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SHINING A LIGHT ON URBAN D E N S I F I C AT I O N P O S T- C O V I D PA G E 3

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Navigating a post-Covid urban agenda

Many people without space and basic services found it virtually impossible to protect themselves from the pandemic. It’s time for innovative new ideas in the town planning sector, say experts BY GUGU SITHOLE-NGOBESE WORLD Town Planning Day is celebrated in more than 30 countries over four continents each year on November 8. This year, more so than any other year, it is crucial that planners reflect on the role of planning in creating liveable communities, in both towns and villages, especially within the context of the Covid-19 pandemic. On October 29, Women in Planning SA (WiPSA) hosted a webinar on the Post-Covid Urban Agenda. During the discussion, Elroy Africa, a developmental activist and registered professional planner, presented his views of a post-Covid urban agenda. Dr Soobs Moonsammy, also a registered professional planner, led a discussion on whether the history of modern urban planning has lessons for us in navigating the current pandemic and the period beyond it. During this discussion, several key questions were asked. WiPSA has compiled a list detailing the five considerations planners need to note amid the pandemic:

The planning sector needs to be regulated and quality assured so that it is not reminiscent of a colonial “town and regional planning” paradigm from yesteryear, says Gugu Sithole-Ngobese (pictured above)

1 Covid-19 has merely highlighted, not created, the stark inequalities that exist in our towns and cities Covid-19 officially entered South Africa in March. The national government sprang into action with attempts to educate South Africans on the importance of physical distancing, hand-washing, and later, wearing a mask. To many, these are easy requests to comply with; however for the 19% of the South African rural population who lack access to reliable water supply, and the 33% of the rural population who lack basic sanitation services, it was an almost impossible feat. Covid-19 did not create this inequality, but it did put a spotlight on the mortal consequences of a lack of sanitation. 2 The prescriptive thinking within the planning sector needs to change Moonsammy noted that planners in South Africa have become prescriptive, and respond mainly to legislated norms and standards, such as land-use management systems, as opposed to the lived realities of people in towns and villages. Planners in a democratic South Africa have yet to experience a “golden age of planning”, unlike those who thrived during apartheid and were able to implement the Group Areas Act.

It has become more important than ever to proactively address the conditions experienced by South Africans in the 21st century. The concept of planning needs to be re-thought, especially on a fundamental level, so that planning students graduating from universities are equipped with a toolbox that allows for innovation and a reconfiguration of our towns and villages. 3 Town planning needs to be innovative and without restrictions In efforts to reject notions of prescriptive thinking, planners are required to embrace innovative and non-restrictive thinking. While it is necessary for us to be mindful of the legislative frameworks that exist, we need to build practical toolboxes for ourselves, which allow us to react to the lived realities of the voiceless, such as the homeless and the poor. The planning sector needs to be regulated and quality assured so that the sector is not reminiscent of a colonial “town and regional planning” paradigm from yesteryear. South African planners need to operate within the African context. While we might borrow from our Western counterparts, our environments are inherently different, and our diverse people and the unique issues we have faced during Covid-19 and the lockdown reflect this. 4 Space is a privilege For a number South Africans who live in cities, the advice and requests for physical and social distancing were easily taken and met. However, for the poor majority, physical distancing was a challenge, due to the modes of transport many had to take to work, the working conditions experienced by many, and their living conditions, which prevented physical distancing on a practical level. Covid-19 has shown that the act of distancing oneself is a privilege. For many South Africans, a lack of isolation facilities within their homes and communities led to cross-infections between family members who had to share homes, or essential workers who had to take public transport to reach their places of work. The onus is on planners to identify that space is a privilege, and is one that all deserve – especially during a deadly and costly pandemic.

5 Densification is not the enemy, overcrowding is While physical distancing was for many a cause of concern, the issue was not merely dense concentrations of people, but dense concentrations of people without access to basic and decent services – which is essentially overcrowding. Densification can benefit communities, because denser communities can support higher-grade quality public services and the possibility of “herd immunity”. South Africa experiences high levels of overcrowding, especially in our cities, which then have the potential to become hot spots for a range of diseases and viruses. The crux of the matter is that millions of South Africans do not have access to basic services and necessities, even though the Constitution states that every citizen is entitled to quality basic services. The fact they are not provided is in fact unconstitutional, and highlights the flawed planning of our public and private spaces. Covid-19 has brought to light the lack of basic services available to many South Africans, and the dire consequences this can have especially during a global pandemic. As noted by Africa during the webinar, “diseases and epidemics exploit human-made conditions”. As planners, it is our duty to acknowledge spatial inequalities to ensure that efforts are made to focus on urban resilience and disaster management. Moonsammy said that “we should not let a good catastrophe go to waste”. Covid-19 has forced us to examine the living conditions of our neighbours and fellow residents, many of whom have been left behind. Rather than attempt to respond in prescriptive methods, we should be imagining alternative and sustainable spaces, and make concerted efforts to make this re-imagined space a reality. World Town Planning Day offers an opportunity for citizens and planners to reflect on the importance of the planning profession, and the need for good quality spaces to ensure liveable neighbourhoods and wellfunctioning villages, towns, cities and metropoles. Gugu Sithole-Ngobese is a registered professional planner and the founding director of Ziphelele Planning & Environmental Consultancy and Women in Planning SA (WiPSA)


