence, contribution to the public domain and strong focus on sustainability. Built to adapt to a changing world, 8 Chifley Square is a beacon of the vertical village concept, delivering lightfilled workspaces linked with atria. The result is a building comprised of two stacked modules (12 and nine floors, respectively), with seven ‘villages’ of three-storey communal workspaces. Designed in response to the climate and culture of Sydney, 8 Chifley Square marries environmentally sustainable design with highly functional spatial planning.

8 Chifley Square Lippmann Partnership (in collaboration with Roger Stirk Harbour & Partners)

This iconic tower was designed by Lippmann Partnership and London-based Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) for Mirvac, following the City of Sydney Design Excellence Competition in 2007. The Australian-based Lippman Partnership has been widely acclaimed all over the world for projects of all types and categories. 8 Chifley Square was designed around three key principles: enhancing the public realm, creating an exemplary and modern workplace that addressed the business needs of the 21st

century, and delivering a highly environmentally sustainable building. “The design of buildings and cities is one of the major contributors to climate change so it is imperative that we address the problem at this grass roots level,” says Lippman. With a reputation as one of the most environmentally advanced buildings in Australia, the tower’s environmental credentials are of the highest calibre. 8 Chifley square is equipped with active and passive sun shading, natural ventilation, solar panel ready roof structure, advanced blackwater treatment and water recycling as well as the latest building intelligence. Carbon emissions are expected to be at least 75 percent less than most Sydney office buildings. For Lippman, architects must ensure commitment from designers, clients and consultants when designing sustainable buildings. “A lot can be achieved with simple good passive environmental design,” explains Lippman, “[but] going beyond that comes at a cost with a slow payback, so ensure the client understands the investment and is committed.”


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

34

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018 winners

Achievement of Merit

For most of his life, Humberto Urriola has been working towards his vision of transforming harsh concrete cities into flourishing, green urban environments. The landscape architect and founder of Atlantis Corporation in Sydney believes cities are not sustainable or pleasant environments for people to live in. “After hundreds of years of urban development, harmonious landscapes have been replaced with hard surfaces like rooftops, concrete and roads,” Urriola says. Often, to build a city, huge amounts of vegetation are cleared and not replaced.

Humberto Urriola Founder of Atlantis Corporation

Plants are up to 99 percent water with the soils they grow in permeable to water and air. “This allows the moisture, temperature and gases to circulate through, Urriola explains. “Yet this whole phenomenon has been lost in our super desert-like cities.” He says green cities are the basis of repairing the earth both “physically and spiritually”. During his university studies in the early 1970s Urriola had a major breakthrough in his achieving his vision.

“For thousands of years, human beings have been building cities contrary to principles for life on a harmonious planet,” he says.

At the time, rooftop gardens in the city were practically non-existent. This was largely because the original rooftop gardens were extremely heavy, expensive and cumbersome, requiring reinforced roof structures to support them.

“Without plants, cities become the source of heat and rising hot polluted air, resulting in global warming.”

Urriola’s spark of genius known as The Atlantis Drainage Cell changed all of that, allowing gardens to grow anywhere.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

35

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

36

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY

Educated Lighting ARCHITECT: Baldasso Cortese Words: Andre Tammes PHOTOGRAPHY: Peter Clarke


N OV/ DEC 2 0 1 8

37

I N FOLI N K - BP N

SPECIFY

As I write, I recall northern hemisphere school days and classrooms which I remember as being pleasant and happy spaces.

O

ne such overlooked wide playing fields surrounded by trees and distant rolling hills. It must have faced east because I remember morning sun and the changes of light within the view as the day progressed.

Lastly, a number of recent digital lighting developments have more readily enabled LED lighting to partially replicate the characteristics and circadian qualities of external daylight.

I also recall that the walls of the small room, accommodating some 25 of us, were painted in cheerful colours, predominantly yellow (this was a ‘progressive’ Rudolf Steiner school) and that plentiful daylight meant that ‘the lights’ were not needed during much of the year. However, in darker winter afternoons natural light was replaced by switching on ‘tube lights’ – late 1950s linear fluorescent fittings with basic diffusers.

