__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

E v e ry t h i n g e a s t e n d

THE

Vo l 2 5

no 13

N ov e m b e r 2 2 2 0 1 7

1826

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

free

Home For The Holidays p. 33

Peconic Estuary, p 14

The Hills, p 15

Guest Worthy Recipe, p 61

Football, p 86


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m Mard_Indep_OpenHousePgAd_Nov17.qxp_Mard_Indep_OpenHousePgAd_Nov17Nu 12:58 t h e I n d 11/16/17 epend e nPM t Page 1

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Please join us..

Marders 42nd Annual Open House NOVEMBER 24, 25 & 26

9-5 DAILY

FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY “Our customers tell us that Marders Open House has been part of their family’s holiday tradition for years. Come celebrate with us and find exceptional gifts for all of your family and friends. The Open House is our way of saying thank you.” – Kathleen and Charlie

OPEN HOUSE EVENTS Sneak Peek Wednesday, November 22nd 5-8 PM – Join us for Champagne • Friday-Sunday, 1-4 PM – Live music • Friday-Sunday, 1-3 PM – Birds of Prey • Friday, 11 AM-1 PM – Friendly life-size Honey Bee along with Mary Woltz’s Bountiful Bee lecture. Honey tasting to follow.

• Saturday, 10 AM-12 PM – The return of the Genesis Gospel Choir • Sunday, 10 AM-1:30 PM – Face painting, hair braiding and tattoos for kids • Sunday, 10 AM-12:00 PM – Bird lecture, Bird walk – bring your binoculars

“Fill Your Bill” Children’s bird activity table. Presented by South Fork Natural History Museum • See how we custom make wreaths and centerpieces • Traditional cakes, cookies & hot mulled cider • See for yourself why we won Dan’s Papers Best of the Best Gold for Landscaper and Nursery

120 Snake Hollow Road, Bridgehampton · 631.537.3700 · info@marders.com

2


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

THE ENZO MORABITO TEAM

T U R N I N G R E F E R R A L S I N T O R E S U LT S

*

SOLD IN 2017* Sag Harbor | $4,500,000

SOLD IN 2017* Quiogue | $3,800,000

SOLD IN 2017* East Quogue | $2,500,000

SOLD IN 2017* East Hampton | $5,400,000

SOLD IN 2017* Amagansett | $1,292,500

SOLD IN 2017* Westhampton Beach | $3,250,000

SOLD IN 2017* East Quogue | $650,000

SOLD IN 2017* East Hampton | $2,400,000

SOLD IN 2017* Westhampton | $6,500,000

SOLD IN 2017* Sag Harbor| $3,160,000

Enzo on Long Wharf in Sag Harbor

This is just a small assortment of our sold properties from 2017

#1 Top Producing Team In The Hamptons For 7 Years Running By GCI

ENZO MORABITO TEAM Lic. Assoc. R.E. Broker

Office: 631.537.6519 Cell: 516.695.3433 emorabito@elliman.com

elliman.com

2488 MAIN ST, P.O. BOX 1251, BRIDGEHAMPTON, NY 11932. 631.537.5900 | © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

3


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Community News

By Kitty Merrill

Fatalities Spark Drug Forum

everyone else was packing their kids off to go to college, I packed mine off to go to rehab. That shouldn’t happen,” Ventura said.

Paul Maffetone wore a hoodie with a shock-value inscription in large letters: “I hate heroin.” After the overdose that killed his older brother at age 29, the North Fork resident founded “Michael’s Hope,” a nonprofit with the mission of raising awareness of the addiction epidemic on the East End.

“We know better. We should do better. No more sweeping it under the rug,” she continued. Families need to be educated, teach their children coping skills, and how to handle their emotions. Kim Laube of the youth development program HUGS, agreed. “Kids know drugs are bad. We have to take the conversation further.”

People don’t want to acknowledge the problem, Maffetone agreed, taking his seat in the audience. They’re afraid property values would be diminished if people found out that, set among the oceanfront mansions and quaint villages on the Twin Forks, drug dealers and drug addicts lurk.

Father Constantine Lazarakis from the Greek Orthodox Church of the Hamptons built on Laube’s comment. It’s the responsibility of the community and adults to commence a “very aggressive” community campaign challenging adults to look at and tackle their own issues and attitudes towards alcohol and drugs. The priest was not alone in mentioning that partying is a cultural norm in the Hamptons. “We need to shake people up,” he said.

Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman watched people file into the auditorium at Hampton Bays High School last Wednesday night. He recognized some who had been at a hearing about a controversial development the night before. “This,” he said emphatically, “is life or death.” In the wake of a staggering uptick in overdose fatalities -- nearly triple in 2017 compared to last year -Schneiderman and the town board convened an opioid addiction task force. On November 15, just weeks after its inception, the task force hosted a public forum entitled “It Hits Home.” Lars Clemensen, Hampton Bays School district superintendent, opened the forum, explaining the task force’s goal -- to develop an action plan to deal with the drug epidemic on the East End. Schneiderman said the 27-member task force wanted to hear “how the opioid epidemic affects our lives personally” from the community. Drug overdoses claim the lives of 142 people every day in America. In Suffolk County, there’s an overdose every day and in the Town of Southampton, with its approximately 60,000 residents, someone dies every month. “One person from our community is being snatched from us every month,” the supervisor said. “Our job is to prevent the next one, to identify the next possible victim.” 4

Independent/Kitty Merrill Paul Maffetone founded a nonprofit group after his brother succumbed to drug addiction.

Recovery Is Possible “It happened to me, it could happen to you,” said Drew Scott. The retired News 12 anchor lost his 22-year-old granddaughter Hallie Rae to overdose earlier this year. Schneiderman related that he ran into Scott after Hallie Rae’s death and, “He said ‘I want to dedicate myself to changing things.’” The task force idea sprang from that conversation. Dr. Jeffrey Reynolds, the president and executive officer of Family and Children’s Association, a member of the governor’s heroin and opioid task force, the Nassau County heroin prevention task force, and the Suffolk County sober home oversight board, was the evening’s keynote speaker.

He directed audience members to look around the room. There were about 250 people in attendance. By the end of this year, twice as many as those assembled will have died from overdoses, Reynolds said. Still,

he noted, the disease of addiction is preventable, treatable, and “recovery is absolutely possible.” There’s no magic bullet but, he said, there are “a whole bunch of things we can do to make progress.”

Reynolds recalled working during the AIDS crisis, wearing pins that said “Silence = Death,” and vowing “Never again.” But, he said, “We’re doing it again.” The stigma attached to addiction was a recurrent theme throughout the forum. If her son had cancer, there would have been spaghetti dinners stacked up in her fridge, Linda Ventura said. Instead, her son Thomas, became “the scourge of the community.” The founder of the Thomas Hope Foundation, Ventura travels the county telling her son’s story. “I’ve been where you are,” she told audience members. “I don’t want you to be where I am.” Thomas started with marijuana and alcohol and in three short years died of an overdose. “When

“Dropping Like Flies” The conversation has changed in law enforcement, STPD Chief Steven Skrynecki informed. Without ignoring the petty crimes perpetrated by addicts, cops are also trained to look at them as people who need treatment. Officers are called to conduct NARCAN saves on a daily basis and sometimes confront addicts they’ve brought back from the brink two or three times before. “We try to connect them to treatment,” the chief said. “Good luck with that,” was the message a number of speakers offered, once the microphones were turned over to the audience. Attorney Lisa Logan articulated a litany of stumbling blocks she faced when trying to get her son help. She has “the best insurance,” and still couldn’t find a place for adequate treatment. “Stop saying we have programs. We don’t,” she declared.

Waiting lists of three to six months, private pay facilities only the wealthy can afford, and programs that don’t provide what’s promised Continued On Page 70.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

The best value for propane. That’s the Petro promise.

Call now and get

1.866.539.5293

petro.com

*$100 heating propane credit is available for new automatic delivery customers only. Offer is delivered as an account credit and subject to credit approval. Additional terms and conditions apply. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Offer expires 3/31/18. Nassau Lic. No. H36006309. Suffolk Lic. Nos. 3134-P, 2901-RE. NYC Lic. No. 1314079. Š2017 Petro. P_17536

5


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Jerry’s Ink

to say he was going to make America great again.

by Jerry Della Femina

THINGS I’M THANKFUL FOR AND THINGS I’M NOT THANKFUL FOR I’M THANKFUL THAT I’M NOT: Harvey Weinstein … Kevin Spacey … James Toback … Brett Ratner … Roy Price … Mark Halperin … Steven Seagal … Roy Moore and on and on and on. I’M NOT THANKFUL THAT LOUIS CK ADMITTED HE WAS A SEX CREEP So Louis CK admitted his accusers were telling the truth when they said he forced them to watch him masturbate. He’s still a disgusting, bullying sex creep. Please don’t tell me he deserves a big hand (cheap joke) for admitting the truth. I AM THANKFUL TO STILL BE ALIVE AFTER A YEAR OF TRUMP

Let’s see, we have survived a full year with Donald Trump as President. With a minimum of at least five lies a day, he’s lied to us over 1500 times this year. He’s playing “My nukes are bigger than yours” with the little demented fat kid who’s running North Korea. Now, if you’re still a Trump fan after all this, why don’t you take out your favorite crayon and write me a nasty letter. I’M THANKFUL THAT I SURVIVED EIGHT YEARS WITH OBAMA AS PRESIDENT Obama is lucky that Trump has made him the second-worst president in my lifetime. What is it with Democrats? They must know Obama was a lousy president. Obama was so lousy that he paved the way for Donald Trump

Obama’s foreign policy was weak and it cost us. He pulled all of our troops out of Iraq when we had it under control, and that’s when an unstable Iraq gave birth to ISIS.

Then there was Syria, where millions were killed when Obama chickened out after his “Don’t go over my red line” threat. Then there was Benghazi, Iran, North Korea, etc. etc. Obama was all voice and no strength.

2 0 M a i n   S t r e e t   S a g   H a r b o r   6  3  1  .  8  0  8  .  3  4  0  1   www.HarborBooksSGH.com  

H a r b o r B o o k s   6

Tag Us:     #harborbookssgh   #bookup  

2017

WHO WILL HAPPILY DIE BY SIMPLY CROSSING A STREET Don’t feel bad for them. They will be hit by a car when they close off the world and become mesmerized while clutching and staring at the one thing they love even more than life – their iPhone. I’M THANKFUL FOR THE SINGLE DUMBEST QUOTE I WILL EVER HEAR IN MY LIFETIME

Obama, who was the popular choice for President of millions of black and white Americans, managed in eight years to start a conflict between races. It started when, according to Michael Eric Dyson in Politico, “just months after his inauguration, he controversially claimed police had ‘acted stupidly’ in arresting Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. for disorderly conduct outside his own home, that act nailed shut for the President the coffin of honest racial engagement.”

The world is filled with dopey politicians, but every once in a while one of them says something so stupid that he stands out from the other morons. Jim Ziegler, a Republican idiot, brought me great happiness in his defense of Roy Moore, a Republican running for the Senate in Alabama. Five or six women are claiming Moore sexually fondled and abused them when he was a District Attorney in his 30s and some of them were as young as 14 years old.

I’M THANKFUL FOR THE THOUSANDS OF IDIOTS

I’M THANKFUL THAT DUMB DEMOCRATS COME IN A CLOSE SECOND TO REPUBLICANS WHEN IT COMES TO STUPID QUOTES

Rusty Weiss and Cliff Kincaid wrote, “The morning after Election Day, 2008, The New York Times proclaimed that Barack Obama’s victory had swept ‘away the last racial barrier in American politics.’ However, a case can be made that the historic election was anything but post-racial; rather, it has been the most racially polarizing presidency in modern times.”

GALLERY

Visit Us  at    

N ov e m b e r 2 2

THE MODERNIST COLOR FRANKENTHALER RIVERS AVERY GORKY CARLES SLOAN BELLOWS BLUEMNER SARGENT JANET LEHR GALLERY DAILY 11aT0 9p 631-324-3303

“There is nothing to see here,” Jim Ziegler told the Washington Examiner. “The allegations are that a man in his early 30s dated teenage girls. Even the Washington Post report says that he never had sexual intercourse with any of the girls and never attempted sexual intercourse.” He later added, “Also take Joseph and Mary. Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus.”

Here’s a gem of wisdom from the Mother Superior of Morons: “We just have to pass the Healthcare Bill to see what’s in it.” -- Nancy Pelosi (2010) (As one physician said, “That is also the perfect definition of a stool sample.”) “My fear is that the whole island will become so overly populated that it will tip over and capsize.” -- Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) (speaking at a hearing on Guam, 2010)

“My fear is if North Korea nukes us, Trump’s gonna get us into a war.” -Maxine Waters (2017)

If you wish to comment on “Jerry’s Ink” please send your message to jerry@dfjp.com.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

7


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Sand In My Shoes by Denis Hamill

IT’S A WONDERFUL FIGHT Give thanks for people like Teddy Atlas.

It was a wonderful crowd that came together at the annual “Atlas Dinner” like a giant triumphant fist to fight to make the lives of others less fortunate a little bit better. There was no racial, ethnic, or religious division.

Everyone had come together, over a thousand strong, to help out fellow people in need a week before Thanksgiving like a heart lifting scene out of a Frank Capra movie, like It’s a Wonderful Life.

They came from all over the place -- from Connecticut, Jersey, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Texas, and Florida, and Nassau and Suffolk to the Hilton Garden Inn ballroom in Staten Island to the Dr. Theodore Atlas Foundation annual fundraising dinner. Only Teddy Atlas, ESPN commentator and boxing guru who trained two world heavyweight champions -- Mike Tyson and Michael Moorer -- could bring together so many sports, entertainment, and media bold face names such as Phil Sims, Evander Holyfield, Tony Danza, sports journalist Russ Salzberg, Harry Carter, Tony “Paulie Walnuts” Sirico, Chuck “Oz” and “Sons of Anarchy” Zito, Roy White, Vinny “Big Pussy” Pastore, Cairan “Les Miserables” Sheehan, Chuck “The Bayonne Bleeder” Wepner, Burt “Rocky” Young.

“When I was a kid I used to tag along with my father who was a medical doctor who one day a week would do house calls for poor people who had no money for decent health care,” Teddy Atlas told me. “He would go into poor neighborhoods, the housing projects, and just visit people. Give them checkups, write prescriptions, give vaccines. They would repay him with a cup of 8

coffee or a sandwich.”

In the days before the majestic Verrazano Bridge was built, Staten Island was the forgotten borough of New York City. It was very much small-town America, no different than Bedford Falls in It’s A Wonderful Life. I lived there back then and the tight knit community in Staten Island wasn’t much different from Shelter Island or Sag Harbor in the off-season. Teddy’s father opened the hospital for the poor on Staten Island that was torn down to make way for the Verrazano.

“Sometimes I’d see my dad visit the same elderly patient in a week and I’d ask what he was suffering from,” Teddy says. “He said loneliness, which can be lethal because it makes you lose your will to live. I gave him sugar pills, a conversation, and the feeling that someone out there cares.”

Twenty-one years ago, after Teddy’s dad died in his 80s and Teddy Atlas became a megastar in the world of boxing, he founded the Dr. Theodore A. Atlas Foundation to keep the name and amazingly selfless deeds of his father alive. “The idea was to help those people who fall through the cracks of the system,” he says. “Sick or disabled people whose true needs are not always covered by medical insurance. We’ve built ramps for the wheelchair-bound, got special vans for quadriplegics. We helped people destroyed by Hurricane Sandy, we have made sure kids with terminal illnesses meet their sports or film idols and paid for their family’s transportation to special out of state clinics so mom and dad could be at their bedside. Sadly, we have paid for small caskets and headstones when those stories don’t have happy endings.” I’ve met and written about people the Atlas Foundation helps: a

Denis Hamill, left, at the Atlas Dinner, with Chuck Wepner who knocked down the great Muhammad Ali and inspired the movie Rocky.

woman who could finally go to the corner store and Sunday church with a motorized scooter provided by the money raised at the annual Dr. Atlas Dinner a week before Thanksgiving and the caring celebrities who often fly across the country to help attract them. “I’d come from anywhere for Teddy Atlas and the people he helps,” said Tony Danza, a boxer before he became a star. “He has the heart of a champion.”

“I’d go to the gates of hell for Teddy,” said Chuck Zito. “He cares about common people the same way he does about champions.” “Teddy is the salt of the Earth,” said Russ Salzberg. “Almost every dime he raises goes directly to people who need it most.”

Chuck Wepner, who went 15 rounds with the great Muhammad Ali, dropping the champ in the ninth round and inspiring the movie Rocky, shook his head looking at Atlas. “The guy is pure and cares about the little people,” Wepner says. “It’s an honor to be invited to this event.” Teddy often shows up in person to assess a bad situation and provide the money or red tape cutting necessary to correct it.

“This is not a Staten Island charity,” Teddy says. “We’ve helped young woman from down south who needed a heart transplant get to the right doctor in New York. We got a mom suffering from cancer

front row seats for her toddler at the Big Apple Circus. We’ve helped families on Long Island, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania. If I see a story in the paper about a kid being hurt or sick who needs a helping hand I hear my father whispering in my ear to reach out.”

Teddy also sponsors three Atlas Cops and Kids boxing gyms in some of the city’s toughest neighborhoods. He sees them as preventive medicine against the sickness of violent street crime. “The gyms have a licensed school teacher on premises to help with homework before a kid can climb in the ring to be trained by members of the NYDN Boxing Team,” says Pat Russo, a retired NYPD detective who runs the program. “The police commissioner comes to thank Teddy and the people because he knows there is no way to measure how many crimes don’t happen because those kids are in our gyms. Every time a kid who might have joined a gang hears a boxing bell ring in those gyms another angel of the Atlas Foundation gets its wings.” This is the kind of spirit to give thanks for on Thanksgiving. This is a wonderful template for every community in the country. This is a wonderful charity that helps give the forgotten a hand up off the canvas to get back into the fight for a wonderful life. Happy Thanksgiving.

To comment on Sand in my Shoes, email denishamill@gmail.com.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

IF YOU ARE 62 OR OVER, A REVERSE MORTGAGE LOAN MIGHT MAKE YOUR LIFE EASIER LEARN THE FACTS WITH FIVE STAR REVERSE FUNDING 1. Is Social Security paying you enough? Investments running low? Maybe you still have a mortgage or credit cards to pay ? The good news is the FHA Insured Reverse Mortgage Loan is here to help! 2. Ownership of your home stays the same doing a reverse mortgage loan, you can move, sell or stay in your home the rest of your life! Just pay your taxes, insurance, maintain your property to FHA standards and live in home as your primary residence. 3. There are no monthly payments to make, but you can prepay the loan anytime without penalty, you get a monthly statement not a bill! 4. Five Star Reverse Funding is a local Suffolk County Company, Serving Long Island, Rated “A+” by the Better Business Bureau. 5. Russell is a Reverse Mortgage Loan expert devoting 100% of his time educating folks on reverse mortgage loans. In Fact his 93 year old mom enjoys what a Reverse Mortgage Loan does for her. 6. Russell will meet with you “face to face” and in “plain english”, answer all your questions and concerns that you may have. 7. Visit RussCares.com to learn more and hear testimonials.

WORK WITH OWNER & SAVE THOUSANDS $$

FREE “IN HOME” CONSULTATION CALL

631-589-7827 AS HEARD DAILY ON

A+

Rating

Russell Joseph Arceri PRESIDENT/CEO MLO #7071

A+ Rating with the BBB Member Chamber of Commerce Member Senior Umbrella Network Licensed, Insured & Bonded Notary Public

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

VISIT: RUSSCARES.COM TO LEARN MORE AND HEAR TESTIMONIALS

Five Star Reverse Funding located at 1376 Locust Ave, Bohemia NY 11716 is a Registered Mortgage Broker with the New York State Department of Financial Service. NMLS # MLO #7071 & NMLS #32828. Five Star Reverse Funding may not make mortgage loans and arranges all mortgage loans with third party providers. This Document and material contained in is not from HUD or FHA and were not approved by HUD or any governmental agency. You must still live in the home as your primary residence, continue to pay required property taxes, homeowners insurance, and maintain the home according to Federal Housing Administration requirements.

9


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Community News

Across The Threshold

Day One Demo: Hard Hats & Happiness

Volunteers, family, and friends pose for a group photo on the official house start day. Independent/Kitty Merrill

By Kitty Merrill

Welcome to the second installment of The Independent’s Across the Threshold series. We’re following Melissa and Kyle Lohr’s journey as Habitat for Humanity, Riverhead Building Supply, and scores of volunteers fulfill the newlyweds’ dream of a home of their own. Visit the www. indyeastend.com archives to read part one in the November 15 edition.

Dancing with excitement and shedding tears of joy – and that was just an observer. Asked to say a few words before the ribbon was cut, Melissa Lohr couldn’t. Standing at the front door of the house that would become a home for her and her husband Kyle, she wiped away a tear and said simply, “I’m happy.”

Friends, family, experts, benefactors, and officials gathered in East Quogue last week for the official

10

“house start” – the beginning of work on the Lohrs’ Habitat for Humanity house.

“It’s just such an exciting day,” Les Scheinfeld, director of development for Habitat said, opening the ribbon-cutting ceremony, noting “tremendous support from our friends at Riverhead Building Supply.” RBS has been an integral Habitat partner for years and is offering a full house sponsorship to the Lohrs.

On site last week, they also offered hands-on support in the form of 15 expert -- and not so expert – volunteers. Veteran carpenters were on hand to help, but so too was staff from Riverhead Building Supply’s corporate office. On a ladder in what would become the kitchen, Keith Davis, a manager from Northport, just shrugged when asked why he decided to come out east to tear down a ceiling.

“They needed volunteers,” he said. Upstairs in a front bedroom, Stacy, Victoria, and Stephanie toiled in a tight space, ripping sheetrock from the walls and puzzling over how to remove the molding around a window. The three women work at RBS upisland – they’re accountants and attorneys.

With speeches, acknowledgements, and press interviews completed, Melissa and Kyle were finally able to enter the house they’d been driving past for months. They didn’t cross the front threshold, though. It was already cordoned off by workers on ladders pulling down rusty gutters. They came in through a side door. “We’re standing in our kitchen,” Melissa breathed. The pair was aiming for a set of temporary stairs leading to the second floor. “When we were listening to the speeches, Kyle kept nudging me to look

inside, we wanted to go upstairs. We’re going to have a laundry room!” Melissa said.

The second floor was crammed with volunteers tearing down sheetrock in each of the four small bedrooms. Melissa and Kyle spent most of the day working on the first floor, carrying debris to a rapidly filling dumpster. Before work could commence, construction manager Chris McNamee addressed the volunteers. Years ago, prior to signing on with Habitat, she ran a daycare center. That gave her the experience necessary to handle volunteers, she joked.

“No one goes inside without a hard hat,” she emphasized, offering a safety primer. Hard hats, work suits, gloves, and construction aprons with the RBS logo were available for everyone; McNamee explained

Continued On Page 71.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

FARMS WATER MILL, NY

Storewide Nursey Sale 20% - 50% off All Items

Come In And Be Inspired

THE BEST SELECTION OF ANNUALS • PERENNIALS • TROPICALS • TREES • SHRUBS

Where Home Gardeners & Professionals Shop

OPEN 7 DAYS • 8 AM - 5 PM 1260 Montauk Highway • Water Mill • Just West of The Milk Pail P (631) 726-1961 • Fax (631) 726-4940

DELIVERY AVAILABLE

11


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Community News

Ocean Friendly Garden: It’s Just Swale

Independent/James J. Mackin The ocean friendly garden is designed to filter road runoff using native plants.

By Kitty Merrill

According to teacher Lisa Lawler, “We met with Steve Mahoney and Colleen Henn from our local Surfrider Foundation, East Hampton Chapter. They taught us about ocean friendly gardens and

The East Hampton Middle School Student Association and Surfrider Club recently visited the ocean friendly garden near Town Pond in East Hampton Village.

WHO KEEPS YOU WARM? Independent/Courtesy East Hampton Middle School

Heating Oil & Propane • Great Prices • Certified Techs & Drivers • Dependable Delivery • Service Plans • 24 Hr Emergency Service • Locally Operated Over 25 Yrs

Licensed/Insured

 NEW PROPANE CUSTOMERS  ASK ABOUT COMPETITIVE PRICES

Tank Monitoring & Installation - including underground tanks

SOUTH FORK

631-283-9302

NORTH FORK

631-298-0404

w w w. HardyEnerg yLI .com

12

The East Hampton Middle School Student Association and Surfrider Club recently visited the ocean friendly garden near Town Pond in East Hampton Village.

how the gardens by Town Pond benefit our oceans. These gardens filter rainwater and help soak up any standing water that may have resulted from a heavy rainfall. As of now, the garden is doing great and is helping to improve our local waterways in East Hampton Village. All the plants in this ocean friendly garden are native to the area as well.”

The garden was planted last spring, a collaborative project between Surfrider and the Ladies Village Improvement Society, which maintains the village-owned space. The goal of the garden – besides beauty – is to filter runoff that flows to Town Pond, Hook Pond, and the ocean. The Surfrider’s Ocean Friendly Gardens program “see landscapes and streets as solutions to water

pollution – and more,” according to its website. The approach includes contouring landscapes for rainwater retention, creating living soil to sponge up water, filter pollution, and sequester carbon and installing climate-appropriate plants to create wildlife habitat and a sense of place. At the Town Pond green, three bioswales were installed to absorb and filter road runoff near the base of the Main Street flagpole. Flood tolerant plants were planted in the swales, which were connected by plants that follow the natural contour of the green. According to the Surfrider website, Stephen Mahoney of Mahoney Farm & Nursery and Tony Piazza of Piazza Horticultural spearheaded the project. Mahoney had the original vision and Piazza is credited with the design and installation.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Community News

Chilled Turkey Photos by Justin Meinken

Braving the frosty weather, the East Hampton Food Pantry held its annual harvest food drive this past Saturday at the East Hampton Middle School. With a goal of collecting enough items to feed at least 350 people as the population in need continues to grow, the food drive was met with overwhelming success.

According to Dr. Connie Jones of the Calvary Baptist Church in East Hampton, an organizer of the event, “People are in a giving mood. They are stepping up to the plate to help.” Board members Judy Samuelson, Holly Reichart, and Pamela Bicket were accepting and sorting the donations while co-chairman, Russell Calemmo, board member Claude Beudert, and volunteer, Nate Fallon, packed the pantry’s truck. Girl Scout Naomi Blau, Girl Scout leader Linda Blowe, and volunteers James McGuire and William McGuire, assisted the pantry with a small donation center in front of the Stop and Shop in East Hampton.

13


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Independent Opinion

A Watershed Approach To Restoring The Peconic Estuary

By Rachel Gruzen

Many Long Islanders are familiar with the term “estuary” -- a place where fresh and salt water meet -- and can distinguish the Peconic Estuary as the 158,000 acres of surface water starting at the Peconic River in Brookhaven and ending at Block Island Sound between Plum Island and Montauk Point. The term “watershed,” on the other hand, may be less familiar. A watershed is the land surfaces off of which rainwater flows, and in the case of the Peconic Estuary watershed, includes 125,000 land acres from the high points of the North and South Fork terminal moraines to the flats of the coastal zone. Fresh water flows off these lands, down rivers and streams, and meets the tidal salt water in the Estuary’s creeks, harbors, and bays. 14

Today water quality in the Peconic Estuary is impaired. Harmful algal blooms are more frequent, eelgrass beds are sparse, and harbor bottoms have become near deserts. Scientific studies point to waste streams in our watershed as the culprit. Sanitary waste, excess fertilizers, pesticides and plastics discharged onto land surfaces and injected into the ground, even miles inland, are flowing with gravity into the Estuary. Waste is also flowing into aquifers and drinking water. The pollutants impact the health of vegetation, shellfish, finfish, humans, and an entire ecosystem upon which the Eastern Long Island economy and quality of life depends. Solving these problems requires a change in behaviors at home and in the community. Species can rebound and ecosystems can recover if given

opportunity, but this demands a comprehensive, watershed approach and effort to mitigate pollution.