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Letter from the editor

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Pandemic highlights SA’s social inequalities Experts say this is an opportunity to have a new look at town planning and housing policies, with an emphasis on properly managed densification BY BONNY FOURIE bronwyn.fourie@inl.co.za

A WHILE back, at the height of hard lockdown, I was fortunate enough to do a few zoom meetings with the top players

Densification needs to be carried out in conjunction with the provision of sufficient amenities and services. PICTURE: SHAKIRA DERTEANO

within the SA Institute of Black Property Practitioners (SAIBPP) on reimagining South African townships. It was some of the most innovative thinking for the future – of what our suburbs could look like – and the story got plenty of positive feedback and started an interesting conversation. To me, the way our towns are planned and how they may look in the future is imperative to so many things including gender, economic and race equality. It also speaks to how we will in future be armed to fight off super bugs and, importantly, create spaces that are geared to making this a better world. One of the most interesting aspects to come out of a recent webinar by Women in Planning SA (WiPSA) is that of densification. It’s no secret that there are two distinct groups – for and against densificatoon. Give our writer Bonny Fourie’s article alongside a read, plus Gugu Sithole-Ngobese’s opinion piece, and do let us know your thoughts. What do you want to see towns looking like in the future? This is a wonderful time to reimagine the world and bring the best of everything into it. Look forward to hearing from you. Enjoy Warm regards Vivian Warby vivian.warby@inl.co.za

T

HE COVID-19 pandemic has shone the brightest spotlight yet on South Africa’s social inequalities and has served as a wake-up call for town planners and housing policy makers. The national hard lockdown saw large families confined to tiny houses with poor ventilation and hundreds of neighbours sharing the same taps and toilets – while they were supposed to be social distancing. Densification has therefore emerged from the pandemic as an enemy of health security but, as urban planners explain, is actually not to blame. A lack of amenities and infrastructure – which can also be put down to neglect – is. The pandemic exposed some of the deep societal imbalances within and across rural and urban spaces and has led to a debate on the value of densification, says Elroy Africa, a developmental activist and professional and former director general at the Department of Co-operative Governance. He was addressing the recent Women in Planning SA (WiPSA) webinar on the Post-Covid Urban Agenda. And while the pandemic has been used as an argument against densification, a recent World Bank study of 284 cities in China found that the cities with higher densities “actually fared a lot better than those with lower densities” in terms of how they faced the pandemic and the impact it had on them. However, as these dense cities were often wealthier and so able to mobilise resources and mitigate their responses, the issue is not necessarily one of densification but overcrowding and access to basic services. “Let us not discard densification as an urban planning tool – and a progressive planning tool. Maybe, within cities, we need to rethink how we provide basic services to people... Let us begin to deal with the issue of overcrowding but not necessarily throw out densification.” Responding to this address and echoing AFRICAN NEWS AGENCY

Africa’s thoughts on densification in the country, Soobs Moonsammy, a town planner and head of urban renewal at eThekwini Municipality, says densification is not the problem but rather “that we densify without any of the necessary services”. “We densify for the poor... We build and then we walk away.” Claire du Trevou, a director and head architect at Bitprop, a social enterprise that seeks to address housing shortages by allowing private investors to invest in backyard micro rentals, says the pandemic and lockdown have taught critical lessons about many of the country’s housing types. “At the informal side of the spectrum, we have learnt that the status of quo of one tap per 23 households is not enough and nor is it safe. “So, we need to address access to water, and innovate around how to allow for increased and better access to water and ablutions in informal contexts. “In terms of backyard rental housing opportunities, the zoning regulations in Cape Town’s townships allow for buildings to be built on the boundary of the property, so long as there are no windows and doors on the boundary edge. This means that often all the windows and doors are on one side of the rental space, and thus there is no cross ventilation, or movement of air.” She agrees that the pandemic has demonised densification in many ways and says that although New York-scale densification is not the answer, “we certainly do need to see an increase in housing density”. “Densification is a critical factor in allowing for affordable housing to exist. Urban density, if it is done well, has all kinds of benefits.” Rashiq Fataar, founder of Our Future Cities, says Covid-19 has both highlighted and exacerbated the country’s housing

inequalities as many lower-income communities have suffered from higher rates of infection. When considering future housing provision, governments must “prioritise the creation of healthy neighbourhoods where communities can access all the services, infrastructure and amenities they require within walking distance of their neighbourhoods”. He adds that many of South Africa’s highdensity settlements are well-located in terms of proximity to schools, work, healthcare and other amenities and that discussions of “de-densification” that involves relocating communities are “harmful and non-viable as they involve the forceful uprooting of wellestablished communities”. “De-densification proposals have also been shown not to secure the provision of other basic needs such as work and social amenities. Globally, including in ‘developed’ nations, high urban density has contributed positively towards concepts such as mass transport, walkable cities with ‘15-minute neighbourhoods’ and lower climate emissions. Thus, appropriate densification fosters healthy communities.” Erwin Rode of Rode & Associates says it is crucial for low-cost housing to be near public transport corridors and this implies that highrise buildings are needed to increase density. However, high-rise buildings carry potential social problems and could end in financial collapse if based on sectional title. “This means sectional title is not practical because one needs tight management. The solution is for social housing agencies and private or listed funds to invest in high-rise rental schemes on transport corridors.” He also notes that give-away housing has become unaffordable and says South Africa should rather proactively switch to site-andservice schemes which enable people to build their own structures, in a more planned manner, on serviced land.

