Page 1

T N E D EPEN

E L P PEO /11

IND

AL ANNU T R REPO

2010


S

CONTENT

port

Chair’s Re

2-3

formation

Financial In

4-5 6-7

Equality &

8-10

A Year of

11

igures

Diversity F

n

Progressio Star

Outcomes

12-13

Leonna’s

14 15 16

Story roject

Upfront P

The Team anks

Special Th

Chair’s Report

of I was privileged to step up to the role nt Chair of the Board of 1625 Independe in ed ow People in September 2010. I foll the footsteps of John Baynes-Reid and ic Rober t Davies who had done a fantast on for job of jointly chairing the organisati . the first 12 months since our inception

AT INDEPENDENT PEOPLE

WE PRIDE OURSELVES ON THE

QUALITY

AND DIVERSITY

OF THE SERVICES

WE DELIVER

2

Board Their departure was a great loss to the mitment. both in terms of their skil ls and com John I and the Board extend our thanks to r such ove d and Rober t for all they did to han on. a strong and wel l respected organisati , the Board At that time, 12 months into our role to ma xim ise felt we should review our structure We the strengths and value we can add. es lay ahead recognised that ver y cha llenging tim ership which called for greater strateg ic lead anisation. and risk management of a larger org ers, we With extensive input from our memb cture and radical ly changed our com mittee stru etings. the format and frequency of our me


CHAIR’S REPORT

Lodge talks about last year, Independent People’s Chair, Stephen n and his first as Chair the second ful l year of the organisatio

ver nment Early into the year our coa lition Go the austere came to power, quickly highlighting y. ntr measures that were to eng ulf the cou w was The Comprehensive Spending Revie ificantly announced in October 2010 which sign d by many increased the financial pressures face g cuts of our par tner agencies. The resultin ding wil l of course, impact on essentia l fun we rely upon to deliver our services. selves on At Independent People we pride our we the qua lity and diversity of the services w that deliver, and it remains the Board’s vie r service this should not be compromised. Ou l continue users remain our central focus. We wil ices to provide the range and qua lity of serv do this they tell us they need. We can only mitment with the continued suppor t and com f, of our dedicated and highly skil led staf ds. who work tirelessly to meet those nee t lay ahead With the uncertainty of the times tha foundations, of us, we see opportunity. Our firm iasm coupled with the com mitment, enthus us wel l n itio pos and skil l of the staf f and Board need for to thr ive. There is an unquestionable as cuts se our services and this wil l only increa society. in public funding impact fur ther on

these We can, however, only thr ive dur ing reliance times with continued and increasing suppor ters on the charitable donations that our so generously and selflessly give us.

“We can only do this with the continued support and commitment of our dedicated and highly skilled staff.” unteers. We are extremely grateful to our vol usly at Par ticularly those who gave so genero our ‘Give Me A Home’ art auction, Night Tuf fin Fer raby Taylor’s Annua l Quiz tary and the Dragon Boat Race. The Ro n Club of Bristol Breakfast have also bee ally nci fina h unrelenting in their suppor t bot few. and in volunteer ing. To name but a t With continued and increasing suppor our e tak such as this, we wil l be able to iety, services to even more members of soc ties offering 16-25 year olds the opportuni that so many of us take for granted. Stephen Lodge, Chair of Independent People

3


FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Statement of the Management Committee These summarised accounts are a summary of information extracted from the annual accounts and certain information relating to both the Income and Expenditure Account and the Balance Sheet.

For further information, the full accounts, which have been subject to an audit, and the annual report of the Management Committee should be consulted. Copies of these can be obtained from Head Office.

These summarised accounts may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the organisation.

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2011

2011

2010

ÂŁ Turnover

ÂŁ

3,313,515

3,146,081

(3,119,942)

(3,173,427)

193,573

(27,346)

212

343

(9,463)

(10,948)

Surplus / (deficit) for the financial year

184,322

(37,951)

Transfer to restricted reserves

(30,638)

(10,647)

Transfer from designated reserves

303,646

-

457,330

(48,598)

8,893

57,491

466,223

8,893

Less: Operating costs Operating surplus / (deficit) Interest receivable Interest payable

Revenue reserve at start of year Revenue reserve at end of year

The results for the year relate wholly to continuing activities. There are no recognised gains or losses other than the results for the year as set out above.

