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PERKINS + WILL SPONSORED STUDIO 2016

ICE

Ice proposes ways to consider anew the built and unbuilt worlds. Drawing broadly on cultural, material, and technological concerns – myths of the Canadian North, our shared experiences of the cold, the pressing realities of climate change, or rising geopolitical tensions around the Arctic – the Master of Architecture studio explores the environmental, physical, and spatial properties of ice in order to advance new scapes. In our day and age, does ice immediately conjure dire predictions of irreversible ecological catastrophe – or can its properties be harnessed to produce meaningful social-ecological relations (associations that may have existed in societies well before the advent of modernity)? As such, can ice help us to define notions on time, of things unfolding slowly (cyclical experiences of seasons) or accelerating quickly (melting polar caps) or occurring suddenly (Russia planting its flag under the North Pole in August 2007)? Do these considerations lead to immediate (and necessarily short-lived) solutions or long-term (and possibly lasting) results? What could architectures of ice look like – will they be rooted in history or project the future? Do we imagine these works in far-flung places or can their effects be discovered much closer to home?

Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism


ICE STUDIO JANUARY - APRIL 2016

Inderbir Singh Riar, Assistant Professor Taylor Balodis Gregory Culos Seyedeh-Ghazal Dehghany Carly Farmer Gandhi Habash Kelly Hann Tella Irani Shemirani Andrej Iwanski Jean Olivier Larocque Matthew Lerch Adam Paquette Wendy Richards Evan Taylor Ryan Thorne


The Ice studio began in January 2016 by pursuing two concurrent comprehensive investigations: first, ways of thinking, or research on environmental, social, and technological conditions of ice encountered in local, regional, national, or global spheres as well as in multiple histories across different cultures; second, ways of making, or aesthetic representations of ice as material form and spatial phenomenon. Drawing on these studies, students considered architectures of ice. When necessary, students remained attentive to contemporary politics surrounding their work. Critical to this effort was approaching environments of ice not as tabulae rasae but as vast, complex worlds with deep meanings and histories including those of indigenous peoples. At the same time, ice provoked explorations at molecular levels or at the expanse of the solar system. In other instances, notions on time became paramount (for example, the differences between, say, melting and cryonics). Scientific, literary, and artistic narratives – whether ancient practices of alchemy or the “crystal” visions of early twentieth-century Expressionism – offered countless ways to register the effects of ice on human consciousness. Projects could, therefore, respond to greater dimensions of life – namely, a vast biodiversity of fauna and flora that easily eclipses needs of human habitation and projections of the built world. Throughout, the studio considered the degrees to which current discourses on the Anthropocene are really the truest measures of our epoch and future. The Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism wishes to thank Perkins+Will (Ottawa and Toronto) for sponsoring the studio. This commitment to our Master of Architecture program underscores how design research can shape polemical ideas in the university and the profession. Inderbir Singh Riar, Assistant Professor


“The sorceress saw him go. She ran into the water to catch him but when she could not reach him she slashed at the granite rock with her ulu as easily as if she were cutting meat. But Kivioq harpooned a stone and it smashed. He warned her that he would have harpooned her in the same way. She asked him to become her husband, but he refused. She was so maddened with rage that she threw her ulu at him and turned all the water to ice.” Inuit legend

“‘My reign is not yet over’ (these words were legible in one of these inscriptions); ‘you live, and my power is complete. Follow me; I seek the everlasting ices of the north, where you will feel the misery of cold and frost to which I am impassive.’” The Creature addressing Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818)

“It had grown uncommonly sultry and dark when at midday, after resting on the beach, I climbed to Dunwich Heath, which lies forlorn over the sea. The history of how that melancholy region came to be is closely connected not only with the nature of the soil and the influence of a maritime climate but also, far more decisively, with the steady and advancing destruction, over a period of many centuries and indeed millennia, of the dense forests that extended over the entire British Isles after the last Ice Age.” W.G. Sebald, The Rings of Saturn (1995)


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Floe and Flow Adam Paquette

Sea ice, or floe, covers less than half the area than it used to during the Arctic summer. Although ice naturally expands and contracts with the flow of time, estimates predict that the Arctic Ocean could be ice free by 2030. The objective is to stop this thaw cycle by strengthening multi-year ice. A futuristic network of mechanical and technological systems will stabilize sea ice melt during summer months while promoting freeze growth during the winter. While harnessing renewable energy, the machines collect and reuse melt water from the surface of multi-year ice, alleviating melt ponds. The shadows cast by the machines structures will result in pedestaling – a natural effect caused by objects shading ice and snow that frequently occurs around abandoned Arctic structures – thereby eventually sculpting the landscape. Independent vessels can also be deployed, extending the structures’ healing radii. The project is designed by a process of deconstructing and reassembling mechanical parts in order to imagine visionary architecture and technology to heal the Arctic.

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Nomadic Infrastructure Gandhi Habash

This project responds to issues surrounding food scarcity in the north. A lightweight, deployable structure facilitates the production and storage of food, among other functions, in proximity to remote northern communities and scientific research stations. The self-sustaining system offers a means by which greenhouse vegetables and aquaculture can be harvested and stored both terrestrially and aquatically with minimal need for heavy equipment and servicing, factors which contribute to the exorbitant cost of living in the north. Deployed aquatically and installed along coastal areas, the project offers a semi-permanent solution that facilitates the creation of new transportation corridors along current and future shipping routes in the surrounding oceans. The design explores structural skins, which not only serve to control its interior climate but also offer the potential to harvest renewable sources of energy. The system receives power from the sun, with solar film integrated into the intermediate layer of skin. Further potential exists to harvest tidal energy within the aquatic pods. Redundancy of structure and automation in deployment were of utmost importance; therefore the skin is designed as multiple layers of flexible material that allow the pods to be self-supporting, while maintaining interior pressure and the shape of its space. The inflation procedure would occur autonomously.