DISCLAIMER: The publisher and editor of this magazine give no warranties, guarantees or assurances and make no representations regarding any goods or services advertised within this edition. Copyright ANA Publishing. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written consent from ANA Publishing. The publishers are not responsible for any unsolicited material. Publisher Vasantha Angamuthu vasantha@africannewsagency Executive Editor Property Vivian Warby vivian.warby@inl.co.za Features Editor Property Bonny Fourie bronwyn.fourie@inl.co.za Design Kim Stone kim.stone@inl.co.za


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The quality of low-cost housing should provide basic shelter while also encouraging a healthy quality of life. PICTURE: FALCO/PIXABAY

An opportunity to right social wrongs SAIBPP President says the government needs to team up with the private sector to develop low-cost housing that restores people’s dignity and promotes healthy lives WITH THE living conditions of South Africa’s poor and vulnerable communities coming under the spotlight during the Covid pandemic and lockdown, there appears to be an urgency to right these wrongs. Tholo Makhaola, professional architect and president of the South African Institute for Black Property Professionals (SAIBPP), penned his thoughts on the situation in response to questions from Property360.

Architect and president of the South African Institute for Black Property Professionals Tholo Makhaola.

What do you believe the Covid19 pandemic and lockdown can teach us/the government about the delivery of low-cost housing in South Africa in terms of the need for such formal housing and the speed at which it is being rolled out/developed? I believe the pandemic went a long a long way towards exposing the deficiencies as far the overall supply of low-cost housing is concerned. It is clear that the quality of low-cost housing produced in South Africa does not respond to the complex requirements of habitable spaces that provide basic shelter while also encouraging a healthy quality of life. The speed at which the government has provided lowcost housing is way below the demand for this housing solution,

with several hindrances being evident; some revolving around the government’s procurement practices and some being around the government’s willingness to team up with the private sector to develop “out of the box” design and procurement solutions which could assist in speeding up the delivery of housing. Do you believe that the pandemic and lockdown have highlighted any changes that need to be made in the design of low-cost, affordable housing and the facilities such property offers? The need for housing where the design limits disease transmission should be a basic requirement that low-cost housing should be required to fulfil, considering that communities where low-cost housing is prevalent are also prone to other diseases such as TB. The government must also be willing to team up with private sector to explore different methods of delivery of lowcost housing, especially in the Alternative Building Technology (ABT) realm which is proving to be a more favourable solution whose benefits include being cost effective and time-saving. ABT seems to be an acceptable avenue for the government and this must be applauded.

What are your thoughts on the development of low-cost housing in terms of densification? Do you believe that more or less densification is needed when developing such property? To date, there has been less emphasis on low-cost housing being a model which can be used to create sustainable communities and more emphasis on the lowcost housing model as a selfcontained unit. Recent attempts by the government and private sector to focus on densification of low-cost housing has a lot of merit as this further enables for the ideal environment of mixed uses incorporating “live, work, and play” which SAIBPP advocates. Given the current Covid-19 pandemic and the considerations of low-cost housing, which also addresses the need to limit disease transmission, densification of low-cost housing would need to be a carefully considered design exercise where local conditions of climate and orientation are taken into consideration. It should not be viewed as the “cookie cutter” or “one size fits all” approach that is currently adopted. The question of more or less densification should be a balance of carefully considered site-specific design and robust policy convictions of the type of communities we are wanting to create.

We need to appreciate that sustainable, healthy mixed-use and densified low-cost housing environments are a combination of well-thought-out design (urban and architectural) and policy considerations working together. What other thoughts do you wish to share regarding densification and low-cost housing in South Africa? SAIBPP is of the opinion that low-cost housing should, at its core, seek to address the restoration of the dignity of black people in South Africa. We feel that it is important to create sustainable townships that are not defined by an economy that is extractive in nature but rather one that seeks to develop and elevate the socio-economic conditions of the community through various devices such as: ◆ The diversification of economies (ie more mixed uses in townships) and ◆ The creation of greater linkages through reliable mass transit systems. The way our communities are housed, especially through lowcost housing, should be reflective of these two key principles to allow for appropriate decisions around the design of low-cost housing in specific areas and the required densities involved.