In the USA the 2007 Heschong Mahone Daylighting Study of more than 21,000 students showed a dramatic correlation between daylit school environments and student performance, including:

When the time came to switch on the electric lighting, I recollect a sense of deprivation – not so much of there being less light (although, to a degree, that may have been the case) rather, it was the loss of some kind of indefinable quality and a resulting negative feeling. It was as if something vital had been drained away, leaving only token illumination. However, since my childhood, a number of inter-related things have happened. For example, in 2007 it was discovered that the retina of the eye comprises not only rods and cones, which provide visual information, but also ganglion cells which are highly sensitive to blue light. These non-visual cells contain melanopsin which, when stimulated by blue light, supresses the production of melatonin by the pineal gland. This hormone is central to our circadian rhythm, or biological clock, and determines our responses to the diurnal cycle. In short, melatonin induces sleep, while its absence under light conditions with a pronounced blue component, keeps us awake and alert. Furthermore, significant research proves the influence of light, particularly natural light, on the process of learning, in terms of information retention, attentiveness, reading speed and comprehension.

Natural Light

• 20 percent faster progression in mathematics • 26 percent faster progression in reading • I ncreased performance of 5-10 percent when students had window views A New Zealand ministry of Education survey includes the following quote from a pupil: “The best classroom in our school is room 10. I like it because at one side of the classroom are huge windows which let in a lot of natural light, and you can see all the peacefulness around you, which makes me feel comfortable.” - Year 6 female These results and responses are unsurprising when one considers that most teaching is done during daylight hours and that natural light has a high blue content. Naturally lit environments are conducive to maintenance of attention, mental energy, avoidance of mistakes and optimum learning and teaching performance. Additionally, because natural light availability is frequently associated with views, this form of lighting can result in a heightened sense of amenity and wellbeing. A further benefit of natural light relates to its potential to conserve energy when engineered to achieve an efficient balance in terms of thermal gain and associated levels of air conditioning. However, this benefit can only be fully achieved if the control of the electric lighting system is designed to respond automatically to varying levels of natural light within the building.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

38

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY

Although the principal requirement for the provision of natural light relates to the needs of students, it should be noted that teachers spend up to 90 percent of their day indoors; they too benefit from buildings with daylight, fresh air and access to views. So, the question arises as to how much available external daylight can realistically be employed within a school building. On average this might amount to 4-5 percent, but the more important point is how the light enters and distributes within the spaces. In this regard there are key design considerations: • D  irect sunlight is to be avoided – creates glare, heat, distraction and fading of materials • A  view of the sky is desirable to maintain contact with external conditions • W  indows with extended views provide valuable momentary breaks from concentrated work • A  s far as practicable, natural light should spread uniformly throughout the full depth of the space; in this regard the ratio of width to depth is critical • T  he distribution of natural light, either directly or by reflection, should ensure adequate lighting of desk and work surfaces, as well as walls and ceilings • R  eflection factors and colours of internal surfaces determine efficient distribution and utilisation of natural light – it is generally desirable to ensure values of 90 percent reflectivity for ceilings, 70 percent for walls and approximately 40 percent for flooring material • A  void inadvertent and distracting specular reflections from shiny surfaces and materials • F  ully, or partially, glazed internal walls enable ‘borrowed light’ and extended views • W  indows in spaces used for data projection are required to have shades or full black out Peter Brown, partner and head of education at architects Baldasso Cortese, is a strong exponent of natural light in the learning environment, and points to the use of clerestory windows and ‘light shelves’ as a good solution to enable daylight and sky views. He also advocates extending the classroom to external spaces when sufficient shelter is available. He says the importance of colour and its ability to modulate attention assists in way-finding, and notes that educational clients frequently have strong views about colour and participate in its selection.


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

39

I N FO LIN K - B P N

SPECIFY

There are downsides to badly engineered natural light. Extreme contrasts in light levels lead to visual fatigue and problems in adaptation between local tasks of reading or writing and their visual context. Students using computers experience eye strain if screens are viewed against the background of a bright window. Likewise, whiteboards or projection screens are required to be viewed without competing light from windows within the field of vision.