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Hexagonal Modular Silo Kelly Hann

The objective for this project was to design a module that could relieve several crucial issues, including food scarcity, in northern Canada as well as in many areas across the Arctic Circle. The design proposes a shell that houses different programs and allows for expansion. The result takes the form of a hexagon, a geometric form found in nature that also appears in the smallest instances of ice as snowflakes. The shape of the hexagon allows each shell to attach together and to develop into infinitely different clusters, thus letting forms to adapt to every site condition. The silos would be built offsite and shipped to each destination. The modularity of the project greatly reduces construction costs in the Arctic and allows for quick completion. Each silo is 4.5m wide and contains programs such as algae biodiesel production, hydroponics, water desalination, and housing. In northern Nunavut, many residents find themselves in poor living conditions: housing does not accommodate residents positively, food and water prices are twice as high as the rest of Canada, and most settlements rely on diesel-generators to produce electricity. For a proposed implementation of the project, a site was chosen on the northern tip of Baffin Island. The town of Nanisivik was abandoned after the mine closed in 2002. Yet many housing sites and a port remain. The cluster formations are derived from wind data acquired at the site; the data shows a complete change in wind direction throughout the year. Therefore a form would be needed to direct wind from all directions to certain points where it can be harvested. This resulted in a stepped-pyramid profile that would accelerate and capture wind when it moves over the many edges as it rises.

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Tension; Suspension; Oscillation Wendy Richards

Initial investigations looked at melting glaciers on Baffin Island that are contributing to climate change, including sea level rise and increasing ocean temperatures. A series of photographic studies explored melting ice into salt water, and how a suspended layer of fresh water is able to trap the denser salt water below. Inspired by the concept of suspension, a structure designed to harvest this fresh water melt is hung between massive cliffs at a fjord, where glacier runoff meets the ocean. With the high cost of food in the north, the structure aims to grow vegetation using the collected water, with the goal of distributing food to the communities along the shipping route that passes the fjord. The project became very much an investigation into parametric structural forms, using modelling tools to inform the design. The structure is composed of two undulating systems of tri-strand braids (for structural integrity and to resist overturning). One acts as structural support and serves to transport and to store water; it intersects the other system; which houses the programmed spaces. To provide energy, including light sources during the dark months, cables, which tie the structure back to the rock, oscillate in the strong winds, thereby converting energy from motion.

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Design Boat for the Arctic Cultural Landscape Carly Farmer

This project seeks to address issues in housing and infrastructure in Nunavut by focusing on education as means of cultural exchange. Since many of the existing issues are the result of “solutions” imposed by the government, real answers must come from within the community as a grassroots approach. The question becomes how people in Nunavut and other northern communities can build education and skills in ways that are culturally relevant. This project proposes a travelling design clinic or “design boat”. It offers courses in studio design, building technology, trades, and cultural histories. The flexible certificate and diploma programs build practical skills to address immediate needs and to inspire further pursuit of architectural education. Furthermore, it is a place of reciprocal learning and cultural exchange between northern and southern Canadian designers. Studies of Baffin Island and the community of Pangnirtung provide context to understand how the design boat integrates with the unique cultural landscape of the Arctic. Each summer the boat travels to a different community; during the winter, it is locked in the sea ice where it literally becomes part of that community for the season. The design of the hull is inspired by both traditional kayaks and icebreakers to withstand the harsh climate. The double hull design provides stability to facilitate design work and operation of machinery in the wood and metal shops. The bridge connecting the two hulls creates the social space of the boat, symbolizes connections with the community, and provides a sheltered outdoor space for various activities and events.

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Anthropo-Form Jean Olivier Laroque and Matthew Lerch

Anthropo-form exists 30,000 years from now. Humans have left Earth. They are travelling to Europa, a moon of Jupiter. Here, they will harness a new world from the ice. Through initial explorations in casting aluminium inside massive blocks of ice, the project developed a lexicon of objects depicting the conditions in which they were formed. In response to the discovered material language and process, the work explores an interplanetary cataclysmic architecture. Set 30,000 years in the future, the project narrative depicts events leading to the colonization of other ice worlds. The five scenes depict the events of departure, satellite-form, lunar-form, arrival, and finally anthropo-form. The narrative concludes with a city-scaled architecture inspired by the initial properties of the material explorations and rendered in a series of large-scale drawings, made by digital and analog means, extending the spatial qualities of this ice world architecture.