Suffolk County and the scientific community have identified nitrogen pollution as the largest factor in water quality decline in the Peconic Estuary. Most nitrogen is attributed to residential septic waste conveyed by groundwater flow into the Estuary. The county and some Eastern Long Island townships have developed septic improvement programs with grants and rebates to incentivize upgrades to new nitrogen-reducing systems. Innovative/Alternative Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems use electricity and concentrated microbes to accelerate the biological breakdown of organic material. Stormwater provides additional pathways for pollution to enter

Independent / Rachel Gruzen

the Peconic Estuary. Rainwater washes off paved surfaces, picks up contaminants such as excess fertilizer, pesticides, motor oil, road salts, loose sediment from construction sites, and floatable plastics, and directly carries them into the harbors and bays. Stormwater also carries bacteria, known as pathogens, which accumulate in overflowing septic systems, dog poop, and the feces of dense colonies of waterfowl like Canadian geese or ducks. High levels of pathogens are the reason why waters are sometimes closed to shellfish harvesting or bathing. Everyone can reduce pollution in the Peconic Estuary watershed. Nitrogen and pathogens can be mitigated by upgrading septic systems or regularly inspecting and pumping existing tanks, picking

Continued On Page 84.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

In Depth News

This rendering may be as close as Discovery Land Corp. gets to building a golf course community in East Quogue. Independent/Courtesy The Hills

The Golf Course Is Dead, Long Live The Subdivision

By Rick Murphy

The Hills, a Discovery Land project that has been the subject of much debate and controversy, is still technically alive – though on life support.

A plan to build luxury homes around a state-of-the-art golf course in East Quogue lies gasping for air, yet a phoenix has arisen for the same site: a 137-home subdivision.

Last week the Southampton Town Board postponed a vote to

accept the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the golf course/luxury home project, which would have finally completed a lengthy environmental review process required under the State Environmental Quality Review

Act.

Ironically, Stan Glinka and Christine Scalera, two board members generally viewed as supporters of The Hills, triggered the postponement. They opined

Continued On Page 16.

Trust your Plumbing, Heating, and Air Conditioning needs to a company that’s always here for you. GET A

200

$

DISCOUNT ON ANY NEW BOILER OR FURNACE INSTALLATION

 OUTSTANDING 24-HOUR SERVICE



 FINANCING OPTIONS AVAILABLE

SOUTH FORK

631-283-9333

FREE IN-HOME EVALUATIONS

NORTH FORK

631-298-8181

CALL FOR DETAILS! Not to be combined with other offers. Coupon must be presented at time of service. Offer expires Dec. 31, 2017.

10% OFF ANY REPAIR

UP TO $1,000 Offer applies to labor on service calls only. Not to be combined with any other offers. Coupon must be presented at time of service. Offer expires Dec. 31, 2017.

XXX)BSEZ1MVNCJOHDPNtinfo@HardyPlumbing.com

Licensed, Insured, Locally Owned And Operated 15


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Golf Course Continued From Page 15.

that the findings statement needs a few more documents to be complete.

Regardless, both are still expected to vote to accept the FEIS on December 5, when the board is to take up the matter again.

That’s when the fun begins. The board, assuming it accepts the findings statement, will then vote to accept the project in its current reiteration: 118 luxury homes and a golf course. Since it is a Planned Development District, a supermajority of the board must vote to approve the PDD. Democratic board members Julie Lofstad and John Bouvier have both indicated they will cast negative votes. Theoretically, that will end the saga -- but don’t bet on it.

“That is when the lawsuits begin,” said Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman. (See the accompanying sidebar for more on possible litigation concerning this project.) Come January 1 the task of getting the golf course pushed through will become even more daunting when Tommy John Schiavoni, a Democrat, replaces Glinka, a Republican, on the board. Schiavoni is not a fan of The Hills development as it is currently configured either. Opponents of the golf course have voiced the hope that Discovery, if turned down, would begin negotiating to sell the land to Southampton Town. Those hopes were quickly dashed

In Depth News

when Discovery announced plans to build 137 residential units on the site. The plan does not require town board approval and may well have adverse affects on the surrounding waterways that far exceed those that would have resulted from the original proposal. “Look at it this way. I offered them $35 million,” Schneiderman said. “They could build 137 $2 million houses and make a million on each of them.” The town would use Community Preservation Fund money to buy the property, but by law, cannot offer more than its appraised valuation. “That is not going to happen, ever,” said Mark Hissey, a senior vice president for Discovery who is spearheading The Hills project. “Either way that parcel is going to be developed.” OFF THE TABLE Discovery made a number of concessions to alleviate nitrogen flow to get the golf course approved. Those concessions are now off the table, meaning the right-to-build development of 137 luxury homes will increase the amount of nitrogen that finds its way into the waterways.

For example, Discovery was going to purchase 33 additional acres of land at the headwaters of Weesuck Creek and preserve it. If Discovery doesn’t buy the land, owner Carolyn Parlato said she plans to develop it, adding more septic flow into the ground.

Also in jeopardy is an aid/incentive package to the East Quogue School District that included a significant upgrade in the septic system. “All those things were voluntary,”

Anthony Bennett L A N D S C A P I N G “No job too big or too small”

631-461-7337 16

Hissey pointed out. “We are going to comply with what we are required to do now.”

East Quogue School District officials for the first time officially voiced its support for The Hills last week.

Discovery had also agreed as part of the golf course deal not to sell any of the homes in the development to anyone with school-aged children, meaning the school district would not be negatively impacted by an influx of new students. That offer is off the table as well. “We’re going to end up with a subdivision that is worse,” Schneiderman agreed.

“They warned that [turning down the PDD] would destroy the school, that it would be disastrous for the community. Bouvier and Lofstad weren’t even paying attention,” Hissey said.

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

The whole ordeal has left Schneiderman, a proponent of the golf course plan, perplexed.

“We have an approved SEQRA statement that is in conflict with the board’s decision. I don’t know if that has ever happened before.” Schneiderman also pointed out that here is no legal mechanism available for a developer to build a golf course in Southampton. Previously, a course could be built on a PDD, but the planned development district zoning designation was repealed earlier this year.

Schneiderman wondered if opening up the golf course to public use or tweaking parts of the The Hills application might get one of the dissenting board members to change their vote before December 5. He wasn’t optimistic. “I don’t see anything that will move John [Bouvier] or Julie [Lofstad] to change their minds,” he said.

“They Messed With The Wrong Dog”

By Rick Murphy

Discovery Land Corporation’s plan to build a luxury home community around a state-of-the-art golf course in East Quogue will likely fail to muster the necessary votes for approval when it comes before the Southampton Town Board on December 5. But if the proposed planned development district on some 600 acres is indeed struck down, heads will roll, the developer promised in an interview this week.

“There is no question about it,” said Mark Hissey, a senior vice president for Discovery Land Corporation, when asked if his company will file suit. “We’re certainly not backing down. You bet we will seek restitution – we’ve spent an astounding amount of money.” Hissey said the company entered into negotiations three years ago in good faith and cleared every hurdle, including getting unanimous approval for the FEIS (environmental impact statement). Four votes from the five-member town board are required to approve

the project. Democrats Julie Lofstad and John Bouvier have said they will vote against it.

Hissey suspects back room dealers conspired to “torpedo the project,” despite fervent pleas from East Quogue School District officials that The Hills project might be the only long-term alternative to closing the school down – property owners are having problems coping with the ever-increasing tax burden. As it currently stands there is no scenario under which a developer would be allowed to build a golf course anywhere in the Town of Southampton. “It’s a huge legislative hole. We are talking about three or four of the greatest golf meccas in the world,” Hissey said. “We’re going to address this.” More to the point, Hissey said the fight has become personal. “I’ve got a good reputation out here. I’ve got a good reputation as an environmentalist. They went after me personally. Let me tell you, they’ve messed with the wrong dog.”


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

In Depth News

Compiled by Rick Murphy Housing Access for Veterans The number of homeless veterans in New York has dropped dramatically over the past five years, according to a report issued last week by State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli. Homeless veterans declined from 5765 in 2011 to 1248 individuals in 2016 in New York, a decrease of 78.4 percent during the time frame, according to US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) data. By comparison, New York State’s homeless population continues to be among the largest in the nation and, in recent years, has also been one of the fastest growing, with the number of homeless individuals rising by more than a third from 2011 to 2016. Due to federal funding uncertainty for programs that assist homeless veterans, some programs may be in jeopardy and lose their federal funding.

“The men and women who defend our nation often need support when they transition back into civilian life. For some veterans, it isn’t an easy road, but we’re turning a corner on reducing the number of veterans living on the streets,” DiNapoli said. “Local communities are playing a key role in helping veterans find a place to live, and we need to build on their progress through continued collaboration at the federal, state and local levels. Any cuts in federal support could undermine the good work being done.” While veteran homelessness exists in all states, the distribution among states has been uneven. Four states, California, Florida, New York, and Texas, accounted for half of the homeless veterans in the nation.

Veterans become homeless for many of the same economic reasons as civilians do – a lack of affordable housing, low wages, and long-term unemployment. As a result of exposure to combat and repeated deployments, however, veterans may suffer from other traumas that may increase the risk of homelessness.

Government Briefs

As part of the 2010 Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness, HUD and the US Department of Veterans’ Affairs, along with several other federal agencies and the homeless assistance community, worked to expand and create programs to identify and connect homeless veterans with housing and supportive services, including health care, substance abuse treatment, and employment services.

For example, several municipalities have teamed with community organizations to identify all homeless veterans in their area. When combined with real-time shelter and street outreach data, shelter providers have been able to increase the number of dedicated beds for homeless veterans. Help For Severely Disabled Veterans Congressman Lee Zeldin announced that his bipartisan legislation (H.R.1005/S.324) to help severely disabled veterans on Long Island and across the country, by expanding access to adult day health care for disabled veterans who need extra assistance and special attention in their day-to-day lives, passed the Senate with strong bipartisan support. Service members who are 70 percent or more disabled from a service-connected injury often require significant assistance from others in order to carry out basic everyday tasks. Many times, the burden falls on family members of disabled veterans; some veterans may even need to reside in institutionalized facilities to receive the daily assistance of a trained medical professional. Both of these options can create financial and emotional hardships. One program that is currently available to help disabled veterans is adult day health care, which can be offered at state veterans homes across the United States. However, the expense of the program is oftentimes directly shouldered by the veteran and their family, which significantly limits the number of veterans who can enroll.

Adult day health care is currently only offered at three facilities in the United States; one being the Long Island State Veterans Home, which is located in the First Congressional District of New York, in Stony Brook. Congressman Zeldin’s bill would define the adult day health care program as a reimbursable treatment option through the Department of Veterans Affairs, which would guarantee that all severely disabled veterans, those who are 70 percent or more service-connected disabled, are able to access adult day health care at no cost to them. The bill would also help expand the program, which could be offered at any of the 153 state veterans homes across the country. “This is an important piece of legislation that provides a valuable and necessary service to our nation’s veterans, and I am pleased to announce that this bill passed the Senate,” Zeldin said.

“By expanding access to adult day health care programs, we can ensure that all veterans receive the best and most efficient services that provide veterans with necessary assistance that also allows them to maintain their independence. With Senate passage of this bill, we are now one step closer to expanding care for disabled veterans on Long Island and across our country, allowing each veteran a more fulfilling life, while keeping families together and strong. Expanding adult day health care for our disabled veterans is a top priority and I commend my colleagues in the Senate for acting promptly to pass this commonsense bill. Helping those who have sacrificed so much for us has always been a top concern, and I will continue to support legislation to give our nation’s veterans what they deserve.” Fred Sganga, executive director of Long Island State Veterans Home, said, “The Long Island State Veterans Home is tremendously grateful to Congressman Zeldin for supporting the mission, vision and values of our home. This new legislation will allow us to better serve our most disabled veterans while providing the much-needed

relief to families who serve as caregivers. No veteran should be left behind and we are grateful that Congressman Zeldin always makes our nation’s warriors his top priority.” Protection For Firefighters Assemblyman Fred Thiele announced that legislation he voted in favor of, which affords firefighters special protection while performing on-the-job duties, was signed into law last week by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The legislation ensures a person who intentionally obstructs the efforts of any firefighter performing emergency medical care is guilty of the crime of obstructing firefighting operations, a class A misdemeanor. Firefighters perform various important functions in their dayto-day routine and are protected by the law while in performance of these duties. However, there is a loophole that does not adequately protect a firefighter who is performing emergency services. The new bill closes that loophole. Testing For Contaminants Thiele also announced that the New York State Center for Clean Water Technology at Stony Brook University is focusing on developing and evaluating methods to remove emerging contaminants from drinking water supplies, with an initial focus on 1,4-dioxane. This effort represents the initial phase of a state-sponsored, multi-year program to proactively address emerging contaminants in drinking water.

The CCWT is soliciting proposals from water providers in NYS to install and test pilot-scale, advanced water treatment technologies to remove 1,4-dioxane from drinking water. The deadline for submission to the pilot grant program is Friday, December 15. The CCWT’s mission is to develop and commercialize affordable, high-performance drinking water quality protection and restoration technologies that are suitable for widespread deployment. 17


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

On The Beat

Compiled by Rick Murphy Grand Larceny

A Bay Shore man was arrested in connection with the theft of merchandise from the Riverhead Home Depot store on several days back in September, Riverhead Town Police said.

Justin J. Cruz, 26, allegedly removed assorted power tools having a total value of nearly $5000 from the store. He was charged with three counts of grand larceny in the fourth degree and two counts of petit larceny. He was arraigned

N ov e m b e r 2 2

In Depth News

Ray Of Hope?

and remanded to the Suffolk County Correctional Facility in Riverside where he remained as of press time.

By Rick Murphy

Riverhead police said additional arrests are expected in connection with these incidents. Guldi faces Another Trial

Poor George Guldi – they just won’t let him be. After enjoying life as a free man, the former County Legislator may have to readjust to life in prison. He was ordered to

2017

Independent / Courtesy RTPD Justin J. Cruz, 26, is charged with grand larceny after being accused of stealing power tools.

return to Suffolk County Criminal Court on January 2 where he will

Please Visit Our Showroom

Continued On Page 71.

260 Hampton Road, Southampton (Right next to Ted’s Market)

Southampton Town Councilwoman Julie Lofstad, who is an integral part of the Democratic Party coalition opposing The Hills golf course proposal in East Quogue, is not willing to nail the coffin shut – yet. To proceed the development needs four yes votes, and John Bouvier, a Democrat and town councilman is adamant in his opposition. That means the fate of the golf course is in Lofstad’s hands.

“As of November 13, when the most recent findings statement was to be voted on, I would have voted no to accept it based on my continuing concerns about the PDD project’s impact on the environment,” Lofstad said Thursday. The town board is expected to approve the findings statement on December 5 regardless of how Lofstad votes – a simple majority (3-2) is required for that vote. The board, assuming it accepts the findings statement will then vote on The Hills proposed Planned Development District immediately after. “As for the actual vote on the PDD, at the appropriate time I will offer my decision. I am continuing to review any new information that is available, until the actual vote on the PDD law,” Lofstad said.

Your Source For All Your Respiratory, Sleep and Home Medical Equipment Needs Breast Pumps, CPAP’s, Supplies, Portable Oxygen Concentrators, Incontinent Supplies, Braces, CAM Walkers, Orthopedic Shoes and Much More.....

Live your life to the utmost with products from Hampton Homecare. 631-283-8217

Visit our website: www.hamptonhomecare.com

260 Hampton Road, Southampton

18

Beach Wheelchair Rentals Available. Reserve Now!

Several new developments have occurred since Lofstad’s statement on Nov. 13: East Quogue School officials have urged the town board to approve the PDD; East Quogue voters chose candidates who favored the golf course in the recent election; and Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman suggested the golf course open to the public on a limited basis rather than remain completely private. Discovery Land Corp, the owner of the 600-acre parcel, has also filed plans to build 137 homes on the property, a plan that does not require town board approval.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Arts & Entertainment Located in one of East Hampton Village’s most coveted locations, a traditional shingle-style house on Further Lane is one of five distinguished homes on the 2017 East Hampton House & Garden Tour.

Independent/Erik Davidowicz

East Hampton House & Garden Tour

By Jessica Mackin-Cipro

The East Hampton Historical Society presents its 2017 House & Garden Tour, showcasing some of the finest examples of historical and modern architecture in the Hamptons. This year’s tour -consisting of five unique houses -- is scheduled for Saturday from 1 to 4:30 PM. Traditionally held over Thanksgiving weekend, the East Hampton Historical Society’s house tour committee has selected homes that express the unique spirit the East End.

FR EE

IN SP W EC HO TI LE ON H –C O AL USE LT OD AY

Attendees will enjoy a shingle-style house on Further Lane. Balanced, curved turrets and multipane

windows give this exquisite estate curb appeal. The generously sized rooms with well-appointed furnishings are said to exude love and hospitality.

Farther east on Further Lane enjoy the home of famed designer Joe Nahem. The house has a distinct modern identity while it showcases an extensive collection of art and mid-century furnishings.

Next up is the iconic Kilkare, an 1877 shingle-style beach cottage overlooking the Georgica Pond and the Atlantic. The home is located in the Georgica Association. It was built by ship builders and the threestory house has been restored with all its authentic detail.

Celebrating its centennial, the Elizabethan-style Woodhouse Playhouse, tucked away on Huntting Lane, is a space for living and performing. Built by the legendary philanthropist and arts patron Mary Woodhouse, and designed by Francis Burrell Hoffman Jr., the current homeowners continue its legacy through year-round music and theater programs.

Lastly, nestled in the village is an early 20th-century cottage with French and English influences. The Sag Harbor architectural firm Beeton & Company, and interior designer Sue Alefantis, masterfully redesigned every detail of this

house.

A kick-off cocktail party on Friday will welcome this year’s house tour. This annual event, now in its 33rd year, will be held at the Maidstone Club. The opening night cocktail party is a fundraising event for the East Hampton Historical Society.

Tickets to the cocktail party are $200 each, and includes entry to the house tour the following day. Tickets to the self-guided 2017 East Hampton House & Garden Tour are $65 in advance and $75 on the day of the tour. To purchase tickets visit www. easthamptonhistory.org or call 631324-6850.

it crawls, flies or walks — if it bugs you we’ll make it disappear! Call today for a We’re experts about what bugs you... whether free, no-obligation, thorough, whole-house pest inspection to find out if you have any pests.*

TwinForksPestControl.com *NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY, THERE ARE A LIMITED NUMBER OF FREE PEST INSPECTIONS AVAILABLE, CALL SOON. SOUTHAMPTON 631–287–9020 | EAST HAMPTON 631–324–9020 | CUTCHOGUE 631–298–0500 19


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Indy Snaps

Halsband Portraits Photos by Morgan McGivern

Seed Exchange

Michael Halsband has photographed some of the most celebrated icons of our time. His work includes the likes of James Brown, David Byrne, Johnny Depp, AM Homes, Iggy Pop, Louise Nevelson, Klaus Nomi, Nam June Paik, Hunter S. Thompson, and Andy Warhol. This weekend Southampton Arts Center opened “Halsband Portraits.� The show is a survey of portraiture by the renowned American photographer that spans over four decades of his work.

Project MOST hosted its second annual Hamptons Seed Exchange on Saturday at Scoville Hall in Amagansett. Guests were encouraged to bring seeds to share or take some to plant. Guests speakers included Edwina von Gal from Perfect Earth Project, Rick Bogusch from Bridge Gardens, Scott Chaskey from Quail Hill Farms, Deb Klughers from Bonac Bees, and Mike Martinsen from Montauk Shellfish Company. A panel discussion was moderated by Brian Halwell of Edible East End.

20

Photos by Nicole Teitler


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

E v E ry t h i n g E a s t E n d

Ad Donated By: thE

1826

21


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Indy Style

We can help stock your bar for the season or next party! Ask about our FREE East End Delivery

Southampton Wines at Watermill

Wide array of spirits and vast selection of wines.

760 Montauk Hwy Watermill, NY 11976 631.726.2712

Sip & Shop Photos by Nicole Teitler

J. McLaughlin in Southampton hosted a Sip & Shop event on Saturday. Shoppers enjoyed light refreshments while shopping the holiday collection. Fifteen percent of the sales went to benefit The Retreat. 22


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Indy Style

Housing Works Fashion For Action

By Jessica Mackin-Cipro

Housing Works hosted its 14th annual Fashion for Action benefit on Thursday. The event brings together iconic individuals who lend their talent, style, and support for an evening of crucial fundraising. Guests at the event had the opportunity to mingle while enjoying cocktails and shopping nearly $2 million in donated merchandise, all marked 50 to 70 percent off retail. The shopping party took place at Housing Works’ flagship shop in Chelsea, with a VIP cocktail hour at Fred’s in Barneys Downtown.

Hosting the evening was Paper Magazine’s editorial director, Mickey Boardman, and Page Six TV’s Bevy Smith. Co-chairs were Patricia Field, Eric Javits, Alex Olson, and Todd Snyder. Kevin Harter, vice president of fashion

direction at Bloomingdale’s and Michael Carl, fashion director at Vanity Fair, served as founding chairs. Music was provided by DJ Louie XIV. “Our company has been supporting Housing Works and their amazing community programs for several years. However, in troubling times like these, we need to lend our full support to the ones closest to us in our communities, I’m proud to step up and chair the Fashion for Action event this year!” said Snyder.

Featured “closet curators” included fashion designer Mara Hoffman and celebrity DJ and actor Mia Moretti. Each closet was created to reflect their own personal style. All merchandise in the closets was for sale to benefit Housing Works. Over 200 brands -- including Bianca Chandon, Carmen Marc

Valvo, Manolo Blahnik, Mark Cross, Opening Ceremony, Robert Clergerie, Simon Miller, and Vince -- donated men’s and women’s apparel along with shoes, handbags, jewelry, and accessories to the event. Proceeds from Fashion for

Independent/Jessica Mackin-Cipro

Action support Housing Works’ mission to end the dual crises of homelessness and AIDS. Each summer Housing Works hosts its Labor of Love event in the Hamptons. For more info visit www.housingworks.org.

Bridgehampton Commons 23


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Gallery Walk

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Arts & Entertainment

by Jessica Mackin-Cipro Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email to jessica@indyeastend. com. Holiday Spotlight The Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor shines the spotlight on three participating accomplished artists. Joyce Brian’s bird series “Mourning Doves,” Adrienne Kitaeff ’s funny and useful ceramic tiles “Red Head,” and Lois Bender’s “Flower Squiggle Grid.” These artists are featured along with many others during its Small Artworks Holiday Invitational, on view from November 24 through January 14. Lyrical Light “Lyrical Light,” paintings by artist Max Moran, will be on display at the Jedediah Hawkins Inn Barn Gallery in Jamesport. View Moran’s interpretation of the vistas, sky, and landscape. An opening reception will be held on Saturday from 3 to 7 PM. Pastels Jonathan Nash Glynn’s “Pastels” opens at Arthur T. Kalaher Fine Art in Southampton. An opening reception will be held on Saturday from 5 to 8 PM. Twenty-five percent of proceeds goes to Wings Over Haiti. The show runs through December 2. Touch The Earth “Touch The Earth,” an exhibition curated by April Gornik, will be on view Friday and Saturday at Madoo Conservancy in Sagaponack featuring artists Robert Dash, Michele Oka Doner, and Toni Ross. The show is open Friday and Saturday from 1 to 5 PM, with a closing cocktail reception on Saturday from 5 to 7 PM. Good In This World The Tripoli Gallery in Southampton presents “There 24

Is Still Good In This World,” its 13th annual Thanksgiving Collective. Featuring works by Todd Bienvenu, Quentin Curry, Félix Bonilla Gerena, April Gornik, Mary Heilmann, Yung Jake, Benjamin Keating, Enoc Perez, Rene Ricard, Rachel Rossin, and Lola Montes, the exhibition will be on view through January 29. An opening reception will be held on Saturday from 6 to 8 PM. ONGOING What the HELL? The White Room Gallery in Bridgehampton presents “What the HELL?” a group show with painters, photographers, sculptors, and mixed media artists. Artists include David Geiser, Paul Dempsey, Hilary McCarthy, Kat O’Neill, Jerry Schwabe, Setha Lowe, Adam Umbach, James Slezak, Phil Marco, and more. The show runs through December 3. Helene Canberg November’s artist of the month at the Old Town Arts & Crafts Guild in Cutchogue is Helene Canberg. Having been trained in both fine art and graphic design, Canberg tries to combine both in a variety of ways. She works in both oil and acrylics and began experimenting in decorative painting about 17 years ago. There will be a reception on Saturday from 2 to 4 PM. Call 631-734-6382 for more details. Off The Wall Christy’s Art Center and Keyes Art in Sag Harbor present “Off The Wall,” a curated selection of contemporary art and objets d’art being held at 3 Madison Street. A holiday showcase includes hand printed scarves, painted wine boxes, original skateboards, and one of a kind jewelry. Artists include John De La O, Lou Pimentel, Breahna Arnold, Yumi Vong, Reed Slater, Steve Miller, and more. The show

Max Moran’s Mustard Field on Sound Avenue.

runs through December 18. Get with the Program Roman Fine Art in East Hampton presents “Get with the Program 2017,” the second edition of its annual holiday group exhibition. This exhibit will feature painting, photography, and mixed media works by nine contemporary artists working in a variety of media and genres.

nature of the local art scene.

The 12 artists with work on view are Claudia Baez, Ellen Ball, Carolyn Conrad, Christopher Engel, Barbara Groot, John Haubrich, Virva Hinnemo, Dean Johnson, Fulvio Massi, Anne Raymond, Will Ryan, and Dan Welden. The “Fall Collective” will be on exhibit through November 30.

In addition to offering works by Maya Hayuk, Elektra KB, Reisha Perlmutter, Leah Schrager, Sarah Slappey, and SWOON, this year’s edition of “Get with the Program” introduces three fresh, new faces: Christina Creutz, Lizzie Gill, and Ciara Rafferty. The show runs through January 28.

Starbridges

The Photo Show

Drawing Room in East Hampton presents dynamic new paintings by Sue Heatley. Heatley’s exploration of the physicality of different mediums has been central to her 30-year studio practice, which has encompassed printmaking, ceramics, and painting. The show will run through Sunday.

Folioeast presents “The Photo Show” with artwork by Carolyn Conrad, Sandi Haber Fifield, and Francine Fleischer at Malia Mills in East Hampton. The exhibition will run through December 3. Fall Collective For the month of November, the Quogue Library Art Gallery will present “Fall Collective: Celebrating East End Artists,” a curated exhibition introducing a mix of artists who have exhibited in past shows along with some who are new to the venue. The group show, curated by art gallery committee members Lulie Morrisey and Cristina Kepner, will showcase the vibrant and diverse

“Starbridges,” an exhibition of over 20 sculptures by artist Robert Schwarz, is open at the Amagansett Library through Tuesday. Schwarz’s constructions are mandalas; balanced designs that represent the search for completeness. Sue Heatley

Sherri Wolfgang The William Ris Gallery in Jamesport presents “Sherri Wolfgang: Nick.e.lo.de.on,” which showcases the complete series of life-size, figurative works that explore youth, dance, strength, and the male form. The exhibition will be on view through November. 


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Hampton Daze

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Arts & Entertainment

by Jessica Mackin-Cipro

Collaborating for a Cure

Independent/Patrick McMullan

The Avett Brothers

The Avett Brothers

cutting-edge research that identifies and corrects abnormal gene function that causes cancer. This research is the basis for developing minimally toxic treatments for

Independent/Jessica Mackin-Cipro

patients, which is particularly crucial for children and seniors battling cancer.” To learn more visit www. waxmancancer.org.

Condo? Co-Op? Rental? Independent/Annie Watt William T. Sullivan, Dr. Samuel Waxman, Marion Waxman, Michael Nierenberg, Elin Nierenberg, and Chris Wragge.

The Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation hosted its 20th anniversary gala -Collaborating for a Cure -- on Thursday at Cipriani Wall Street. The event included a performance by The Avett Brothers and honored, in memoriam, William S.

Gorin, the former CEO of MFA Financial, Inc. The Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation, which throws its annual A Hamptons Happening event every summer in Bridgehampton, has a mission to “eradicate cancer by funding

Aces

bsolutely

Cleaning Service

To you it’s simply “Home.” Ask me about the kinds of policies Allstate offers for Condominium or Cooperative owners and renters.

