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January 15, 2020

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Real Realty

Arts & Entertainment

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Asher Lipman:

Carving a unique niche as a renovation coach

‘The News Broads’ take on national news with humor

LaValle’s Retirement May Spur Upheaval

FIVE TOWNS ONE NEWSPAPER

choring “Good Morning, New York” on WABC Channel 7 in the city, and was a familiar face on WNYW, Channel 5 . . . before it became Fox TV. “One of the producers put Lynne White and I on in a thing called ‘The Power Panel.’ The idea was to take one of the leading news stories of the day — national, local, whatever — and have us debate on it, because she’s extremely liberal, and I’m socially liberal, but the idea was to have me as the more conservative voice.” Both Licht and White were products of “the old days” of Channel 5 news journalism, and they clicked. “It was a lot of fun,” Licht recalled. The segment eventually made it to the six o’clock news with Chuck Scarborough, but after a few years, with a changeover in management, the segment was viewed as too divisive. “People really thought Lynne and I hated each other,” Licht said with a laugh, “because we would really go at each other. We didn’t pull any punches. But it was too controversial for them. They wanted pablum. And I didn’t want to be toned down.” “The News Broads” is anything but bland. “What we saw about journalism and media in general was really distressing to us,” said Licht. “And it was distressing in a profound way, which we thought we had a particular insight into,” she said. “We’re not the most famous names in journalism, but we know who they are, and they are coming to us.” “What scares me in this age of post-truth,” she said, “is we’ve gone from Walter Cronkite being the voice of the nation, and you believed what he said, no matter what your politics were, to Kelly Anne Conway saying

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Asher Lipman: Carving A Unique Niche As A Renovation Coach

No Pablum With Judy Licht’s Podcast

By Bridget LeRoy bridget@indyeastend.com

What does it take for a veteran news hound — one of the first and most feted females in broadcast journalism, who could easily sit on her laurels — to get back in the game with a podcast? Well, for the beautiful Judy Licht (far be it from me to break tradition here), it was the dialing-back from real news, the problem distinguishing the real from the unreal, or sometimes surreal — listen to the show about deep fakes — that got Licht thinking. The result is “The News Broads,” featuring Licht and two other journalist powerhouses, Lynne White and Gina Cirrito. Some titles of past shows, which started last year, include “The Revenge Project,” about Roger Ailes and how Fox News was created, and “Is Journalism Dead As We Know It? Or Does It Just Have A Bad Cold?” featuring news analyst Jeff Greenfield. There’s even “Patient Zero Of Journalism,” about Licht herself, who admits that she was the first person to put Donald Trump on the air. “It was back in 1978, for a news interview,” reads the podcast’s website. “What she learned about the future President provides us with quite an earful. Her husband claims if there ever was a Nuremberg Trial for Journalism, Judy would be the first accused!” Licht’s husband, advertising guru Jerry Della Femina, former owner and columnist at The Independent, makes no secret of hating the name “The News Broads.” “I hate it,” he said. But, Licht parried, “It has an oldtime, newsroom feeling. This represents us. We deal with the hard facts and subjects, but we have fun doing it.” Licht has appeared on many shows and stations, including co-an-

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No Pablum With Judy Licht’s Podcast

Mendoza’s 20 Pts Propel Hurricanes Past John Glenn

Judy Licht. Independent/Gideon Lewin

there were ‘alternative facts.’ Now, with deep fakes, seeing is no longer believing. So how do you educate people who no longer know what’s the truth and what isn’t. We are really tribal, and it’s becoming your tribe against mine. It’s almost like just before the Civil War.” However, there is a bright side to all of this. “I think as we age, we have more perspective,” Licht mused. “Lynne and I don’t go at it with the same intensity, because we have more perspective than we did when we were younger. We should celebrate what we have in common,” something, Licht said, that local journalism does in spades. “The local papers, the local stations, they have their share of bad news, but there’s also that sense of celebrating what we have in common; common goals like improving the school system,

or how your utilities are delivered to you, no matter what your political beliefs are. When you tune that out, or it’s not available to you, all you watch is national news, and that covers the divisiveness. It creates apathy and a sense of tribalism.” But, she pointed out, it’s not just politics. “We want to be entertaining, and we have fun with it,” she said. Recent podcasts include an interview with Alec Baldwin, called, appropriately, “The Broads Meet Baldwin.” The podcasts are available where podcasts can be found, or on the www.thenewsbroads.com website. “There’s more news than ever out there, but there’s less knowledge,” she said. “Hopefully, we can help people understand what they’re hearing, and be able to make more informed decisions on what is real and what is not.”