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Final Review

Safdar Abidi, Principal, Perkins+Will Sandra Dyck, Director, Carleton University Art Gallery Andrew Frontini, Design Director, Perkins+Will Jay Lim, Senior Associate, Perkins+Will Quilian Riano, 2016 Azrieli Visiting Critic; DSGN AGNC, New York David K. Ross, artist, INFER, Montreal Jill Stoner, Director, Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism Fiona Wright, Carleton University Art Gallery

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Andrew Frontini (Perkins+Will, Toronto), Jill Stoner (Director, Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism), Fiona Wright (Carleton University Art Gallery), student, Sandra Dyck (Director, Carleton University Art Gallery)

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Jay Lim (Perkins+Will, Ottawa), David K. Ross (artist, INFER, Montreal), Fiona Wright (Carleton University Art Gallery), Andrew Frontini (Perkins+Will, Toronto), Sandra Dyck (Director, Carleton University Art Gallery) Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism


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Andrew Frontini (Perkins+Will, Toronto), Inderbir Singh Riar (Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism), David K. Ross (artist, INFER, Montreal), Safdar Abidi (Perkins+Will, Toronto)

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Ice Safdar Abidi (Perkins+Will, Toronto), Inderbir Singh Riar (Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism)

Quilian Riano (DSGN AGNC, New York), Fiona Wright (Carleton University Art Gallery), Sandra Dyck (Director, Carleton University Art Gallery), Andrew Frontini (Perkins+Will, Toronto) Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism


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Longyearbyen Terminal Building Taylor Balodis

On the Norwegian Archipelago of Svalbard, the Longyearbyen Terminal Building seeks to amalgamate various programmatic opportunities under one roof as the gateway for arrival and departure to the world’s northernmost permanent settlement. Initially a company coal mining town, Svalbard, one of the most preserved landscapes on Earth, now serves as a critical research destination and base point for North Pole expeditions that have also become increasingly popular for year-round tourism. The long, linear building is divided into several zones that accommodate the town’s projected increase of tourists, researchers, business, and supplemental cargo relative to their anticipated path of travel through the site and building. Driven by the scale of the mountainous topography, the building captures particular vistas in the form of long ramped promenades and framed atrium spaces that connect sea to scape. Inspired by the local vernacular and historical mining roots of the aerial coal tramway system, the proposal engages the water’s edge through a primary structural corridor, connecting interior levels and different areas of density. The ecologically light footprint of the building lifts off the ground, allowing for moments passing underneath to the dockside and engaging the landscape beyond. Stilting (with piles) keeps the building away from the active melt layer of permafrost to prevent flooding and sinking.

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R 11.50 m

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TOURISM / VISITORS RESEARCH / EXPEDITION SHIPPING / GOODS

Master of Architecture Studio PATHS OF TRAVEL

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TOURISM / VISITORS RESEARCH / EXPEDITION SHIPPING / GOODS

PATHS OF TRAVEL TOURISM / VISITORS RESEARCH / EXPEDITION SHIPPING / GOODS

PROGRAM ZONES ZONE 1 RESEARCH FACILITIES EXPEDITION CENTRE CAFE / LOUNGE

ZONE 2 STORE NORSKE COAL / MINING OPERATIONS MECHANIC SHOP / MAINTENANCE FACILITIES STORAGE FACILITIES HOTEL

PROGRAM ZONES ZONE 1 RESEARCH FACILITIES EXPEDITION CENTRE CAFE / LOUNGE

ZONE 3 TOURISM INFORMATION CENTRE

ZONE 2 STORE NORSKE COAL / MINING OPERATIONS MECHANIC SHOP / MAINTENANCE FACILITIES PROGRAM ZONES

ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCY OFFICE RESTAURANT HOTEL

STORAGE FACILITIES

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HOTEL ZONE 1

PORT AUTHORITY OFFICE / CONTROL TERMINAL

RESEARCH FACILITIES

NORWEGIAN COASTAL ADMINISTRATION

EXPEDITION CENTRE CAFE / LOUNGE

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TOURISM INFORMATION CENTRE

PROGRAM ZONES STORAGE FACILITIES HOTEL

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RESEARCH FACILITIES EXPEDITION CENTRE

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PORT AUTHORITY OFFICE / CONTROL TERMINAL NORWEGIAN COASTAL ADMINISTRATION

ZONE 2 STORE NORSKE COAL / MINING OPERATIONS

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TOURISM INFORMATION CENTRE

STORAGE FACILITIES HOTEL

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CIRCULATION ZONE 4 DENSITY AND PATHS OF GATHERING

PORT AUTHORITY OFFICE / CONTROL TERMINAL NORWEGIAN COASTAL ADMINISTRATION

ZONE 3 TOURISM INFORMATION CENTRE ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCY OFFICE RESTAURANT HOTEL

ZONE 4 PORT AUTHORITY OFFICE / CONTROL TERMINAL

CIRCULATION DENSITY AND PATHS OF GATHERING

CIRCULATION DENSITY AND PATHS OF GATHERING

CIRCULATION DENSITY AND PATHS OF GATHERING

ATRIUMS FRAMED VISTAS OF LANDSCAPE

ATRIUMS FRAMED VISTAS OF LANDSCAPE

ATRIUMS FRAMED VISTAS OF LANDSCAPE

ATRIUMS FRAMED VISTAS OF LANDSCAPE

NORWEGIAN COASTAL ADMINISTRATION


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Scientific Village in Antarctica Tella Irani Shemirani

The project proposes a new international scientific research station at the South Pole. It replaces scattered and obsolete facilities. Housing 50-200 people, the 15,000 square metre facility is designed to respect extreme weather conditions: 100 days of sun; an immense and flat landscape; long, dark winters but 24 hours of sun in the summer; and wind speeds of 200 miles per hour. The aim was, therefore, to find opportunities in the site in order to create a functional, sustainable, adaptive design, based on environmental changes. The resulting shape, based on solar and wind studies, minimizes resistance to natural forces while capturing wind to generate energy. The skin is a nanotechnology carbon combined with polymer; it is embedded with solar collectors in large aperture-like openings (operated by robotic motors) allowing sunlight to enter deep into the structure. Windows are covered with smart tint film in order to control light coming into buildings and to convert energy to electricity by digital means. Throughout, the use of environmental technologies and respect for the Antarctic landscape and its natural forces aims at improving the circadian rhythm of people living and working inside the research station.