Joseph Haines 631-537-3540 3420 Montauk Hwy WAINSCOTT josephhaines1@allstate.com

Reasonable Year Round & Seasonal Rates Weekly and Bi-Weekly Cleanings Home Openings & Closings

631-377-2233

Policy issuance is subject to qualifications. Allstate Indemnity Co. Northbrook, IL. © 2009 Allstate Insurance Co.

25

217651

10 Years Experience


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Reading Our Region Tango Down

Although bad boy Sam is getting on -- this his eighth appearance in the series -- he can still deliver the blows that made him once a successful boxer and the verbal jabs that mark him as a literate MIT graduate and former CEO of a

major tech research firm, a position he lost when he punched out a VP in a previous novel. Sam still has some anger management issues, but has them sufficiently in check to sustain the love of his beautiful Little Peconic Bay next-door neighbor, Amanda Anselma, the cooperation of local police, the respect of denizens of various Hamptons watering holes (vodka is still Sam’s go-to drink) and, most of all, the devotion of his beloved dog, Eddie (named for the rock guitarist Eddie Van Halen).

Also there are not many thrillers or mysteries that feature a lead character who can smoothly reference or allude to Occam’s razor, quantum mechanics, MC Escher, William Blake, Macbeth, and any number of Latin sayings, sacred and

profane.

If Tango Down doesn’t sizzle or satisfy as much as Knopf ’s earlier award-winning work, it’s still in the running as inventive fiction and shows why, after detours to introduce other protagonists, Knopf has brought Sam back.

The guy’s smart and sexy. Not even his engaging, slightly ditzy lawyer friend, Jackie Swaitkowski, who went out on her own in a couple of books, could fill his shoes, but here, working closely with him, trying to find out who killed the well-liked Victor Bollings, for whom Sam was working as a fine cabinet maker, and defending a Colombian immigrant they both believe is innocent, Jackie shines as his smart-ass foil.

The title, by the way, may prompt googling. Knopf notes threequarters through that “tango down” is US military slang “for taking out a targeted individual.” Tango, it would appear, is standard military code for T, as Alpha is for A or Bravo for B, and, with its Latinate connotation, also suits the subject matter of the plot. Though Sam insists his deepest pleasure is simply sitting on their shared lawn with Amanda, the

•Crabtree & Evelyn •Thymes •Douglas Plush Toys •Lilly Pulitzer

“I just love how you have changed the Pharmacy and how bright and inviting it is... and the staff is so helpful and friendly.” -George & Jeanette Smith 120 Main Street, Sag Harbor SagHarborPharmacy@aol.com www.SagHarborPharm.com

Tango Down by Chris Knopf. The Permanent Press, 288 pp., $29.

reader intuits that Sam can and will be roused by seductively intractable events, such as a murder case no one else can figure out. He may celebrate moments when he and Amanda look out at the bay at dusk, when “the banality of the conversation collapsed under the weight of the present world and we both fell silent, our strategy of avoidance and denial defeated by the inexorable insistence of the real” (not to worry --Sam can also do blunt and brusque and use a gun as fast as he can use his mouth), but no way is he going to avoid investigating the murder, especially since he confronts the dead body on page one. Even when Amanda is suddenly stricken with signs of what turns out to be a serious life-threatening impairment is he going to back off. It’s a nice narrative move on Knopf ’s part – slowing down the action to sustain suspense and reinforce the loving, repressed affection of his hard-as-nails hero.

Janice D’Angelo, Owner

Jeffrey Yohai, Rph, Owner •AHAVA •Dr. Hauschka •ALIXX Candles (France) •Mason Pearson (London)

Phone: (631) 725-0074 Fax: (631) 725-8672

To his credit, Knopf keeps up with changing times and local issues, namely illegal Latino immigrants on the East End and hostility toward them that can turn violent. The book also makes an implicit plea for cognitive learning that moves beyond the insular mindset of too much specialization. Sam’s an engineer but he’s also open to “intuition” and modes of knowing beyond empirically-based evaluations and logic. Leave it to him to retort to someone who mentions his Ivy League education: “MIT isn’t an Ivy. No scientist would let vegetation crawl over old masonry walls.” A cat may have nine lives. One can only hope as much for Sam. *“catabolic” – look it up!

26

2017

Arts & Entertainment

by Joan Baum

It’s more than likely that if it’s a Chris Knopf Sam Acquillo murder mystery, a reader gets two bonuses: at least one new English word to look up* and descriptions of local places East End residents may think they can identify. (Knopf generously translates the Latin phrases his sarcastic protagonist loves to drop to amuse himself.) Not to mention, of course, the pleasure of following the complexities of a colorful whodunit that illustrates Knopf ’s skill in integrating familiar characters into an original plot.

N ov e m b e r 2 2


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Indy Snaps

Tuesday Club Photo by Sheldon Kawer

Indy executive editor Rick Murphy with East Hampton Village Mayor Paul Rickenbach, Jr. after Murphy spoke at the monthly Tuesday Club luncheon. The club, in its 48th year, is comprised of local gentlemen interested in our communities and national affairs. The topic was “Fake News.”

Screenwriters Lab

By Jessica Mackin-Cipro

The Hamptons International Film Festival is now taking submissions for the 2018 Screenwriters Lab. The Lab takes place in East Hampton from April 6 to 8. Going into its 18th year, the Lab develops emerging screenwriting talent by pairing established writers and creative producers with up-andcoming screenwriters, chosen by HIFF in collaboration with key industry contacts.

Holiday House NYC Photos by Richard Lewin

On November 14 the Holiday House NYC’s 10th annual gala benefiting the Breast Cancer Research Foundation was held at the Academy Mansion on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Holiday House founder Iris Dankner, was joined by design chair Thom Filicia, honorary chair Christopher Hyland, and ASID chairs Bjorn Bjornsson and Kim Radovich. The gala unofficially marks the New York Design community’s launch of the holiday Season.

The mentors advise in a one-onone creative setting while events bring participants together with board members, the community, and friends of the festival. Scripts are produced year after year, and the Lab continues to be an inspiring place for artists to find and hone their craft. A number of the Lab’s projects have gone on to be produced and have screened at festivals like

Sundance and South by Southwest. Highlights include Short Term 12 with Brie Larson and John Gallagher, which won the Grand Jury and Audience Award at SXSW, The Discoverers starring Griffin Dunne, Little Accidents featuring Elizabeth Banks and Chloe Sevigny, Fort Bliss starring Michelle Monaghan and Ron Livingston, and 2010 Sundance Film Festival closing night film Twelve starring Ellen Barkin and Emma Roberts. For the submissions, HIFF is seeking a broad selection of screenplays addressing a variety of subject matters. The following deadlines for submissions are: November 28 (early bird), December 12 (regular), January 2 (late), and January 11 (extended). The submission link and fee information can be found at www.hamptonsfilmfest.org/ screenwriterslab. 27


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Arts & Entertainment

Reporting From Broadway by Isa Goldberg The Band’s Visit There is a new lullaby on Broadway, with a fusion of influences from the big bands to traditional Egyptian music to get lost in -- enchantingly lost, that is, and charmed. In The Band’s Visit, the Alexandria Ceremonial Police Orchestra arrives in Israel to perform at the Arab Cultural Center in the town of Petah Tikva. Opening on a note sweetly evocative of the Keystone Cops, the band seeks transport to their destination.

Humor surrounds the fact that in Arabic there is no “p” sound, so the band ends up, instead, in the desert town of Bet Hatikva. While the place is fictional, it is an evocation of barrenness and banality such as one feels when life is filled with disappointments and unalterable dailyness. Happily, romance is the chord that brings these characters together. In part, the musical’s arresting quality comes from the nontraditional characters. Here, Tony Shalhoub (best known for his TV portrayal

Let

MICKEY

pick it up so you don’t have to!

of “Monk”) as Tewfiq, the band’s conductor, portrays the graceful, gentle soul who discovers the kindness of the young woman at the town’s only café. In this role, Katrina Lenk, whose portrayal of the lesbian lover in last season’s Indecent remains memorable, is a delicate rose amidst this harsh environment.

Both actors are wonderful, but it is jaw-dropping to watch Shalhoub in yet another role that is completely unlike the last one we saw him in, namely Arthur Miller’s The Price on Broadway. Exhibiting boundless range, Shalhoub is a consummate actor.

The two protagonists are joined by a gifted ensemble that includes John Cariani and George Abud, among others. In fact, the musical, with its small cast and quiet small stage quality, works surprisingly well in the Broadway theater. Last season, the show debuted Off Broadway at the Atlantic Theater to great acclaim. And because the musicians are on stage throughout the play, the human harmony that emerges, amidst the haunting blend of instruments, including oud, violin, trumpet, bongo, clarinet, is wondrous.

As is his wont, director David Cromer mines the humanity of the piece, adapted by Itamar Moses from the screenplay for Eran Kolirin’s 2007 movie of the same title.

MICKEY’S CARTING, CORP. The Best Service! The Best Value! Professional Waste Removal Company Since 1986 • Homeowners, Businesses and Builder Services. • Loose pickup (we have men that can help remove the debris) • Basement-Relocation cleanups. • Demolition Services.

668-9120 28

Composer/lyricist David Yazbek blends a range of musical genres in a unique way, while writing lyrics that evoke “Umm Kulthum and Omar Sharif…floating on the jasmine wind.” It’s the brilliance of the musicality that drives the show.

Scott Pask’s revolving set and Tyler Micoleau’s rustic lighting evoke the reality of this bleak environment, perhaps much like Peta Tikva itself, before it became a bustling urban

The Band’s Visit.

center.

The Band’s Visit - not to be missed! Office Hour To put it bluntly, Office Hour, Julia Cho’s new play at The Public Theater, isn’t at all funny. The central character, a withdrawn Chinese American student, is evocative of the lone gunmen of recent days.

In fact, Dennis (Ki Hong Lee) is like a photographic negative of Steve Carell’s character in “The Office.” Only in this case, the paper factory -- where the TV series was set -- is now the college where Dennis is a creative writing major. For him, all roads lead to hell. He writes screenplays and even poems that explode with bizarre violence and deviant sex.

As the play opens, three of his teachers gather over drinks to figure out what to do with this kid who implies, through his narratives, that he is about to take a gun and shoot us all.

As the one man in the group, David (Greg Keller) feels particularly pissed off at his powerlessness in the face of this loose cannon. Genevieve (Adeola Role) is beyond words; and Gina (Sue Jean Kim), the next one to be tested, is trying to learn from their experience. Portraying the antagonist of sorts, Sue Jean Kim delivers a strong portrayal -- one that is focused and truthful. Even her reactions are riveting. In fact, most of the play takes place in her office, where she has summoned Dennis to discuss his violent narratives, while he sits there, refusing to respond. That she

Independent/Matthew Murphy

keeps him in the room, along with the audience, is a mighty feat. Eventually she gets him to reveal himself -- his sense of inadequacy, self-loathing, and fatality. The character that emerges is a kind of cookie-cutter mass murderer.

While the events in this drama are based on the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre, Cho’s cynicism appears to be aimed at the tyranny of political correctness. When Gina touches the young man on the arm to show him compassion, we watch with a sense of foreboding. After all, she isn’t supposed to touch him, or communicate so intimately with him. It’s an invasion of his (private) physical and psychic space. And he isn’t supposed to be carrying a gun. Although in reality, whether or not he is carrying a gun, or guns, remains a matter of interpretation.

As directed by Neel Keller, scenes of imagined killing and suicide merge with the banality of everyday conversation. Tense scenes are repeated, so that we see the potential for different outcomes. The reality feels miserable enough, but the fantasies are lurid and deathly. Still, it’s all portrayed as ongoing life. It’s a story we hear so frequently these days that it almost tells itself.

Set inside the ivory tower (Takeshi Kata, sets, and Christopher Akerlind, lighting), the atmosphere expresses warmth and intellectual desire, all of which recede behind the silence of alienation and the shattering sound of gunshots.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

East End Calendar

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Arts & Entertainment

by Kitty Merrill Each week we’ll highlight local community events and library offerings presented by area institutions and organizations. It’s on you to send ‘em in, kids. Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email news@indyeastend.com.

East Hampton

Thursday 11•23•17

• Thanksgiving Day. Don’t forget the giblets and the gratitude. FRIDAY 11•24•17 • The YMCA hosts Friday night preteen and teen programs from 6 to 9 PM. Round-trip transportation for Sag Harbor, Southampton, and Bridgehampton kids is avails, too. Visit www.ymcali.org and look for Friday night preteen and teen program transportation to sign up online and learn more about the offerings. SATURDAY 11•25•17 • Hike Hither Hills with the East Hampton Trails Preservation Society at 10 AM. Meet at the Hither Hills West Overlook ready to walk seven miles. Call leader Judy Kossover with questions: 845548-7604. tuesDAY 11•28•17 • There are free ESL classes every week at the Most Holy Trinity school on Buell Lane in East Hampton. 9:30 AM, drop-ins welcome. Wednesday 11•29•17 • An Inconvenient Truth screens at the East Hampton Library at 6 PM. The free film is sponsored by the East Hampton Town Sustainability Committee, the town recycling and litter committee, and the EHHS Environmental Awareness Club.

Southampton

THURSDAY 11•23•17

• Eat. Watch TV. Repeat. Happy

Thanksgiving. FRIDAY 11•24•17 • Friends of Long Pond Greenbelt host their annual “walk it off ” hike at 10 AM. Co-sponsored by the Southampton Trails Preservation Society, the fast-paced perambulation commences at the end of Round Pond Lane in Sag Harbor. SATURDAY 11•25•17 • Be sure to check our holiday calendar elsewhere in this edition for listings of all the festive activities happening across the South Fork. SUNDAY 11•26•17 • The topic of this week’s meeting of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the South Fork is “The Gift of Giving.” UUs gather at the meetinghouse on the Bridgehampton/ Sag Harbor Turnpike each Sunday at 10:30 AM. MOnDAY 11•27•17 • Hampton Bays Civic Association welcomes Jack Warner of the Hampton Bays Water District to its annual meeting at 7 PM. He’ll discuss the state of the hamlet’s water at the community center on Ponquogue Avenue.

• Take an introduction to a plantbased diet at the Rogers Memorial Library in Southampton at 4 PM. Free, but registration is required. Visit www.myrml.org for more info.

Picture Your AD Here! To Advertise in The Independent call us at

631.324.2500 or visit our website

www.indyeastend.com THE INDEPENDENT NOW, FOR THE NORTH FORK, THE

Traveler Watchman TRUTH WITHOUT FEAR SINCE 1826

East Hampton • Southampton • Riverhead • Southold • Shelter Island

29


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Arts & Entertainment

Entertainment Guide Compiled by Bridget LeRoy All singing, all dancing? Readings, stagings, and slams? We can’t print it if we don’t know about it. Send your entertainment events to bridget@ indyeastend.com by Thursday at noon.

Music

Stephen Talkhouse Tonight at the Talkhouse in Amagansett, it’s Little Head Thinks with Matt and Bosco at 8, followed by DJ Hanzi at 10 PM. On Friday enjoy the Nancy Atlas Project at 8 PM, with Inner Roots at 10. Yellowman takes the stage at 8 on Saturday, with LHT afterward at 10 PM. Visit www.stephentalkhouse.com or call 631-267-3117 to purchase tickets or for more info.

Karaoke at Springs Tavern The Springs Tavern at 15 Fort Pond Boulevard hosts karaoke night every Saturday night beginning at 10 PM. No cover, just bring your best singing voice! And this week, Andy Aledort, Bosco Michne, Rich Rosch, and Roy DeJesus will host a tribute to The Allman Brothers on Friday, at 9 PM. Andy Aledort performs regularly in the tri-state area with his band, the Groove Kings. They released an acclaimed studio album, Put A Sock In It, a few years ago, and released an equally highlyregarded live album, Live at North Star, in 2009. There will be no cover.  

The Realm performs at Townline BBQ.

For further information call The Springs Tavern at 631-527-7800. Smokin’ Hot Tunes Townline BBQ in Sagaponack continues live music every Friday from 6 to 9 PM. This week, it’s The Realm. For more information, call 631-537-2271 or visit www. townlinebbq.com. ’80s are back at Suffolk Theater This black Friday, travel back in time to the 1980s with Dan’s Papers Homecoming Show and The Ronald Reagans. The dance floor is open for one totally bitchin’ night of ’80s hits -- everything from Madonna to Van Halen to A-Ha to 99 Luft Balloon and more.

A five-piece band with both female and male vocalists, the performers have both Broadway and national touring experience. Come on, Eileen!

Feeling funky? Saturday brings the Earth, Wind, & Fire tribute band for some groove. Tickets for both shows start at $35. Doors, bar, and restaurant open for drinks and dining at 6:30 PM, with the show following at 8. For tickets and more info, visit www.suffolktheater.com. Masonic winter Concert series Jazz vocalist Rafaela Gurtler will perform on Saturday as part of the Masonic winter concert series at the Masonic Temple in Sag Harbor. Doors open at 7:30 PM, with the performance at 8.

Ad Donated By The Independent

30

Relax and enjoy cool jazz with Gurtler’s easy style. Accompanying are Wayne Sabella on keyboard and John Ludlow on saxophone.

Experience the beauty of the inner sanctum of Sag Harbor’s historic masonic lodge #437. Tickets $20 at the door. Refreshments will be served. All proceeds go to the Pierson High School scholarship fund and the local food pantry.

theater

Salesman in sag harbor Called one of the greatest American plays of all time, Bay Street’s Literature Live! program brings Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman to the stage through Sunday.

Set in the late 1940s, Death of a Salesman follows Willy Loman, a failing salesman, and his family as they face the harsh reality of their lives that they have been denying. Ultimately, Miller explores themes surrounding the uncertainty of the American Dream and the struggles that families face in the wake of a changing economy, both of which are as contemporary today as when the play was written. For more information and tickets, visit www.baystreet.org. Bolshoi at Peconic Captured LIVE in HD!: Bolshoi Ballet & BY Experience present Le Corsaire, on Sunday at 3 PM at the Peconic Landing Theater in Greenport.

Inspired by Lord Byron’s epic poem and reworked by Alexei Ratmansky from Petipa’s exotic 19th-century classic, this miracle of the repertoire is one of the Bolshoi’s most lavish productions. Complete with a magnificent awe-inspiring shipwreck and dramatic scenery, this grand romance allows enough

Continued On Page 76.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Charity News

#GivingTuesday Goes Bigger Than Ever

By Nicole Teitler

In 2012, the Tuesday after Thanksgiving was named #GivingTuesday (hashtag included), to combat the super saturation of consumerism postturkey day. This 24-hour period, started right here in New York by the 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation, encourages others to donate their time and money -- all through the power of social media. In 2016 the movement hit a record high of charitable donations as it continues to expand far beyond New York. In the days following the Trump presidential victory, #GivingTuesday donations rose 44 percent last year, raising $168 million. Citizens across 98 nations contributed.

And they went beyond charitable donations. A survey conducted by eBay concluded over 50 percent of Americans -- and 67 percent of millennials -- were more apt to purchase from a company involved in charity.

However you decide to participate, there are many local ways to give back:

Katy’s Kids aims to provide a trusting atmosphere for grieving children and families affected by pediatric cancer. Peer support groups utilize art and play for those going through a difficult time to come together to share experiences, both creatively and vocally. Donate online at www.katyscourage.org or send to Katy’s Courage at PO Box 3251, Sag Harbor, NY 11963. Donate to the arts. Some options include Bay Street Theater, The Parrish Art Museum, Guild Hall, or the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center.

Sylvester Manor on Shelter Island preserves its historic land and celebrates culture and food. Learn more at www.sylvestermanor.org. Camp SoulGrow of Montauk,

which encourages creativity in children to build their confidence and self-esteem, welcomes donations. Learn more at www. campsoulgrow.org.

Concerned Citizens of Montauk advocates for coastal conversation in addition to protecting and improving water quality and promoting sustainable development. Visit www. preservemontauk.org.

East End Hospice is accepting donations for its programs like the Good Grief Family Bereavement Center or its Camp Good Grief. Go to www.eeh.org.

life jacket or other supplies at www. boatingsafety.com. The North Fork Environmental Council educates and preserves the environmental quality of life on the North Fork. Donate at www.nfec1. org.

Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt, which aims to preserve coastal plain ponds, freshwater swamps, wetlands, and woodlands in the Town of Southampton, can be found at www. longpondgreenbelt.com.

The Retreat provides safety, shelter, and support for victims of domestic abuse. Visit www.theretreatinc.org.

You can follow more stories from Nicole Teitler on social media @ NikkiOnTheDaily or email her at NTeitler@gmail.com.

The Ellen Hermanson Foundation supports breast cancer patients. For more visit www.ellensrun.org.

To find more ways to donate, view a full list at www.GivingTuesday.org.

East Hampton Library has several programs you can donate to including its Library Society, its annual Authors Night, the Childrens Fair, and Book Store. Visit www.easthamptonlibrary.org.

The Clamshell Foundation supports people, programs, and projects on the East End. One hundred percent of all profits support college scholarships, food banks, and fish seeding programs. Visit www. clamshellfoundation.org. The Sea Tow Foundation in Southold promotes safe boating practices to reduce accidents related to recreational boating. Donate a

631-324-5218 Licensed and Insured Family Owned and Operated since 1970

www.Coloursconstruction.com 31


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Sweet Charities

Charity News

Support the center’s kids and families by bidding on www. charitybuzz.com through December 4. Unique experiences that are available include lunches with Arlene and Alan Alda, Susan Taylor, Susan Lacy, Ambassador Suzan Johnson Cook, and Reggie Van Lee.

by Jessica Mackin-Cipro Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email to jessica@indyeastend. com. Jean Georges Dinner December 2 marks the third year that the Bridgehampton Child Care & Recreational Center will

N ov e m b e r 2 2

be honored by Topping Rose House with a holiday dinner. Once again celebrity chef Jean Georges Vongerichten will travel to the East End to be at the dinner. The cost is $200 per person for a three-course meal with wines and cocktails. The event starts at 6:30 PM.

Reservations can be made at www.bhccrc.org or by contacting Debra McEneaney at mcsanzo@ hopeworksltd.com or 917-741-6257. Denim and Dice Eastern Long Island Hospital Auxiliary invites the community to Denim and Dice in December, held on Saturday, December 2, from 7

Did you know?

Schenck offers automatic delivery for home heating oil. Never worry about running out.

2017

to 11 PM, at Peconic Bay Yacht Club in Southold. Enjoy cocktails and a casino with a Texas hold’em table, blackjack, roulette, and more. The cost is $125 per person and includes $125 in playing chips. All proceeds benefit ELIH.

For more info visit www.elih-twigs. mybigcommerce.com. ARF’s Winter Wonderland Join the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons (ARF) for a cat and dog holiday adoption event at PETCO in Commack at 30 Veterans Memorial Highway from 11 AM to 4 PM on Saturday, December 2. Celebrate with ARF by giving an adoptable animal a home for the holidays. Mutts, purebreds, kittens, and puppies will be available for adoption. All animals are neutered, microchipped, and vaccinated. If you already have a dog, be sure to bring them with you -- meet and greets are a must. Free admission, adoption fees apply. For more information contact Michele@arfhamptons.org or call 631-537-0400 ext. 207 or email www.arfhamptons.org. Founders Gala

f f o 0 $5 w e N l l A r o y F r e v i l e D c i t a m Auto tomers* Cus Call Now

The Suffolk County Historical Society board of trustees presents its second annual Holiday Founders gala on Thursday, December 7, from 6:30 to 8:30 PM at the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum. Join for a dazzling evening of live jazz music set against the backdrop of the holiday-decorated galleries. Enjoy signature cocktails, local wines, and hors d’oeuvres. The cost is $75 per person. Reserve by December 4 by calling 631-727-2881 ext. 100.

631-287TOTS 631-287-TOTS

om

Source of Energ e en

H

ating Oil: A G e He r

32

k Fuels se lls

Low Sulphur

631-324-0142

nc che •S

a Ultr

62 Newtown Lane, East Hampton

y

*$50 credit applied to second delivery


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays 2017

33


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

34

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Happy Hour Every Day from 5-6:30pm Live Music on Thursdays Lunch & Dinner Prix-Fixe Open for Thanksgiving New Year’s Eve Party Available for Holiday Parties

126 MAIN ST, SAG HARBOR | 631.725.0900 | lulusagharbor.com

35


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

The Nutcracker Returns

By Bridget LeRoy

What would the holidays be without the dulcet strains of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker? And what would the holidays in the Hamptons be without the pitter-patter of little toeshoes in the Hampton Ballet Theatre School’s production of The Nutcracker at Guild Hall’s John Drew Theater? Hampton Ballet Theatre School’s Nutcracker is designed to enchant, as the audience is transported to a land where angels, snowflakes, and flowers dance, and Clara saves the Nutcracker Prince from the evil Mouse King.

HBTS has been bringing Clara, the Mouse King, and, of course, the eponymous wooden fellow himself to the John Drew stage for almost a decade under the direction of Sara Jo Strickland, who herself danced the role of the Sugar Plum Fairy for years in a previous production at Guild Hall before she founded the Hampton Ballet Theatre School in 2007. This is the production’s ninth incarnation. 36

Strickland’s choreography and Tchaikovsky’s music are two of the draws -- another are the ephemeral and beautiful costumes designed and hand sewn by Yuka Silvera.

“My favorite job is to research and learn to create the image of the character,” said Silvera. Designing for dancers can be challenging, she said. “Unlike fashion, dancers cannot sacrifice for beauty. I have to make the costumes so that they can dance comfortably.”

And of course, there are new dancers each year. “The sizes of the dancers are different,” Silvera continued. “One year I extended the material, but the following year it was too big for the new dancer. Also, with the Arabian Princess, the first costume was made with silk chiffon pants with very expensive and beautiful sequins and beaded applique. But when Miss Sara added an Arabian Prince, the choreography was changed and the applique scratched her partner’s bare chest, so the costumes were modified.” She said she and her

costume crew modify, add, and redesign costumes every year.

“Yuka is part of the reason people come to see the show,” said Adam Baranello, who is in his seventh year of performing the role of the Arabian Prince. “They love her beautiful costumes.” Gail Barenllo, who dances the role of the Arabian Princess, added, “Yuka really raises the bar.”

The Baranellos of A&G Dance Company appreciate their turn as the Arabian Prince and Princess. Adam enjoys it, he said, because it gets him out of his focus on original content. “I get to step away for a moment and be part of another person’s work.” Also, “I love to be able to perform in the community where I have settled -- to perform in front of people you like and people that you know. I’m grateful that I am lucky enough to do that.”

Gail echoed Adam’s sentiments. “Performing in the Hamptons is special,” she said. “We live here now so it’s easy to take it for granted,

Independent/Marsha Terry

but I’ll take it any day over the grind of travel and shabby NYC stages!”

What’s it like to work with the littles? “It’s nice for our students to work alongside professionals,” Gail added. “It gives them something to aspire to. And for me, it’s fun because it has a light feel. It’s a student production, so it’s really all about them.” Adam agreed. “I really enjoy watching them evolve each year into better dancers and better performers,” he said.

Silvera also loves The Reveal – when the kids get to see the costumes each year. “They are so cute,” she said. “Their face light up when I walk into the studio carrying new costumes.” Silvera acknowledges that she has her favorites. “It’s the Harlequin Dolls. I got the inspiration from the Alexander McQueen exhibition, Savage Beauty, at the Metropolitan Museum. I made the same lace top for myself too,” she said with a

Continued On Page 57.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

A World Of Thanks

On the first Sunday of October Germany, typical in rural areas, celebrates Erntedankfest. This harvest festival is a way to celebrate a bountiful collection and another year without starvation. Traditionally observed with a parade, music, church services, and a country fair-type setting, a thanksgiving procession presents a harvest crown (Erntekrone) to the harvest queen (Erntekonigin). An evening of dancing, music, and food follows -- in some locations children enjoy a lantern and torch parade.