4


FINANCIAL INFORMATION

BALANCE SHEET AT 31 MARCH 2011

2011 £

2010 £

£

£

Fixed assets Housing properties

325,735

302,506

Capital grant

(71,895)

(71,895)

253,840

230,611

650,879

683,118

904,719

913,729

Other fixed assets

Current assets Debtors

195,474

239,300

Cash at bank and in hand

473,398

277,727

668,872

517,027

(393,570)

(406,702)

Creditors: Amounts falling due within one year Net current assets Total assets less current liabilities Creditors: Amounts falling due in more than one year Net assets

275,302

110,325

1,180,021

1,024,054

(668,477)

(696,832)

511,544

327,222

34

34

466,223

8,893

45,287

14,649

303,646

511,544

327,222

Capital and reserves Called-up share capital Revenue reserve Restricted reserves Designated reserves

5


EQUALITY & DIVERSITY FIGURES

Total number of young people supported in 2010/11

13%

19%

810

% of young people per service

41%

Key Bristol Housing Services Bristol Floating Support Services South Glos Housing Services South Glos Floating Support Services

2%

St George’s House 25%

Percentages of young people who had a planned/positive move on or are still maintaining their tenancy

Number of young people who left each service

6

Bristol Housing Services

149

Bristol Housing Services

77%

Bristol Floating Support Services

91

Bristol Floating Support Services

92%

South Glos Housing Services

3

South Glos Housing Services

100%

South Glos Floating Support Services

67

South Glos Floating Support Services

94%

St George’s House

85

St George’s House

76%


EQUALITY & DIVERSITY FIGURES

Gender by Service Female

32%

45%

68%

55%

Bristol Housing Services

Bristol Floating Support Services

Male

62%

61%

38%

39%

South Glos Housing Services

South Glos Floating Support Services

34%

66%

St George’s House

Age by Service Aged 18+

91%

86%

9%

14%

Bristol Housing Services

Bristol Floating Support Services

Aged 16/17

69%

55%

31%

45%

South Glos Housing Services

South Glos Floating Support Services

31% 69%

St George’s House

Ethnicity Non BME

63%

62%

37%

38%

Bristol Housing Services

Bristol Floating Support Services

BME

92%

93%

78%

8%

7%

22%

South Glos Housing Services

South Glos Floating Support Services

St George’s House

7


A YEAR OF PROGRESSION

A year of progression would sum up 2010/11 quite well. 2009/10 was very much about new beginnings as would be expected with a newly merged organisation and this year has seen many of those blossom.

WE THINK IT SHOWS WE

CARE ABOUT THE

8

QUALITY

OF OU R SERVICE


A YEAR OF PROGRESSION

New Service Standards In 2009/10, with the help and input of our service users we started to develop our Service Standards for Housing and Support. This year, working closely with young people we developed four more: Moving On Service Standard Hate Crime and Harassment Service Standard Customer Care Service Standard Staying Safe Service Standard These now form a Service Standard Booklet, which we go through with young people as part of their introduction to our services. We think it shows we care about the quality of our service and lets our service users know what they can expect, and what to do if they don’t think they’re getting that service. It helps us to have an honest relationship and accept responsibility if things haven’t gone right.

Fairer Shares of the Funding We promised we would focus on making sure everyone in our services saw the benefit of the funding we get for activities and in particular, this meant young parents and their children. Joni, our Youth Involvement Worker organised several free trips aimed specifically at parents and their kids. Among them were trips to Weston-super-Mare beach, Bristol Zoo, Softplay and Santa’s magical appearance at the Kids Christmas Party. We know some young parents need encouragement to get out and socialise, and that for most it’s just too expensive, so these trips have been well attended and successful. They provide a safe environment for young parents to let their kids play and allow parents to meet, relax, share experiences and let staff know what their needs are. There are already six more trips planned.