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LensSpace Seyedeh-Ghazal Dehghani

The project, set in the town of Nuuk in Greenland, is composed of panels that in their positioning follow the natural contours of the rocky landscape. Reflecting the appreciation of the lines and characters of the landscape, it is a project that in orientation and scale appears subordinate to its surroundings. Openness, light, views and flexibility are the primary values guiding the design. By using a series of panels, walls, windows, and doors, Lensscape aims not only to frame the horizon and the ocean beyond but to create an open exhibition space to showcase the rich culture of Nuuk. The contrasts of nature – snow, ice, rocks, moss, blue sky, sun, night, day, birds, and other animals – are brought into the panel-scape by the way the built elements are arranged in relation to each other. Vegetation is used to create contemplative spaces within the pathways. The result is collections of small, well-defined and delicate landscape works linked by pathways in a magnificent and vast natural setting.

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ShatterShard Order Gregory Culos

“To demand the creating hand of man to shape a meaningful entity out of the chaos of the elemental forms” Wassily Luckhardt

A crystalline shard brings forth the next ice age. Glacial wastes envelop what once was. A clean slate, brought upon by decimation, offers the chance to rebuild and harness the elemental form of ice. The sandstone block of ancient times is now replaced by solid ice and the crystalline fragment. Peoples congregate in hope of establishing a new world influenced by the technologies of past and present: society as master builder. The aesthetic and style is pure speculation; the existence of beauty in translucent form is what is desired. A melding of styles and methods throughout human history creates a plethora of fantastical worlds. These dramatic landscapes and poetic cityscapes reach to the highest peaks and into the deepest caverns of the new world. The glacial wastes become tamed and manipulated to the will of men and women as a new outlook emerges from the ashes of the old world. The elemental spirit of ice – the crystalline shard – is treated as a deity. The built environment is revered and given a soul that was absent. The ShatterShard Order is born.

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Healing the Atmosphere Ryan Thorne

For many, the Arctic is seen as an “other� world that has real effects on local and global environments. Today, the Arctic requires a healing of its environment. Healing Atmospheres are new technologies that implement current research in physical chemistry and lightweight structures. Flying-floating kites provide surfaces that use sunlight to convert atmospheric carbon dioxide to ozone, which, in turn, responds to ozone depletion. Economies of scale constructed with low embodied energy reduce the carbon footprint of an immense landing platform that sits lightly on the landscape. Once a site is chosen, the space frame is deployable within an adaptable structural framework. From it, kites are launched day and night, year-round. The floating, sailing infrastructure serves to repair the damage done to this precious and seemingly infinite environment, which regulates the temperate of the world.

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The Technopocene Sagas Andrej Iwanski and Evan Taylor

Technopocene Adj. 1. Of, relating to, or denoting a future geological age foreseen as the period of mechomical-technological activity becoming the dominant influence on land forming, climate change, and environmental processes.

Technopocene Sagas explores the potential realities of socio-environmental machines. The allegorical nature allows us to use ice as a medium to explore Post-Anthropocene futures through emergent and fantastical technologies. We pose a multitude of mythico-technological projections that will explore understandings of architecture in the distant future. Technopocene Sagas explores the cultural, environmental, and technological aspects of the Anthropocene. The relationship between humans and nature is situated through narratives, stories, delineating a number of post-anthropocentric events. Technopocentric describes a category of “godlike” machines directly resulting from human intervention in nature’s cyclical processes. These machines echo the geomorphological capabilities of ice on the earth’s surface. Each saga reflects a certain stage of the Technopocenic era, factual as well as fictional. The opening episode addresses the concept of “first contact” and how human and nature coexisted. The second episode explores humanity’s quest to conquer nature. The third and fourth episodes revolve around humans’ inability to conquer nature – the loss of control and realization of the impact we have made – and the eventual rejection of humanity within nature.

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CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

23.0000° N, 13.0000° E

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200 B.C.E

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43.49” W

13°43’46” E

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23°10’51” N

23°10’51” N

10.57” N

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10.63” N

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10.68” N

10.68” N

43.55” W

43.49” W

13°43’46” E

43.38” E

43.32” E

PLAINS OF GLASS ICE STUDIO Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

The Plains of Few Hills are located on a planet whose oceans have long recessed to its molten core. Mineral deposits from the water have created an extremely hard surface that is as clear as crystal. Cryovolcanos occasionally erupt below the crystalline surface causing large chunks of minerals to be displaced across the Plains. Due to these active cryovolcanos it is known to rain shards of crystal.