Grenada celebrates the anniversary when the US militia restored order to the West Indian Island in 1983. After hearing from soldiers about the American Thanksgiving, it originally started by surprising these soldiers with a gratitude meal they missed at home. Now, Grenada celebrates with formal ceremonies to remember the day they were freed from communism.

By Nicole Teitler

American Thanksgiving dates back to the first meal in 1621. However, that meal wasn’t the start of a tradition, nor was it celebrated in the modern-day sense. It was a secular gathering with a religious connotation that was three days long based off the English harvest festivals. Finally, in 1863 President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the national holiday we know today.

Thanksgiving Day football dates back almost as far, with a Princeton-Yale game in the mid1870s. Touchdown! But one thing has remained constant throughout the centuries -- remembering to be thankful, despite race, gender, or religion. Around the world other countries give thanks in their own ways, ranging from godly worship to a feast such as ours. Here are nine ways thanksgiving varies around the globe. On the fourth Thursday of

November, in the Dutch city of Leiden, non-denominational church services are held to commemorate breaking of the Spanish siege in 1574. This is actually believed to be the inspiration behind the American Thanksgiving, as around 40 percent of the Pilgrims came from this town.

November 23 is Japan’s national public holiday of Kinro Kansha no Hi. Rather than celebrating a successful harvest, in 1948 this day, literally translated as Labor Thanksgiving Day, was created to celebrate another year of hard work. It was originally derived from the ancient ritual called Niinamesai, harvest festival, where the Emperor offers fresh rice to the gods. Today it has strayed far away from any godly worship. Labor organizations hold festivals and children create crafted gifts for local police officers. Korea enjoys a three-day harvest festival known as Chuseok. On the 15 day of the eighth month in

the lunar calendar, citizens return to their hometowns to remember their ancestors. Traditional rituals are performed during the morning followed by offerings of food, drinks, and crops. China continues a thousand-yearold tradition of the August Moon Festival to think about the bounty from summer harvest and the immortal goddess, Chang O, who lives on the moon. Mooncakes are given during the celebration and gratitude is felt throughout.

Oh, Canada. Similar to the American origin of giving thanks for a safe journey, L’Action de Grace began in 1578 when the English explorer Martin Frobisher gave thanks for his fleet’s safe journey. In 1879 Parliament declared it a national Thanksgiving Day, which has been celebrated on the second Monday in October since 1957. It’s a day of all the fixin’s, turkey, mashed potatoes, corn, stuffing, and don’t forget the maple syrup.

Like Grenada, Liberia celebrates Thanksgiving after inspiration from the freed American slaves which founded the country. On the first Thursday in November, Liberians give thanks for their freedom and foundations (sort of like Thanksgiving and Independence Day mixed into one). A large meal, concert, and dancing are part of the festivities.

The Jewish holiday of Sukkot, known as the Feast of Tabernacles, is celebrated on the 15 of Tishrei on the Hebrew calendar. This festival is a time of praise and thanks to God for the protection of Israeli children leaving Egypt. Five days after Yom Kippur, a harvest booth, called sukkah, is built where meals are eaten and a special thanks is offered for fruit harvested.

Being thankful is not limited to a time or location. Rather, every day is a moment to appreciate what life brings us. For now, as the American saying goes -- Happy Thanksgiving. Dig in! You can follow more stories from Nicole Teitler on social media @ NikkiOnTheDaily or email her at NTeitler@gmail.com.

37


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

Behind The Scenes At Santa’s Workshop

By Justin Meinken

A select few of us from The Independent volunteered for a once in a lifetime opportunity last week. We formed an expedition team tasked with traveling to the North Pole to interview the big man himself. The team was led by famous mountain climber Reinhold Messner and his pet Yeti, Sulley. After a long day’s journey, we finally got to meet old Saint Nick. Once he confirmed that we were not in fact members of the CIA, Santa Claus led us inside and we began our interview. When we asked how Santa handles the holiday season, he said, “Oh, it’s crunch time in the workshop again. Many of my elves have been working 36-hour workdays since the summer. They all feel like tax attorneys on April 14.”

When asked if he was faced with any new challenges this year, Santa responded, “Yes, Rudolph is currently out on paternity leave. He’s holding a contest for baby names, by the way. But I can’t fly my sled without a good light to lead the way; can’t be too careful with those Delta flights. I’ve been trying to decide between Tinkerbell or Puff the Magic Dragon as temporary replacements.”

We wanted to know if there were any areas in the United States that Santa had trouble delivering to in the past and he answered with, “The big cities are always a little tricky. Usually, I wind up having to be buzzed in. A few of the southern states are a bit risky, too.” When we asked why, he said, “Well, how often does a hunter see nine 12-point bucks on the roof of his house? But no one should worry, though, and everyone’s presents will be arriving on time, as they always do. My elves have 2,346,498,506 presents set to deliver for the US alone. All I ask, is if everyone would please put out their fireplaces on Christmas Eve. Mrs. Claus had to sew me two new fur pants last year.” When we asked where Mrs. Claus was, Santa informed us that she was busy making espresso for the elves. Not wanting to add to any more of Santa’s busy schedule, we left 38

to interview some of the elves in the workshop. The first elf we interviewed said, “Hi! I’m Phil I work here all the time but I like it a lot. It’s really cold out today, did you notice it’s really cold out today? My friends think that global warming will heat up the North Pole but I still think it’s really cold out today. How did you get here? Did you fly on reindeer? I don’t see any reindeer. Maybe a Yeti over there but no reindeer. Did you hear that Rudolph’s going to be a dad? I’m so happy for him, we’re all so happy for him! Well, all of us except for the director. The director says Rudolph leaving will slow us down. Did you talk to the director already? I hope you didn’t talk to the director, the director’s a di-- ” The elf seemed to have fainted after that. Undeterred, we interviewed workshop director Elrond Alboin, who said, “I’m very busy right now! My workers have had too many breaks and we need to test Santa’s new present loading system. Pull!” Just then, a worker elf was catapulted into the air by a large

spring-powered device. The director continued, “I need to test the launcher’s strength and my workers are perfect test subjects. Now, shoo!” We left at the director’s request and fortunately, we were able to get more information out of the workshop floor manager and certified tree whisperer Legolas Erridin. We asked him how he started working in Santa’s workshop. “After I left Hollywood, I came back home to take over my father’s position so he could finally pursue his dream of being a Keebler cookie baker,” Erridin explained. “As floor manager, I double-check the quality of all the presents we build and I make sure that each elf can handle their own work loads.”

We asked Legolas if there was anything unusual about the presents this year and he said, “There were a lot of Wonder Women costumes this year which we’re all very excited about, but aside from that there wasn’t anything out of order. A billion cars, a few million Xboxs and Play Stations, a couple Rhino posters titled, ‘Save the Chubby Unicorn,’ just business as usual for

us.”

On a side note, we asked Erridin what his favorite movies and TV shows were and he said, “For movies, it’s a tossup between Frozen and Elf and for TV shows, I have to go with “Game of Thrones.” I don’t like the White Walkers, but I’d totally hang out with the Wildlings.” Unfortunately, it gets very dark at the North Pole and the night came in quickly. Realizing our trip to Santa’s Workshop had to come to an end, Reinhold and Sulley resumed their lead of our team and we began the long trek back to East Hampton. We hope to have a follow-up interview with Santa after the big day, but before we left, we managed to grab Rudolph’s contact information for the contest. If you would like to submit your girl or boy baby names for Rudolph’s newborn, send them to ieenews@ indyeastend.com. Remember, Rudolph needs your help to pick the perfect name, so don’t be shy and give us all you got!


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

No F Fro ve rid m mb ay er , 24 th

Don Duga

2017

De Su Thr ce nd u mb ay er , 31 st

World Famous Artist and Animator Creator of “Frosty the Snowman”, “The First Unicorn” starring Mia Farrow, “Mad Monster Party” starring Phyllis Diller and Boris Karloff Don is retiring and having a Major 60 year Retrospective of his Original Life’s Art at

Green Earth Gallery

From Friday, November 24th 11am to 8pm Thru Sunday, December 31st 11am to 8pm Original Mandalas “The Beatles”, “Grey Gardens”, “The Little Drummer Boy”, “Santa Clause is Coming to Town”, “The Cone Heads”, and “Rudolf the Red Nosed Reindeer” and many more Curator: Andrew Wargo, Black Tie Magazine

Frosty The Snow Man 24x18”

Grey Gardens 11x14

George Harrison 17x131/2”

The Last Unicorn 14x12 3/4

All are one of a kind • Own a piece of history For Sale from $200 to $1,000 - 50% off GREEN EARTH NATURAL FOODS and GALLERy 50 East Main Street, Riverhead, Ny 11901 Tel: (631) 369-2233 www.genfm.com Health Foods/Organic Herbs ★ Blankets, Sweaters, Caps made from Natural Fibers from around the world ★ Spiritual books (East and West)

Ad Compliments of Richard Novak Art Collector and 40 year Hamptons Home Builder of 150 homes from Manhattan to the Hamptons to Montauk

NovakLtd@hotmail.com www.hamptonsbuildersltd.com

516-456-5920

Office: 631-898-4800

& Andrew@blacktiemagazine.com

39


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

Fun & Frivolous Blazers

By Zachary Weiss Tis the season to be stylish -- and that means all men should be donning their finest threads this holiday season. This time of year calls for festive looks; ones you couldn’t break out of your closet

any other time of year. That’s why we rounded up this selection of fun and frivolous blazers that will leave party guests wondering: Where did you get that? They range from the ultra-kitschy option from newcomer Shinesty, to the awesomely elevated -- a Black Watch plaid tuxedo available via rental from the good folks at The Black Tux. There’s even an option courtesy of rapper Snoop Dog. Now all you have to do is choose!

The Black Tux Westwood Outfit, Rental starting at $200

Shinesty Rock Star of David Hannaukah Sweater Suit, $99.99

Snoop Dogg x COLLECTION by Michael Strahan for JC Penney Burgundy Velvet Jacket, $200

J. Crew Ludlow Tartan Slim Fit Dinner Jacket, $410 40


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

In support of Concerned Citizens of Montauk’s (CCOM) efforts to improve Montauk Water Quality, part of the “Save the Lake - Save the Pond” program, Hamptons Septic Services is providing educational resources and discounted services to help raise environmental awareness in % the Montauk Community.

SALE 15 OFF Extended through November 30th

For more information contact CCOM by calling (631) 238-5720 or visit their website at

www.savethelakesavethepond.com H.S.S. is Certified with Suffolk County Consumer Affairs & Long Island Liquid Waste Association

CALL TODAY (631) 267-7515 www.hamptonssepticservices.com

41


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

Home For The Holidays

N ov e m b e r 2 2

Cinnamon Crunch Sugar Cookies

By Chef Joe Cipro

Ingredients (About 1 dozen cookies) 1 c all purpose flour

1/4 c granulated sugar 1 tsp baking powder

1/4 lb butter (softened) 1 Tbsp cinnamon

1 tsp vanilla extract 1 egg yolk

Directions Mix dry ingredients in a KitchenAid mixer with dough hook attachment. Add the egg and vanilla extract. Add the butter, a little at a time, until a ball of dough is formed. Roll dough flat and use a small holiday cookie cutter for desired shape. Place them on a sheet tray with parchment paper. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes.

42

2017


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Celebrate The Holidays at

Cliff’s Elbow Too! The 71st Year Run by the Saunders Family

Private Parties Welcome up to 50 People. Select a menu customized to your special day. Advanced reservations required. Call Today! 631-722-3292

Gift Certificates Available

Also Try: Cliff’s Elbow Too! Cliff’s Elbow Room 1085 Franklinville 1549 Main Road Road, Laurel Jamesport 631-298-3262 631-722-3292

Cliff’s Rendezvous 313 East Main Street • Riverhead 631-727-6880

cliffselbowroom.com cliffsrendezvous.com

“Steaks this Well Done . . . are Rare” 43


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

AQU ADMIASRSIUM INCLUDEION D!

SANTA BRUNCH

The East Hampton Chamber and Rowdy Hall will kick off the holiday season with a visit from Santa Claus on Saturday, December 2. Following the annual Santa Parade on Main Street in East Hampton, which begins at 10 AM, Santa will be at Rowdy Hall by the fire for photos and visits with children of all ages.

Compiled by Kitty Merrill

Be sure to check the calendars in our Arts & Entertainment section each week for additional holiday events.

DECEMBER 10 10AM, 12PM & 2PM

Wednesday, November 22 • Take a sneak peek at Marders open house from 5 to 8 PM. Every year all weekend long, ring in the season against the backdrop of Marders’ lavish décor. Tonight, sip champagne and get a first look at the holiday extravaganza. Located on Snake Hollow Road in Bridgehampton. Thursday, November 23 • The annual Thanksgiving Day Run for Fun/ Turkey Trot in Montauk helps you work up an appetite for the feast ahead. Race check-in runs from 8 to 9:30 AM on the Village Green, $15 to participate. Run three or six miles. Categories for all ages are available.

MEEET M E! HER

Friday, November 24

Fishes & Wishes

• From 9 AM to 5 PM all weekend, Marders in Bridgehampton hosts its 42nd open house with daily live music, including the return of the Genesis Gospel Choir, Birds of Prey, bee lecture & honey tasting, bird walks (bring your binoculars) and events for the children. Traditional cakes, cookies and hot milled cider will be served.

NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY DECEMBER 31 • 6:30 - 11PM

Call to reserve - 631.208.9200, ext. 426 or book online @ LongIslandAquarium.com.

431 East Main St, Riverhead, NY 11901 *All prices plus tax. 72-hour cancellation, within 72 hours, no refund. Santa Brunch includes all-day Aquarium Admission and service charge.

44

2017

Holiday Calendar

Celebrate the Season With Us!

Santa NewYears EH Indpt 4.313x11.25 Dec2017.indd 1

N ov e m b e r 2 2

11/3/17 2:47 PM

• To celebrate the start of the holiday season join the Southold Historical Society for their annual Candlelight Tour from 3 to 6 PM.

Guests will enjoy an assortment of treats, visit Santa in the Barn, and tour their historical houses. This event is free for the community.

• Romany Kramoris Gallery on Main Street in Sag Harbor hosts its small artworks holiday invitational beginning today and running through January 14. The works of Joyce Brian, Adrienne Kitaeff, and Lois Bender are spotlighted. • The Country Parlor Holiday Craft and Gift Show rolls into Hallockville Museum Farm on Sound Avenue in Riverhead for the whole weekend. From 9 AM to 3 PM Friday and Saturday and 10 AM to 2 PM on Sunday, the North Fork’s most unique holiday show of fine folk artists and craftspeople graces the historic Naugles Barn at Hallockville. Shop for handmade artisan gift items including baskets, ornaments and seasonal decor, rugs, woodcarvings, Santas and Christmas items, gift baskets and so much more. Something for everyone on your list! Saturday, November 25 • It’s the ninth annual lighting of the light in Montauk. The Lighthouse lighting takes place from 4 to 7 PM. Parking and admission to the lighthouse grounds are free. Santa, music, and caroling, plus lots of lights to illuminate the festive spirit. A special guest will throw the switch

Continued On Page 45.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Holiday Calendar Continued From Page 44.

and the lights stay on until the New Year. • Montauk Community Church will be hosting its Annual Christmas Fair from 9 AM to 2 PM. The fair will include baked goods, handmade items, Christmas decorations, new and used toys, handmade rugs and other gifts. Santa arrives at noon. Refreshments will be sold throughout the event. • The Mattituck-Laurel Historical Society presents its Festive Holiday Open House at the historic Tuthill house off the Main Road in Mattituck. From 3 to 5 PM enjoy open house tours and visits with Santa. At 5 PM, it’s the tree lighting, caroling and 50/50 raffle with refreshments in the New Egypt Schoolhouse.

the Independent

Home For The Holidays

Montauk from 11 AM to 4 PM. Pony rides, caroling and tasty refreshments add to the festive feel. • Southold Historical Society sponsors its first ever Home for the Holidays show house. The Anne Currie-Bell House will be expertly decorated by Lori Guyer of White Flower Farmhouse in Southold. Don’t miss this dazzling display of Victorian enchantment. 1 to 4 PM today and December 3. Tickets are $10 at the door.

Wednesday, November 29 • The Suffolk County Parks Department, in cooperation with the Town of Southampton Parks Department will host

the annual Big Duck Holiday Lighting Ceremony at 7 PM. This year’s festivities will feature live entertainment including a duck carol sing-a-long led by the Riverhead Middle School Show Choir, a visit from the LI Ducks Mascot “Quackerjack,” and of course the ever-anticipated arrival of Santa Claus courtesy of the Flanders Fire Department. The Big Duck is located on Flanders Road in Flanders. Friday, December 1 • Eat, drink, and be merry with a traditional tree lighting and festive celebration at Baron’s Cove in Sag Harbor from 3 to 9 PM. Enjoy

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

complimentary cookies and warm cider, holiday crafts for the kids, music by Lynn Blue Duo and a visit from the guy in the red suit.

• Westhampton Library hosts a lunch and learn about de-stressing during the holiday season at noon. Create appetizers for the holiday season and discuss stress reduction. Call 631-288-3335 to register for this free program.

• The Southampton Cultural Center presents A Christmas Carol dinner and theater package. Dinner’s at 5 PM at the Plaza Café, with the show at 7 PM at the center. $62. Call 631-287-4377 for reservations and tickets.

Continued On Page 50.

• The Montauk Library holds a holiday book sale beginning at 10 AM and ending at 3 PM. Gift books, art books, cookbooks, children’s books, decorations, jewelry, and more are what’s in store.

•The annual “Parade of Lights” takes place in Southampton Village from 4:30 to 6 PM. Fire trucks kick off a procession from Windmill Lane to Agawam Park where the tree is lit at 5 PM. And there’s caroling by Vosh and Mosh. Santa welcomes visitors to a reception after the tree lighting. • The Montauk Chamber of Commerce presents its annual family holiday fun day at the Montauk Yacht Club noon to 2 PM. Kids create holiday crafts and ornaments. Plenty of good cheer served. Free.

• It’s a Wonderful Village. Southampton Country Holiday and the chamber present an array of festive events including horse and buggy rides from 12:30 to 3:30 PM. • The winter indoor Riverhead Farmers Market kicks off today from 10 AM to 2 PM. Offering local farm produce, gifts, crafts, and holiday treats, the market runs through March 31. In the old Swezey’s building, 117 East Main Street. Sunday, November 26 • See Santa at the Lighthouse in 45


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

46

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

47


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

What’s Behind Your Fence?

Independent/Justin Meinken

including a knight’s armor and old-style bellows cameras. The collection of items is unique and seemingly endless.

According to Meredith Goodyear, a sales rep for Behind the Fence Gallery, the merchandise is manufactured in the Philippines, Thailand, and China and customized on premise by artists at the store. Their most popular sellers are cows and dinosaurs. “Someone during the summer rented a whole bunch of cows from us because they were having a country wedding outdoors and wanted it to look authentic, so they put all the cows out in the field.”

By Justin Meinken

If you drive down County Road 39 in Southampton it’s impossible to miss the menagerie of dinosaurs, action figures, a polar bear, and Santa Claus with his reindeer and elves peering at you from the storefront of Behind the Fence Gallery. Looking for something super unusual for holiday gift giving? Go big or go home. Dad doesn’t need 48

another tie and Mom doesn’t need another scarf – but they’d be the envy of the neighborhood with a T-Rex in the backyard next to the begonias. Recently purchased by Jeremy Essay, the store is 10,000 square feet of various forms of art, collectibles, and life-size statues separated into multiple rooms. Each room seems to send you on a different adventure. Monkeys,

lions and other animals only seen in the Serengeti line one wall. Sound effects help clinch the sensation of being in the African plains as you stand next to a life-sized lion with the sounds of snarling and roaring filling the room. Moving on through the store, you encounter swashbuckling pirates and find Santa Claus sharing the room with Batman and Superman. Other rooms offer up collectibles

Behind the Fence Gallery stages its merchandise based upon the holidays. Its Christmas theme promotions have started, which is why Santa is prominently watching over CR39. Essay is working to become part of some of the local charitable events, as he feels that giving back to the community is important. He plans to bring the 10-foot-tall polar bear to Coopers Beach in Southampton for the Polar Bear Plunge scheduled for Saturday, December 9. If you can’t get to the gallery to experience the unique collection personally, you can browse the merchandise at www.lifesizestatue. com.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Giving Thanks

To all our loyal & new customers Receive 10% OFF Septic Pumping when you sign up for a Residential 2 yr. Service agreement by 12/31/17. Email or call for more details

631.907.4426

www.QuackenbushCesspools.com 49


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Holiday Calendar Continued From Page 45.

Saturday, December 2 • Santa arrives by fire truck at 3 PM in Sag Harbor Village. Mr. Claus will visit with the kids while WELJ offers Christmas music. At 5 PM, the community is invited to join the lighting of the giant tree at the foot of Long Wharf. • There’s family wreath decorating at the Westhampton Library from 1 to 3 PM. $5 materials fee. Register by calling 631-288-3335. • St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Hampton Bays will hold its Christmas Fair from 9:30 AM to

the Independent

Home For The Holidays

2 PM. Don’t miss their Famous Cookie Walk, raffle baskets, fresh handmade wreaths and greens, homemade soups, baked goods and much more. Santa will also be making an appearance from 11 AM to 1 PM and everyone gets a complimentary drink. For more info call 631-728-0776.

• Southold Historical Society presents a holiday fair from 9 AM to 4 PM at the Southold Recreation Center on Peconic Lane in Peconic. Find unique holiday gifts and stop in the café for yummy baked goods. Bring the kids for crafts, face painting and visits with Mr. and Mrs. Claus. Photos and admission are free.

• Cutchogue New Suffolk Historical Society will hold its annual Tree Lighting on the Cutchogue Village Green at 4:30 PM. As you watch the tree lighting carolers will be singing and Santa will make an appearance. The event will include seasonal drinks as you visit with Santa inside the Old Schoolhouse.

• Railroad Museum of Long Island presents its Holiday Open House in Greenport today and tomorrow and in Riverhead December 9 and 10 from 11:30 AM to 3 PM. Everyone is welcome and admission is free. Free refreshments are available and Santa will arrive at noon. Souvenirs will be handed

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

out to boys and girls from Santa. A train set will be raffled off as well.

• Southampton’s It’s a Wonderful Village festivities continue with a holiday stroll, horse and buggy rides, from 1 to 4 PM, and a visit by Ol’ St. Nick at the chamber office from 1:30 to 3:30 PM. • Christ Church of Sag Harbor will host its Christmas Boutique from 10 AM to 4 PM. Tabletop trees and wreaths for sale. A hot dog stand for hungry shoppers and a tea (with $10 admission) featuring sandwiches, cakes, cookies, and of course a spot of Earl Grey. Baked goods, including glutenfree selections, plus lots of items for sale, like gift baskets from local shops. Anything you buy can be gift wrapped right there. This year all proceeds will be donated to the village of Chermaitre in Haiti. • Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center presents Chanticleer, the world’s reigning male chorus. They’ll perform original interpretations of holiday classics. 8 PM. Visit the WHBPAC website for tickets. • The seventh annual Friends Bazaar will take place at Ashawagh Hall in Springs off SpringsFireplace Road from 10 AM to 5 PM. Quality arts and fine crafts will be up for sale as well as handmade items that fit every budget. All are welcome and admission is free. • A Christmas Bazaar will be held at the Old Steeple Community Church on the Main Road in Aquebogue from 10 AM to 2 PM. Expect crafts, quilts, cookies, and a Chinese auction. Luncheon will be served.

• The popular East Hampton Chamber of Commerce Santa parade steps off at 10 AM traveling along Main Street and Newtown Lane. At 11 AM, there are pictures with Santa at Rowdy Hall. • The Westhampton Presbyterian Church will be having its annual Christmas Bazaar and Tea from 1 until 3:30 PM. Decorated fresh wreaths, handmade ornaments, gift items, baked goods and jewelry will be available to buy. Don’t miss the cookie walk.

• Suffolk County Historical Society presents its 7th annual wooden Continued On Page 52.

50


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

From all of us at

ONE 1 STOP MARKET Boar’s Head Deli, Groceries Beer & Soda N.Y. State Lottery Large Selection of Instant Lottery Tickets

OPEN 7 DAYS

6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving & Christmas Day Full Time Butcher available 9am to 1pm daily Springs Fireplace Road, East Hampton

631-324-6055 51


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

wonderland from 10 AM to 4:30 PM. This family-friendly event will feature local handmade wooden items as well as other local artisans’ wares. Live woodworking and woodcarving demonstrations will go on all day indoors in historic galleries as well as outdoors on the Great Lawn. The event includes dozens of local vendors, holiday arts & crafts, ornaments, home décor, rustic Santas and gnomes, unique handmade carvings and other wooden items, local artisancrafted holiday and everyday gifts, handmade soaps, candles, hats &

r’s M e om Cr

2017

Home For The Holidays

Holiday Calendar Continued From Page 50.

N ov e m b e r 2 2

scarves, and much more (too much to list!). There’s something for everyone on your holiday list. • Hampton Bays Fire Department holds its “stuff a truck” toy drive running through December 11 at the firehouse. • It’s “homegrown for the holidays” at Hayground School in Bridgehampton. 10 AM to 4 PM gifts, food, art, jewelry from 45 vendors.

• Shinnecock Community Center is the place for a Christmas Bazaar. Arts and crafts and raffles, oh, my! 11 AM to 4 PM.

shes A i W t e ark

Sunday, December 3 • Stop by the Amagansett LifeSaving Station on Atlantic Avenue for a holiday bazaar from noon to 4 PM. Peruse exotic and useful wares by local artists and artisans affordably priced for holiday shopping. Seasonal refreshments, too.

• It’s Ronnie Spector and the best Christmas party ever at the Suffolk Theater in Riverhead. Tickets range from $55 to $79. Show’s at 7:30 PM. Visit the website for tickets. • Make a wreath with Peconic Land Trust at Bridge Gardens in Bridgehampton at 2 PM. BYO

ll The Happi est o f Ho l id ays

3500 NOYAC ROAD SAG HARBOR 11963

PHONE: 725-9004

ribbons, seashells, feathers, lights, or other decorative items to add to the locally grown greens and dried flowers that will be provided. $35 includes materials and light refreshments. Bring gloves and clippers, Call 631-283-3195 to reserve your spot.

• The Hampton Bays Chamber of Commerce sponsors a tree lighting and visit with Santa at the firehouse on Main Street at 4 PM. • Shelter Island Historical Society invites the public to a holiday open house, art show, and Santa’s workshop at Havens Barn from 1 to 4 PM. Take a free pic with St. Nick, create holiday crafts, and enjoy homemade refreshments. Sing along with Island Folk and donate an unwrapped toy for a needy child. Thursday, December 7 • At 7 PM examine the backstory of It’s A Wonderful Life with Sal St. George at the Hampton Bays Library. Friday, December 8

Standing Prime Rib Roast • Filet Mignon Crown Roast of Pork • Racks of Lamb Spiral Hams • Fresh Turkeys Bone-in Smoked Ham Fresh Hand Made Sausage Three Kinds of Stuffing Available Holiday Pies Cheeses & Cold Cuts Platters DECEMBER 24TH 6:30 AM - 5:00 PM 4 Butchers on Duty

Get all your Holiday Wines & Spirits at Noyac Wines & Liquor Store

725-0330

DECEMBER 25th 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM Deli & Butcher Closed

Remember to call in your special orders early! 52

• The Hampton Ballet Theatre School presents The Nutcracker at Guild Hall in East Hampton at 7 PM tonight, Saturday at 1 and 7 PM, and Sunday at 2 PM. Advance tickets range from $15 to $45, $20 to $50 on the day of performance. Call 888-933-4287. • From 5:30 to 7:30 PM it’s the annual windmill lighting at Stony Brook Southampton. Student Center Cafeteria. Music, refreshments, family activities, ice carving, and photo booth will be there. Will you? It’s free. Saturday, December 9 • The Clamshell Foundation and Camp SoulGrow collaborate to present a Holiday Spectacular at the camp’s studio in Montauk. Make ornaments, decorate cookies, wrap presents for those in need, and enjoy candy, dancing, hot chocolate, karaoke, and of course, Santa. 2 to 4 PM. • Bay Street Theater & Sag Harbor Center for the Arts holds a “Rockin Holiday Dance” featuring music by the HooDoo Loungers and Joe Delia & Thieves at 8 PM. Get tix by calling 631-725-9500. $25. • There’s gingerbread house

Continued On Page 54.


the Independent N ov e m b e r 2 2

SHOP ECANTIQUES.COM

MICHAEL DAVIS DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

324 Hedges Lane, Sagaponack • OPEN HOUSE Saturday Nov 25th • 11:00am - 1:00pm

Terry Cohen of Saunders Associates Presents Sexy Sophistication

ENGLISH COUNTRY HOME AND GARDEN

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m 2017

53


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Holiday Calendar Continued From Page 52.

decorating with Citarella at Guild Hall in East Hampton at noon. Join the merry team of confectionary experts to make a festive display using frosting on a freshly baked gingerbread house. Reserve your spot early, seating is limited. $20, $15 for Guild Hall members. Call 631-324-0806.