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ASKED

ANSWERED

There is a tendency to be locked in by old rules and regulations, but now is the time to loosen the bonds and come up with planning solutions that satisfy citizens’ needs

A: I think that we are still too prescriptive in planning. We are still focusing on the same thing and we really need to let go. So many things have changed but we are fixated on particular aspects. As you do more reading and fieldwork people will tell you that they want something that fixes problems. They are not looking at how you split hairs, how you look at a licence for this or special consent for that, and the definition of things. This does not mean we do not have those but we need to be far more flexible and actually free our planners to have time to engage with some of the intimate issues we are speaking of. We have to look at how we engage with communities. From when I was a young planner to now I still go to sites, engage with communities, do research and talk to people. This is important in terms of how we respond to this issue. A bigger issue is the home. How do we see a house and how do we not see the livelihoods? How are we still fixated on 20% of this and 50% of that? We are past those kinds of challenges. And the way we see humanity is really different in different communities. So many notions of humanity

have shifted yet we still have certain policies and tools based on what we think humanity is. We need to start loosening ourselves from the very tools we have created that have locked us into thinking a certain way. – Soobs Moonsammy, town planner Q: Has the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown highlighted any changes that need to be made in the design of affordable housing and the facilities such properties offer? A: Quality materials and working with architects and the local community is essential. There are opportunities to create more mixed-use housing developments, which include landscaped outdoor areas, opportunities for retail, and flexibility in design to allow for incremental development by homeowners over time. UN Habitat’s research on Covid-19 and public space has shown that neighbourhood public spaces are being frequented more during the pandemic as people look for more avenues to socialise and exercise, and view the adaptability of these public spaces to accommodate various functions such as pop up markets or community health centres. This calls for people-centred designs that prioritise safe and inclusive neighbourhoods. – Rashiq Fataar, Our Future Cities

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With property planning under the microscope, we need to let go of prescriptive ideas and become more innovative. PICTURE: MAURÍCIO MASCARO

WHAT DO PEOPLE WANT? ASK THEM! Q: What can planning professionals such as town planners, architects and policy makers, learn from the pandemic to change the way they work?

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Q: How can densification be better carried out to solve some of the country’s housing problems, including the shortage of affordable housing? A: Incremental densification (small-scale densification) is one of the best potential routes for sustainably providing affordable housing in South Africa. For instance, the developer Bitprop works with individual homeowners to construct high-quality bachelor rental flats on the homeowner’s property. This both provides an affordable rental housing option and an income stream for the homeowner. We believe that city officials should focus on releasing welllocated land and accelerating incremental in-situ low-cost housing developments. – Rashiq Fataar, Our Future Cities Q: How does backyard rental accommodation help solve some of the housing issues facing the country? A: Backyard rental accommodation brings more affordable rental units onto the market and allows property owners to begin to earn passive incomes. In the years to come, I believe we will see an end of the government subsidy programme and new housing being built will be targeting low-income and gap households. These properties need to be

designed and developed to allow for the addition of rental accommodation, enabling the neighbourhoods to organically densify over time. – Claire du Trevou, Bitprop Q: As housing continues to become less affordable for many people, what other options could aspiring homeowners explore? A: South Africans should make use of the variety of national housing subsidy programmes available to them to help them afford the costs of homeownership. While the variety of housing subsidies and grants available will not solve this problem on their own, they do offer a solution to a number of South Africans who are struggling to enter the real estate market. The trouble is that too few know about these options or that they qualify for the assistance. One of these often under-utilised programmes is the Finance Linked Individual Subsidy Programme (Flisp). Households which earn between R3 500 and R22 000 a month can apply for this subsidy. Depending on the applicant’s gross monthly income, the once-off Flisp subsidy qualifying amount varies between R27 960 and R121 626. Successful applicants will receive this money which can be used either as a deposit or to cover transfer and registration fees. Another possible solution for lowincome households is to pool their resources so that they have a greater chance of qualifying for a home loan. To increase their chances of qualifying, buyers can co-apply with a partner or family member. However, this decision should not be undertaken lightly as this means that they will each co-own the property and be responsible for the monthly repayments. Buyers can also purchase a property without a deposit. For the year ending March 31, 2018, a total of 42.76% of all home loans registered through BetterBond were calculated at 100% of the purchase price. Absa even offers a Young Professionals Home Loan of up to 105% for a property valued at R1.5 million or less. The extra 5% helps homeowners afford the registration costs and transfer duties. – Adrian Goslett, chief executive, Re/Max of Southern Africa


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ProPerty exPerts remain conFident desPite mounting economic Pressure South Africans are settling in for a long and slow road to economic recovery. While the inevitable increase in pressure on consumers’ pockets will unavoidably filter down into the property market, experts remain cautiously optimistic about property’s performance. “There’s no doubt that our country is in a tough financial position,” says Tony Clarke, MD of the Rawson Property Group. “However, it’s positive to see the government taking responsibility and looking to its spending to address the budget deficit, minimising the effects on the consumer as far as possible.” When it comes to property, Clarke says there are several factors contributing to the market’s current resilience that will continue to bolster it through these tough times. Affordability is one of the biggest of these contributors, responsible for much of the post-lockdown boom in residential sales activity. “Not only are property prices subdued thanks to a long period of slow growth, but interest rates are at record lows, and lenders are highly motivated, offering up to 100% loans,” says Clarke. “This has created a climate of affordability – particularly for first-time buyers – that we haven’t seen for many years.” While the forecast economic contraction of 7.8%, average medium-term GDP growth of 2.1%, and tax increases of R40 billion over the next 4 years could eat into buyers’ income, Clarke says other conditions are likely to remain in buyers’ favour. “Property prices should begin to rise in response to increasing demand, but we’re not expecting dramatic price growth for some time to come,” he says. “Interest rates will also likely start climbing from mid-2021, but at a very conservative rate that shouldn’t cause problems for buyers unless they’ve bought at the absolute limit of their affordability.” There may also be a few new positive influences bolstering property’s performance if Finance Minister Tito Mboweni’s plans come to fruition as outlined in his budget speech last month.