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25°41’26� W

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3’19� N 45’21� N

42’29� S

42’29� S

51’29� S

45’17� N

45’17� N

42’03� S

42’03� S

51’03� S

51’03� S

45.13� N

45.13� N

41.77� S

41.77� S

50.77� S

50.77� S

67’32� N

45’21� N

67’25� N

67’25� N

67.18� N

67.18� N

67’32� N

51’29� S

5m

5m

5m

3’23� N

3’23� N

3.29� N

3.29� N

3°3’36� N

3°3’36� N 51°67’06� N

3.41� N

3.41� N

3.47� N

3.47� N

3.52� N

3.52� N

15.72� W

15.69� W

60°15’65� W

15.58� W

51°67’06� N

41.25� S

50.25� S

50.25� S

66.56� N

66.56� N

45.01� N

45.01� N

41.02� S

41.02� S

50.02� S

50.02� S

66.51� N

66.51� N

44.58� N

44.58� N

40.78� S

40.78� S

49.78� S

69.32� W

69.26� W

4°69’19� W

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

0M

150M

0M

250M

55.14� W

54.57� W

54.51� W

23.52� E

0M

150M

0M

250M

39.39� W

5° 12' 39.6" W

0M

150M

0M

250M

49.78� S

41.52� W

23.00� E

47’39�

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

894 A.D.

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

0M

150M

0M

250M

27’9� S

4.46� W

41.00� W

21’29�

5’59� N

12’33� N

21’03� N

5’53� N

12.37� N

20.77� N

5’48� N

12’26�

41.13� W

41.05� W

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

/ 

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

L O C AT I O N 76°10’53� N, 14°39’31� W

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

D AT E

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

2046 B.C.E

40.13� W

4.42� W

0°4’36� W

4.29� W

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

0M

150M

0M

250M

4.23� W 39.52� W

27’9� S

25°41’26� W

An extensive area of moorland near the ancient settlement of Nessus. Much of the sandy area is desolate, covered in brambles and thorny plants. The heath is the haunt of witches and should be avoided by travelers as the voices of invisible creatures are heard in the air. It is advisable to wear a cross when venturing onto the wastelands.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

47.50� W

47’39�

41.39� W

WA S T E L A N D S O F G R E A T G A R A B A G N E ICE STUDIO

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

51.5000° N, 0.1167° W D AT E

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

38.52� W

23.13� E

Indentations form a porous extent of coves and caves along the levitating island of Anemoi. The land is formed from crystalline diamond, reflecting and refracting light in unusual ways. It is said that the rock forms reflect one’s shadows into the island’s surface revealing their truest self within.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

L O C AT I O N

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

2032 A.D.

47.10� E

174°23’26� E

ICE STUDIO

/ 28

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

3° 12' 43.2" S, 5° 12' 39.6" W D AT E

47.16� E

23.39� E

PECULIAR COVES OF ANEMOI FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

Found a year and a day from sea from a country of uncertain location. The country boasts a promise of unlimited fortune, but is guarded by a fortress of unaimed and untamed dreamers, hypochondriacs, and sleep-walkers who seek only to stop any visitors from passing into the gold-ridden core of the country.

L O C AT I O N

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

73°47’21� E

73°55’00� W

F L Y N N ’ S F O R B I D D E N P L AT E A U Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

47.27� E

55.07� W

ICE STUDIO

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

56°27’1� S, 73°47’21� E D AT E 680 A.D.

47.53� W

69.09� W

In a land of continuous harvest and festival, the inhabitants, the nymphs and fairies are scattered in tribes across the undulating landscape. Once per seasonal shift, the tribes gather around the central lake in the central island of the chain and celebrate together.

47.36� E 113°48’00� W

69.14� W

DIONYSUS’ ISLAND CHAIN ICE STUDIO Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

48.09� W

46°50’51� S

41.25� S

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

48.21� W

46°50’51� S

45.05� N

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

D AT E

18°41’51� S

45.05� N

L O C AT I O N L O C AT I O N ƒĆ?ĆŽ1ƒĆ?ĆŽ:

18°41’51� S

66.59� N

15.52� W

A series of seven symmetrical caves are found at the centre of the flood-prone island of Lhassa is said to be the inhabitations of Cthulhu and its servants. Cthulhu is the high priest of the Great Old Ones, unnatural alien beings who ruled the Earth before humanity formed, worshipped as gods by some misguided people. It is said that They will return, causing worldwide insanity and mindless violence before finally displacing humanity forever.

200 B.C.E

45°45’08� N

66.59� N

CAVERNS OF THE SEVEN HEADS ICE STUDIO Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

45°45’08� N

39.39� W

14°39’26� W

39.13� W

39.00� W

5’59� N 11’29� N

11’29� N

5m 5m

5m

47’43� N

47’43� N

47.49� N

47.49� N

40°47’59� N

40°47’59� N

27’15� S

27’15� S

27.37� S

27.37� S

56°27’51� S

56°27’51� S

48.05� N

48.05� N

27.58� S

27.58� S

48.09� N

48.09� N

27.62� S

27.62� S

48.18� N

48.18� N

27.70� S

27.70� S

48.21� W

48.09� W

113°48’00� W

47.53� W

47.50� W

47.36� E

PAMPAS OF A MILLION CURSES ICE STUDIO

47.27� E

73°47’21� E

ICE STUDIO

/ 

47.16� E

5.35� N

12.54� N

20.02� N

5.28� N

13.00� N

19.78� N

5.24� N

49.52� W

49.39� W

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

0M

150M

0M

250M

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

39.21� E 94°49’26� W

49.13� W

39.15� E

76°39’06� E

49.13� W

49.00� W

4.46� W

0M

150M

0M

250M

ICE STUDIO

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

15.72� W

38.58� E

15.69� W

60°15’65� W

15.58� W

21’03� N

15’01� S

15’01� S

20.77� N

20.77� N

14.87� S

14.87� S

10.77� N

76°10’51� N

76°10’51� N

10.25� N

10.25� N

5.28� N

10.02� N

10.02� N

5.24� N

9.78� N

9.78� N

4.23� W

39.52� W

39.39� W

14°39’26� W

39.13� W

39.00� W

T H E G R E AT I S L E O F E A R L E ICE STUDIO

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

An island in the deep ocean ruled by a vexatious god to whom the locals pay homage by casting ornaments and tobacco into the surrounding waters. The jealous god shields the land from curious travelers by shrouding the island in thick mist. No outsider has ever set foot on the Isle of Earle.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