Summer Social The 2010 Summer Social was a festival style party attended by over 50 service users. Staff and young people performed tracks from a CD, ‘A place called home’ produced to raise awareness about homelessness. They went on to perform at the Bristol Festival (Brisfest) later in the year. That prompted another project ‘Your Tunes’, working with community musicians.

Targeted Positive Activities With funding from Bristol City Council’s Targeted Positive Activities we took groups of young people on confidence building activities like camping, mountain biking, rock climbing and canoeing to name but a few! 9


A YEAR OF PROGRESSION

Support Through the Arts

Out There – in the Community

Art has always been a great bringer-together of our staff and young people, and a therapeutic vehicle for expressing what it’s like to be young and out there on your own. So when we were invited to produce a ‘tent’ for the Portents exhibition on College Green we said “yes please – we’ll do two”. The exhibition showcased work from transient and mobile communities in Bristol and appeared on the BBC.

We’ve worked hard to bring the local community into our own and forge relationships that will grow. In February we joined forces with the College of Law, students from the college did a workshop with young people on Street Law, the Powers of the Police.This was aimed at dispelling some of the myths around the stop and search laws.

Later in the year we hosted ‘Give me a home’ an art auction to raise funds for property improvements and skills-based training. Artists from all over the country generously donated works for sale and once again, the paints came out and young people and staff produced art for the cause! We’re printing some of the images on to t-shirts and selling them to raise even more funds to improve services. The artistic streak didn’t stop there.With funding from Groundwork South West, young people were able to work with the ‘YouandYourWork’ collective on an interactive performance-art piece. It was hosted at the Arnolfini in Bristol.Youth Involvement Worker Tom and artist Liz Clarke helped young people to explore the emotional journey of their own homelessness.

Our Own Community By the end of the year, with so much energy present, we felt the need to gather as an organisation. 50 Service Users, 20 staff and Board members came to our annual Development Day. As well as general discussions about support and services, we focussed on four themes:

10

We consulted young people about how they prefer to find out about opportunities available in their community. The overriding response was they wanted hands-on, interactive information. In March 2010, we launched ‘Try It’, a training, education and employment event. Over 30 local organisations including City of Bristol College, Filton College, Job Centre, Army Recruitment and many others came along with interactive stands, tasters, demonstrations and workshops. We hope to repeat the event at least once year so it becomes a regular feature in our calendar.

Young people’s involvement in improving our property services. This has resulted in early talks with Filton College around running apprenticeship schemes in property maintenance and painting and decorating. Ideas for the development of an unused building next door to our head office.We have now appointed Ethical Property Foundation to conduct feasibility reports on the ideas generated.

Developing the Young Adult Outcomes Star (see page 11). Increasing service user participation and accessibility. Since then young people have signed up as members of our Youth Board, which will play a vital role in challenging the Board of Management to continually improve our services. It has been brilliantly busy and constructive with too many activities to mention.


OUTCOMES STAR

WE ARE VERY EXCITED TO

BE WORKING CLOSELY WITH

TRIANGLE CONSULTING TO DEVELOP A YOUNG ADULT

OUTCOMES STAR A New Star is Born

We are very excited to be working closely with Triangle Consulting to develop a ‘Young Adult Outcomes Star’. The Star is a highly visual tool and will become a national online resource. A young person and their support worker use it as a basis for discussion about each area of support. It focuses on strengths rather than problems. It measures progress and achievement and the impact of our services on young people’s lives. The Star is linked directly to Support Plans and complements current Supporting People outcomes monitoring. It will allow us to benchmark and collate common outcomes-data nationally and locally. During the Development Day we consulted with over 50 young people, staff and Board. Using realistic case scenarios, groups used the Star to plot a young person’s overall situation at a time of crisis and then three months later.

“It focuses on strengths rather than problems. It measures progress and achievement and the impact of our services on young people’s lives.” General feedback was very positive, most said it would be useful and gave suggestions on frequency of use and design.