“The R2.2 billion allocated to social housing and R96 billion for student housing will not only be a powerful community upliftment initiative, but it will also boost construction and provide new property investment opportunities,” says Clarke. Less direct support will be felt from the additional 12 000 MW of new electricity capacity sourced from independent power producers, and the R12.6 billion allocated to employment initiatives. “We hope these plans will put an end to load shedding, which could be detrimental to businesses trying to recover from lockdown, and improve unemployment, helping to get money flowing through our economy once again,” says Clarke. “This would boost consumer spending power and improve buyers’ ability to take advantage of favourable property market conditions, thereby supporting healthy growth in the sector.” While Clarke is confident that the property market will weather the current challenges, a lot is also riding on the government’s ability to follow through on its economic recovery plans. “Property has always been one of the most stable and secure investments to have during unpredictable economic times,” he says. “Current buying conditions will only make those benefits more pronounced. Those able to take advantage will not regret their decision as long as they’ve done their research, partnered with an experienced professional, and resisted the urge to overreach on their spending power.” For more information email marketing@rawsonproperties.com or visit www.rawson.co.za for the latest property news and market updates.

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WANT TO SELL WANT TO SELL WANT TO SELL WANT TO SELL WANT TO SELL WANT TO SELL WANT TO SELL YOUR PROPERTY? WANT TO SELL YOUR PROPERTY? WANT TO SELL YOUR PROPERTY? YOUR PROPERTY? YOUR PROPERTY? YOUR PROPERTY? YOUR PROPERTY? YOUR PROPERTY?

0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com info@in2assets.com info@in2assets.com info@in2assets.com info@in2assets.com info@in2assets.com www.in2assets.com info@in2assets.com www.in2assets.com info@in2assets.com www.in2assets.com info@in2assets.com www.in2assets.com info@in2assets.com www.in2assets.com info@in2assets.com info@in2assets.co www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS info@in2assets.co www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS info@in2assets.co www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS info@in2assets.co www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS info@in2assets.c www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS info@in2assets.c www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www.in2assets.com THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS CONTACT www.in2assets.com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS www in2assets CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS co www in2assets CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS co www in2assets CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS co ii 22 t com CONTACT THE LEADING PROPERTY SPECIALISTS

YOUR YOUR PROPERTY? YOURPROPERTY? PROPERTY?

DURBAN COMBINED AUCTION 09 DECEMBERYOUR 2020 IN LIQUIDATION

Muhammad | 079 458 4256 AUCT-001383

Pristine 3 Bedroom Apartment in Umhlanga Rocks Section 7 (Door C7) Salamander, 65 Lagoon Drive, Umhlanga Rocks Extent: ± 127 m² | 3 Bedrooms | 2 Bathrooms | 1 Lock up garage | Secure complex | Walk across to the beach | Fully furnished | Sold with movables

N O V E M B E R

Virend | 071 383 1735

Exellent Business Opportunity in the Popular Kapenta Bay 5th Avenue, Port Shepstone Consisting of 4 sections measuring ± 1 922 m² | ± 180 Seat restaurant | Offices | Fully operational restaurant & conference facilities | Private lounge | ± 80 Seat conference room | Bar with cold room | ± 250 Seat function & conference rooms | Catering kitchen | Laundry Off-street take-away | Additional storerooms sold with restaurant | Admin section

AUCT-001392

DECEASED ESTATE

Virend | 071 383 1735

Upmarket Retail and Office Units in Gateway, Umhlanga Rocks Sections 1, 2 & 205 African Palms, 6 Palm Boulevard, Umhlanga J S Maharaj Property Investments CC (In Liquidation) Masters Ref: D110/2020 Unit 1: ± 65 m² - Ground floor | Unit 2: ± 124 m² Ground floor | Unit 205: ± 158 m² - Second floor | Vacant occupation | Ground floor units facing Gateway Boulevard | Designated secure parking bays

AUCT-001384

Tom | 083 636 7800

Irrigation and Grazing Farm 46km on the R69 from Vryheid to Louwsburg, KwaZulu-Natal Total Extent: ± 518.6944 Ha | Situated on both sides of the R69 between Vryheid and Louwsburg | Improvements include dwellings, sheds, & irrigation infrastructure | 6 Adjoining portions | Land Uses: Irrigated arable: ± 110 Ha (Center pivots) | Potential Irrigable: ± 90 Ha | Arable land: ± 80 Ha | Grazing Veld: ± 228 Ha | Pecan Nut Orchid: ± 10 Ha

AUCT-001379

Virend | 071 383 1735

Apartment Overlooking Greyville Racecourse Section 29 Manjee Centre, 320 Dr Yusuf Dadoo (Grey) Street, Greyville Estate Late: Indumati Mehta Master’s Ref No.: 012242/2020 Unit Extent: ± 162 m² | Vacant occupation | Panoramic views of Greyville Racecourse | 4 Bedrooms (2 En-suite) | Lounge, dining room & fitted kitchen | Separate bathroom | Balcony | 1 Parking bay