VOL 27 NO 18 JANUARY 15 2020

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The Independent

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January 15, 2020

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The Independent

Letters The Independent accepts exclusive letters of 500 words or less, submitted digitally by Friday at 4 PM. The Independent reserves the right to not publish letters deemed slanderous, libelous, or otherwise questionable. Letters can be sent to news@indyeastend.com.

Offensive Firepower Dear Editor, In a New Hampshire Union Leader 2017 op-ed Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews described why the Donald Trump administration should continue the Iranian nuclear agreement. She delved into the value of the agreement and how the U.S. and the world were relatively safe from a nuclear attack by Iran for 15 years if the agreement remained in force. This was terrible thinking. Dr. Mathews and other proponents of the agreement believed the international surveillance program designed to monitor Iran’s compliance with the agreement would ensure Iran could not develop its nuclear arms program. This was a theoretical fantasy. Iran hides its nuclear weapons development activities from inter-

Tully’s View

Publisher & GM James J. Mackin Executive Editor & Associate Publisher Jessica Mackin-Cipro

national surveillance systems, and Iran continues to expand its nuclear arsenal. Thankfully, President Trump exited the agreement. Iran is a primary sponsor of radical Islamic terrorism. It wants to spread its virulent anti-western Islamic fascism throughout the Middle East and Iran, and its proxies are threatening and attacking our military forces in the region. President Trump should continue sanctions against Iran to cripple its strategic weapons programs, and we need more defensw systems and offensive firepower in the Middle East to deter Iran from attacking U.S. forces and partners and interests in the region. Donald Moskowitz

Tortured Lives Dear Editor, Heather Buchanan’s January 8 article titled “The Energy Continued On Page 30.

Executive Editor Rick Murphy

Director of Marketing & Real Estate Coordinator Ty Wenzel

Associate Editor Bridget LeRoy

Graphic Designer Lianne Alcon

Deputy News & Sports Editor Desirée Keegan

Contributing Photographers Nanette Shaw Kaitlin Froschl Richard Lewin Gordon M. Grant Rob Rich Jenna Mackin Lisa Tamburini Irene Tully Ty Wenzel Justin Meinken Tom Kochie

Senior Writer T.E. McMorrow Copy Editor Lisa Cowley Writers/ Columnists / Contributors Denis Hamill Nicole Teitler Zachary Weiss Dominic Annacone Joe Cipro Karen Fredericks Isa Goldberg Vincent Pica Bob Bubka Gianna Volpe Heather Buchanan Vanessa Gordon Joan Baum Jenna Mackin Vay David Georgia Warner Brittany Ineson Ernest Hutton Head Of Sales Daniel Schock Advertising Media Sales Director Joanna Froschl Sales Manager BT Sneed Account Managers Tim Smith Sheldon Kawer Annemarie Davin John Wyche Art Director Jessica Mackin-Cipro Advertising Production Manager John Laudando

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January 15, 2020

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News & Opinion Shinnecock Protest Building On Ancient Burial Grounds Indian Nation shocked Southampton Town did not notify tribe of construction By Desirée Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com The Shinnecock Indian Nation is waging ongoing protest to protect its ancient and sacred burial grounds on Shinnecock Hills. “If you went to a Colonial gravesite, you can’t dig something up without there being consequences. So why are there no consequences when someone does that to our gravesites? Or build on it?” Shinnecock Indian Nation Council of Trustees Vice Chairman Lance Gumbs said. “It’s a joke.” Since December, tribal members

have staged rallies at a worksite on Montauk Highway calling on the town to issue a cease-and-desist order for construction said to be taking place at a property adjacent to the Nation’s Sugar Loaf Hill burial grounds. Another demonstration took place January 14. Tribal leaders said they were shocked to find out about the construction via a drive-by. Although under different circumstances, the Shinnecock Indian Nation entered a verbal agreement with Southampton Town following