“It got us talking – because it’s a scale it gets you thinking about where you are on it.” “It is useful to see progress, the process and picture makes things clear. The visual aid reinforces it.”

11


LEONNA’S STORY

“WITH AN ATTITUDE FROM THEN I BECAME A TEARAWAY

THAT THE WORLD WAS AGAINST ME

15

I WAS LIVING

BY THE AGE OF

ON THE STREETS

I started my life on a council estate, with a typical family who were frequently involved in boozing and brawling. My family unit broke down, I was aged eight when my dad left.

Living on the Streets I started my life on a council estate, with a typical family who were frequently involved in boozing and brawling. My family unit broke down when I was aged eight when my dad left. From then I became a tearaway with an attitude that the world was against me. I was living on the streets by the age of 15. For a time I slept on a shelf in a container with friends. I went home for a while, but I didn’t get on with my ma and left home again on my 16th birthday. I found Independent People (then Priority Youth Housing), who managed to find me a room in a shared house. After about a year I got a self contained flat. 12

My support worker Becky Cottrell was a great help to me during and after the time I lived with Independent People. She is down to earth and is direct with her approach. I always knew where I stood with her as she always told it like it was. This allowed me to quickly build a trusting relationship.

“After a few years living on my own, my life took a downturn.” Becky would always do her best for me, making time for me regardless how busy she may have been at the time. After a few years living on my own, my life took a downturn - I became unhappy and frequently felt depressed which lead to a time recuperating in hospital. After this my life began to improve.


Turning the Corner My life began to change for the better and I found direction from volunteering. This surprised me as I’ve always had the attitude “I’m not working for free”. Volunteering quickly changed my way of thinking as it allowed me to work on something that I felt passionately about, which was helping people who are in similar situations to me when I was growing up.

A Trusting Relationship Leonna’s support workers didn’t just find her somewhere to live. In the time we supported Leonna, they helped her confront and deal with anger management issues (she was well known for flying off the handle at staff ). Her attitude used to be that she didn’t care and could pretty much do what she liked. Her support workers were always there for her and over time built up a trusting relationship where she felt comfortable enough to drop the attitude and explore what she was capable of.

“Volunteering quickly changed my way of thinking as it allowed me to work on something that I felt passionately about, which was helping people who are in similar situations to me when I was growing up.”

Supporting Independent People When Leonna decided she wanted to channel some of her abundant energy into improving services for other young people, she came back to Independent People. Our Volunteering at Independent People (V.I.P) scheme was just getting off the ground and she came on board as our Volunteer Coordinator, two days a week. Shortly after that she heard there was part-time relief work available in our emergency accommodation unit in the city centre. So now she’s getting work experience in the field she’s interested in as well as a part-time wage. We haven’t supported Leonna for quite some time. The fact that she has completely turned her life around (she now supports us!) is a testament to her courage and the unwavering presence of her support workers while she found her own strength.

13


UPFRONT PROJECT

. ..IT’S IMPORTANT TO

PLAN CAREFULLY

BEFORE HOME

LEAVING

Upfront – Peer Education Project ‘Upfront’ our peer education project inspires and motivates young people to leave home in a planned way and to be aware of the risks of leaving home in an unplanned way.

During the year we have:

The project challenges misconceptions about leaving home and encourages young people to take up support offered through schools, youth workers and voluntary agencies.

Recruited and trained eight peer educators to run workshops, with another 10 being trained over Summer

Lisa, our Peer Education Co-ordinator has achieved huge amounts throughout the year. She works closely with schools to understand their needs. She has developed the workshops with the Peer Educators to meet our target of preventing homelessness alongside the needs of teachers to measure learning outcomes linked to the curriculum. She has also created a Resource Pack for use by schools to accompany the workshops and always offers follow up sessions. This collaborative working has made the project easier for schools to integrate and bookings have soared.

Delivered an average of 1.5 workshops per week

Worked with over 1170 young people, in 18 schools, youth clubs and pupil referral projects across Bristol and South Gloucestershire, in groups of 2 up to 270. 74% said they would now be more likely to seek support if they were having problems at home Peer educators are working towards BTEC Qualifications in Peer Education, and are now looking at voluntary placements or considering careers in youth work. Existing peer educators are training new recruits passing on knowledge.