URGENT SALE

NORTHWAY ROAD

RIVE RL D PEA

AUCT-001382

Muhammad | 079 458 4256 AUCT-001381

High End Mini Factory Section 22 (Door 26) Micro Park, 26 Crassula Road, Cornubia Extent: ± 143 m² | Mezzanine level | Vehicular access | 2 Exclusive use parking bays | 24 Hour security in complex

Muhammad | 079 458 4256 AUCT-001385

Retail Unit in High Trade Zone Section 1 Queens Court, Corner of Margaret Mncadi Avenue & Samora Machel Street, Durban CBD Extent: ± 187 m² | High levels of pedestrian and vehicular traffic | Prime corner unit with excellent exposure | Divided into 2 individual units

Luke | 071 351 8138

Neat Offices in Sought after Office Park Section 7 Kingfisher Office Park, 30 Fairways Avenue, Mount Edgecombe Extent: ± 134 m² | Secure offices | Private ablutions | Neat offices with drywall configuration | Ample parking bays | Very popular office park | Option for a 3 year lease with Gross Annual Income: ± R243 K

AUCT-001281

Luke | 071 351 8138

Prime Positioned Home with Abundant Accommodation 24 Kenneth Kaunda (Northway) Road, Durban North Extent: ± 1 414 m² | Well situated in Durban North off Kenneth Kaunda Drive | Newly built outbuilding with 8 apartments | Staff quarters | Swimming pool | 1.5kms from Varsity College

AUCT-001387

Luke | 071 351 8138

AUCT-001397

Muhammad | 079 458 4256

AUCT-001391

Luke | 071 351 8138

Mansion Situated in an Exclusive Umhlanga Node 11 Pearl Drive, Herrwood Park Umhlanga Extent: ± 1 401 m² | Situated in the Exclusive Herwood Park | High end finishes | Large swimming pool | Double storey property on a large stand | Exquisite views of Umhlanga and the Indian Ocean

INSOLVENT ESTATE UM HL AN GA RO CK SD RIV E

DEFAULT SALE

AUCT-001386

ESCENT GLENMORE CR

Luke | 071 351 8138

Magnificent 5 Bedroom Mansion 19 Burnham Drive, Lower La Lucia Extent: ± 1 403 m² | The Premier street address in Lower La Lucia | 5 En-suite bedrooms plus staff accommodation | A secure guard house | Spectacular sea views | Sophisticated finishes | 32 KVA Generator | 10 000L Filtered jojo tank

AUCT-001390

Luke | 071 351 8138

Tenanted Industrial & Commercial Park 4 Ivy Road, Pinetown Extent: ± 2 632 m² | Multiple units in this business park | Industrial & commercial units | Income generating property | Good investment and end user opportunity

AUCT-001393

Virend | 071 383 1735

25 x Industrial Mini Factories in Hillcrest Sections 2-12, 18, 19, 21-26, 30-32 & 34-36 Fischer Park, Blessing Ninela (Fischer) Road, Hillcrest Combined Extent: ± 9 629 m² | Gross Annual Income: ± R3.9 Million | Mini-factories range from ± 275 m² to ± 800 m² | Sold individually or as a combined lot

AUCT-001396

39 TIMAVO DRIVE

Virend | 071 383 1735

4 Bedroom House on Upmarket Street of La Lucia 39 Timavo Drive, La Lucia Insolvent Estate: L Roome Master’s Ref No.: D12/2012 & Insolvent Estate: C B Vermeulen Master’s Ref No.: D142/2017 Site extent: ± 1 394 m² | 4 Bedrooms | 2 Bathrooms | Lounge, dining room and kitchen | Independent bachelor flat | Double garage | Pool, Koi pond, braai area & large garden

3 Industrial Units in Durban North Sections 22, 23 & 24 Kingfisher Park, 45 Marseilles Crescent, Briardene 3 Individual units | Individual Extents: ± 185 m² | Combined Extent: ± 555 m² | Double volume height | Easy access of Queen Nandi Drive

BUSINESS RESCUE

STREET KING SHAKA (COUPER)

AUCT-001394

Luke | 071 351 8138

Tenanted A-Grade Commercial Investment Section 4 Torino Court, 4 Crooked Lane, Hillcrest Extent: ± 241 m2 | Income generating investment | A-Grade offices | Located in a secure office complex | Gross Annual Income: ± R519 K | Investment and end user potential

AUCT-001389

Luke | 071 351 8138

Fully Tenanted Industrial Park 22 Cassiafield Grove, Springfield Park Extent: ± 1 064 m² | 3 Separate industrial units | Fully tenanted | Located in Springfield Park | Immaculate industrial property | Good investment and end-user opportunity

CRI SPA ROA D

CRA SSU LA

PAP ILIO CLO SE

ROA D

CORNUBIA INDUSTRIAL PARK

AUCT-001388

Muhammad | 079 458 4256 AUCT-001398

2 Bedroom Apartment on Durban Beachfront Flat 21 Sahara Sands, 25 Nathaniel Isaacs Crescent, North Beach Extent: ± 77 m² | 2 Bedrooms | 2 En-suite bathrooms | 1 Undercover parking bay | 2nd Floor unit | Walking distance to the beach Viewing: Sunday 29 November 2020 from 14h00 - 16h00