Ongoing Battle Over Heritage, Economic Development By Desirée Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com Shinnecock Indian Nation tribal members say what they see as Southampton Town’s slow bureaucracy to help them protect sacred burial grounds is the latest move in an ongoing battle between the two parties dating back nearly three decades, when the municipality fought the reservation’s no tax on cigarettes in 1984. “There’s a pretty clear pattern to us,” Shinnecock Indian Nation Council of Trustees Vice Chairman Lance Gumbs said. “We’ve always had a contentious relationship with the town because we’ve basically been ignored. And any time we’ve tried to spur some economic development, from the cigarette tax to gaming to the monuments . . . any time we try to do something economically viable for the

tribe the town is suing us.” He said there’s a possibility these projects are part of why the town seems to be stalling on passing legislation to better protect what has been a known burial site in Shinnecock Hills. “People have this misconception that we’ve only been on this little piece of land here, but we have a map that shows the different areas where our people lived — from Shinnecock Hills to the canal that used to be call Canoe Place and beyond,” Gumbs said. “And when our people died they were buried right in that area, on the highest point of land. We were there until 1859.” He said the tribe holds the land in the same vein the Great Sioux Nation

Shinnecock Indian Nation members protest construction at a Montauk Highway property in Shinnecock Hills which tribal members say houses ancient burial sites. Independent/Courtesy Shinnecock Indian Nation

construction on nearby Hawthorne Road in 2018 after remains were found during excavation, to ensure the tribe’s sacred land would be protected. “We had this verbal agreement. We had this understanding that the nation would be notified if any digging were to transpire. And poof,” Gumbs said. “This is the Catch-22 we’re running into. It’s been frustrating. There was supposed to

be discussion. There’s a clear sense the town feels it just doesn’t have to do it.” The property is in a state Department of Environmental Conservation-designated Critical Environmental Area, but the town authorized a subdivision of the lot last year and in November issued a building permit for a two-story home. Tracker Continued On Page 31.

holds its Black Hills, and for the past 30 years he’s seen a big push to develop Shinnecock Hills. “We’re doing things on our land to benefit the nation and to benefit our people,” Gumbs said. “Any time we try to do anything who is the arch nemesis? The town. If you stood in our shoes and looked at it, how can you see it any other way? You can’t whitewash this.” Tribal members elect officials just like the town does — providing services, housing, programs for seniors, health care, and a dental program, and Gumbs wishes the town could respect the tribe fighting for a better way of life and protection of its heritage. The Shinnecock Indian Nation unveiled a 61-foot-tall billboard sign, known to tribal members as a monument, that has generated millions of dollars in ad revenue. Gumbs said members, young and old, were crying during the sign’s first lighting. “It’s a testament. We have survived here in the Hamptons, and literally that’s what it’s been, in this ‘Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,’” he said of the project. “We have a fiscal responsibility to the tribe, and it was moving to see something

we’ve accomplished as a community, as a people. It was the most beautiful thing I’d witnessed in my life.” The nation is looking to build two gas stations, and potentially partner to build a gaming center. The tribe broke ground on an agreement with Conor Green Consulting to build and operate a 3600-square-foot medical marijuana dispensary in November of last year, and earlier this month reached a deal with PSEG Long Island and LIPA that resulted in the tribe receiving payment to let the utility company run a cable under tribal land along Sunrise Highway. At the Shinnecock’s request, PSEG also hooked up electric service for its second billboardmonument. “People come out to the Hamptons and drive right by us. They don’t even know an Indian community is here. Well, they know now,” Gumbs said. “We put a marker out here so we’re no longer the forgotten people. We’ve been here, always have been good neighbors to the people around us, and we have to do what is in the best interest of our people to maintain our identity, our culture, our traditions, our heritage. That takes money in this day and age.”