Electric Light While natural light is the ‘go to’ form of lighting in educational environments, it invariably needs to be supplemented by electric or ‘artificial’ light. The Australian lighting code AS/NZS 1680.2.3 recommendation for general classroom and lecture rooms lighting levels of 240 lux represents a basic starting point for what, in reality, is a complex process. When the Building Code of Australia, Part J6 lighting energy limit for classrooms of 8 watts/sqm is added to the mix, things become even more complex. The objectives of combined natural and electric lighting are: • An environment free of direct or indirect glare • G  ood facial visibility and modelling – students and teacher • H  orizontal and vertical illumination – walls, and what appears on them, are important • B  alanced brightness values enabling comfortable viewing of chalkboards, whiteboards, desktops, laptops and tablets: • P  rovision of high-quality lighting in any part of the space – teaching is no longer only carried out in a static, frontal, student/ teacher relationship

• H  igher illumination for students under the age of 6-8 who have not developed the levels of visual acuity of older students • S  uccessful visual fusion of natural and electric light The last of these objectives links to the potential to broadly mimic the changes in colour temperature of external natural light with that of the electric light. Conversely, it raises the opportunity to increase the colour temperature (more blue light) to maintain alertness or decrease it (less blue light) to create a gentler, more relaxed condition. This approach is referred to as ‘circadian’ or ‘human centric’ lighting and is based on the use of LED light sources operating with programmed control systems which respond to the time of day, external light conditions and/or direct touch panel commands. Although circadian lighting has been found to be beneficial in health and aged care environments it is only recently that it has started to be used in educational environments. While many manufacturers make ‘tunable white’ LED lighting equipment, such as Zumtobel, one company, Philips Lighting, markets a formalised circadian lighting system for schools known as SchoolVision, an installation which allows teachers to choose between four different light settings that mimic the natural patterns of daylight and help children stay focused and alert. The scenarios are referred to as: ‘normal’, ‘energy’, ‘focus’ and ‘calm’. The settings are used to calm down children when they are exceptionally energetic, wake them up when listless and help them concentrate when undertaking demanding tasks. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Philips Lighting architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/

• A  dequate levels of illumination for the task, be this at the horizontal desks or on the walls

Philips-Lighting Zumtobel zumtobel.com/au-en/ index.html Baldasso Cortese bcarch.net


w

Make your mark The INDE.Awards celebrates the Indo-Pacific region’s most progressive design and architecture. Establish your place among the region’s leading names. Entries open 29 November indeawards.com.au

IL1812_INDE_DPS_V3.indd 40

10/29/18 3:38 PM


“An extraordinary statement and a new dimension for Sydney’s Barangaroo precinct.” – INDE.Awards Official Jury 2018 Winner | The Social Space Barangaroo House, Collins and Turner

IL1812_INDE_DPS_V3.indd 41

10/29/18 4:02 PM


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

42

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY

Stop, look and listen: Why acoustics matter in classrooms WORDS: Bonnie van Dorp


NOV / DEC 2 0 1 8

43

INFOLINK - BPN

SPECIFY

There is a direct correlation between learning and teaching outcomes and the physical performance of a classroom. This is a fact that has been proven time and time again.

W

hile light, temperature and air quality are top of mind for both architects and educators alike, the acoustics of a classroom isn’t given nearly as much credence in the literature surrounding school learning spaces. This is interesting considering people are quick to complain about bad acoustics in such environments, but its supporting role is rarely highlighted. Sound affects us physiologically, psychologically, cognitively and behaviorally. The consequences of poor acoustic design in learning environments can lead to a number of problems for both educators and students alike. “Teaching and learning is a hotly contested subject at present, with more people invested in the debate around the evolution (or not) of pedagogies,” Dr. Terry Byers, a research fellow at Melbourne University tells Infolink.

“Proponents of the ongoing discussion have identified a change in a learning environment, from traditional classrooms to innovative learning environments (ILEs) as a means to support the shift.” “However, many do not contemplate how the notion of changing from conventional teacher led to student-centred learning activities, higher incidence of collaboration within and between classes affects the ‘noise profile’ of the space.” “This change, traditional to diversified teaching often leads to high noise levels, which has proven to increase distraction, stress and reduction of concentration.”

“Unlike tactile and visual engagement with digital and visual technologies, furniture and physical layout, acoustic treatments are somewhat hidden – or do not attract attention – within the fabric of the interior.” Acoustic solutions need to match an activity setting, he said.

How much noise is too much? According to Byers, about 16 - 18 percent of students have some level of hearing difficulty, and a mere 10-decibel increase in noise can cause a drop in exam performance. “As the distance of the teacher to the student increases, there is a decrease in what students can comprehend and hear.” “In the UK, Building Bulletin 93 states that teaching spaces explicitly intended for students with special hearing and communication needs – including autism – should not exceed 35 decibels as a measured average over 30 minutes,” Byers comments. “The work by Mealings, Demuth, Bucholz and Dillon in Australia found that open-plan and multiple class primary classes – even in quiet activity – easily exceeded this guideline. They, like others, found that as a learning space increases in volume, student speech perception decreased.” “Interestingly, the Association of Australian Acoustical Consultants (AAAC) Version 2 guidelines state that the internal ambient noise for classrooms and open-plan spaces should be around 35-40 decibels.”