Luke | 071 351 8138

High Trade Retail Property with Multiple Blue-Chip Tenants 112-114 King Shaka (Couper) Street, Stanger Extent: ± 2 043 m² | High trade zone | A number of blue-chip tenants | High exposure onto Couper Street | Good income on the property | Gross Annual Income: ± R4.7 Million (Incl. recoveries)

High Quality Offices Section 5 The Summit, 2 Derby Place, Westville Extent: ± 611 m² | Unit 5 | Good quality commercial office Good investment and end user opportunity

BUSINESS RESCUE

GE BRID GATE TOLL

1

HWAY JAN SMUTS HIG

AUCT-001358

Luke | 071 351 8138

AAA Office Block 7 Bush Shrike Close, Victoria Country Club Estate, Pietermaritzburg GLA ± 1 828 m² | Leases in place | Stunning views | Investment opportunity

AUCT-001371

Virend | 071 383 1735

Development Land in Cornubia Industrial & Business Estate 31 Papilio Close, Cornubia Site extent: ± 5 400 m² | Flat service land | Frontage to Crassula Road and Crispa Road | Prime location close to King Shaka International Airport | Architectural designs drawn up for a warehouse of ± 2 800 m²

AUCT-001380

Muhammad | 079 458 4256 AUCT-001399

Well Positioned Industrial Property Section 14 Maywest Centre, 57 King Cetshwayo (Jan Smuts) Highway, Durban Total Extent: ± 495 m² | Mezanine offices & storage | 3 Phase power supply | Easy access from the N3 | Vacant occupation

Muhammad | 079 458 4256 AUCT-001365

4 Bedroom Home 6 Spantou Street, Roodekrans, Johannesburg Extent: ± 1 000 m² | 4 Bedrooms | 3 Bathrooms | Double garage | Swimming pool

3

M13 2

Muhammad | 079 458 4256

High Exposure Development Site 1, 2 & 3 Khaled Road (Off Cliffdale Road), Assagay Total Extent: ± 27 367 m² | Zoning: Business Park | High exposure and easy access to N3 and M13 | Ideally situated for high brand exposure and advertising

Auction Date and Time: 09 December 2020 | 11h00 | Auction Venue: The Durban Country Club, Isaiah Ntshangase Road | Terms: R50 000 refundable registration deposit. Strictly by bank guaranteed cheque or EFT. FICA Documents are required | Auctioneer: Andrew Miller The Rules of Auction & CPA Regulations can be viewed at www.in2assets.com or at Unit 505, 5th Floor, Strauss Daly Place, 41 Richefond Circle, Ridgeside Office Park, Umhlanga Ridge. Bidders must register to bid and provide original proof of identity and residence on registration. The Rules of Auction contain the registration requirements if you intend to bid on behalf of another person or an entity. The above properties are subject to a reserve price and the sale by auction is subject to a right to bid by or on behalf of the owner or auctioneer.


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ON AUCTION

ONLINE TIMED AUCTION 24 NOVEMBER 2020

AUCT-001395

Luke | 071 351 8138

Newly Renovated Mansion In Cotswold Downs Golf Estate 3 Chipping Camden Close, Cotswold Downs, Hillcrest Site Extent: ± 1 195 m² | Building Extent ± 770 m² | Magnificent views | Situated on the 9th Fairway overlooking lush bush and the 9th Green | Previously the Course Clubhouse | High end finishes | 2.5 Storey property on a large stand | No transfer duty payable

Auction Date and Time: 24 November 2020 | 11h00 | Visit https://auctions.in2assets.co.za to register for this auction | Terms: R25 000 refundable registration deposit. Strictly by EFT. FICA Documents are required

0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com www.in2assets.com

LIVE STUDIO AUCTION 25 NOVEMBER 2020

AUCT-001331

Tom | 083 636 7800 AUCT-001372

± 1 655 Ha Irrigation and Livestock Farm – Nylstroom 40km on R33 from Nylstroom to Vaalwater, then left to Alma, 1km west of Alma, Limpopo Matter: T & I Bouwer Boerdery (Pty) Ltd (In Liquidation) Master’s Reference No.: N000051/2020 Total Extent: ± 1 655 Ha (7 adjoining portions) | ± 348 Ha Irrigated land under centre pivot | ± 250 Ha Arable dryland | ± 1 047 Ha Grazing

Tom | 083 636 7800 AUCT-001373

Large Development Site within Industrial Node Cnr of M57 & Porcelain Ave, Clayville EXT 27 Extent: ± 9.5 Ha | Four portions | Largely vacant land | Improved with admin office |Good access off M57 and in close proximity to R21 and N1 | Prominent street frontage

± 4 Ha Vacant Land in Withok Estates 235 Mans Street, Withok Estates, Brakpan Extent: ± 4 Ha | Vacant flat land | Good access off M57 | Located between Heidelberg and Brakpan

Tom | 083 636 7800

Auction Date and Time: 25 November 2020 | 11h00 | Visit https://auctions.in2assets.co.za to register for this auction | Terms: R50 000 refundable registration deposit. Strictly by EFT. FICA Documents are required | Auctioneer: Andrew Miller