/ 28

0M

150M

0M

250M

L O C AT I O N

L O C AT I O N 38°57’04� N, 34°22’16� W

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

42.0000° S, 174.0000° E

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

D AT E

0M

150M

0M

250M

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

D AT E

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

709 A.D.

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

0M

150M

0M

250M

15.52� W 23.52� E

15’09� S

4.29� W

11’03� N

10.77� N

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

3.366640 N, -60.165005 W D AT E 878 A.D.

900 B.C.E

39.01� E

15’09� S

3’19� N

23.39� E

174°23’26� E

23.13� E

22.24� W

23.00� E

22.19� W

34°22’16� W

22.08� W

22.01� W

3’19� N

21’29�

21’03� N

0°4’36� W

The long isthmus that one must pass over toward the foretold destiny of enlightenment. Those who followed the landform believed in fate as something strict and unchangeable, resulting in salvation only for the “chosen ones.� Surrounded by an irritable environment, venturers must endure the savage climate thats thrusts itself at them along the passage, seen as the final trial of man on the path to destiny.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

49.00� W

21’29�

4.42� W

11’03� N

PASSAGE OF DESTINY’S PLIGHT FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

It was told that this mountain range was brought up from the bowels of an earth-like planet by Cybele on the grounds of ancient war of Servaringo. The jagged hill-scape and sharp peaks expose above the horizon but conceal the caverns of extremely hot and volatile thermal vents and dwellings of nocturnal monsters below.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

200 B.C.E

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

49.39� W

94°49’26� W

ROHAN’S TWELVE HILLS ICE STUDIO

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

44°47’83� S, 76°39’06� E D AT E

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

49.52� W

51°5’41� N

5.35� N

L O C AT I O N L O C AT I O N L O C AT I O N 16°20’51� N, 94°49’26� W D AT E 1534 B.C.E

51°5’41� N

20.25� N

47.10� E

An island of paradise found in an uncharted location. Its lush flora and towering mountain peaks draw in travelers from all around. Once on land, visitors become entranced in its beauty, neglecting their ships. Costal storms soon destroy the voyaging vessels, trapping them until inevitably perishing.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

5’48� N

12.49� N

SCYLLA - THE ISLE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

A swampy landscape in an unknown location, always shrouded in mist. All its plants are poisonous and all its animals let off a venomous stench. Those who have visited this repulsive land are not known to have visited a second time.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

16°20’51� N

3° 12' 43.2" S

5’53� N

3’23� N

42’29� S

42’29� S

42’03� S

42’03� S

41.77� S

41.77� S

3’23� N

3.29� N

3.29� N

57’16� N

57’16� N

57’10� N

57’10� N

57.07� N

57.07� N

N 16°20’51� N

16°20’51� N

47.75� S

20.02� N

47.62� S

47.62� S

19.78� N

47.56� S

47.56� S

20.25� N

20.02� N

19.78� N

49.39� W

94°49’26� W

49.13� W

44°47’83� S

47.75� S

20.25� N

49.52� W

44°47’83� S

49.00� W

39.21� E

39.15� E

76°39’06� E

ICE STUDIO

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

Vast neighboring canyons scattered about the area of the Gorgoroths. Acidic lakes often cover the basins becoming entrapping pits for predators of the land; the Mongazas. For generations the Mongazas have captured and trained other creatures to dwell and serve in their subterranean world.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