The case against open plan learning environments The open plan trend has invaded every project you can imagine; from office spaces to homes, commercial buildings to dining establishments, and now we are seeing the emergence of this trend in classrooms as well. But does this layout provide the right conditions for teachers to teach and for students to learn? Byers says there is a limited evidence base that has evaluated the impact of different environments on academic results. However, he pointed to a study by Byers, Imms, Mahat, Liu and Knock which was “critical of the negative impact of open-plan spaces”. “Much of this research, conducted in the 1970’s suggested that primary age students in open-plan spaces performed lower on standardised testing than similar peers in conventional space. Which is surprising given the current investment in these spaces now.” “Emerging research from the Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change (ILETC) project found similar results within the Australian context when looking at primary school student performance,” Byers says. “It is only when these spaces are inhabited that sound issues appear. If we look at schools that have embraced the open-plan setting in both Australia and New Zealand, increased problems with noise is one of the most prominent complaints by teachers, students and parents.”


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

44

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY

OPENER: Atkar Group’s acoustic solutions to Victoria’s first vertical school, South Melbourne Primary School. THIS PAGE: Atkar Group supplied Au.diBoard AB2505/120 Perforated Plasterboard Ceiling Panels, complete with integrated acoustic backing for the O’Connell Street Public School in Parramatta, Sydney.


NOV/ D EC 2 0 1 8

45

INFOLINK - B P N

SPECIFY

RIGHT: Asona custom 1500 x 300mm Triton 15 acoustic ceiling panels.

“With a negative evidence-base, one would think that there should be a greater investigation of proponents of open-plan to justify their design agenda.” He says that the problem we see in the current trends in the design of school spaces is the assumption that larger areas support noisy, collaborative learning. “As space – and therefore its volume – gets larger, the acoustic treatment and not the segmentation of volume presented by walls mediates its performance. However, acoustics treatments in these spaces are an afterthought, with the acoustician working with set design.”

Putting acoustic solutions to the test USG Boral installs Asona Acoustical Ceiling Range at Unilodge In a bid to control the noise in the corridors at 55 Symonds Street Unilodge, a purpose-built student accommodation complex in Auckland, Asona collaborated with architects Ashton Mitchell, Hawkins Construction and Alpha Interiors to install an acoustic solution to control excess sound in the corridors. Asona produced custom 1500 x 300mm Triton 15 acoustic ceiling panels, which extended the full width of the corridor. To control the reverberation in the shared dining/study hall, Triton Cloud panels in 25, 50 and 75mm thicknesses were equipped. This solution not only assisted in reducing the reverberation but also ‘added drama and interest’ to the ceiling. Triton Baffle Beam 40mm in white Sonatex was incorporated to follow the curved wall leading into the study/dining area, mirroring the vertical wooden slats of the wall panelling providing additional acoustic control.

For the main feature wall separating the Study Lounge and Games Room, Asona manufactured and installed Triton Fabwall 40 in varying lengths wrapped in Textilla Bond-Leaf fabric with a 40mm reveal around each panel. The varied lengths and wide reveals softened this two-storey wall, which if tightly fitted together would have been overpowering. “Selecting the right acoustical treatment can be difficult, environments often require a combination of high sound isolation, damage resistance and reduced construction time,” USG Boral category manager Susan Lawrence tells Infolink. “The two important properties to keep in mind when choosing acoustical ceiling and wall panels are Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) and Ceiling Attenuation Class (CAC).” Atkar Group provides acoustic solutions to Victoria’s first vertical school There hasn’t quite been anything like South Melbourne Primary School before in the state of Victoria, but Atkar Group was up for the challenge to provide a solution to control excess noise between the six storeys. Working closely with architects Hayball and ADCO Constructions, Atkar Group was able to supply Au.diBoard AB2505/120 Perforated Plasterboard Ceiling Panels, complete with integrated acoustic backing.