LIVE STUDIO AUCTION 26 NOVEMBER 2020

AUCT-001338

In2assets | 0861 444 769 AUCT-001351

In2assets | 0861 444 769

AUCT-001352

In2assets | 0861 444 769

AUCT-001353

In2assets | 0861 444 769

AUCT-001355

In2assets | 0861 444 769 AUCT-001356

In2assets | 0861 444 769

AUCT-001377

In2assets | 0861 444 769 AUCT-001376

In2assets | 0861 444 769

±1 740 Ha Livestock, Game and Irrigation Farm Between East London and Komga, Eastern Cape Including: ±1 680 ha Grazing | ± 60 ha Irrigated arable land | ±12km of River frontage – The Great Kei River | Implement shed, cattle handling facilities, office, staff houses | Hiking, mountain biking, fishing, 4x4 trails Viewing By Appointment

Vacant Plots in Morgans Bay 243 & 244 Pampus Place, Morgans Bay, East London Erf 243 - Extent: ± 709 m² | Erf 244 - Extent: ± 819 m² | Total Combined Extent: ± 1 528 m² | Panoramic views Less then 1km from the beach | Development opportunity | Vacant occupation

Redevelopment Opportunity in Morgans Bay 238 Pampus Place, Morgan’s Bay, East London Estate Late: D.S Mitchley Masters Reference Number: 003452/2019 Extent: ± 776 m² | Renovation opportunity | Situated along the river and offers panoramic views | Less than 1 Km from the beach | Vacant occupation

Vacant Land in Morgans Bay 245 Pampus Place, Morgans Bay, East London Estate Late: D.S Mitchley Masters Reference Number: 003452/2019 Extent: ± 850 m² | Panoramic views | Less than 1 Km from the beach | Vacant occupation

Vacant plot in Katberg Katberg Eco Golf Estate, Eastern Cape Extent: ± 750 m² | Situated in the majestic mountainous area of the Katberg Eco Golf Estate | The estate offers an 18-hole classic country style golf course | Investment opportunity to build a home away from home | Vacant occupation

Sought After Residential Home 45 Ries Avenue, Butterworth, Eastern Cape Extent: ± 1 163 m² | GLA: ± 280 m² | 3 Bedrooms | 1 Bathroom | Lounge, dining room and kitchen | Outside room with single garage | Fully fenced and secure

Vacant Plots in Berlin 6, 10 & 14 Bauer Road, Berlin, Eastern Cape Extent: ± 4 047 m² (each) / ± 16 188 m² (combined) | Residential development opportunity for 17 units per hectare | Vacant occupation

Investment Opportunity 44 Drake Road, Bonnie Doon, East London Extent: ± 1 460 m² | GLA: ± 320 m² | 4 Bedrooms | 3 Bathrooms | Open plan lounge and dining room with kitchen | Double garage | Month to month tenancy

Auction Date & Time: 26 November 2020 | 11h00 | Visit https://auctions.in2assets.co.za to register for this auction | Terms: R50 000 refundable registration deposit. Strictly by EFT. FICA Documents are required | Auctioneer: Andrew Miller

ON-SITE AUCTION 01 DECEMBER 2020

Outstanding Grazing Farm 21km South of Normandien on Cundycleigh Pass Road, Normandien, KZN Extent: ± 994 Ha | Winter and Summer grazing | 6 Camps | 1 Registered stock dam | Perennial river that waters each camp | Potential for ± 130 Ha arable dry lands Viewing By Appointment

AUCT-001375

Tom | 083 636 7800

Auction Date & Time: 01 December 2020 | 11h00 | Auction Venue: On-site, Off Collings Pass Road, Normandien, KZN | Terms: R50 000 refundable registration deposit. Strictly by bank guaranteed cheque or EFT. FICA documents are required | Auctioneer: Andrew Miller

VISIT OUR WEBSITE: WWW.IN2ASSETS.COM FOR A DETAILED LISTING OF ALL UPCOMING AUCTIONS OR GO TO: AUCTIONS.IN2ASSETS.CO.ZA TO REGISTER TO BID ONLINE

The Rules of Auction & CPA Regulations can be viewed at www.in2assets.com or at Unit 505, 5th Floor, Strauss Daly Place, 41 Richefond Circle, Ridgeside Office Park, Umhlanga Ridge. Bidders must register to bid and provide original proof of identity and residence on registration. The Rules of Auction contain the registration requirements if you intend to bid on behalf of another person or an entity. The above properties are subject to a reserve price and the sale by auction is subject to a right to bid by or on behalf of the owner or auctioneer.


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HOME LOANS

Now is the time to find out how much you qualify for as the repo rate is at a record low. Celestine is always available to take your call and guide you through the process from application through to registration. She will pre-qualify you for a home loan before you start house hunting. A pre-approval is very useful when house hunting as it helps the agent narrow down which properties to show you and not waste unnecessary time. Complete one application and she will apply to all 4 major banks and negotiate the best interest rate on your behalf. Call her for quick and efficient service Please feel free to contact Celestine at any time on 084 559 1786 | celestine@property360.co.za

www.property360.co.za

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Profile for ANAPublishing

Property360 - National Digital Magazine - 20 November 2020  

The Coronavirus pandemic has exposed the harsh inequalities of our country's housing and social systems, and this week's magazine shares exp...

Property360 - National Digital Magazine - 20 November 2020  

The Coronavirus pandemic has exposed the harsh inequalities of our country's housing and social systems, and this week's magazine shares exp...