D AT E

0M

150M

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

73°55’00� W

3.52� N

0M

250M

15.69� W

ICE STUDIO

/ 28

0M

45.13� N

45.13� N

60°15’65� W

15.58� W

41.02� S

3.52� N

40.78� S

40.78� S

23.52� E

25°41’26� W

23.39� E

45°45’08� N

0M

21.3114° N, 157.7964° W

250M

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

0M

150M

0M

250M

D AT E

46.13� W

50.77� S

21’23� N

21.27� N

21.27� N

46°50’51� S

44.58� N

44.58� N

49.78� S

49.78� S

41.52� W

41.39� W

L O C AT I O N

ICE STUDIO

L O C AT I O N

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

44°47’83� S, 76°39’06� E D AT E

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

39.21� E

39.15� E

76°39’06� E

0M

150M

0M

250M

39.01� E

15’01� S

14.87� S

14.87� S

44°47’83� S

44°47’83� S

47.75� S

47.75� S

47.62� S

47.62� S

47.56� S

47.56� S

39.15� E

76°39’06� E

39.01� E

21.46� N

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

21.51� N

21.51� N

46.39� W

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

0M

150M

0M

250M

157°46’26� W

46.13� W

21’18� N

21’23� N

21.27� N

21.27� N

10.68� N

43.49� W

13°43’46� E

43.38� E

21.46� N

21.51� N

21.51� N

43.32� E

46.52� W

0M

150M

0M

250M

5’48� N

5’48� N

51°5’41� N

51°5’41� N

ICE STUDIO

/ 28

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

2032 A.D.

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

0M

150M

0M

250M

L O C AT I O N 38°57’04� N, 34°22’16� W D AT E

11’29� N

39.39� W

5° 12' 39.6" W

40.13� W

11’03� N

12’33� N

10.77� N

10.77� N

12.37� N

76°10’51� N

76°10’51� N

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

20.77� N

16°20’51� N

3° 12' 43.2" S

10.25� N

12.49� N

20.25� N

5.28� N

5.28� N

10.02� N

10.02� N

12.54� N

5.24� N

5.24� N

9.78� N

9.78� N

13.00� N

4.29� W

39.52� W

4.23� W

39.39� W

14°39’26� W

39.13� W

39.00� W

49.52� W

CLOUDS OF STRANGE PHONICS FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

/ 28

ICE STUDIO Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

Floating above an ocean made entirely of musical notes, the clouds of strange phonics act as both an accoustical insulator as well as transmitter. The constant friction between the notes in the ocean produces a noise so loud it can be heard by the deaf. When travelling through these clouds, ear protection is required.

/ 28

22.08� W

0M

150M

0M

250M

22.01� W

57’16� N

57’10� N

57’10� N

57.07� N

57.07� N

49.39� W

94°49’26� W

49.13� W

38°57’04� N

38°57’04� N

56.58� N

56.58� N

20.02� N

56.52� N

56.52� N

19.78� N

56.48� N

56.48� N

22.24� W

49.00� W

ICE STUDIO Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

A field of lakes located in a subglacial world that lies beneath the Lambert-Fisher Glacier. Since these lakes have been frozen in time since the era of animism they have retained ancient unique personalities. Because of their inherrent temper, their water temperature is in constant flux, ranging from -137 o C to 123 oC.

22.19� W

34°22’16� W

22.08� W

22.01� W

T H E D O O M E D C O A S T O F P S A M AT H E

L A K E S O F I N D E T E R M I N AC Y FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

34°22’16� W

57’16� N

21’03� N

10.25� N

0°4’36� W

22.19� W

21’29�

5.35� N

A set of densly overgrown volcanic islands in an unkown location where extremely high temperatures cause a rift in the worlds magnetic field. On these islands only one cardinal direction exists. Anyone who sets foot on these islands will be forever lost. The only beings that live here are a race of mutated magnets.

/ 28

41.00� W

12’26�

11’03� N

46.00� W

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

709 A.D.

38.52� W

39.00� W

46.13� W

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

3° 12' 43.2" S, 5° 12' 39.6" W D AT E

39.13� W

11’29� N

157°46’26� W

In the passage of unusual extrusions dwells a shapeless and faceless being called the Nyarlathotep. The geological formations consist of solid geometrical extrusions and polygonal shapes defined by booleans which the Nyarlathotep controls. Only the non-innumerate are able to safely pass.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

5.35� N

4.42� W

46.39� W

PASSAGE OF UNUSUAL EXTRUSIONS FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

A scape of concentrated moon particles broken down to a fine dust by the constant bombardment of heat and sunlight for three quarters of the year. During the short winters, the entire planet is shrouded in shadow, seeing no sunlight. The surface is said to be colored as a reflection of the temperature, not the material make up of the land; turning the planet from a fire red tone into a deep dark blue in the winter months.

L O C AT I O N

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

14°39’26� W

21.37� N

21.46� N

ANCHIALE’S SCORCHED VALLEY Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

39.39� W

21.37� N

10.63� N

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

L O C AT I O N 76°10’53� N, 14°39’31� W D AT E

20°21’31� N

10.57� N

ICE STUDIO

5’53� N

ICE STUDIO

250M

21’23� N

46.00� W

A strange earth formation of changing locations. From the sea the frontiers are undefined and access to the isles is very difficult and dangerous. The peak of the mountain range is said to hold the instruments of immortality.

3671 A.D.

5’53� N

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

150M

0M

20°21’31� N

ISLE OF MOUNT GAEA Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

CARDINAL ISLANDS / 28

0M

46.00� W

23°10’51� N

43.55� W 46.52� W

ICE STUDIO

/ 28

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

4.46� W

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

46.13� W

10.46� N

10.68� N

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

5’59� N

38.58� E

157°46’26� W

10’40� N

10.63� N

41.05� W

5’59� N

DESERTS OF SETEKH’S FURY Frequented by sand storms and heat waves, the desolate desert of Set holds no home but to the sand borne serpentine creatures called Letalispons. Venturers who dare to traverse the barren sand hills will face the fate of succumbing to the heat or snares of the sand monsters.