Decor Systems fits O’Connell Street Public School with Vogl perforated plasterboard The O’Connell Street Public School in Parramatta, Sydney opened its doors to 1,000 students earlier this year. It is the largest public primary school in New South Wales. To address the issue of excess noise in classrooms, TZG Architects worked with Decor Systems to come up with a solution to address the acoustic needs of the space. Bright and bold, Vogl plasterboards were chosen for their unique aesthetic and acoustic performance. Mitchell Faulkes, senior project consultant, Decor Systems said the drawcard for Vogl ceilings is that they are “seamless”. “There are no visible joints from panel to panel, the perforations flow right through the entire ceiling without a break.” Other major drawcards of the product include a crack-free guarantee for 50 years, it is group 1 fire rated and can be specified impact-resistant, making it perfect for multi-purpose halls. The O’Connell Street school site has a significant cultural history, with some of the buildings dating to 1836 when it was Australia’s first large private boarding school. n

The solution was found to be both ‘attractive and cost-effective’. Another key element was that Au.diBoard also delivered on the need for a Group 1 Fire Rated ceiling. SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Decor Systems

“Correct installation is critical to acoustic absorption panels achieving their desired result,” Atkar Group architectural consultant Matt Lihou explains.

architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/DecorSystems Atkar Group architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/atkar USG Boral architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/usg-boral


N OV/ D E C 2 0 1 8

46

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY

Get the Information you need AustraliA’s leading source of new & exciting building and Architectural products

showcase index

2

ways to use infolink:

ONLINE

e-newsletter

visit architectureanddesign .com.au/products to download information and/or enquire directly to the advertiser

subscribe to architecture & design newsletter & get new products & news sent directly to your email

PAGE CODE

ACOUSTICS Modular acoustic fins

48

236AY

48

232AY

CEILINGS, INTERNAL WALL MATERIALS & PARTITIONING 47

227AY

Timber ceiling and wall panels

48

233AY

Premium ceiling and wall panels

49

238AY

48

231AY

Anti-slip floor treatment

49

240AY

Designer carpet collection

49

242AY

Commercial flooring underlay

50

261AY

49

241AY

49

239AY

49

243AY

47

228AY

50

258AY

50

256AY

226AY

Instant boiling and cold water mixer taps LANDSCAPING & OUTDOOR Outdoor shower unit

COATINGS & PAINT FINISHES 48

235AY

LIghting & lighting accessories Solar lighting device

DOORS & HARDWARE High-performance sliding door

48

237AY

Stainless steel security door

50

257AY

SECURITY Security bollards SHELVING & STORAGE

EXTERIOR WALL MATERIALS Designer steel cladding

47

229AY

Concrete architectural bricks

48

234AY

Non-combustible aluminium cladding

49

244AY

Non-combustible aluminium façade

49

245AY

Modular concrete wall system

50

255AY

Timber-look non-combustible aluminium cladding

50

260AY

fire protection Fire detectors

Engineered hardwood flooring

KITCHENS & KITCHEN EQUIPMENT

Verticle garden system

Anti-corrosion protection solutions

PAGE CODE

FLOORS & FLOORING

BATHROOMS & LAUNDRIES High speed automatic hand dryer

showcase index

50

259AY

Designer wall cabinet lift system STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS Tensile architectural hardware WINDOWS AND GLAZING Frameless glass louvre system

47

Mesh laminated glass

48

230AY

Energy efficient glass

50

254AY


n ov/ d e c 2 0 1 8

47

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY

DISCOVER THE MINIMAL MAINTENANCE VERTICAL GARDEN The Atlantis vertical gardens are ideal for foyers, entrances, outdoor features or wherever your creativity leads to.

LF550 FrameLess gLass Louvre system by ebsa Introducing the LF550 frameless glass louvre system......for when size does matter. • large frameless blades up to 600mm high • continuous glass spans of up to 3300mm • end pivoting with concealed mechanisms (in closed position) • performance glazing with blades from 12mm up to 21.52mm thick • manual or automated versions with option to integrate with BMS and Fire

The Atlantis Gro-Wall® systems are highly water efficient and require minimal maintenance. The Atlantis Gro-Wall® systems all provide generous living room for root systems of 6 litre capacity and feature built in water reservoirs for plant uptake and effective removal of excess water. In addition Atlantis provides horticulturist growing media specifically designed for vertical gardens and plant longevity.

this is not your average louvre!

Our vertical gardens systems provide targeted watering control of individual plants, maximum water efficiency, last minute design changes and easy access to irrigation components.