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LaValle’s Retirement May Spur Upheaval Locals pols privately eye new positions By Rick Murphy rmurphy@indyeastend.com

The dean of Suffolk politics is stepping down and that means a hearty game of musical chairs on the political front. Ken LaValle, the District One State Senator, served for 44 years and accumulated formidable power in the process, securing valuable perks for his East End constituents. Even before LaValle’s official announcement on January 10, Tommy John Schiavoni, a councilman for Southampton town and a Democrat, said he would run for the seat. LaValle is a Republican. Bridget Fleming, the veteran county legislator who made a spirited run against LaValle a few years back, will stick with her original plan; to challenge U.S. Congressman Lee Zeldin for the First Congressional seat. Fleming is a Democrat. Zeldin is a Republican and a staunch Donald Trump supporter. “I am absolutely committed to this congressional race,” Fleming said. Zeldin recently joined a coalition of congressmen — mostly Republican — asking the Supreme Court to “reconsider” Roe v. Wade. “Roe is a landmark of American juris prudence,” said Fleming. Perry Gershon, who lost the congressional race to Zeldin two years ago, has announced his intention to run again and presents a potential roadblock for Fleming. Fleming said she would support Schiavoni in his bid to win LaValle’s seat. Should Fleming and/or Schiavoni prevail, there will be an open seat on the horseshoe and another on the Southampton Town Board. Former Southampton Town Supervisor Linda Kabot, who ran a vigorous race again Fleming last year, would be a logical choice for either seat. Kabot did not return an email asking for comment but said only a month ago she had every intention of running again. On Friday, January 10, in his home town of Port Jefferson, with colleagues, family and friends in attendance, the senator, 80, said it “feels like time to pass the torch.” LaValle will serve out the remainder of his term, leaving office in December 2020. A former fifth-grade teacher and principal in the Middle Country school

Ken LaValle. Independent/Courtesy New York Senate

district, LaValle first was elected to the Senate in 1976. He was a co-sponsor with then-Democratic Assemblyman Thomas DiNapoli of the Pine Barrens Preservation Act, which created new protections for 100,000 acres in Suffolk County. DiNapoli and Assemblyman Steve Englebright from nearby Setauket were in attendance, as well as longtime colleague and friend Fred Thiele. Thiele, a state assemblyman, again doused speculation he might move across the aisle. “I’m very happy here,” the Sag Harbor native responded when quizzed. “I’m not going anywhere.” The smart money pegged Tony Palumbo of New Suffolk, a Republican assemblyman, as the favorite to win LaValle’s seat. His entire district, mostly in Brookhaven, is in LaValle’s senate district. Other contenders bandied about include Dan Panico, councilman in Brookhaven town and Jodi Giglio, a veteran town board member in Riverhead with powerful ties in the GOP local party. Among the Democrats — Laura Ahearn, executive director at Parents For Megan’s Law and Schiavoni have already announced their interest in the race. Ahearn is an attorney and a victim’s right specialist and Councilman Schiavoni, from Sag Harbor, has also served on the Sag Harbor school board and North Haven Village Board. Valerie Cartwright, a councilwoman in Brookhaven and Margot Garant, who is the mayor of Port Jefferson, were also mentioned by party leaders.


News & Opinion

January 15, 2020

Southampton Town Trustees Ed Warner Jr., Eric Schultz, Scott Horowitz, Bill Pell, and Ann Welker were sworn in January 7. Independent/Courtesy Southampton Town

Schultz Sworn In, Named President Ann Welker now Trustees secretary By Desirée Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com Eric Schultz was sworn in as a Southampton Town Trustee the day after being named president of the board. At the group’s organizational meeting January 6, now former president Ed Warner Jr. stepped down after three years, and nominated Bill Pell for president due to his longevity on the board. “I want to thank everybody for supporting me,” Warner said. “I have a lot on my plate in the coming year.” Scott Horowitz seconded Warner’s motion, Ann Welker abstained, Pell said no, and Schultz, after looking to Pell, who shook his head, voted the motion down. “I’d like to thank them for thinking of me as president, but I think there’s someone that could do a better job than I