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

46.39� W

21’18� N

22.24� W

15’01� S

39.21� E

21.46� N

39.52� W

15’09� S

ICE STUDIO

21.37� N

38.58� E

15’09� S

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

41.13� W

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

894 A.D.

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

D AT E

10’35� N

10.57� N 21.37� N

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

51.5000° N, 0.1167° W D AT E

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

200 B.C.E

25°41’26� W

This massive circular trench is all that is left of the large hadron collider used by CERN for studying black holes. It has a circumference of 27 kilometers and a mean depth of 100 meters. In the post-apocalyptic present it has become an extremely dangerous place. Failed experiments have caused black holes to appear in and out of reality. Also called the Surrealist River due to sightings of strange fata morgana.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

/ 28

43.32� E

23°10’51� N

LARGE HADRON TRENCH FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

43.38� E

20°21’31� N

50.25� S

54.51� W

13°43’46� E

10.46� N

20°21’31� N

50.02� S

54.57� W

250M

21.3114° N, 157.7964° W

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

43.49� W

10’40� N

46°50’51� S

50.02� S

73°55’00� W

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

46.52� W

50.77� S

45.01� N

The Obscure Geometry Crater is the result of the impact of a comet comprised of a highly densified piece of Erroneous Aether on the Cartesian Plains. Within it, all imaginable geometrical forms exist. The remnants of Aether cause matter to de- and reconstruct itself constantly. If one were to enter the crater the Aether would abstract the body into a form not visible to mankind.

0M

L O C AT I O N

1395 B.C.E.

51’03� S

O B S C U R E G E O M E T R Y C R AT E R

150M

10’35� N

21’23� N

22.01� W

5m

51’03� S

45.01� N

55.07� W

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

/ 28

0M

46.00� W

21’18� N

22.08� W

The Erroneous Aether is a very rarefied and highly elastic substance made up of the all disproven scientific theories and wrong assumptions. It is believed to be able to permeate all space, including the interstices between the particles of matter. The Aether acts as the medium through which new theories travel. With time it gains mass.

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

43.55� W 157°46’26� W

21’18� N

34°22’16� W

THE ERRONEOUS AETHER

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

200 B.C.E

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

46.39� W

51’29� S

50.25� S

55.14� W

56.48� N

22.19� W

23.00� E

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

23.0000° N, 13.0000° E

41.05� W

45.05� N

ICE STUDIO

23.13� E

This island is said to be sculpted from the spine or Ourea, the Greek goddess of mountains. Its surface is so hard that it is impenetrable and its landscape is so volatile that it is even uninhabitable by the gods.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

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DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

D AT E

41.13� W

45.05� N

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

174°23’26� E

ICE STUDIO

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

5m

45°45’08� N

56.52� N

NESOI OUREA

L O C AT I O N L O C AT I O N

WATERFRONT SHOWN REPRESENTS THE APPROXIMATE LINE OF THE TIDE

41.39� W

56.58� N

56.52� N

56.48� N

15.52� W

The Twin Tuya of Aero are two blade shaped, flat topped inactive volcanos stemming from the earths origin. Because of their unique geological formation and geographical location an infinite loop of air circles around them. Their cliffs are so steep and the air current so strong that all have died trying to claim their peaks.

Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

46.52� W

45’17� N

41.02� S

150M

51’29� S

45’17� N

3.47� N

38°57’04� N

56.58� N

ICE STUDIO

54.51� W

45’21� N

41.25� S

38°57’04� N

22.24� W

15.72� W

1395 B.C.E.

54.57� W

45’21� N

41.25� S

TWIN TUYA OF AERO

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

41.52� W 55.07� W

3.47� N

18°41’51� S

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

DATUM IS MEAN SEA LEVEL

D AT E 3400 A.D.

DEPTH CONTOURS AND SOUNDINGS IN METERS - DATUM IS MEAN LOW WATER

55.14� W

3.41� N

18°41’51� S

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

ƒĆ?ĆŽ1ƒĆ?ĆŽ:

CONTOUR INTERVAL OF 1 METRE

1975 A.D.

3.41� N

38.58� E

Through the Valley of Eden flows the river Pishon, a biblical river stemming from the Garden of Eden. The river circles Havilah, a land made entirely of gold. The gold walls of the valley cleanses the water and it is said to be the purest of all waters only to be consumed by the select few who have been deemed worthy.

L O C AT I O N L O C AT I O N 45.4500° N, 73.7500° W

39.01� E

3°3’36� N

VALLEY OF EDEN

GORGES OF GORGOROTH ICE STUDIO

3°3’36� N

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

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ICE STUDIO Evan Taylor Andrej Iwanski

Formerly the most defined edge on the island of Psamathe, swallowed by the sea in the thirteenth century when the island overturned like a capsized ship. The foothills which girdled the island now rise up like a bell jar, protecting the natural scape within.

FICTIONAL LANDSCAPE SERIES

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This pamphlet represents what we hope will become a series of studio monographs documenting and celebrating collaborative engagement between the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism and community partners from the architecture, development, and policy sectors. In winter 2016, Perkins+Will (Ottawa and Toronto) sponsored this Master of Architecture studio, which explored the conceptual, material, and environmental properties of ice. The Azrieli School sincerely thanks the offices of Perkins+Will for their support. Jill Stoner Professor and Director, Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism


Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism Carleton University 202 Architecture Building 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6 t. +1 613 520 2600 f. +1 613 520 2849 e. architecturegrad@carleton.ca

ŠAzrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, Carleton University, 2016 No part of this booklet may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, Carleton University.

Publication design by Andrej Iwanski and Evan Taylor

Studio generously sponsored by Perkins+Will (Ottawa and Toronto)

Printing generously provided by Astley Gilbert Limited, Ottawa

Profile for Inderbir Singh Riar

2016 ice studio  

In winter 2016, I led a Master of Architecture studio on the topic of “Ice”. Drawing broadly on cultural, material, and technological conce...

2016 ice studio  

In winter 2016, I led a Master of Architecture studio on the topic of “Ice”. Drawing broadly on cultural, material, and technological conce...

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