Contact ebsa 1300 327 200 ebsa.com.au

Contact Atlantis 1300 38 28 38 atlantiscorporation.com.au

000AX 226AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

227AY 000AX

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

Protecting star casinos Leda’s engineers have assisted in designing, manufacturing and installing high security crash rated bollards for the entrance areas at the star casinos in sydney and gold coast. at the sydney casino we were faced with the added task of disguising the security bollards. This was done by fitting stainless steel sleeves with the star logo engraved on the lid.They were finished with a bronze metallic finish. In addition LED lighting was incorporated in to the base of the bollard sleeves resulting in an aesthetically attractive outcome. in the case of the gold coast casino it was simply a security upgrade at the front entrance for the recent commonwealth games. the front facade and main entrance of the building was secured by installation of 22 Leda certified and tested shallow mount bollards fitted with stainless steel sleeves.

the Fielders Finesse® range includes five unique profiles, Boulevard™, Shadowline 305™, Prominence™, Grandeur® and Neo Roman™ that have been designed to combine the aesthetic appeal, durability and flexibility of steel cladding. All profiles are available in a diverse range of materials including traditional COLORBOND® steel and high-end COLORBOND® steel Metallic and Matt finishes, offering options to suit any style. PROJECT: Opal Aged Care Facility, Carine WA ARCHITECT: Silver Thomas Hanley BUILDER: BGC Constructions Feature Product: Finesse® grandeur® Contact Fielders 1800 182 255 Fielders.com.au/finesse

contact Leda security 1300 780 450 ledasecurity.com.au

000AX 228AY

Fielders Finesse made For style

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS architectureanddesign.com.au/Products

229AY 000AX

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS architectureanddesign.com.au/Products


n ov/ d e c 2 0 1 8

48

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY SEFAR® Architecture Vision - mesh laminated glass SEFAR Architecture Vision is a quality aluminium mesh laminated between two panes of glass resulting in decorative panels like no other. The mesh comes in various colours and densities for different looks and levels of privacy and can be teamed up with regular glass, low iron or on the mirror back.

230AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

TURBO-Slim™: High speed automatic hand dryer Only 102 mm deep, this high-speed dryer can fit in most confined spaces. Quick drying with infrared sensor, auto-resetting thermostat and adjustable air speed and temperature. On/off heating options. Dryer automatically shuts off after time-out. Available in white, satin stainless steel and matte black.

232AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Architectural Concrete Brick With a variety of textural and colour options, Adbri’s hard wearing concrete Architectural Bricks will improve the street appeal of residential, multi-residential and commercial projects.

234AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Frontier™ Acoustic Fins Frontier™ revolutionises what it means to have beautifully designed acoustics. With modular fins that can be arranged and spaced in countless formations, Frontier™ is available in five styles and is designed for targeted sound absorption for the commercial, education and hospitality sectors.

236AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Par-ky prime grade planks & herringbone timber flooring Havwoods’ Par-ky planks and herringbone blocks are crafted for exceptional value, making a genuine engineered hardwood floor an option on even the tightest of budgets. This pricefriendly, stress-resistant timber flooring is available in an array of exceptional colours and finishes.

231AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Screenwood Ceiling and Wall Panels Screenwood Ceiling and Wall Panels add warmth and texture to both interior and exterior surfaces, through the use of natural timber. The panels offer style and a timeless effect, topped off with the highest quality finish.

233AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Anti-Corrosion Warranty Systems for Mild Steel from Interpon Powder Coatings Interpon Powder Coatings offers the first concise range of high performance corrosion protection coating systems for the Australasian powder coat finishing industry.

235AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

AGS 900 series highperformance sliding door Designed to deliver unrivalled performance and design flexibility, the AGS 900 series high-performance sliding door is the latest generation of commercial door development. The AGS 900 series highperformance sliding door comes with thick and double glazing options and is tested to meet cyclonic requirements.

237AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS


n ov/ d e c 2 0 1 8

49

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY Ultraflex Ultraslat™ UltraSlat™ panels are the perfect solution for premium ceiling and integrated wall systems. Offering custom, acoustic, fire resistant and pre-finished options, UltraSlat™ panels are the ideal solution for your next project.

238AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Grip Guard AntiSlip treatment for tiled and stonebased floors Grip Guard anti-slip treatment increases the wet slip resistance of tiled and stone-based floors. The treatment microscopically modifies the internal pore structure of the tiles to reduce the risk of aquaplaning - the cause of slip accidents.

240AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Customisable Outdoor Shower Unit with Integrated Signage The Aquafil FlexiShower is a 2100mm-high outdoor shower station designed specially for coastal public environments. The product can be configured with one shower head space (single sided) or two (double sided), and comes with two anti-bacterial bottle refill points as standard.

239AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Apartment living solutions from Multitap®3N1 The new Multitap3N1 is a standard kitchen mixer tap that also offers the convenience of instant steaming hot water. Three functions in one hence removing the need for a kettle and freeing up valuable bench space.

241AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Beton Collection by Carpets Inter

DayRay - flexible day lighting

Béton is inspired by the natural organic surface of freshly laid concrete. With a subtle interaction of color tone, the collection provides an undulating texture for an aesthetically neutral backdrop to compliment any interior.

DayRay™ harvests daylight by the conversion of solar energy via a Solar Panel on the roof to drive a daylight simulator LED array on the ceiling. This new green technology is known as a Hybrid Solar Lighting Device or HSLD. Available in either a 30W or 50W solar panels.

242AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

DecoClad noncombustible aluminium cladding

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

STRYUM noncombustible aluminium cladding

DecoClad pairs the proven strength of aluminium with the Super Durable DecoWood powder coating to create enduring beauty. The marine grade material makes DecoClad the ultimate exterior cladding for enjoying in almost any environment.

244AY

243AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Stryüm intelligent aluminium façade is available in a range of high-quality plate aluminium façade panels, providing a reliable and attractive, modern facade alternative to other commercial cladding products on the market today.

245AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS


n ov/ d e c 2 0 1 8

50

I N FO L I N K - B P N

SPECIFY Commercial and Residential Energy Efficient Glass from Viridian Virdian supplies energy efficient, hard coat performance products for the residential, commercial, industrial markets. Being a member of the Green Building Council of Australia, they have implemented initiatives to assist in meeting their ‘Target of Zero Waste’ and exceed EPA standards wherever possible.

254AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Tensile architecture hardware Manufactured in Denmark, Blue Wave delivers the highest standard of product quality, with the ability to work with your engineers to custom design unique fittings for tensile structures.

256AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

MaxiWall: The future in walling is here MaxiWall is a new, costcompetitive Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) from Big River Group, available nationwide in Australia. The use of MaxiWall panels leads to faster construction times and decreased site costs, as their light weight makes them safer to work with and easier to install.

255AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Crimsafe iQ™ the strongest stainless steel security door in Australia Crimsafe iQ™ is the strongest stainless steel security screen door in Australia. With the patented technology and smooth profile of Crimsafe Ultimate as its foundation, Crimsafe iQ™ adds anti-jemmy heavy duty hinges and a wider, stronger, patented frame.

257AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

AVENTOS lift systems for wall cabinets

Fire safety solutions from Siemens

AVENTOS lift systems bring ease of motion and is the ideal solution for any wall cabinet. With AVENTOS every wall cabinet opens effortlessly, even wide and heavy, open with the utmost ease.

Siemens fire detectors offer multilayer signal analysis and intelligent analysis algorithms (ASAtechnology). Detectors with the innovative ASAtechnology provide intelligent detection of smoke, heat and CO in any environment, without false alarms.

258AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Alu Selekta: A new standard of durability Urbanline Alu Selekta is an innovative new product made from highly durable aluminium. This non-combustible cladding looks just like timber and works interchangeably with Euro Selekta profiles for a seamless look from top to bottom.

260AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

259AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

Dunlop commercial underlay provides exceptional durability & support for high traffic areas With frequent foot traffic, it’s important that commercial environments provide flooring that lasts. Dunlop Underlay is a market leader in the development of carpet and hard flooring underlay.

261AY

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS


ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU Combining the best in new projects, industry news and expert commentary with the country’s most comprehensive archive of new products, suppliers and their educational resources. Go online today and discover what’s new.


ARCPANEL, the new name for Ritek Roof Systems. Photograph by Adam Sebastian West

Call us 1300 200 004 Visit us arcpanel.com.au

000693_ARCPANEL A&D INFOLINK MAGAZINE FP AD FINAL.indd 1

17/10/18 2:43 pm

Profile for Indesign Media Asia Pacific

INFOLINK |BPN November_December 2018  

INFOLINK |BPN November_December 2018