18th Annual MLK Breakfast

The Rogers Memorial Library in Southampton is hosting its 18th annual Rev. Martin Luther King breakfast on Monday, January 20, from 10 AM to 1 PM. The event celebrates the life and legacy of the late Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. There will be fellowship, food, musical offerings, and a talk by professor James Banks, who drew particular inspiration from Dr. King’s phrase: “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” Space is limited and registration is required. Contact 631-283-0774, ext. 523, or visit www.myrml.org.

could,” Pell said. He nominated Schultz. Warner abstained, while the rest of the board casted “yes” votes. “I am looking forward to re-establishing relationships with other officials not only in this town but with other state and local leaders,” Schultz said. “The most important task is working closely with the town board so that we can both achieve the best environmental protection that the people of Southampton deserve. I’m excited for what the next two years can bring if we solidly work as a team.” Schultz is a former trustee president who at the age of 17 became a member of the Southampton Town Conservation Board, on which he served for 20 years. He spent an additional 13 years on the planning board before being elected, then as a Republican, to the trustee board in 1994. Schultz has since switched parties, and stepped away from the board in 2017 after 22 years. The board now consists of two Republican party members, two Independents, and a Democrat. As a trustee, Schultz helped get treated lumber banned in town waters, opposed a tax on saltwater fishing, and helped convince the state to recognize the trustees as a municipal corporation so they could buy land from the county to preserve and create additional access for the public. Warner nominated Welker to secretary, a position held by Horowitz for the past three years, which the now-former secretary seconded. Schultz also approved the motion, while Pell voted it down. After a few moments, Welker let out a quiet “yes.”

Discover Your Passion at Ross School ADMISSIONS PREVIEW NIGHT AND SENIOR PROJECT EXHIBITION THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2020 4:30PM Join us for an information session followed by our annual Senior Project Exhibition Night. RSVP online today!

ross.org/previewnight 631-907-5400 The Senior Project is the culmination of the Ross School experience and draws on students’ passions which they explore in an interdisciplinary fashion. This year’s Senior Projects include an in-house 3-D printed and EMG-controlled prosthetic hand, a graphic novel based on astrophysics, an original fashion line with ethical underpinnings, and many more! Senior Projects depicted above are from past years.

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8

The Independent

Rick Martel Takes His Seat First-time councilman sworn in during Southampton Town ceremony By Desirée Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com

Rick Martel was sworn in as a Southampton Town councilman January 7. The Hampton Bays resident is the owner of the hamlet’s Skidmore’s Sports & Styles, and has been a longtime president of the Hampton Bays Boys Little League, youth basketball program, and the Hampton Bays Booster Club. He is a member of the Kiwanis Club and president of the San Gennaro Fest, which donates thousands of dollars to local charities each year including Maureen’s Haven and the Coalition of Women’s Cancers at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital. “All the community service that I have done for more than 40 years makes

entering politics a natural transition,” Martel said. “I think this town is going in the right direction and I want to be a part of that. I am looking forward to working with everyone on the board. Each member has a good vision and I think we are going to make a great team.” Martel replaces Christine Preston Scalera, who was termed out. He will serve as the only Republican on the board. Councilman John Bouvier was sworn in for a second term. “I’m looking forward to continuing to serve the residents of Southampton and working with my fellow board members,” he said. “I’m excited about the prospect for the future.”

Fine Moves Up, Land Purchase Complete

Adam Fine, principal of East Hampton High School, will move up to be East Hampton Union Free School District superintendent when Richard Burns retires at the end of 2021. Robert Tymann, the assistant superintendent, will also be retiring. “I’m excited about it,” Fine said. “There are some superintendent searches going on closer to where I live, but I love East Hampton, and this is my community.” Fine is a resident of the Moriches area. In other school news, the district closed on a property it purchased from East Hampton Town on Springs Fireplace Road for its new transportation depot. A full story will appear in next week's paper. BL

Adam Fine. Independent/Bridget LeRoy

Theresa Kiernan was sworn in for her fourth term as receiver of taxes and Gary Weber for his second term as town justice. Supervisor Jay Schneiderman was sworn in for a third term at the helm. The supervisor outlined his goals, including improving water quality, reduc-

ing property taxes, and addressing the chronic erosion at the east end of Dune Road in Hampton Bays. “I am honored to be supervisor for a third term,” Schneiderman said. “I look forward to working together over the next two years with my colleagues on the town board.”