• Learn how to make a holiday centerpiece with the Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons. Bring greens from your garden – at least 25 cuts, 10” long -- and a pair of clippers. Register by November 25. $15 for HAH premium members,

Home For The Holidays $20 for HAH members, and $30 for nonmembers. The crafting happens at the HAH library in the ground floor of the Bridgehampton Community House, School Street side of the building. • Southampton’s It’s a Wonderful Village festivities continue with horse and buggy rides, from 12:30 to 3:30 PM, and a visit by Ol St. Nick at Rogers Library from 2 to 4 PM. 1:30 to 3:30 PM. • It’s a hearthside swing time party at the Rogers Mansion in Southampton. The Southampton Historical Museum is your host. Swing dance lessons and big band music, ’40s-style dress encouraged.

5:30 to 7:30 PM. Visit the museum’s website for tickets. Sunday, December 10 • Peconic Landing in Greenport presents A Christmas Carol: A Live Radio Play at 2 PM in the community center. See Joe Landry’s take on the holiday classic as a live 1940s radio broadcast complete with vintage commercials for extra fancy fruitcake and the magic of live sound effects and musical underscoring. Free. Tuesday, December 12 • JDT Lab at Guild Hall in East Hampton hosts a Christmas SingAlong and Musicale presented by

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

the Johansen-Markard piano duo. Free, but reservations suggested. Visit Guild Hall’s website to sign up. Wednesday, December 13 • The Montauk Chamber of Commerce hosts its “Starbrite” storefront lighting contest. Judging for the best holiday-decorated Montauk business takes place with prizes for the best traditional, whimsical, brightest, and Montaukthemed storefronts. 5 to 5:30 PM. Friday, December 15 • The Harbor Bells English Bell Choir performs at Peconic Landing in Greenport at 7:30 PM. Free, but registration required. Visit Peconic Landing’s ticket leap site. • From 6 to 7:30 PM, there’s a holiday celebration at Brecknock Hall in Greenport, brought to you by Peconic Landing. A visit from Santa and a special reading of The Night Before Christmas are part of this free celebration. Hot apple cider, holiday cookies and cider, and pajamas welcome. Saturday, December 16 • Kick up your heels with WLNG’s Rockabilly Christmas at the Suffolk Theater in Riverhead at 8 PM. Check the website for tickets.

Now is the perfect time to clean your air ducts For a cleaner and healthier home Musty smells - Just give us a call! Dryer vents haven’t been cleaned in a while - Just give us a call! Allergens, pet dander - Just give us a call!

Call for a Free Inspection 62 Newtown Lane, East Hampton •

54

631-324-0142 •

www.schenckfuels.com

• Singer, songwriter, producer, and Southampton native Darren Ottati has chosen his favorite holiday musical numbers for a revue at Peconic Landing in Greenport at 2 PM. With fellow artists Jenifer DeMeo, Amanda Kuchinski, Ralph DAmbroses, Shannon DuPuis, and their five-piece band, these dynamic performers will surely put you in the holiday spirit. The event is free, but registration is appreciated. Visit the Peconic Landing website. • Southampton’s It’s a Wonderful Village festivities continue with horse and buggy rides, from 12:30 to 3:30 PM, Sunday, December 17 • Enjoy It’s a Wonderful Life – A Live Radio Play at the Suffolk Theater in Riverhead. 6 PM. Tickets run from $15 to $30. Visit the theater website to grab yours.

• Join Nina Et Cetera for a Rockin Around the Holidays concert sponsored by the Friends of the Hampton Bays Library at the library at 2 PM.


Jam

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Hampton

Company

www.hamptonjam.com 55


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

What’s Playing At The Movies

The Last Jedi

By Rick Murphy

There are holiday movies, and then there are holiday movies. The film can be about the holiday season, or it can be released during the holiday season. The industry relies on both – kids and parents alike love a good Christmas movie, and the studios save many of their most important films for year-end release so that Academy members will remember them when Oscar ballots go out. Oh, and one other thing – the holiday season still ranks as one of the most important box office drivers, right there after summer blockbusters.

Speaking of box office clout and blockbusters, prepare for The Last Jedi, which will be available in theaters all over the world December 15. The latest vehicle features Mark Hamill, who started out as a young Luke Skywalker 40 years ago and has returned periodically ever since. The buzz will be deafening, complete with mountains of merchandise available at stores everywhere just in time to be wrapped for Christmas. There will also be the obligatory clothing line, toys, and lunchboxes.

Two of the year’s most important films – and Oscar hopefuls – are due out shortly. The Shape Of Water, a Guillermo de Torro effort, is a fantasy-thriller that has wowed film festival audiences, including the Hamptons International Film

56

Independent/Courtesy Luca Film

Festival attendees.

Early forecasters list it as a second favorite for the Best Movie Oscar, right behind Dunkirk. It’s impossible to talk about potential Oscar winners without talking about Oscar pedigree. Academy members have their favorites, and at the top of the list is Meryl Streep. She is pared with another Oscar stalwart, Tom Hanks, in The Post. The movie is about the Pentagon papers scandal, and how it was covered by the Washington Post. The two superstars play Ben Bradley and Katherine Graham, the editor and publisher of the newspaper (in real life the pair ended up living in Grey Gardens, the creepy East Hampton house owned by the Beale mother and daughter duo). It is set for release on December 22.

Did we mention holiday movies? The Star is an animated film about the first Christmas as viewed through the eyes of a donkey (voiced by Sidney Yeun) that presumably had a front row seat in Bethlehem, and we don’t mean during the steel strike. Keegan Michael-Key, Kelly Clarkson, Vhing Rhames and Gabriel Iglesias add their voices to the film. It’s due out any day. Daddy’s Home 2 will be out by the time you read this, and with John Cena, Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, and John Lithgow costarring, it is destined to do big numbers at the box office.

Wonder Wheel

There is nothing like a tender, touching family holiday tale the whole family can enjoy together and indeed, will resonate with youngsters for years to come. And then there is A Bad Moms Christmas, which is none of that. The story line reads thusly: “When three overworked and underappreciated moms are pushed beyond their limits, they ditch their conventional responsibilities for a jolt of long overdue freedom, fun, and comedic self-indulgence.” A sequel to the raunchy hit, Bad Moms, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell, and Kathryn Hahn, it sounds suspiciously like it could be called Moms Behave Badly so be forewarned. Morgan Freeman has a new movie. Morgan Freeman always has a new movie. If it’s an action-comedy you are after, this promises to be a funny one. Just Getting Started, out Friday January 8, is directed by Ron Shelton (White Men Can’t Jump) and co-stars Tommy Lee Jones, Rene Russo, and Glenne Headly. The plot revolves around Duke Diver (Freeman), who is living the high life as the freewheeling manager of a luxurious resort in Palm Springs, CA. He soon faces competition from Leo ( Jones), a former military man who likes the same woman that Duke is interested in. When Diver’s past suddenly catches up with him, he must put aside his differences and reluctantly team up with Leo to stop whoever is trying to kill him.

Independent/Courtesy Amazon Studios

Independent/Courtesy Entertainment One Just Getting Started

Richard Linklater (Boyhood) brings us The Last Flag Flying, about three Vietnam veterans who come together 30 years later to bury a son, a young Marine killed in the Iraq War. Bryan Cranston, Laurence Fishburne, and Steve Carell star. It’s set to open this week. Wonder Wheel, Woody Allen’s latest, may be a surprise player at this year’s Oscar ceremonies. Kate Winslett gets the lead and is said to turn in an Oscar-worthy performance, and co-stars Juno Temple, Justin Timberlake, and Jim Belushi are all getting supporting role buzz.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

Hop Aboard For The Polar Express

By Peggy Spellman Hoey

Grab your pajamas and prepare for boarding.

North Fork Trolley has produced an interactive trolley ride based on the iconic award-winning children’s book by Chris Van Allsburg, The Polar Express, which will run from stops on the North and South Forks starting this Friday through December 23. During the trip, passengers, who are encouraged to wear pajamas, can listen to a recorded narration of the book by Liam Neeson while mingling with the conductor and other characters from the movie. Upon arrival at a secret location decorated as the North Pole, passengers will disembark the trolley for a visit with Santa and his elves. Saint Nick and his minions will present youngsters with their first gift of Christmas and before they reembark on the train, they will be offered hot cocoa and cookies to warm them on their journey back to the station.

Nutcracker

Continued From Page 36.

smile.

Holida Bovio and Jillian Hear will be sharing the role of Dew Drop Princess, and the Snow Queen will be danced by Beatrice DeGroot and Devon Friedman -- all are pro student level 7 dancers at HBTS. Samantha Prince, also a level 7, will be dancing the role of Sugar Plum Fairy. Guest artist Nick Peregrino will dance the role of Cavalier. Guest artists Timothy Sloan and James Monroe Stevko will be sharing the roles of Snow King, Dew Drop Prince, and Marzipan. Performances are Friday, December 8, at 7 PM, Saturday, December 9, at 1 and 7 PM, and Sunday, December 10, at 2 PM. Advanced ticket prices range from $15-$45, and day of performance ticket prices range from $20-$50, depending on the designated section. Group rates are also available.

To journey to the Land of Sweets, go to www. hamptonballettheatreschool.com or call 888-933-4287.

The train departs from Riverhead on the North Fork and Southampton on the South Fork. In Riverhead, the trolley departs from the All-Star Bowling Alley, 96 Main Rd. (Route 25 just west of route 105), and in Southampton, from Omni at the Hampton Jitney Terminal on County Road 39A. Departure times start at 4:30 PM

and end at 8:30 PM. Organizers are asking that riders arrive 30 minutes early before departure. Fares are $53, which includes transportation, a gift for children, and refreshments. Rides are restricted to passengers over two years old. To purchase a ticket, go to www. northforktrolley.com. For more information, call 631-369-3031.

Independent/Courtesy North Fork Trolley

Great Tray

Giveaway

Dine-in or Takeout an order (of $10 or more from any location) from now ‘til Dec. 23rd and enter to win a free platter for Christmas Eve! ($75 Value)

Now taking reservations for Christmas Eve Dinner in Westhampton and Chef Dave’s Night of Seven Fishes! buoyone.com for more info | Call in your Holiday Orders Today!

Riverhead | Westhampton | Mattituck | East Hampton

1175 W Main St 631-208-9737

62 Montauk Hwy 631-998-3808

10095 Main Rd. 631-315-5405

17 Race Lane 631-527-7557

57


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

Rumrunner Home Gifts Photos by Jan Marie

With a friendly and helpful staff, Rumrunner Home in Wainscott and Southampton is a fabulous place to go for unique holiday gifts. 58


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Home For The Holidays

A Window Wonderland Photos by James J. Mackin

Storefronts along Main Street in East Hampton are beginning to spark the holiday spirit. Clockwise from top left: White’s Apothecary, Roberta Roller Rabbit, Ralph Lauren, East Hampton Florist. 59


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

Emil Norsic & Son, Inc., the East End’s Sanitation professionals. (631) 283-0604 • www.norsic.com 60

2017


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Dining

Guestworthy Recipe: Chef Daniel Holzman 2 c garlic croutons or stuffing cubes 1 c dried cranberries 2 large eggs

¼ c bread crumbs

2 Tbsp chopped fresh sage 2 tsp salt

Pinch of ground cinnamon DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Drizzle olive oil into a 9x13-inch baking dish and use your hand to evenly coat the entire surface. Set aside.

Combine the ground turkey, croutons, cranberries, eggs, bread crumbs, sage, salt, and cinnamon in a large mixing bowl and mix by hand until thoroughly incorporated. Roll the mixture into round, golfball-sized balls, making sure to pack the meat firmly.

WHO: Chef Daniel Holzman, chef and owner of The Meatball Shop INSTAGRAM: @ChefHolzman GUEST WORTHY RECIPE: Gobble Gobble Balls WHY? “These Gobble Gobble balls are so nostalgic of a Thanksgiving dinner – crafted with ground turkey, fall spices, and of course, stuffing – without all of the mess and prep. They’re easy to serve too – heat up gravy for the perfect dipping accompaniment. Guests will go crazy for them, because nothing says fall like all of the flavors of Thanksgiving, rolled into one.”

Place the balls into the prepared baking dish, being careful to line them up snugly and in even rows vertically and horizontally to form a grid. The meatballs should be touching one another. Roast for 20 minutes, or until the meatballs are firm and cooked through. A meat thermometer inserted into the center of a meatball should read 165 degrees.

Allow the meatballs to cool for five minutes in the baking dish before serving.

INGREDIENTS: 2 Tbsp olive oil

2 lbs ground turkey 61


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Dining

Tipsy Tastes: Wölffer’s Got The Rosé

By Nicole Teitler

Wölffer Estate has long been known for its wine and has received national recognition for its Summer in a Bottle. But the iconic brand has expanded its flavoring to libations of a different sort -- cider and gin. Rosé all day takes on a different

note with Wölffer Estate’s Dry Rosé Cider that’s 6.9% ABV (alcohol by volume). With 100 percent New York State apples – five percent grown at Bridgehampton’s Halsey Farm and 95 percent from DeFisher Fruit Farms close to Rochester -- it’s an aromatic blend. Jonagold, Mutsu, Golden Delicious, Idared, Gold

Rush, and Northern Spy are all chosen for their dessert flavorings in the mix. The sweetness of a rosé yet subtle tartness of a traditional cider give it a blend leaving you wondering whether it’s summer or fall. Double the flavor, double the fun! Wolffer’s Dry White Cider, paler in color, retains more of the

We Have Your Holiday All Wrapped UP!

Independent/Nicole Teitler

BIG LITTLE HOLIDAY PARTY

BRUNCH WITH SANTA Sunday, December 10 & 17 10am- 3pm

Friday, December 15 7 - 11pm 4 Fabulous Hours with Premium Open Bar Full Buffet with Gourmet Stations Music by L.I. Sound Entertainment Win Great Prizes All Size Groups Welcome

$69.95 +Admin + Tax Per Person Reservations Required

NEW YEAR’S EVE GALA

CHRISTMAS EVE DINNER December 24 � 4 - 9pm NEW YEAR’S EVE DINNER December 31 � 5 - 10pm To Reserve Call

631.846.2335

in the Grand Ballroom

December 31 � 8pm - 1am Reserve Online or Call

631.929.6585

Celebrate and Give the Gift of the Season!

d ’s | D es m o n Spa | In n

Gift Card

A Gift Card to

The Inn & Spa

Order Online � By Phone � In Person

631.846.2339

62

Both are crafted in a 355 ML bottle, which can be purchased on-the-go individually or in a four-pack at any of the brand’s locations.

Prefer gin over cider and wine? Wölffer’s got it -- with that rosé touch. Its Pink Gin, distilled on property, uses the rosé as the base, followed by juniper berries picked from bushes on the estate itself. Anise, fennel, coriander, cumin, cardamom, and fresh mint from the garden are all added together in a copper pot from Germany. As a final touch, a small amount of red grape skin extract is added to give it that iconic pink coloring. The estate’s winemaker and partner, Roman Roth, said, “Using our rosé wine as the base gives us a clear advantage over grainbased gins. The aroma is much more playful and fruit-driven, and because of our strict and more generous cuts, we have a fine gin!” Sold in two bottle sizes, 750 ML or 375 ML, bring it home with you.

5720 Rt. 25A ⏐ Wading River NY 11792 631.929.3500⏐EastWindLongIsland.com Independent Holiday AD V1.indd 1

traditional cider you’d expect but with the magic touch on the palate that the estate is famous for. This blend is 100 percent made with Halsey Farm apples, found a mere 4.6 miles away from the vineyard. The mix adds in a little less sweet and more of a crisp flavor with Red Delicious, Jonagold, Idared, Fuji, Empire, Honey Crisp, Golden Delicious, Mutsu, Gala, Asian Pear, and others.

Continued On Page 77.

11/16/17 5:19 PM


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Dining

Yvonne Schultz: Queen Of The Crumbs

By Bridget LeRoy

It sounds positively Dickensian – an orphan, adopted by a loving family, vows to pay it forward with her baking skills and her big heart. And yet it’s true, and right here on the East End. Yvonne Schultz founded her company, Herbie’s Crumb Cake, as a way of honoring her adoptive father, Herbie Collomb, who passed away in 2004.

crumbs,” she said. “And any product that doesn’t sell is made into the crusts for my cheesecakes or donated to the food pantries.”

“But adoption was not an easy process back then,” Schultz said from the Stony Brook Food Incubator in Calverton, where she creates her baked goods daily. “It wasn’t official until just before my 18th birthday.” During all of this, her father taught her about perseverance, patience, compassion, and how to give back to the community.

And her heart is with the special needs community. As of now, she employs two people with special needs in her bakery. But as the company continues to grow, she sees an even bigger picture.

Fundraising is a huge part of Schultz’s mission. Besides straight-out donations of her products, she also sells her goods at wholesale prices or below to schools and clubs to use. “We just helped Islip raise $1000,” she said. Unlike other school fundraisers featuring wrapping paper, cookies, or chocolate, when clubs and institutions use Herbie’s Crumb Cake, they are also supporting a local business, Schultz said.

Abandoned at the New York Foundling Hospital when she was 15 months old, Schultz longed for a family of her own until she was eight-and-a-half. That’s when Barbara and Herbie Collomb brought her home.

And, “There was always a box of Entenmann’s on the kitchen table,” Schultz recalled. “One day I started making crumb cakes, and my dad liked them even better than the store-bought ones.” An idea was born.

But it would be years before the idea became reality. Schultz worked for a time for the Eastport-South Manor school district, operating a café and working with special needs children, another important cause she champions. She started her company, with her husband, Bob (“I make the crumbs”), in 2014, and business has been steadily growing. “We started with about eight sheets a week,” she said, referring to the cake sheet pans which are used to make the finished product. “Now we’re up to 80 or 90.”

And the flavors. Oh, the flavors! At the beginning, there were just two – original and raspberry. But now the crumb cakes range from pumpkin to key lime, peanut butter to maple bacon, pineapple to blueberry. “And I use fresh, local ingredients as much as I can,” said Schultz. “I

“I’d like to go national,” she said with a smile and a laugh. “And I would love to employ a lot of special needs people, not just teaching them baking skills but life skills as well.” Independent/Bridget LeRoy Yvonne and Bob Schultz of Herbie’s Crumb Cake, and some of the goodies available.

never use any preservatives.”

Along with the retail outlets that carry her crumb cakes, Bob works several markets, include the Westhampton Beach market in the summers and the Riverhead

Farmers Market in the winter.

But most importantly, Schultz is dedicated to giving back, in every way possible. First of all, there is almost no waste in her company. “The crusts are made into the

Can’t find a crumb cake when you really need one? They also ship. You can find out more about Yvonne and Bob Schultz and Herbie’s Crumb Cake at www. herbiescrumbcake.com.

18 Park Place East Hampton 324-5400 Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner Take Out Orders 63


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Food & Beverage

N ov e m b e r 2 2

Dining

by Jessica Mackin-Cipro

award-winning mixologist, and general bon vivant, with 25 years experience in the hospitality industry. He is one half of the dynamic duo known as the Tippling Bros., a New Yorkbased beverage consultancy dedicated to “spirituous advisement and raising of the bar.” He has won several major awards and national cocktail competitions and has judged, organized, and emceed a few as well. Carducci is a partner in the Mercadito Hospitality group, with restaurants in New York, Chicago, Las Vegas, Philadelphia, and Miami. Tickets for the event, which are limited, are $50 and can be

2017

purchased online at http://bit. ly/2yY75Kq or by calling The Baker House at 631-324-4081. Rowdy Hall Rowdy Hall in East Hampton has announced they will offer a lunch special every Monday through Friday beginning at noon. Diners may enjoy a cup of soup, complete with half a sandwich or salad for $12. The promotion will not be offered on holidays. The chef will prepare the soup, sandwich, and salad specials and the menu selection will change daily.   

For further information call Rowdy Hall at 631-324-8555.  

Where To Wine by Kitty Merrill Clovis Point Vineyard and Winery From 1:30 to 5:30 PM on Saturday Jeff Leblanc and Bryan Gallo perform. www.clovispointwines. com. Baiting Hollow Farm Vineyard Mixologist Tad Carducci.

Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email to jessica@indyeastend. com. Cocktails & Conversation The Baker House 1650 in East Hampton, a boutique inn, along with partner Domaine Select Wine & Spirits, presents a special

Wholesale 725-9087 Retail 725-9004 64

event “Cocktails & Conversation – An Evening with AwardWinning Mixologist Tad Carducci” on Saturday, December 2, from 4 to 6 PM. The demonstration by mixologist Tad Carducci of the Tippling Bros. will include the art of mixology with holiday cocktails that you can make at home.  Carducci is a lifelong bartender,

Prime Meats • Groceries Produce • Take-Out Fried Chicken • BBQ Ribs Sandwiches • Salads Party Platters and 6ft. Heroes Beer, Ice, Soda

Open 7 Days a Week

Baiting Hollow Farm Vineyard presents music on Saturday and Sunday. From 2 to 6 PM, it’s 2 EZ on Saturday with Super Acoustic from 2 to 6 PM on Sunday. www. baitinghollowfarmvineyard.com. Wölffer Estate Vineyard Live music fills the tasting room every Friday evening. This week Charles Certain performs. www. wolffer.com. Raphael The Dinny Keg Band performs from 1 to 4 PM on Saturday, with Drinkwater Brothers the next day, same time. www.raphaelwine.com. Martha Clara Vineyards Participate in the annual Toys for Tots collection. Drop off a toy and

get a complimentary flight. www. marthaclaravineyards.com. Jason’s Vineyard There’s music every weekend this month from 1:30 to 5:30 PM. On Saturday T J Brown performs. Sunday, check out April Rain at the mic. www.jasonsvineyard.com. Macari Vineyards The Macari team will be featured in a five-course wine dinner at Topping Rose House in Bridgehampton on November 30 beginning at 6 PM. $125. Visit www.macariwines.com


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Recipe Of The Week

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Dining

by Chef Joe Cipro

Chocolate Raspberry Filled Macaroons Ingredients

and cornstarch then add the egg yolks and cream mixture to the raspberry sauce. Whisk vigorously over medium heat until thick. This will take about five minutes. 

1 c walnuts

1 1/4 c powdered sugar 1 1/2 egg whites

4 1/2 Tbsp cocoa powder

Cool in the refrigerator for about three hours.

1/4 tsp cream of tartar 1/4 tsp salt

Set oven to 350. In a food processor pulse the walnuts, powdered sugar, and cocoa powder until fine. Strain the mixture to remove any large pieces.

3 pints raspberries (washed) 1/2 c granulated sugar 2 egg yolks

1/4 c heavy cream

1 1/2 Tbsp cornstarch Directions Begin by making raspberry cream filling. Cook the raspberries with the sugar in a small saucepot over medium heat covered for about 15 minutes. Blend and strain mixture. Return raspberry sauce to the pot. Over a double boiler, whisk the egg yolks until they are pale in color. Whisk together the cream

In a separate bowl, whisk the egg whites and cream of tartar to soft peaks. Fold the egg whites into the dry ingredients gently, being careful not to deflate the egg whites. Spoon the mixture into half-dollar sized balls on a baking sheet to make the macaroons. 

Japanese RestauRant and sushi BaR

Cook for eight minutes at 350. Remove and allow to cool completely before spooning raspberry cream in the middle of two cookies. Enjoy!

Read The Independent

Onlin

www.indyeastend.com

E

Fine Dining Specializing in Japanese Cuisine & Sushi Offering Lunch & Dinner Menus and Exotic Cocktails We also have a Tatami Room

ASTPORT LIQUORS Monday 9-6, Tuesday-Thursday Friday• &•Closed Saturday 9-9, 12-6 Open 12pm 6pm onSunday Monday OpenSunday Sunday 12pm-9-8, - 6pm Monday 12-7pm

Tastings Every Sat. 3-7 pm

Senior Discount Tuesday

All Cards AllMajor Major Credit Credit Cards & DebitAccepted Cards Accepted

Gift Wrapping LOTTO IN STORE

$

1.00 Off 10.00 Purchase $

Not to be combined with other offers.

$

2.00 Off 20.00 Purchase $

Not to be combined with other offers.