“I was really nervous to begin with, but just being able “Talking to the class in their own language, using the to say as much or as little as I wanted made me feel words they use, makes them pay attention more than more comfortable.” – Peer Educator they would to some teachers.” – Teacher “The two peer mentors were fab, the delivery was excellent. I’d recommend you to everyone. They understood what homelessness was and wasn’t and had a lot of their preconceptions blown apart last time. I’d definitely like to use you again, many thanks for your time, you were fab!” – Teacher

14

“I learnt what it really means to be homeless, and that it’s important to plan carefully before leaving home as it can be harder than it looks. I think it’s better to resolve your issues at home as moving out can be hard.” – Pupil


THE TEAM

Senior Management Team – 2010-2011 Dom Wood – Chief Executive, Sam Wilding – Corporate Services Director, Howard Symonds & Denise Tombs – Operations Directors, Jamie Gill – Service Improvement Director.

Volunteer Board of Management – 2010-2011 Stephen Lodge – Chair, Karen Ross – Vice Chair, Meirion Rushworth – Treasurer John Baynes-Reid ( Joint Chair to September 2010), Robert Davies ( Joint Chair to September 2010) Paul Hale (to 2010), Nat Selman, Ann Thorne, David Clowes, David Morgan, Barbara Berryman.

T HE RANGE OF WORK OUR VOLUNTEERS

HAVE DONE FOR US IS

QUITE STAGGERING

V.I.P – Volunteering at Independent People We are so pleased to say our V.I.P scheme is working really well. Our volunteers have played an important part in our development over the last year. The V.I.P scheme has added huge value to the quality and diversity of the service we offer young people. It has also increased our presence in both public and business communities. Our list of volunteers has grown to include:

The range of work our volunteers have done for us is quite staggering: 18 service users volunteering for the Upfront peer education project Help running the V.I.P scheme Organising, planning and delivering service user activities

Service users

Fundraising and awareness events

Ex-service users

Additional responsible adults at St George’s House (emergency accommodation)

Local supporters from the community Students

Help with administration and finance at Head Office

Corporate volunteer groups (inc. Rotary Club of Bristol Breakfast/HBOS/Gleeds/DTZ/ Guinness Hermitage, Tuffin Ferraby Taylor and others!)

Running a training and employment drop-in service

Staff

Decorating properties

Board

Clearing gardens

Reception display co-ordinator Art workshops

15


Finally, A Big Thank You Very special thanks to Bristol City Council and South Gloucestershire Council for their unending support this year and also to the Rotary Club of Bristol Breakfast for naming us as their chosen charity for the next three years. We are not able to name all the individuals who have contributed to our work in the past year but would like to say a heartfelt thanks to all those who have supported, volunteered, donated, advised, encouraged and believed in us and what we do. And to the courageous and wonderful young people we provide a service to – thank you for being you! BTCV Bluefin Boots Pharmacy – Avon Meads Bristol Bridge Rotary Club Bristol Charities Bristol City Council Bristol Green Store Business in the Community Charities Information Bureau (CIB) Comet – Avon Meads Connexions West of England Fairbridge West Fareshare Frank Buttle Trust Groundwork South West i.e. Intelligent Marketing Jephson Housing Knightstone Housing Association

Lankelly Chase Merlin Housing Minuteman Press Orange Street Studios Places for People Prince’s Trust Quartet Community Foundation Solon South West Housing Association Solsoft South Gloucestershire Council South West Consortium Studio 2 Printers The Farm Pub The Funding Network The Sofa Project Tudor Trust Tuffin Ferraby Taylor Youth Justice Board

The leading provider of housing, support and advice to young people in the South West of England Kingsley Hall, 58-59 Old Market Street, Bristol BS2 0ER 0117 317 8800 www.1625ip.co.uk

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Independent People Annual Report 2010/11  

Independent People Annual Report 2010/11

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