15 Eastport Manor Road • Eastport • 325-1388 • Open 9 am (In the Eastport Shopping Center, next to King Kullen)

Open 7 Days for Lunch & Dinner

631-267-7600 40 Montauk Highway Amagansett, NY 65


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

THE INDEPENDENT Min Date = 10/11/2017 Max Date = 10/17/2017

Source: Suffolk Research Service, Inc., Hampton Bays, NY 11946 * -- Vacant Land

BUY

East Hampton Town ZIPCODE 11930 - AMAGANSETT Fingeret,K &Levine,D Bartlett, L ZIPCODE 11937 - EAST HAMPTON Katz, R & Emanuel, M New Sunshine Custom Staubitser, T & M Haines,C & Mormile,J Winston, M & E Three MileHarborHldg Cunningham, S Trust Laub, R & F Okin,S & Amsterdam,A Valdivieso,H &Flores 25 Quarty Court LLC Whitehead,A &Barer,J Sherman, W & H Hickey, T & C 117 Buell Lane LLC Grimeh, M Trust ZIPCODE 11954 - MONTAUK Town of East Hampton Cullen, S & C Kim, J & Brennan, M ZIPCODE 11963 - SAG HARBOR Spadoro,G&Desimone,C Daum, D & Dai, Y Southampton Town ZIPCODE 11901 - RIVERHEAD Stewart, O US Bank Trust Nat Diaz, N Midence, R & C ZIPCODE 11932 - BRIDGEHAMPTON 1863 SHR LLC Tyree, E Rodriguez, P ZIPCODE 11946 - HAMPTON BAYS Chatham, J Brosnan,A&Munizaga,A Jimenez, C & A Your Home RealtyCorp C&M Premier Properts ZIPCODE 11959 - QUOGUE Matz, S & Katz, B Lungstrum, J & E ZIPCODE 11960 - REMSENBURG DiLandro, J & H Fogg, R & D ZIPCODE 11962 - SAGAPONACK Capasso, C ZIPCODE 11963 - SAG HARBOR Matelsky, J & B Blue Swan LLC Madden, S Madden, S Tightlines Partners Sag Watch 316 LLC ZIPCODE 11968 - SOUTHAMPTON Finelli, P & E Wolf, J Gazza, J 43 Straight Path Bank of NY Mellon Dixon, J & Song, S Souhrada, C & S 15 Overlook LLC Citibank N.A. Salm, C & Lerner, R Rosenblum, J & R Knaub,R & Camarate,L ZIPCODE 11976 - WATER MILL 419 Little Noyac LLC 369 Little Noyac LLC ZIPCODE 11977 - WESTHAMPTON Jaros,P&Deak-Jaros,N ZIPCODE 11978 - WESTHAMPTON BEACH Rettig, M & Kodsi, S Levine, V Source: Suffolk Research Service, Inc., Hampton Bays, NY 11946 * -- Vacant Land

66

N ov e m b e r 2 2

Real Estate SELL

Gusse, P 2017 Trust HappyAcresAmagansett

2017

DEEDS

PRICE LOCATION 2,750,000 4,300,000

872 Montauk Hwy 99 Three Sisters Ln

GreenwayCoastalPrprt Panken, T Score ConstructionCo Little Jimmy I LLC NYHO LLC Zukas Land Sales Inc Keltz, J & J New Sunshine Custom Halpern, R & S Your Home RealtyCorp Dizon, C by Exrs Wilson, M RRS Properties Annacone, P Trust ASW Services LLC Maynard Jr, W & J

2,350,000 287,500* 953,800 2,645,000 525,000 75,000* 1,900,000 878,500 757,500 700,000 775,000* 2,175,000 3,550,000 975,000 2,350,000 5,250,000*

69 Isle Of Wight Rd 64 Pembroke Dr 167 Norfolk Dr 43 Settlers Landing Ln 348 Three Mile Harbor Hog 20 9th St 5 Ingalls Rd p/o 3 Lafayette Pl 128 Harbor Blvd 150 Neck Path 25 Quarty Circle 107 Swamp Rd 80 Gould St 44 Towhee Trail 117 Buell Ln 7 Baiting Hollow Rd

Kim, J & M Foffe, M Trust Liebell, J & M

420,000* 1,150,000 515,000*

161 S Fairview Ave 12 Hoyt Pl 86 Laurel Dr

47 Terry Holdings Gastwirth, D & L

2,625,000 1,250,000

47 Terry Dr 28 Wildwood Dr

Carrera, M & D Monterroso,A by Ref Miller, H 15 Albany Street

240,000 239,000 122,000 414,000

177 Riverside Ave 62 Brookhaven Ave 14 Tyler St 15 Albany St

Fairhills Two LLC Residential Mortgage Walker, M by Exr

5,647,500 471,880 745,000

1863 Scuttle Hole Rd 145 Narrow Ln 136 Norris Ln

Fannie Mae Barell, J & N McCabe,J &Donnelly,B Melillo, D Mendez, Z by Ref

320,000 500,000 470,000 140,000* 270,000

37 Washington Heights Ave 20A Oceanview Rd 6 Lincoln Rd 9 Washington Av3 137 West Tiana Rd

Maybaum, R & L Quogue/Cooper Lane

2,250,000 3,300,000

3 Pine Ln 4 Cooper Ln

Fishman, J 116 SouthCountry&Est

365,000* 565,000*

p/o 180 South Country Rd p/o 116 South Country Rd

Fish, B

1,730,000

61 Glenwood Ln

Kreichman, B Trust 15 Sims Drive LLC 26 SBR LLC Sullivan, C 173 Redwood Road RZ Adams,M & E Trust

580,000 3,500,000 2,137,500 2,137,500 4,375,000 2,350,000

31 Cove Dr 15 Sims Drive 26 Short Beach Rd 30 Short Beach Rd 173 Redwood Rd 15 Church St, PH 316

Schumacher, J Rendon, S & J Reigler Enterprises US Bank National As Gifkins, G by Ref Snyder, P Bayview Loan Srvcng Zaluski, M MacPherson, D by Ref Beechwood BenedictSH Duplantis, D McConnell, A

1,275,000 910,000 1,000* 423,000 1,397,728 776,000 710,000 1,350,000 1,640,111 1,731,900 3,300,000 2,250,000

31 Wooleys Dr 54 Warfield Way Ocean View Pkwy 43 Straight Path 1455 Majors Path 21 Whitfield Rd 504 North Magee St 15 Overlook Dr 58 Shinnecock Hills Rd 907 Annette Ln 18 Lewis St 127 Meeting House Ln

419 Noyac LLC WatermillVentures369

1,300,000* 800,000*

419 Little Noyack Path 369 Little Noyack Path

Malter, D & C

1,150,000

39 South Country Rd

Snug Harbor Devlpmnt Beccaria, D & P

1,012,500* 765,000

51 South Rd 18 Glovers Ln


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Real Estate News

Compiled by Rick Murphy Quogue waterfront It’s gonna sell, be sure of that. Oceanfront settings like this rarely come to the market at this price point. First there is the lot – a generous 2.8 acres. Add in the fact this four bedroom is being offered for the first time and the breathtaking ocean AND bay views from almost every room.

The 2.5 bath layout offers an open dining-living-kitchen area situated on second level with access to ocean and bay side decks. The master bedroom is on the third level, and there are three additional bedrooms located on the ground level. The property encompasses 212 feet of ocean frontage, and a rarity these says, an oceanside heated gunite pool. The house can be lived in and loved as is, expanded, or raised to build a 7000-square-foot dream home within the large building envelope. Grab your surfboard, boogie board, or bottle of wine and enjoy one of the most outstanding settings in the Hamptons. Town & Country’s Toni-Jo Birk has the listing -- her cell is 631-514-5295. Winter Coat Drive In the spirit of the season Town & Country Real Estate is opening all of its East End offices for its annual winter coat and accessories drive. They’ll be collecting gently used or new winter coats, hats, and gloves and distributing them to those in need at Maureen’s Haven

Independent/Courtesy Town & Country

Under $10 million? Just say yes.

Homeless Outreach, John’s Place Shelter, and the United Veteran’s House.

“We invite our community to be generous during the season of giving,” says Judi Desiderio, Town & Country’s CEO. “We are all so blessed to live and work here, and to raise our families here in the Hamptons and the North Fork. Not many people know that we have a population in need here on the East End. Our annual coat drive is the least we can do to raise awareness and help.” Donations can be made until December 15 between 9 AM and 5 PM.

Road, Southampton; 2415 Main Street, Bridgehampton; 46 Main Street, East Hampton; 1 Carl

Fisher Plaza, Montauk; 6920 Main Road, Mattituck; 57125 Main Road, Southold.

East Hampton Summer Cottage Rentals Steps To Maidstone Bay Beach Charming cottage. Newly renovated, 1 BR, air conditioning, Two charming cottages. Rent justone-bath, one or rent both. cable ready, with indoor and outdoor shower. Newly renovated, 1 BR, one-bath, air conditioning, Long Season: April 15 through October 30: $14,900.

cable ready, each with indoor and outdoor shower. FOROctober 2018 SEASON Long Season:NOW MayRENTING 1 through 30: $13,500 each. Or call re: shorter rental

Office locations: 132 Main Street, Westhampton Beach; 16 Hampton

Where can our passion take your business?

Our expanded network of more than 40 branches means we can bring our passion for community banking to businesses from Montauk to Manhattan. Member FDIC

Community banking from Montauk to Manhattan 631.537.1000 I bridgenb.com

631-276-8110 or 631-324-5942 Pictures and movies: maidstonecottage.com EHT Rental Registry 16-2325

67


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Rick’s Space

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

By Rick Murphy my nourishment right about now or

family, sat around with a growing sense of dread. Many of us drank heavily, even the children.

my blood sugar will go wild.” I just looked down at that angelic little face and I must say my heart nearly melted.

RICK’S SPACE

by Rick Murphy

Yeah, Thanks A Lot I’m all up in Thanksgiving. Despite my somewhat cynical public persona, we’re all about giving and caring at our house.

We are very much aware how fortunate we are to have a warm house and an abundance of food on this very special day. We understand many people aren’t as lucky, so we reach out every Thanksgiving to one of the less fortunate, allowing them for at least one day to see how wonderful life can be. A couple years ago we had an intelligent man who became homeless through no fault of his own. He stayed for hours, sitting by the warm fire after dinner, regaling us with tales of his adventures around the world. We still keep a plastic plate and cup under the sink should he ever return.

Then there was the woman who “chose to lead an alternate lifestyle.”

We used to call them “hookers” but “alternate lifestyle” works for me. She ate dinner, put $20 on the bureau, and left.

I like to honor my forefathers by cooking a suitable Thanksgiving feast. Well, actually, it was my foremothers who did the cooking because my forefathers, like most of the men in my family, were inveterate gamblers who bet on just about everything, especially football games. So the men gathered in the den (while the women cooked) and drank, smoked, and watched football games.

That doesn’t work in my house, because, as many regular readers know, Karen is incapable of cooking anything edible. Once early in our marriage she insisted on cooking a holiday dinner. All of us, including her

NYS INSPECTIONS • WHEEL ALIGNMENT • FACTORY SOFTWARE & DATABASES

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC VEHICLES

When she cheerfully announced it was ready – “Come And Get It!” – we shuffled slowly to the table as if we were going to receive our last rites. It was like musical chairs, with each of us hoping they would be stuck without a place at the table and thus wouldn’t have to eat. I still shudder at the thought of that meal. Instead of debating what was the best part we argued over what was the least offensive dish. (I voted for the cranberry sauce because it came directly out of the can.) My Uncle Tom was my idol. He had season tickets to the Giants and he was a passionate football fan who bet a lot of dough on the Thanksgiving games. He would insist that we put a TV in the dining room and leave the games on while we ate. If things didn’t go his way he would scream obscenities with his mouth full of giblet gravy. Once he threw a drumstick at Yale Lary, the punter for the Detroit Lions. I loved it but it scared the hell out of the homeless guy.

Here are the critical times to remember on Thanksgiving Day: 12:30, 4:30, and 8:30. Those are when the three NFL games begin. I arrange it so I can watch all three games by serving breakfast in the morning, a light lunch at noon, and dinner at 7:30.

Granted, 7:30 is a little late for dinner for the younger set. My little nephew Bean, who is as cute as, well, a little bean, pointed that out to me last year at his mother’s prodding. “Uncle Rick, I’m really, really hungry and I’ve been waiting all year for this very special feast. I have a disorder and I should receive

“Tough crap, you spoiled little brat. Have a bologna sandwich and go to bed,” I said tenderly. Bean cried himself to sleep that night, but one day soon he’ll be with the other males in the family watching the games, and then he’ll be crying for another reason: The Bears didn’t cover the spread and we all just lost our rent money.

Every year we argue about what to serve on Thanksgiving. Most of my in-laws don’t like turkey. Every year I get their hopes up. “Well, should we try something different?” I ask. “How about fresh ham?” “How about roast lamb?” “How about Osso Buco?” I act like I’m deliberating for a couple minutes and then I answer: “No, no, and no. We’re having turkey.” Once Karen’s grandmother schlepped all the way to her sister’s house in Noyac – in the pouring rain, no less – just so she could have a crown roast on Thanksgiving. Hey, it was her decision to make, so I didn’t feel the least bit guilty. Besides, there was a lot more room around our table without her and her wheelchair. Like I said, Thanksgiving is a day of feasting, a day to be with loved ones, and a day to enjoy life. In other words, it is a day to eat turkey and watch football – whether you like it or not. Rick Murphy is a six-time winner of the New York Press Association Best Column award as well as the winner of first place awards from the National Newspaper Association and the Suburban Newspaper Association of America and a two-time Pulitzer Prize nominee.

Get 3 One Pound Bags of Coffee for $19.99 Dark Roast • Original • Decaf French Vanilla • Hazelnut 2044 Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton, NY 11932 • 631-537-0542 68

10 Main Street East Hampton

(631) 324-8646 • (631) 793-8345 www.hamptonlashes.com


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Editorial

Next Forum Right Away

Inspiration. Despair. Grief. Hope. Anger. Determination. Frustration. Empathy. As the lingo goes, the Hampton Bays High School auditorium was the scene of “a lot of feels” last Thursday night.

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Insight

Kudos to the Southampton Town Board, its supervisor Jay Schneiderman, and its newly-convened opioid task force for hosting Southampton’s first community forum. The drug epidemic does indeed hit home, as the outing was titled. And it’s well past time to shed the denial that addiction strikes our beautiful, bucolic, and well-heeled homeland. Progress is not impossible and while challenging, multi-faceted strategies exist. The talking-about-it phase is in full effect and needs to transition into the doing-something-about-it phase quickly. We enthusiastically support two audience recommendations.

First, the task force needs to add young people and minorities to its ranks. Their inclusion will be invaluable going forward.

Second, the town and the task force need to capitalize on the sense of urgency expressed during the forum. Schneiderman suggested another forum “next spring.” The depth and breadth of the epidemic warrants more frequent gatherings and more focused discussion. Our lives, and the lives of our loved ones, may depend on it. Why Pardon A Turkey? Dear Editor,

dumped them in boiling water to remove their feathers.

The other 244 million turkeys killed in the US this year have not been so lucky. They were raised in crowded sheds filled with toxic fumes. Their beaks and toes were clipped to prevent stress-induced aggression. At 16 weeks of age, slaughterhouse workers cut their throats and

Now, for the good news: per capita consumption of turkeys is down by a whopping 34 percent (*) from a 1996 high of 303 million, as one third of our population is actively reducing meat consumption. * Per capita consumption: 1996

President Trump is getting his pardon pen ready, as the Muller investigation starts indicting his associates. This Wednesday, he plans to practice on two very innocent Minnesota turkeys.

Consumers pay a heavy price too. Turkey flesh is laced with cholesterol and saturated fats that elevate risk of chronic killer diseases. Intense prolonged cooking is required to destroy deadly pathogens lurking inside.

Ed Gifford US population 269 million and # turkeys slaughtered 303 million, or 1.13/person; 2017 US population 325 million and # turkeys slaughtered 244 million, or 0.75/

person, yielding a per capita drop of 34 percent. Our supermarkets carry a rich variety of convenient, delicious,

Continued On Page 70.

IS IT JUST ME? Introducing:

The Turkipede! Turn those scowls into smiles at your Thanksgiving table! The Turkipede guarantees no one will ever go without a drumstick again!

© Karen Fredericks Karen was chosen Best Cartoonist by the New York Press Association in 2017. She’s also the recipient of multiple awards for her illustration of the international bestseller How To Build Your Own Country, including the prestigious Silver Birch Award. Her work is part of the permanent artist’s book collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Karen likes drumsticks best. Which part is your favorite? Go to the comment section of isitjustme.com & tell her!

69


the Independent

i n dy e a srytt hei nn .c om EvE g Ed ast End thE

1826

Letters

JUST ASKING

Continued From Page 69.

Publisher James J. Mackin

Associate Publisher Jessica Mackin-Cipro

Executive Editors:

Writers Bridget Leroy, Peggy Spellman Hoey, Nicole Teitler, Justin Meinken

Copy Editors Bridget LeRoy, Karen Fredericks

Columnists / Contributors Jerry Della Femina, Patrick McMullan, Denis Hamill, Zachary Weiss, DOMINIC ANNACONE, JOE CIPRO, KAREN FREDERICKS, Isa goldberg, Laura Anne Pelliccio, MILES X. LOGAN, vincent pica, Ashley O’Connell, Elizabeth Vespe, Justin Meinken

Advertising

Sales Manager BT SNEED Account Managers TIM SMITH JOANNA FROSCHL Sheldon Kawer Annemarie Davin Art Director Jessica Mackin-Cipro Advertising Production Manager John Laudando Graphic Designer Christine John

Web/Media Director JESSICA MACKIN-Cipro Photography Editor CHRISTINE JOHN Contributing Photographers Morgan mcgivern , PEGGY STANKEVICH, ED GIFFORD, Patty collins Sales, Nanette Shaw, Kaitlin Froschl, Richard Lewin, Marc Richard Bennett, Gordon M. Grant, Justin Meinken Bookkeeper sondra lenz Office & Classified Manager Maura Platz Delivery Managers Charlie burge Eric Supinsky

Published weekly by:

East Hampton Media Holdings LLC

healthful plant-based meat products, including several ovenready roasts. This Thanksgiving holiday, as we give thanks for life and good fortune, let’s also skip the gratuitous violence and grant our own pardon to an innocent animal.

Edwin Horath

Main News & Editorial kitty merrill In Depth News Rick Murphy Arts & Entertainment Jessica Mackin-Cipro

The Independent Newspaper 74 Montauk Highway Suite #16 East Hampton, NY 11937 P • 631-324-2500 F • 631-324-2544 www.indyeastend.com

or email to: news@indyeastend.com send photos to: photos@indyeastend.com Subscriptions by 1st Class Mail: $91 yearly ©2017 Entire Contents Copyrighted Financial responsibility for errors in all advertising printed in The Independent is strictly limited to actual amount paid for the ad. Business Hours - Monday to Friday 9 AM to 5 PM Closed Wednesdays

70

2017

1826

THE

N ov e m b e r 2 2

Curbing Climate Change

By Karen Fredericks

What are you particularly grateful for this year? Liz Bianco I’m thankful for my daughter deciding to go to college. She had many interests and was considering several things but I think this is the best choice she could have made.

Jessica Calbo I’m grateful for my family first. And for my job. I’m a flight attendant and it lets me travel a lot.

Dear Editor,

EPA administrator Scott Pruitt is dismantling the Clean Power Plan, a rule intended to combat climate change. But concerned citizens can still take steps to significantly curb climate change -- starting by choosing vegan foods rather than animal-based ones.

According to the Worldwatch Institute, at least 51 percent of global greenhouse-gas emissions are caused by animal agriculture, and Worldwatch Institute senior fellow Robert Engelman has said that the “world’s supersized appetite for meat” is one of the main reasons why greenhouse-gas emissions are still rapidly increasing. Research shows that meat-eaters are responsible for about twoand-a-half times as many dietary greenhouse-gas emissions per day as vegans. Since humans are largely responsible for climate change, as stated in the newly-released Climate Science Special Report, we should also be part of the solution. We can all help protect the environment -- and save animals -- just by eating tasty vegan foods. See www.PETA.org for more information and a free vegan starter kit. 

Heather Moore The PETA Foundation

Fatalities

Continued From Page 4.

– Logan criticized area treatment programs as “useless,” prompting Southampton Town Justice Barbara Wilson to fire back in support of her town’s drug court. Logan said the program is “not a legitimate solution” and the pair verbally sparred until Schneiderman interceded.

Annabel Means I’m grateful for so much in my life. It sounds corny but I’ve been so lucky in many ways. It seems everything I come upon is good. I’m from New Zealand and I’m going there over the holiday. But in New Zealand on Thanksgiving one can’t find a turkey anywhere! Ron Fletcher It’s been a very good year. I lost my car keys a few days ago and then I found them the next day! Then I lost my wallet and someone found it.

“This is a no judgment zone,” he reminded, encouraging speakers to step forward.

Several speakers, including Meesha Johnson, pointed to a lack of minority and young people on the task force. She offered to be a representative for the Shinnecock Native American community.

“We’ve been dealing with addiction for decades,” Johnson said. Her mother, Michelle, affirmed, “We’ve lost a lot of young men to drug overdose.” Members of the nation are “dropping like flies,” she said. Schneiderman said the committee just started recently and, speaking to the audience said, “You are all part of this task force.” Johnson wanted to know how police are responding to drug dealing on the reservation.

Marie Guerra Tooke offered how police responded to it in her community – they punished her as a whistleblower and refused to take action against dealers. “Police protected them and hurt my family,” she charged, making reference to the conviction on

drug-related charges of former town councilman Brad Bender and the scandal surrounding a member of the police’s Street Crime Unit’s drug use while working undercover. The town and its police have been part of the problem for 20 years, Tooke said. Noting the new police chief, she said, “It’s time to drain the evildoers of their power.”

Before opening the forum to the audience input, Schneiderman said the town would likely host another forum next spring. Patti Brushi said the next forum needs to happen sooner. “They’re dying left and right. We need help.”

Picture Your AD Here! To Advertise in The Independent call us at

631.324.2500 or visit our website

www.indyeastend.com THE INDEPENDENT NOW, FOR THE NORTH FORK, THE

East Hampton

Traveler Watchman TRUTH WITHOUT FEAR SINCE 1826

Southampton

Riverhead

Southold

Shelter Island


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

Day One

Continued From Page 10.

how to loop a hammer through the apron, how to set up ladders, and the best way to fill the dumpster. “We want you to leave tired, dirty, and happy. And we want you to come back,” she told the volunteers.

The house was originally a small summer bungalow. A previous owner built a two-story structure around it. Before the official house start day, workers had to pour a new foundation under the house and construct a new bearing wall to make sure the building was safe enough for volunteers. The challenge on “house start” day was to demolish the interior and portions of the exterior. “A lot of insulation and the ceiling had to come out,” Melissa explained Thursday. “Everyone was in good spirits, laughing and joking through the day.” Hours later, the Lohrs walked home to the house they share with Melissa’s parents and other family members – nine people in all live in her childhood residence. “The whole way home, Kyle was going crazy. I don’t think I’ve ever heard him talk so much,” Melissa said of her husband, the quieter half of the young couple.

Earlier that morning more experienced public speakers offered words of encouragement and gratitude at the ribbon cutting. Scheinfeld introduced Edgar Goodale and John Callahan of Riverhead Building Supply. With Goodale’s grandson and Diane Burke, executive director of Habitat for Humanity, they held a giant check for $100,000 as full house sponsors.

“We’re honored to be a part of this,” said Callahan. “Today we have an opportunity to come together and make a difference in two people’s lives.” RBS has partnered with Habitat for Humanity for three decades.

Turkey Donation Photos by Morgan McGivern

On Friday, the Clamshell Foundation teamed up with Camp SoulGrow and the Lions Club to donate over 100 turkeys to community members and families across the East End. Dozens of kids came out to help.

“Anything that’s good that happens, it’s because of partnerships,” State Assemblyman Fred Thiele observed, offering accolades to RBS, Habitat, and the Hamptons Interfaith Council. Comprised of religious institutions from the South Shore of Long Island, the

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

council has sponsored four local Habitat houses.

Chaplain Tom Mendenhall offered a blessing. But before that, a personal word: “I’ve known Melissa since she was born. . . I’m just so happy.” On Thursday, Melissa reflected on that ribbon-cutting moment. “There were so many emotions going on. All I could say was ‘Thank you.’ I had no other words . . . We kept the ribbon. Kyle said he wants to frame it.” Next time, we learn all about Habitat for Humanity and its efforts on Long Island.

On The Beat Continued From Page 18.

be re-tried for felony grand larceny and insurance fraud charges.

Guldi, an attorney, had been incarcerated for six years before gaining his release earlier this year after a state appellate court threw out his conviction on a technicality. Recently the New York State Court of Appeals denied an appeal filed by prosecutors this summer to overturn that ruling, leading to the assumption the book on Guldi would close. Guldi was convicted in 2011 for running an insurance scam, part of a series of alleged wrongdoings in which Guldi would acquire properties, rent them or renovate them, and re-sell them. At one point he obtained $860,000 in insurance money to supposedly rebuild his home on Griffing Avenue in Westhampton Beach after a fire and used the money elsewhere. Boy Missing Riverhead Town Police Department is looking for a 14-year-old boy is reported missing from the Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch. Brayan Medrano is 5’ 1”, weighs 100 pounds, and has dark hair, police said.

No foul play is suspected, according to police.

Anyone with information on this missing person is asked to call the Riverhead Town Police at 631-7274500. 71


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

School Days Submitted by local schools

Independent/Courtesy Hampton Bays Schools Throughout the month of November, members of Hampton Bays Elementary School’s service group, K-Kids, have been working to collect nonperishable items for those in need. The third and fourth graders will donate all items collected to local food pantries.

hampton bays Schools In its mission to take history out of the textbooks by honoring a local veteran each month of the school year, the Hampton Bays School District is paying tribute to Vincent Ciano by flying an American flag in his honor throughout the month of November. Ciano, who gave 33 years of service to the country as a member of the US Army Infantry, the Air National Guard, and US Air Force, was honored at an annual Veterans Day breakfast and ceremony held on Nov. 8 at Hampton Bays Elementary School. During the event, fourth- and fifth-grade students read his biography, spoke about the importance of Veterans Day, and sang the songs of the US armed forces’ five branches.

Ciano served quietly and honorably, following orders regardless of conditions. He was surprised that he, like all Vietnam vets, received a frosty welcome on return to the States. He also was surprised that he was ill-prepared for a return to civilian life. “The Army said, ‘Go home. Be normal,’ but did not tell the soldiers how,” he said. 72

“The district is proud to honor Mr. Ciano for his bravery and service to the United States,” said Superintendent of Schools Lars Clemensen.

Hampton Bays Elementary School first graders in Joan Barker’s class have been busy “hiding” paper turkeys to spare them from the farmer on Thanksgiving Day. The students recently hid their paper turkeys in creative costumes after reading Turkey Trouble by Wendy Silvano. Riverhead Schools As part of their mission to give back to the community, members of the Riverhead High School NJROTC participated in three community service activities during the weekend of Nov. 4.

The cadets spent time cleaning up the Association for the Developmentally Disabled’s sensory garden, located on Sound Shore Road in Riverhead, and helped serve and clean up at the annual Rotary Club pancake breakfast and VFW pancake breakfast. At the Riverhead High School, AP Biology students’ eyes lit up as

Independent/Courtesy Westhampton Beach School District Suffolk County Legislator Bridget Fleming on Nov. 2 presented Westhampton Beach Elementary School fourth grader Max Atkinson with a proclamation that recognizes the work he did for the victims of Hurricane Harvey. Over the past two months, the student has raised $500 through a school-wide fundraiser and lemonade stand. All of the money was donated to Houston, Texas football player JJ Watt’s Houston Flood Relief Campaign.

Dr. Gabrielle Russo, a professor of anthropology at SUNY Stony Brook, led a hands-on lesson regarding the evolution of bipedalism during their class on Nov. 8.

During the session with Dr. Russo, the students first listened to a college-level lecture and then observed and compared skeletal samples of modern day humans and ancient human fossils. “This was such an amazing opportunity for these students,” said AP biology teacher Susan Monahan. “They were able to apply the knowledge and make a connection to what we have been learning in class.” Third graders at Roanoke Avenue Elementary School learned about the sacrifices and the service of American heroes from local veterans during a Veterans Day event at the school on Nov. 9. During the event, four local

veterans with ties to the school spoke to the third-graders about their experiences in the military and answered questions. Among the veterans were Walter Brown, a Roanoke Elementary School security guard whom served as a US Army specialist during Desert Storm, Mark Anasky, an maintenance crew worker at Roanoke Elementary School who served as a second class US Navy Utilities member, Barry Golmore, a Roanoke third-grade teacher (Gary Karlson’s father-in-law) who served as a specialist 4 during the Vietnam War, and Brian Mooney, a Roanoke Elementary School crossing guard, who served as an Army Sergeant First Class during the Vietnam War, in Germany, Korea, and in Eastern Europe during the Cold War. The 20-year Army veteran also served in the National Guard. After learning from the veterans, students treated them to lunch and thanked them for their service.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

East End Business & Service

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

www.indyeastend.com

TO ADVERTISE IN THIS DIRECTORY, CALL THE INDEPENDENT @ 631-324-2500! • DIRECTORY 1

AIR COND. & HEATING

BBQ CLEANING

CAR WASH

CONSTRUCTION

$2ith5CoOuFpoFn W

Grill Cleaning, Service & Maintenance

“Because you don’t want to do it�

631-209-5688 CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB • CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB

WE KNOW THE HAMPTONS! Call The Independent to find out how our experienced Sales and Design Teams can create an advertising campaign tailored to suit your business.

www.sparklegrill.com

BOTTLED WATER CONSTRUCTION

www.indyeastend.com 631-324-2500

Dan W. Leach

CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB • CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB

Custom Builder

AUTO BODY V.A.V. CLASSICS Fine Paint and Body

The Ultimate in BMW and Mercedes Bodywork Foreign and Domestic

Spray Booth and Unibody Repair Detailing and Waxing

283-9409 www.vavclassics.com

BUSINESS SERVICES  ď€Ąď€›ď€žď€šď€˘ď€€ď€Žď€›ď€Ąď€˜ ď€œď€•ď€–ď€˜ď€€ď€‘ď€— ď€?ď€?ď€? ď€&#x;ď€žď€ ď€€ď€?

ď€“ď€€ď€ˆď€†ď€…ď€‚ď€‹ď€„ď€‰ď€‚ď€‹ď€†ď€‹ď€† ď€Žď€€ď€ˆď€†ď€…ď€‚ď€‹ď€„ď€‰ď€‚ď€Šď€ˆď€†ď€‹

    

ď€ƒď€ˆď€ˆď€‡ď€’ď€‹ď€Žď€‰ď€€ď€?ď€?ď€ˆď€‡ď€“ď€“ď€‹ď€?ď€?ď€?ď€?ď€?ď€? ď€?ď€‹ď€”ď€˜ď€€ ď€?ď€„ď€‹ď€’ď€“ď€ ď€€ď€‚ď€Šď€‡ď€…ď€Œď€€ď€?ď€? ď€Ľď€Ľď€Ľď€ƒď€–ď€•ď€Ąď€Ľď€›ď€˘ď€˜ď€ƒď€–ď€&#x;ď€?

AWNINGS Canvas Awnings Marine Boat Covers

www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com

PAYCHEX

ALL TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION/ HOME IMPROVEMENT Residential & Commercial Chimney Service & Repairs • Masonry Bricks • Roofing • All types of Roofing • Gutters Siding • Skylights, Soffits Fascia & Wood Trim Removal & Repair

Free Estimates

631-772-2221 www.universalroofingny.com

Lic #52276-H • Southampton Lic #L004369 • East Hampton Lic #8629-2015

• Custom Renovations & ConstRuCtion speCiaList • aLL CeDaR • mahogany • CumaRu + ipe DeCks DesigneD + BuiLt W/WiRe RaiLing • FinisheD Basements + BathRooms • siDing • painting • tiLe • masonRy • DRaFting & FuLL peRmits pRompt • ReLiaBLe • pRoFessionaL QuaLity DanWLeaCh@aoL.Com

631-345-9393

east enD sinCe 1982 sh & eh LiCenseD & insuReD

Payroll • HR • Retirement • Insurance

Zackary Will

Small Business Consultant 631-258-3491 zwill@paychex.com

CHIMNEYS

Complete Home Remodeling Interior / Exterior Painting Bathrooms • Finished Basements Windows / Doors Kitchens Power Washing • All Types of Decking Property Management

631-287-2300

CE King & Sons Inc. www.kingsawnings.com

10 St. Francis Place, Springs East Hampton, NY 11937 631-324-4944 • FAX 631-329-3669

Custom Crafted Awnings, Pergola Covers, Sun Shades, Screens and Hurricane Shutters • Fast Installation • Over 150 Fabric Patterns & Colors • Superior Quality & Construction sunesta.com

631-287-6080

Call CAROL or DUFFY for a FREE ESTIMATE

www.eastendawning.com

CHIMNEY

Roofing • Chimney Gutters • Siding Skylights • Masonry *Cleaned *Repaired *Installed Family Owned & Operated 855-339-6009 631-488-1088 SunriseRoofing@Outlook.com www.SunriseRoofingAndChimney.com Licensed & Insured

73


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

East End Business & Service

2017

www.indyeastend.com

DIRECTORY • 2

DECKS

FENCING

EAST HAMPTON FENCE & GATE

FLOORING

CR Wood Floors Installations Sanding Refinishing Free Estimates

Driveway Gate Specialists Cedar Fence • Aluminum Deer • PVC • Pool Picket • Gate Service Complete Design Installation and Service

631-324-5941

www.easthamptonfenceny.com ehfence@gmail.com

Help-When You Need It! Errands, Small Jobs, Pick-Ups to NYC Extensive Knowledge of East End Westhampton to Montauk

Marshall & Sons Fuel Oil Delivery Plumbing, Heating & AC

Montauk

www.marshallandsons.com

631.668.9169

30 Years Experience-Owner Operated

www.indyeastend.com

Cell: 631-599-2454 631-849-1973

house cleaning

Lic’d

Ins’d

GENERATORS

www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com ESTATE MANAGEMENT

HEATING & FUEL OIL









GENERATORS Residential • Commercial-Industrial Custom Wood Fence (All Styles) • Electrically Operated Gates Arbors • Pergolas • Deer Fence • Bid Estimates for Contractors Ornamental Estate Rail • Fencing for Tennis Courts Chain Link • Pool Enclosures • Baby Loc PVC Fence • Railings

631-682-8004 • www.fenceworksli.com Design-Build-Install • Serving the North & South Forks Family Owned and Operated 39162

SALES-SERVICE-INSTALLATIONS



      

     

                       

Dan Mc Grory Honest, Reliable, Retired 516-220-6529 “Let me make your job easier

    CALL TODAY 631-567-2700   

 

GLASS & MIRROR FENCING

Robert E. Otto,Inc. Glass & Mirror FLOORING

Ser ving The East End Since 1960 350 Montauk Highway • Wainscott

537-1515

Glass, Mirrors, Shower Doors, Combination Storm/Screen Windows & Doors

HANDYMAN

CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB • CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB

WE KNOW THE HAMPTONS! Call The Independent to find out how our experienced Sales and Design Teams can create an advertising campaign tailored to suit your business.

www.indyeastend.com 631-324-2500

CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB • CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB

74


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

East End Business & Service

2017

www.indyeastend.com

DIRECTORY • 3

LANDSCAPING

PEST CONTROL

POOL SERVICES

ROOFING

A FULL SERVICE POOL COMPANY

• WEEKLY MAINTENANCE $74 • OPENINGS/CLOSINGS $369 • NEW GUNITE CONSTRUCTION • NEW VINYL CONSTRUCTION • PROPERTY MANAGEMENT • CERTIFIED SERVICE TECHNICIANS • REPAIRS & LINER CHANGES

LANDSCAPE DESIGN

CALL 631.871.6769 PLOVERPOOLSERVICE.COM OWNER OPERATED / LICENSED & INSURED

Southampton

287-9700 East Hampton 631324-9700 Southold 631765-9700 tickcontrol.com

Call Today to Advertise! 631-324-2500

PLUMBING & HEATING

REMODELING/ REPAIRS

631 CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB • CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB

WE KNOW THE HAMPTONS! Call The Independent to find out how our experienced Sales and Design Teams can create an advertising campaign tailored to suit your business.

www.indyeastend.com 631-324-2500

CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB • CLASSIFIED • SERVICE • PRINT • DISPLAY • WEB

PEST CONTROL

Let The Independent get all up in your business for as little as

11

$

a WEEK!

Prado Brothers

Plumbing, Heating & AC Fuel Oil Delivery Montauk

www.marshallandsons.com

Frank Theiling Carpentry ❖aLL types oF RooFing❖ asphaLt, CeDaR, FLat

❖ siding ❖ ❖ trim ❖ Windows ❖ ❖ Doors ❖ Decks ❖ Local owner/operator on site everyday Licensed and Insured

516-380-2138

631.668.9169

ROOFING

www.FrankTheilingCarpentry.com

TREE SERVICES PLUMBING • HEATING • A/C

✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

ROOFING

TRUSTED QUALITY

Roofing • Chimney Gutters • Siding Skylights • Masonry

OUTSTANDING 24-HOUR SERVICE FREE IN-HOME EVALUATIONS FINANCING OPTIONS AVAILABLE WHATEVER IT TAKES

Propane & Heating Oil Service & Delivery Available Plumbing & Heating

Heating & Air Conditioning www.HardyPlumbing.com info@HardyPlumbing.com

631-283-9333 631-287-1674

Licensed, insured. Locally Owned & Operated

*Cleaned *Repaired *Installed Family Owned & Operated 855-339-6009 631-488-1088 SunriseRoofing@Outlook.com www.SunriseRoofingAndChimney.com Licensed & Insured

www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com 75


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Entertainment Continued From Page 30.

dancing for nearly the entire company and is made especially for those who seek miracles in theatre. Registration required at www. peconiclanding.ticketleap.com.

Peconic Landing is located at 1500 Brecknock Road, Greenport NY 11944. For additional information, visit www.peconiclanding.com.

Christopher Disunno, Richard Gardini, Joey Giovingo, Barbara Jo Howard, Deb Rothaug, Ken Rowland, Josephine Wallace, and Gerri Wilson. Michael Disher directs.

Performance times are Thursdays at 7 PM, Fridays at 7 PM, Saturday at 2 PM, 5 PM, and 7 PM, and Sundays at 2 PM and 5 PM. For more information, visit www.sccarts.org.

words

Scrooge on the Radio Center Stage at Southampton Cultural Center will presents Joe Landry’s A Christmas Carol, A Live Radio Play, Friday through December 3 in the Levitas Center for the Arts.

The beloved classic, A Christmas Carol, springs to life in Joe Landry’s clever take on the epiphany of Ebenezer Scrooge. Produced and written as a live 1940s radio broadcast, Landry’s adaptation gets to the heart of each story and aurally and visually recreates an era of hope and understanding, Assisted by sound effects and an actor’s vocal prowess only, A Christmas Carol echoes simpler times and the power of story and storytelling. A Christmas Carol, A Live Radio Play cast includes Daniel Becker,

Baldwins at Bookhampton

After reading a classic story or two for children of all ages, Hilaria and Alec will sign copies of their respective books, The Living Clearly Method and Nevertheless. The event is free but registration is suggested. Visit www. bookhampton.com for more information.

Film

victoria and abdul at WHBPAC Victoria and Abdul is the extraordinary true story of an

www.indyeastend.com

DIRECTORY • 4

WINDOW WASHING

WINDOW WASHING

631-241-9465 Proprietor-Conrad East Hampton Serving Montauk -Watermill 76

alliance with a loyalty to one another that her household and inner circle attempt to destroy.

There are four chances to see the movie this weekend in Westhampton Beach: Friday at 7 PM, Saturday at 4 and 7 PM, and Sunday at 4. For more info, visit the website www.whbpac.org.

As part of #GivingTuesday, the global day for giving back, the Society of Professional Journalists has begun its own movement of #GivingNewsDay. The mission of SPJ, a national organization, is being “dedicated to the perpetuation of a free press as the cornerstone of our nation and our liberty.”

Founded in 1909 under Sigma Delta Chi, later becoming a professional society in 1960, SPJ has currently over 7500 members throughout the US in the print, broadcast, and online mediums, including educators and student journalists. The group marks historic sites of the people and places that contribute American journalistic history -- with New York State holding the most at 15 sites. Today freedom of the press is threatened more than ever with slanderous claims of “fake news” turning into a world-wide catch phrase. Journalists are being hit

with libel suits and government opposition. Information that was once freely flowing is under attack and swept under the rug, all amid a critical time in history when the public has a revitalized right to know, and a desire for the truth.

Donations will be divided four ways: supporting the educational training for journalists through the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation, financial aid for journalists amid legal battle through the Legal Defense Fund, helping to fight for freedom of the press through the First Amendment Forever Fund, and the support furthering the excellence of journalism through the Presidents Club.

By supporting those entrusted to deliver the news, SPJ asserts it is taking a stance for a right this country was founded upon. Through #GivingNewsDay particpants help to secure the future of America’s First Amendment. Contact Anna Gutierrez at agutierrez@spj.org to make a donation or visit www.spj.org for more information. You can follow more stories from Nicole Teitler on social media @ NikkiOnTheDaily or email her at NTeitler@gmail.com.

WE CLEAN WINDOWS Reasonable Prices Call for Free Estimate

2017

Giving News Day

By Nicole Teitler

Join authors Hilaria and Alec Baldwin at BookHampton on Friday at 2 PM for children’s storytime and booksigning.

East End Business & Service

unexpected friendship in the later years of Queen Victoria’s (Academy Award winner Judi Dench) remarkable rule. When a young clerk travels from India to participate in the Queen’s Golden Jubilee, he is surprised to find favor with the Queen herself. The two forge an unlikely and devoted

N ov e m b e r 2 2

WEBER & GRAHN Heating & Air Conditioning

TIMELY ESTIMATES BECAUSE YOUR TIME IS VALUABLE

CALL TODAY

631-283-2956 WWW.CCWINDOWS.NET 31654

Prompt ♦ Quality ♦ Service “We Install the Best & Fix the Rest”

(631)

728-1166

24/7 Emergency Service


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Tipsy Tastes Continued From Page 62.

While the ciders and gin can be taken anywhere, for those who’d rather stick to the classic wine list, all alcoholic beverages can be savored at the numerous Wölffer locations throughout the Hamptons.

Want to try these yourself ? Visit for the Lighting of the Vines on December 2, an artistic wreath auction benefitting Fighting Chance. From 6 to 8 PM, catch a rare glimpse of 15,000 LED lights

as they glow over the rows of vines, dance to holiday jazz, and delight on appetizers, mulled wine, and more. For a full list of locations in the area to try Wölffer products, or where to buy near you, visit www. wolffer.com. For a more detailed list of the cider, visit www. wolffercider.com. #DrinkLocal. Cheers!

You can follow more stories from Nicole Teitler on Instagram and Facebook @NikkiOnTheDaily or email your comments to NTeitler@ gmail.com.

ARTICLES FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

SEASONED FIREWOOD $350 Cord (Delivered and Stacked) $290 Cord (Dumped) $180 1/2 Cord (Delivered and Stacked) $150 1/2 Cord (Dumped) Call Jim 631-921-9957.

TREE SPECIALIST-Topping for view and sunlight. Tree removal, pruning, etc. 631725-1394. UFN LANDSCAPE SPECIALIST- Custom design and installation. Planting of trees and shrubs. Hedge and bush trimming, etc. 631-725-1394. UFN

CAR FOR SALE

2002 - “FORD FOCUS -ZTW WAGON” - Metallic Green with Tan Leather interior, Excellent condition, 90K miles, new white wall tires, regularly serviced. A MUST SEE $ 3800 -Call or leave message. 631-749-0258. UFN

1996 DODGE RAM 2500 SERIES-5.7, 4x4 pick-up with cap and headliner. 151K miles. All Records. New Tires, new work. $950. Call 631740-7341. UFN

2017

Vay’s Voice Voiceover Artist

vaysvoice@gmail.com

CONSUMER TIRE HAS OPENINGS FOR AN AUTO MECHANIC AND TIRE MECHANIC CALL MIKE AT 631-324-8292

RECEPTIONIST WANTED for fast paced, service industry office in East Hampton. Must have excellent communication skills, be able to multi-task and type fast with efficiency. Office experience necessary. Must be fluent in English. Responsibilities include answering the phone, booking appointments & filing. Mon-Fri 9-5. Starting at $16 hour. Please e-mail resume to HamptonsHelpWanted@gmail.com 10-4-13 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE /PAYABLE OFFICE MANAGER in East Hampton wanted. Interested candidates must be fluent in English, have excellent organizational skills and experience managing an office setting. Responsibilities include A/R (invoicing & collections), A/P, Estimates &

Call The Independent for more info 324-2500 Fax: 631-324-2544 Classified deadline: Monday at noon

JOIN THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD

HELP WANTED Follow ups, Filing & help answering phone. Quickbooks experience is necessary. Qualified individuals please send resume, references and salary expectations to HamptonsHelpWanted@gma il.com. 10-4-13 PLUMBER: Plumbing and heating Company in Mattituck looking for a F/T plumber with 5 years experience. This includes service, Small alterations, repairs. Must have a valid driver’s license. Excellent salary, medical benefits, commission, 401(k), Great working environment. Please contact 631-298-0147. 11-4-14

PETS

AUXILLARY

CALL DAVE HUBSCHMITT AT 1-973-650-0052

FOR MORE INFORMATION UFN

search for a new home. Preferably they'd be adopted together but not required. Bootsy and Kitty are kid and dog friendly and perfect family cats- no issues! They're approximately 5 yrs young. They are healthy and come fully vetted and microchipped!For more information, Please call (631) 533-2PET (2738) or fill out an adoption application online! (631) 7283524 UFN

LOVING HOME NEEDED!! Bootsy (mostly black with white "boots") and Kitty are sweet female cats who were rescued from a neglect situation a while back. They were taken in and given a loving home but severe allergies forced their owner to

www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com

631.903.9598

audio samples available

CLASSIFIEDS

39-45-31

N ov e m b e r 2 2

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE/RENT EAST HAMPTON MOBILE HOME for sale, Oak View Hwy. 2,000sq. ft., 2Br, 2 bath, new appliances, CA, good condition. 205K. 631-5377944, 631-466-6721. 12-4-15

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE/RENT HOUSE FOR RENTSouthampton, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. $2,200 per month. Available January until June. 917-916-9158 13-2-14 MATURE ADULT-Looking for room or home to look afterHandy man/RH local/References/Licensed Security Guard/Winter or Year round/Will do work/Drive to barter housing. Call Eric 631-603-2823 13-2-14 www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com www.indyeastend.com

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE/RENT

PRIMELINE MODULAR HOMES, INC. Builders of Customized Modular Floor Plans that Fit Within Your Budget. Licensed & Insured. Locally Owned Since 1993. Steve Graboski, Builder Amagansett, N.Y. 11930 Tel: 631-267-2150 Fax: 631-267-8923

email: primemod@aol.com www.primelinemodlarhomes.com 46-26-20

GARAGE SALE GREAT RATES CALL

631-324-2500

77


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Traveler Watchman

Compiled by Kitty Merrill

The good news on the North Fork comes from Riverhead High School and East End Arts in Riverhead.

Cool Kid And Cadets

Moving from one cool kid to a cadre of cool cadets, during Veterans Day weekend, Riverhead High School NJROTC cadets visited several historic sites and toured the US Naval Academy.

Ba’Ase Gilbert is the recipient of the 2017 France Ligon Memorial Scholarship from East End Arts. He is a 12-year old seventh grader at Hampton Bays Middle School. This year he plays in world drumming at his school as well as for the youth ministry choir at the Friendship Baptist Church in Riverhead, where the Harvest Gospel Concert has convened for the past 31 years.

The trip kicked off in Philadelphia where the cadets toured major historical sights, including the National Constitution Center and Independence Hall. They also explored the Betsy Ross House and the Liberty Bell.

Following a day in Philly, the cadets stopped at the Battleship USS New Jersey, moored in Camden. The cadets experienced life on a battleship by taking a guided tour, trying out a flight simulator, and sleeping in 3’ by 7’ bunks stacked three high.

His biggest supporter was his grandmother, Ms. Annie Bell, who was also his caregiver since birth. She was the one who recognized his interest in drums at an early age. Ms. Bell passed away in June 2016, and Ba’Ase has vowed to try to be the best that he can be to honor her memory. His heart’s desire is to attend Howard University in Washington, DC when he graduates from high school. Ba’Ase is currently taking drum lessons with Rick DeLuca at East End Arts School. This is the second year that he has been awarded this scholarship. The scholarship was established in 2007 in memory of Ligon, who

of education, support, advocacy, and inspiration.

Independent/Courtesy East End Arts Ba’Ase Gilbert is the 2017 recipient of the France Ligon Memorial Scholarship from East End Arts in Riverhead.

served on the EEAC board of directors from 2005 to 2007. She was an advocate for the arts and early childhood education as well as an avid gospel singer who was a member of the Harvest Gospel

Choir.

East End Arts is a multi-award winning 501(c)3 not-for-profit arts organization serving the five East End towns of Long Island since 1972. East End Arts is committed to building and enriching community through the arts by way

The trip concluded with a tour of the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Following the tour, the students cheered on the Midshipmen during a football game at the Navy and Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.

Of the trip, Cadet Lieutenant Commander Michael Daniel said, “Visiting the Naval Academy was an amazing experience that bolstered my desire to attend the prestigious institution and one day call it my home.”

THE LAW OFFICES OF

CARL ANDREW IRACE & ASSOCIATES, PLLC

Criminal/DWI, Real Estate, Ordinance Violations, Zoning & Planning ◆ EAST HAMPTON • QUOGUE (631) 324-1233 ◆ www.southforklawyers.com cirace@southforklawyers.com 78


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Traveler Watchman

Compiled by Peggy Spellman Hoey

There are always a ton of events happening on the North Fork. Here are our picks for the week. Got some you would like to share for next week’s issue? Email us at news@indyeastend.com

North Fork News

Stop by Mashomack Preserve from 1-2 PM on Saturday to hear from a Quogue Wildlife Refuge naturalist about the very cool adaptations that reptiles, owls, and opossums acquire to thrive at night. Close up views are guaranteed. The event is rain or shine. Mashomack Preserve is located at 79 South Ferry Road, Shelter Island. For more information, call 631-749-4219.

GOT MITTENS? Peconic Bay Hospital Medical Center in Riverhead will be accepting new gloves and mittens for children of all ages. The items will be distributed to community children in need. The mitten tree will be located in the window of the Bay Gift Shop through Dec. 15. For more information, call 631548-6022. PAINT AN ORNAMENT The Old Town Arts & Crafts Guild is sponsoring an ornament painting class for adults on Saturday from 1 to 3 PM. All paints, brushes, and necessary art supplies will be provided. The fee for the class is $20 and is due at registration. Shatterproof ornaments will be available for purchase at a nominal fee. The guild is located at 28265 Main Rd., Cutchogue. To register, please stop by the guild or call 631734-6382 or email oldtownguild@ aol.com. For more information, go to www.oldtownartsguild.org.

CREATURES OF THE NIGHT

RAISING DIABETES AWARENESS Independent/Courtesy PBMC Peconic Bay Medical Center is on the lookout for donations to cover its “mitten tree.” New gloves and mittens are collected for needy kids.

him that what was taken away, never really left.

“The inspiration for this story comes from the love I have for my family and my hometown of Southold while dealing with some of the pain I will always carry over the loss of my mom,” stated Pierson in a press release. “I truly hope you like this Christmas story about

Santa, Jesus, reindeer, and war. I hope my heart comes through on the page and touches you.”

Books will be available for purchase with author signing. Refreshments will be served. The Ann CurrieBell House is located at 55200 Main Rd., Southold. For more information, call 631-765-5500.

November is National Diabetes Awareness month. Join Dr. Alan Goldenberg at Peconic Landing on Monday as he discusses transforming the way people live, manage, and deal with diabetes. The discussion, which is sponsored by Eastern Long Island Hospital, will be held in the community room between 4 and 5 PM. Peconic Landing is located at 1500 Brecknock Rd., Greenport.

BOOK LAUNCH The Southold Historical Society’s Ann Currie-Bell House will host a book launch for author Jean Marie Pierson’s new book, The Light in the Woods, from 1 to 3 PM on Saturday. The Light in the Woods tells the heartbreaking and magical story of how Santa Claus, Comet, and Christ himself, all hiding in plain sight, help a grieving boy cope with the loss of his father and reassure

sales and rentals of Lift Chairs, Ramps, Wheelchairs, Hospital Beds, Bracing, Catheters, Mastectomy Products and many more Lewin accepts most insurances including Medicare, Medicaid, Care Connect, United HealthCare, Blue Cross Blue Shield, NYSHIP and many More

Visit our Showrooms 165 Oliver Street Riverhead 631-727-7006

Your locally owned community pharmacy for over 75 years Bob GrisnikPharmacist/Owner

283-1506 Jagger Lane • Southampton

3655 Route 112 Coram

1/2 Mile South of Route 25

631-716-4040

www.lewinmedical.com

Open Mon. - Fri. 8:30am - 5pm Sat. 9am - 1pm

79


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Shop Small On Saturday

entrepreneurial spirit of small businesses are vital to the prosperity and vibrancy of every community throughout New York State.” According to the National Retail Federation, there are an estimated 3.7 million retail establishments in the country, with 99 percent of them small businesses with less than 50 employees.

On the Twin Forks, most village and hamlet downtown sections play host to special holiday-themed activities. Parades, tree lightings, and more are designed to draw shoppers to Main Street during that time frame between big box store-focused Black Friday and the online shopping extravaganza Cyber Monday.

$100 REWARD

By Kitty Merrill

American Express launched Small Business Saturday in 2010 as a way to help companies affected by the recession. At the inception of the campaign, AmEx offered its customers discounts for shopping at small businesses. It proved an effective incentive.

Shelter Tails

November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month! Meet McLovin!

for information leading to the return of the Independent’s outdoor newspaper rack removed from East Hampton train station.

324-2500 80

According to Forbes, in 2012 consumers spent some $5.5 billion on Small Business Saturday. By 2015, they spent almost three times as much -- $16.2 billion. Over the years of the campaign, incentives from AmEx have dwindled, but the growing societal push to “shop local” has kept the day a lucrative one for mom-and-pop stores. In 2015 about 1.3 million small businesses participated in the event, as did 95 million consumers. Congress designates a national Small Business Saturday each year and has since 2011. Reminding East Enders to shop local next weekend, Assemblyman Fred Thiele, chair of the assembly’s small business committee, noted that “the dedication and

Black Friday is considered the biggest shopping day of the year. Many employees (unless they work in retail, obviously) have the day after Thanksgiving off and kick off the shopping season on a quest for bargains. Large chain stores oblige with special sales and extended hours. According to the website moneycrashers.com, the busiest shopping day of the year used to be the Saturday before Christmas. In 2002, Black Friday took the lead. Retailers create a sense of urgency around the day by offering steep discounts on a limited stock of desired items. But then there’s Cyber Monday. For some, that’s the day to grab the gifts and bargains they missed on Black Friday. The term “Cyber Monday” was coined in 2005 by marketers for the online retail association Shop.org. They were looking for a way to compete with the brick-and-mortar stores and offer an alternative to Black Friday.

McLovin is a beautiful 8 year old orange cat with long hair who was brought to us because his family was no longer able to care for him. McLovin is very sweet and is ready to cuddle with his forever family. Bring this pumpkin home this holiday season!

COMMERCIAL • CONSTRUCTION Please call 728-PETS(7387) or visit our website at www.southamptonanimalshelter.com. Please patronize our ReTail Shop located at 30 Jagger Lane in Southampton Village!

WASTE REMOVAL

locally and family owned since 1958

1.5 TO 30 YARD CONTAINERS FOR ALL YOUR COMMERCIAL, RESIDENTIAL, AND CONSTRUCTION NEEDS PORTABLE TOILETS

SERVICING SAG HARBOR AND SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES PO BOX 1181, 92 CLAY PIT ROAD SAG HARBOR


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Captain William Butler, 81

On October 31, 2017, Captain William Butler passed away. Born on October 23, 1936, “Captain Willie” was educated at Brown and Hofstra Universities.

Butler began his boating career with the Davis Park Ferry Company piloting trips to Fire Island while teaching English at Patchogue High School. In the early 1960s he moved to Montauk with his family where he continued teaching and coaching basketball at East Hampton High School.

His love for boats and the water led

Obituary

him to serve as an East Hampton Town Trustee while pursuing a fulltime fishing career. Captain Willie’s famous LazyBones fishing trips brought joy and lifelong memories to everyone involved.

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Gary Brady, 64

Captain Gary Michael Brady served four years in the US Navy. He often spoke of his travels and how proud he was of his country. He grew up in Hempstead and made many fishing trips with his father and four brothers to Montauk. After being discharged from the service, he came out to Montauk and soon became the captain of his own charter boat, The Sandpiper. He loved fishing in the Long Island waters -- offshore and bays. He married Priscilla Jean Berry on Nov. 15, 1981 and the couple lived in Montauk and worked for a flooring company together. They bought a house in East Hampton. They had two daughters, Kristen, born Sept. 3, 1986 and Laura, born May 4, 1988. Gary worked for many years doing private carpentry and construction work. He has left his woodworking marks all over town.

In the last 15 years, he was blessed with nine grandchildren. He enjoyed attending their sports games, school plays, and just simply pushing them on the swing. In his retirement, he enjoyed gardening, working on projects around the house, and evenings at the bay watching his daughters, sonsin-law, and their children, his grandchildren, play on the shore, and going kayaking in the bay and digging for clams. He will be missed and remembered by many.

Brady is predeceased by his father, John P. Brady, and mother, Lorraine (nee Jones), and his brother, Jack. His wife, brothers, Daniel and Mark; and his two daughters, nine grandchildren, and four nieces and nephews survive him. Capt. Brady died at home in East Hampton on November 9. A funeral was held at Most Holy Trinity Church last Friday, with interment following at Calverton National Cemetery.

SEASONED PROFESSIONALS

The captain is survived by his wife of 60 years, Lynn ( Jensen Beach, FL), sons Rhett (Parker, CO), and Nathaniel (Westfield, NJ), and daughters Jennifer (Newark, DE) and Alisa Sanabria (East Hampton, NY), along with 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

HANDY HANDS, INC. ★ LICENSED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR

Complete Electrical service • Residential - Commercial • New Construction • Additions & Repairs Free Estimates Professional & Prompt INSURED - EAST HAMPTON

631-329-1187

w

BURKE & SULLIVAN PLLC

.no ww

rsic

. co

m

Attorneys at Law Est. 1970

Serving Long Island (Year ‘Round) For 83Years

Real Estate • Zoning & Land Use / Permits • Code Violations Personal Injury • State Liquor Authority • Estates • Wills

HON. EDWARD D. BURKE, SR.

2000-2007

(Former - NYS Supreme Court & Southampton Town Justice)

1994-2000

TEL: 631-283-4111 • CELL: 516-885-7420 • FAX: 631-283-7711 2007-2015 Web: www.burkeandsullivan.com • Email: judgeburke@burkeand sullivan.com

41 MEETING HOUSE LANE, SOUTHAMPTON, NEW YORK 11968 3348 NOYAC ROAD, SAG HARBOR, NEW YORK 11963

283-0604 Dumpsters - Rubbish Services - Cesspool Service - Portable Toilets

81


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Strictly Business by Kitty Merrill EETA News The East End Tourism Alliance has been awarded a $250,000 regional tourism grant from NYS EDC Market New York, to create a video library to help brand our unique East End and make video footage available to all East End tourism businesses with affordable access to professional HD video required for multimedia marketing. The Riverhead, Southold, Southampton, and Shelter Island committees of the East End Tourism Alliance are currently in production to film a “Find It on the Forks” video for each of the towns. These videos, along with a regional overarching video, will be utilized in purchasing $150,000 travel media in 2018 to promote the off-peak tourism season to help stimulate business when most need the help. All tourism businesses are invited to attend an information meeting to understand how they may be included in the project. EETA also hopes to announce major sponsors of the project that are generously enabling more small businesses to participate than ever before.

Also of great importance, and interest to all tourism stakeholders, EETA has been actively working with Assemblyman Fred Thiele and Senator Ken LaValle on formation of a Peconic Region

tourism marketing district that would permanently establish a funding mechanism for regional marketing that would help to grow the off-season tourism business, as well as contribute to establishment of much-needed tourism transportation systems during the peak tourism seasons. The legislative process for the formation of the Peconic Region tourism marketing district will also be presented and discussed. While EETA has been working diligently with each of the Town’s supervisors and mayors, it is equally as important that all stakeholders are involved with the creation of the district overlay. Finally, on Tuesday, December 5 at 3 PM at Gurney’s Inn in Montauk, EETA hosts a South Fork tourism summit. Baker’s Winter The Baker House 1650 on 181 Main Street, East Hampton, a boutique award-winning Hamptons inn offering casual luxury with a “home away from home” feel, has unveiled two winter packages that guests may enjoy for the winter season. The new packages highlight fun activities in the Hamptons and amenities at the Baker House. They will also offer a winter discount beginning Monday that will be

Independent/Courtesy Sag Harbor Chamber Long Island Radio Broadcasting recognized The Wharf Shop as the Outstanding Member Business for 2017 at their first annual Small Business Chambers of Commerce reception. The Wharf Shop has been a supporting member of the Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce since its inception. Nada Barry, owner of the Wharf Shop, was one of the founding members of the organization. Her daughter Gwen Waddington and manager Dede O’Connell continue to volunteer their time and talent to the running of the Chamber. Pictured are Barbara Matteia (Long Island Radio Broadcasting), Lisa Field (president, Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce), Nada Barry and Gwen Waddington (The Wharf Shop), and Stephanie Bitis (general manager, Long Island Radio Broadcasting). Not pictured: Dede O’Connell

available through March 29. The discounts include 10 percent off the winter rate, and guests must use promo code “Winter10” when booking to receive the discount. The promotion may be used any day of the week with the exception of holiday weekends.

Both packages are available immediately. The Romance package includes a bottle of champagne, chocolate-covered strawberries, couples massage, and one hour of use of the Baker spa, with rates based on a two-night stay. The Wine Tasting package includes private wine tasting at the Wolffer Estate for two, a bottle of Wolffer

wine, and a fruit and cheese board in the room upon arrival, plus $75 dining credit toward one of the local restaurants. Both packages must be booked by calling the inn at least 24 hours in advance of stay. To book a stay at this boutique hotel, call 631-3244081. There’s The Rub The Ed & Phyllis Davis Wellness Institute of Stony Brook Southampton Hospital announced this week that their one-hour massage gift certificates are on sale through December 29. Just $70. Call 631-726-8800 to learn more.

SINCE 1979

’S CARTING C E D R O. O F 67 Newtown Lane, East Hampton, NY

631.324.6215

82

(631) 324-8924

• Self Load Dumpster Service • Household Cleanouts • Attic • Basement • Garage • Cleanups


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

A Giant Mobile Boombox

By Justin Meinken

Last Friday evening, the YMCA East Hampton RECenter revealed BOLD Broadcasting’s latest studio, a giant mobile boombox. Transmitting on 104.7 WELJ, the unveiling was complete with Christmas tunes and a ribboncutting ceremony. Topped off with hot chocolate and cookies from

Hampton Coffee as well as wool gloves provided by Bridgehampton National Bank, guests fended off the frigid evening. According to sales and promotions manager for BOLD Broadcasting, Andrew Adams, the idea of a mobile studio has been in the works since March. “We’re a local station and we want to engage the

community. We thought that we could give back by using our mobile station at events all over the East End. We’d like it to be used in all types of events, festivals, parades, tree lightings, community events at schools, and at the RECenter. The nice thing about this is that being a mobile studio, everyone in the listening community will hear what is going on at any event that our mobile unit is at. We’re hoping that our presence will help draw people to the events.”

Independent / Courtesy ARF

Adams and co-owner, Matthew Glaser, have partnered with the RECenter and BNB to develop

their mobile station because, ”We believe that both organizations share our vision of community engagement and they both have a long tradition of working together with the community.”

Bold Broadcasting was formed in 2016 when it had the opportunity to purchase WELJ’s signal. It kicked off programming last year with an all holiday format which transitioned into easy listening. In its short tenure it has build a substantial audience which continues to grow, and now rates the station as perhaps the largest on the East End.

The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons is moving its popular dog training classes indoors to a heated greenhouse at Wainscott Farms on Daniels Hole Road in Wainscott. The next session of classes with instructor Matthew Posnick is set to start Friday. Classes include puppy k, dog obedience, dog agility, therapy prep, and the new AKC trick dog class. For a full list of offerings or to register visit ARF’s website or call 631-5370400 ext. 202.  

83


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Thanksgiving At Sofo

By Peggy Spellman Hoey

The South Fork Natural History Museum is hosting a free family Thanksgiving open house on Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM.

The event will feature a full day of information about astronomy and outer space exploration where families can learn about binoculars and telescopes, space telescopes, and the Earth from our doorstep to outer space. Children can write a note to a space alien, enjoy crafts, face painting, have a blast with their own special stomp rocket, pose for an astronaut photo-op, or view a demonstration of a solar house with its own solar car. Visitors can take in the museum’s StarLab planetarium show for a small fee -SoFo members are $3 per person, non-members $5 per person. “This day of fun and informative events about astronomy and space is just one of the many new topics you’ll find at the South Fork Natural History Museum’s

Thanksgiving open house,” said Carol Crasson, the museum’s education director. “We’re cosponsoring the day with the terrific Montauk Observatory, and adding information about space exploration and outer space to our thinking about the natural world.” The subject matter, she continued, “could not be timelier with NASA getting ready to send humans back to the moon, SpaceX’s rocket launches, and continued plans for more Mars explorations.”

The indoor StarLab planetarium shows, which last about 20 minutes, will begin at 10:30 AM and will be offered at the following times: 10:30, 11:10, 11:50, 1:10 PM, 1:50, 2:30, and 3:10. Advance reservations for the StarLab showings are strongly suggested. The museum asks those who are interested in attending a StarLab showing to call SoFo at 631-5279735 to schedule the preferred time of their visit and to indicate the number of people attending.

N ov e m b e r 2 2

Peconic

Continued From Page 14.

up dog waste, recycling, and not feeding waterfowl. Homeowners can ensure their neighbors know about the Suffolk County Fertilizer Reduction Initiative, which bans the application of fertilizer from November 1 to April 1 when the ground cannot absorb the nutrients. There is room for creativity as we steward our watershed, too. The Roanoke Elementary School and the Riverhead Engineering Department collaborated on a design competition whereby second graders created sketches for rain gardens and rain barrels to fabricate at home. Three student designs received awards from the town supervisor on World Oceans Day. The Peconic Estuary Program has a $500 rebate program for homeowners who replace lawn and pavement with bioswales and gardens. The vegetation retains stormwater and pollutants, and allows the water to percolate into the soil where it ultimately recharges the aquifer. The Village of Sag Harbor distributes a Guide to Native Plants, which use less irrigation, maintenance, and fertilizer than non-natives.

Springs School fourth graders wrote an opera titled, “Beyond the Duck Pond,” which educated fellow students and their families about the ecological harm of feeding ducks in Pussy’s Pond at the headwaters of Accabonac Harbor. Four Greenport restaurants partnered with the Product Stewardship Institute in a pilot program to reduce single-use plastics in restaurant operations, serving as a role model for other waterfront businesses on keeping plastics out of the Estuary. The Peconic Estuary Protection Committee, formed in 2015, is an intermunicipal alliance that shares technical resources and cooper­ ates on education and planning to protect water quality in the Estuary. Members are the Towns of Brookhaven, East Hamp­ ton, Riverhead, Shelter Island, Southampton, and Southold; the Villages of Greenport, North Haven and Sag Harbor; Suffolk County; and the New York State Department of Transportation. Visit www.PeconicProtection. info for creative ways in which you can take a watershed approach to protect the Peconic Estuary, or write the Committee at PeconicEstuary@gmail.com to share your ideas.

There are also many examples where one motivated group is teaching its larger community to engage on estuary health. The

Rachel Gruzen, MEM, LEED AP is the coordinator for Peconic Estuary Protection Committee.

Licensed

PROFESSIONAL WATERPROOFING EXPERTS RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Exterior Waterproofing Basement Waterproofing Crawl Spaces • Humidity Control Mold Remediation • Venting & Insulation Structural Repairs • Wall Stabilization Cracked Foundations Repaired

275-1811

(631)

www.DryBuilding Solutions.com Licensed & Insured

84

OVER YEAR S OF SERVIC E

Deal Directly W/The Owner & Only Trained Certified Employees On Every Job!

2017

Insured

Landscape, Inc. Lawn, Tree & Garden Care Think of us for your next project

• TREES, BUSHES • PRUNING & REMOVAL • • CABLING & BRACING • • FERTILIZER & SOIL CARE • • SCENIC VISTAS • • STORM DAMAGE • • TREE INSPECTION • • LIGHTING PROTECTION • • STUMP GRINDING-ROOT LINE • Free Inspection & Estimates

Call Hector @ 631.960.8242

Aces

bsolutely

Cleaning Service 10 Years Experience

Reasonable Year Round & Seasonal Rates Weekly and Bi-Weekly Cleanings Home Openings & Closings

631-377-2233


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Revitalization Funds

By Peggy Spellman Hoey

Four East End community groups have been tapped to receive $300,000 -- spread out among them -- in downtown revitalization funds from the Suffolk County Downtown Revitalization grants program, County Executive Steve Bellone announced Thursday.

On the North Fork, the Association Town of Riverhead will receive $40,093 for the installation of new LED street lights along Main Street in Jamesport and the Mattituck-Laurel Civic Association will receive $60,180 for improvements including the addition of 14 new spaces at the Pike Street municipal parking lot. On the South Fork, the Greater Westhampton Chamber of Commerce will receive $100,000 for the installation of energy-efficient LED decorative streetlights along Main Street between Potunk Lane and Beach Road, and the Hampton Bays Beautification Association an additional $100,000 for the construction of a comfort station in Good Ground Park. A total of $580,000 in funding was designated as part of Round 15 of the revitalization grants program. Then grants leverage over $1.1 million for a total of $1.6 million. The county’s Downtown Revitalization citizens advisory panel chose the groups following a competitive selection process. The panel utilizes a point system to evaluate each application to ensure projects that receive funding will make the greatest contribution to the long-term improvement of local downtowns and have a positive economic impact on the county. This year,

the county received 16 applications for the Round 15 grants and 12 projects were funded. A pool of $600,000 was made available to partially fund qualified capital projects located in or adjacent to downtown areas on municipallyowned property. “Creating and improving robust downtowns around Suffolk County is an integral part of my administration’s economic development agenda,” Bellone said. “Investing in our downtowns and their infrastructure are not only critical to creating jobs and improving safety in our communities, they also help showcase the rich culture and beauty that makes Suffolk County the ideal place to work, live, and raise a family.”

“The long history of the Downtown Revitalization grant program shows that by supporting these projects and encouraging applicants to leverage outside funding we are having an important and sustainable impact on creating vibrant downtowns and business districts,” said Theresa Ward, Deputy County Executive and commissioner, Economic Development and Planning. Since 1997, the county has awarded over $11.5 million in funds for downtown revitalization initiatives. Among the various projects that are eligible for grants are public parking facilities, curb and sidewalk construction, pedestrian walkways, street lighting, public restrooms, disabled accessibility, renovations to existing structures, cultural, and recreational facilities. For more information on the Suffolk County Downtown Revitalization initiative, visit www. suffolkcountyny.gov.

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Civilian Police Academy

By Peggy Spellman Hoey

Do you think you have what it takes to be a cop? Would you like to know more about what it’s like to be one? Or maybe you are a concerned resident or local business owner who would like to get to know more about how the Southampton Town Police Department operates?

Any questions you might have could be satisfied by taking Southampton Town PD’s Civilian Police Academy, a 14-week course where residents can learn more about the inner workings of the law enforcement through some

classroom training and hands-on experience riding along with the town’s men and women in blue. The academy is held one night per week from 6 to 9 PM at Southampton Town Police Headquarters in Hampton Bays. Seats are limited to town residents first; however, consideration will be given to non-town residents pending the availability of seating. To apply for the program, contact Lt. Susan Ralph via email at Sralph@southamptontown.gov. A short application will be emailed or mailed to you. Completed applications will be accepted up until Dec. 27.

$327 Million

By Peggy Spellman Hoey

It’s that time of year again when temperatures go down and heating costs go up, making it difficult for some families to heat their homes over the winter months. With that in mind, Assemblyman Fred Thiele is reminding his constituents that there is $327 million in federal funding available through the State’s Home Energy Assistance Program for low- and moderateincome New Yorkers to help cover heating costs.

As part of the program, which is administered by the state’s Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance, nearly 1.5 million households received assistance through HEAP last year, and of that number, 66,565 of those homes were located on Long Island. This winter, eligible households can

receive assistance of up to $726, depending on income, household size, and the manner in which their home is heated, whether it be electricity, natural gas, oil, coal, propane, wood/wood pellets, kerosene, or corn. A family of four can earn up to $53,482 per year and still qualify for assistance. Residents can apply for a regular Home Energy Assistance Program benefit online at www.myBenefits.ny.gov. Households may also qualify for an emergency benefit if they are at risk of getting their heat shut off, or if they are running out of fuel. Applications for emergency benefits will be accepted beginning Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018. Applications for the emergency benefit program are accepted at the Suffolk County Department of Social Services. For more information, go to www.otda. ny.gov/programs/heap/contacts.

Masterpiece Cleaning Keeping homes sparkly-clean for over twenty years. Southampton to Montauk

C.E. KING & SONS, INC. CANVAS AWNINGS • MARINE BOAT COVERS www.kingsawnings.com Established 1948

10 St. Francis Place, Springs, East Hampton, NY 11937 631-324-4944 • Fax 631-329-3669

Residential | Commercial | Parties House Openings & Closings 631.488.7180 masterpiececleaning.com

85


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Sports

Dyan Laube’s powerful thrusts and blazing speed produced a season for the ages. Independent / Gordon M. Grant

Westhampton Punishes HHHW To Earn Title

By Rick Murphy

The Westhampton Hurricanes made history Saturday by finishing unbeaten and untied, earning the Suffolk County Division III championship in the process. However, as is so often the case in the world of sports, there is always

86

one more goal to accomplish.

The Hurricanes overcame a determined Half Hollow Hills West squad Saturday at Stony Brook University 28-14 before a crowd estimated at 5000 strong. In doing so they advance to the final destination of this magical journey

-- the Long Island Division III championship game at Hofstra University Sunday at high noon against Lawrence.

The locals dug deep to prevail against HHHW, using a punishing defensive effort to augment their strong rushing attack.

The victory bore out Coach Bill Parry’s belief that the team is still improving, but Hills was peaking at exactly the right time as well. The team was 8-3 over the season, avenging one early season loss against Sayville two weeks ago in

Continued On Page 87.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Sports

Quarterback Clarke Lewis is the team’s hidden weapon. Independent / Gordon M. Grant

the playoffs. The other two losses came at the hands of Westhampton. The HHHW Colts had won their last three games by a combined score of 128-12 and had a fivegame winning streak going into the title game during which they crushed opponents by a 173-19 margin. The Colts were picked as the preseason favorite coming into this season after reaching the Division II county championship the past three seasons. Westhampton Beach defeated Hills West on its home

field, 33-7, on September 16.

Hills was no pushover this time around. The two teams battled evenly through most of the game. Westhampton took a 13-7 lead into the third stanza and nursed a 21-14 fourth quarter lead. The speedy Colts backfield tandem of Deyvon Wright and Justin Brown combined for 1700 yards and 20 touchdowns during the season.

Westhampton’s Dylan Laube, on the other hand, has over 2000 yards

himself, and the HHHW game plan, if not to stop Laube, was to make the senior All-American work for his yards. And that’s what he did. He scored all four of his team’s touchdowns, giving him an astounding 39 this season. Each time the Colts answered, there was Laube, a relentless running machine who sensed paydirt.

Laube finished with 185 yards on 20 carries, and undefeated Westhampton (11-0) won its first Suffolk title since 1989. After

Wright put in his own highlightreel run, a 65 yarder, there was Laube to restore order and put his team up 13-7. In the fourth stanza, when Hills closed to within a touchdown again, Laube inserted the final dagger, a 24-yard blast through a sliver of an opening to put the ‘Canes up by 14.

Lawrence nipped Wantagh 1410 to earn the berth in the Long Island title game against the Hurricanes when Jordan Alexander intercepted a pass with 38 seconds left to end a Wantagh potential scoring drive. 87


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

Sports

Indy Fit by Nicole Teitler

Hamptons Hottie With the grocery list of skin care products out today it’s hard to know which ones really work. Is that $15 body scrub just as good as the $50 one? How can you ever be sure? For those who prefer to keep their money in the community and shop local, there’s Hamptons Hottie. Karyn Mannix is the East Hampton resident behind the flirty brand name -- which I discovered at the Lululemon Artisan Holiday Market in East Hampton. Mannix, a well-known East End artist and curator, has experienced bad skin her entire life and tried everything to fix it. When nothing else seemed to do the trick she took matters into her own hands and began concocting things on her own. After years of trial and error, the formula worked and she began gifting her creations out to friends. Seven years, and endless hours of research later, Mannix slapped a logo on it and a business began. Hamptons Hottie Body Care is a 100-percent organic and vegan line made for the neck down right in East Hampton. I took home the “Chill Out” scented Main Beach Body Buff and Sagaponack

Shimmer to try -- which contains a blend of lavender, geranium, marjoram, orange, chamomile, and patchouli.

The Body Buff, which I used on my hands and feet, is very aromatic. It’s made with sea salt, raw sugar, caffeine, almond oil, grapeseed oil, virgin olive oil, and essential oils. I placed a quarter size of product to begin scrubbing and should mention my hands require moisturizer to feel the feminine way they do. Twenty four hours later, even after using the gym (which was arm day, so my hands were lifting metal bars), my hands still felt the softer difference.

The Sagaponack Shimmer ingredients are a simple mix of distilled water, glycerin, and essential oils for face and body. Thanks to my genetics, I’m not prone to breakouts or super sensitivity to products -- just oily skin in summer and dry in winter. While the Shimmer felt refreshing and light on my arms and upper chest, my face did respond with a slight itch -- no visible difference though. Perhaps I’ll stick to using this lightly scented, on-the-go spray for my body when it needs a little

At Your Service On The Holidays

Adult Clinics TBA Inquire Within

OPEN THANKSGIVING DAY

88

Now let’s compare size and price to a well-known brand. Hamptons Hottie 8 oz Body Buff sells for $25 and the 6 oz Shimmer for $20. A 13 oz Sleep Sugar Scrub from Bath and Body Works retails for $16.50 whereas a 3.3 oz Coconut Body Mist from The Body Shop runs around $13. Overall, it’s really about preference. Do you want to shop local and organic or go with a bigger brand? What makes Hamptons Hottie stand out is the tweak of caffeine in some of Mannix’s products. Those with cellulite could use the jolt, as caffeine is known to tighten the skin, exfoliate, and reduce the appearance of cellulite.

Look and feel like a Hamptons Hottie with more than just body product but paraphernalia -- mugs, beach towels, and a baseball cap with the signature pink kiss. A full list of products will be listed online at www.hamptonshottie.com, expected to go live this week.

Even better, meet the original Hamptons Hottie, Mannix herself, in person to purchase your own or get ahead on holiday gifts. She’ll be at the Lululemon Artisan Market at Loft35 on 35 Main Street in East Hampton every Saturday through December 23.

To follow more stories from Nicole Teitler follow her on Instagram and Facebook @NikkiOnTheDaily or email her at Nteitler@gmail.com.

Sports Sponsored by

OPEN CHRISTMAS EVE & CHRISTMAS DAY

EAST HAMPTON INDOOR TENNIS (631) 537-8012

moisture.

Give us a Call Before Problems Arise

Childrens Clinics TBA Inquire Within

OPEN NEw YEAR’S DAY

Independent/ Dell Cullum

www.ehit.ws

A to Z Auto Radiator & Air Conditioning

1040A Hortons Ln, Southold, NY 11971 Auto, Truck, Industrial Equipment & RV Cooling, Heating & A/C Systems Mention you saw us in The Independent

Bob Andruszkiewicz

(Prop.)

Phone: 631-765-6849 • Fax: 631-765-6847 email: HvyResQ1@aol.com


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

HEALTH on the EAST END A Special Supplement to our

Dec. 6 Edition

Special Promotional Rates Apply Contact The Independent 631.324.2500 or your Sales Rep for further details 89


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

THE

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

1826

wishes you a safe & happy holiday

Don’t Drink & Drive 90


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

$

Starting at

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

7999

W/Coupon. Exp 12/5/17

W/Coupon. Exp 12/5/17

W/Coupon. Exp 12/5/17

W/Coupon. Exp 12/5/17

$

8999

W/Coupon. Exp 12/5/17

$

9999

W/Coupon. Exp 12/5/17

91


Wines & Spirits the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

N ov e m b e r 2 2

2017

mpton Bays a H

Open Thanksgiving Day 9am-1pm ($200 Minimum) 5 or more cases call by Thursday 5pm Saturday Delivery HOURS M-Thurs: 9AM - 7:00PM • Fri & Sat: 9AM - 8:00PM • Sunday 12PM - 6PM FREE DELIVERY From Hampton Bays To Montauk

Johnnie Walker BLUE

Titos Handmade Vodka

Platinum 7X Vodka

750 ML

Mag.

Mag.

185

$

31.

$

35.

Mag.

64.

124.

$

Mag.

99

52.

$

Liter

99

Basil Hayden's Bourbon

Mag.

Mag.

Mag.

750ML

19.99

$

Bulleit Bourbon

59.99

18.99

$

Glenmorangie

Mag.

46.99

Absolut Vodka Mag

29.99

Wine 750 ML

750ML

39.

$

99

62.99

Fri & Sat • 4-7 PM

36.

$

99

21.

$

99

Knob Creek Mag

99

Mag.

22.99

21.

99

Johnny Walker 750ML

79.99

$

Cutty Sark Mag

29.99

$

.

34.99

$

Bacardi

Mag.

1- 24.99 2-$42 3-$60 $

2 FOR

$Grey Goose

50or Flavors Reg. Liter

34.99

$

.

Mag

$

Spud Pumpkin Spice 750 ML

9.

$

99

Tanqueray Mag.

39.99

$

Mag.

32.

$

49.

99

Sauza Hornitos Plata and Reposado

29.

$

2-$60

Belvedere Mag.

49.

$

99

Hendricks Gin

Mag.

99 ea.

56.99

Goslings Black Rum

Mag.

23.$

99

2- 40

Pinnacle Vodka Mag

18.99

$

Mag.

$

Skyy Vodka

$

Mag.

99

Mag.

$

Mag.

99

Stolichnaya Vodka

Makers Mark

750 ML

$

36.

$

39.99

2- 42

59.

21.

99

$

$

$

Mag.

$

Kettle One Vodka

Svedka Vodka Mag

Canadian Club

Single Malt Whisky

$

49.

99

Dewars White Label

Oban

750ML

750ML

$

Famous Grouse

LVOV Vodka

12 Year Old

Milagro Silver

Platinum

30.

$

Mag.

99

Smirnoff Vodka

Mag.

1-$21.99ea. 2-$20.99ea. 3-$19.99ea.

We will match any of our local competitors’ coupons presented at the time of purchase!

Ruffino Gold Label ................ 39.99 Blackstone (all varieties)3 for 30.00 Antinori Christina Red Blend .......... ................................10.99 2 for 20 Santa Rita 120 All Types2 for 10.00 Kim Crawford Sauv. Blanc..... 13.99 Sterling Meritage .................... 9.99 Crane Lake ...................2 for 10.00 Ecco Domani Pinot Grigio .......8.99 Chateau Ste. Michelle Chard .10.99 Chateau Ste. Michelle Riesling 9.99 Salentein Malbac16.99 2 for 30.00 Livio Felluga Pinot Grigio .....19.99 Elsa Bianchi Malbac ............12.99 ................................... 2 for 20.00

FREE Wine Tasting

26.99 $ 36.99

$

Mag.

$

Jack Daniels

Liter

Glenfiddich

Glenlivet 12 Year old

Jim Beam Black Label

Mag.

92

Johnny Walker Gold

29. 39.

Mag Mag.

99 99

Clan MacGregor

Khortytsa Vodka

$

99

99

$$

Boodles Gin

29.99

$

750 ml

$

99

$

$

Lagavulin 16 Year Old Scotch

Johnnie Walker RED

$

12.

99

Malibu Rum

Chateau St. Jean All Types .....8.99 Santa Margarita Pinot Grigio21.99 ..................................240 for case Bogle Chard ............................ 8.99 Bogle Cabernet ....................11.99 Bogle Pinot Noir...................11.99 Bogle Merlot ..........................9.99 Excelsior All Types .... 8.99 3 for 21 Riff Pinot Grigio .......... 2 for 18.00 Louis Jadot Macon Village ....11.99 Conundrum White or Red .....19.99 Apothic Red or Dark...............9.99 Minuty Rose ................ 3 for 48.00 Domaines Ott ....... 49.99 3 for 120 Macrostie Chardonnay .........19.99

Wine Magnums Lindemans (all varieties) ......... 9.99 Beringer White Zin .................. 9.99 Frontera (all types) ...6 for 7.99each Yellowtail (all var) .6 for 10.99 each Fetzer (all varieties)................. 9.99 Woodbridge...........6 for10.99 each Barefoot (all types) .......6 for 60.00 Gekkeikan Sake ..................... 9.99 Estrella All Types ..................... 9.99 Mark West Pinot Noir ........... 19.99 Santa Marina Pinot Grigio ..... 10.99 .......................... or $60 for a case Beringer All Types ................... 9.99 Not responsible for typographical errors. Subject to Inventory Depletion All Prices expire 12/6/17

Sparkling

Cristalino Brut ................... 8.99 Veuve Clicquot ................ 42.99 La Marca Prosecco . ............. 12.99 90+ Prosecco .... 11.99 2 for 20 Pierre Giamonnet Brut .... 34.99 .............................. 2 for 60.00 Francois Montand Brut or Rose .. $11.99 2 for $20 Louis Roederer Brut ......... 40.99 Laurent-Perrier Brut ........ 35.99 Valdo Extra Dry .............. 11.99 .............................. 2 for 20.00 Moet Imperial ................. 39.99

Check us Out On Facebook for Coupons & Discounts!

Hampton Bays Town Center (Next to King Kullen) • 46 East Montauk Highway

631-728-8595

15% OFF Mixed Wine Case Discount

Ful Har

App Pumpk

Profile for The Independent Newspaper

Independent 11-22-17  

Independent 11-22-17

Independent 11-22-17  

Independent 11-22-17