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News & Opinion

January 15, 2020

9

Peter Van Scoyoc is sworn in for his second two-year term as supervisor January 7 calling for unity in the Town of East Hampton and Betsy Petroski was awarded a new five-year term and chairperson position on the architectural review board. She is seen here being sworn in by town clerk Carole Brennan January 7. Independent/T. E. McMorrow

Shakeup To Town’s Architectural Board East Hampton supervisor calls for unity, says town is in tip-top shape By T. E. McMorrow t.e@indyeastend.com

East Hampton Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc called for unity during his State of the Town speech, while, at the same time, switching appointed leadership on the architectural review board. During the January 7 organizational meeting, former board member Betsy Petroski was named chairperson of the architectural review board following the December resignation of Richard Myers, who still had a year left to serve of his five-year term. Petroski, whose position on the

board was set to expire at the end of 2021, had resigned last summer. The town board named her to a new fiveyear term, to fill vice chairman Peter Gumpel’s slot, whose term expired at the end of December. Gumpel was then named to fill Petroski’s old seat, meaning his time on the board will now be up in two years, but remains vice chair. Chip Rae was chosen to fill the final year of Myers’ term. The shakeup may, in part, be the fallout of a tempestuous architectural review board meeting last July.

At that time the board was debating an application from homeowner Stephen Preuss, who wanted permission to install a six-foot gate at the front of his driveway on Bonac Wood Lane. The height was taller than the town code allows. “He is entitled to a four-foot gate,” Petroski had said. Michael Sendlenski, a former town attorney who resigned last April to pursue opportunities in the private sector and was representing Preuss, disagreed. He said his client was entitled to make an application to the board for a gate up to six feet high. Myers, at the time, asked Petroski: “Do you have a problem to decide, or is it just the height of it?” “I don’t think it is appropriate for the area,” Petroski responded. She said she felt “bullied” into accepting something she opposed. The other two women on the five-person board, Esperanza Leon and Dianne Benson, agreed with Petroski, and voted down the proposal, 3-2. “I would also like to ask for a timeout too, please,” Myers said, asking the streaming signal be cut. It was not, and a few contentious minutes still

ensued. Petroski resigned from the board soon thereafter. Between the town board, the zoning board of appeals, the planning board, and the architectural review board, only the latter has a female majority, and only the architectural review board is now headed by a woman. John Whelan, chairman of the zoning board of appeals, whose term had just expired, was given a new five-year term, and remains chair. Chairpersons of each board are named every year. Ian Calder-Piedmonte returns to the planning board for a new seven-year term, and Samuel Kramer was again named chairman of the planning board. “The state of the town is very good,” said Van Scoyoc, who was re-elected in November to his second two-year term as supervisor. “East Hampton has led the way with visionary and innovative approaches to land use, energy sustainability, resiliency, affordable housing, and historic preservation. In order to be successful in the new year and new decade, we must work together on the many initiatives planned to improve the condition of our town and the world around us.”

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10

The Independent

New EH Town Historian Named To Unpaid Position East Hampton is the only East End town not paying for state-required job By T. E. McMorrow t.e@indyeastend.com The East Hampton Town Board, at its annual organizational meeting on January 7, replaced Averill Geus, now the former official town historian, with Hugh King, already the official town crier. The move was not unexpected for the non-paying position, after a heated exchange among Geus, Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc, and town board member David Lys last August over the

restoration of a cemetery in Northwest Woods. In 1919, the New York State legislature passed a law that requires a historian “for each city, town, or village” in the state. The responsibilities are several. A town historian, the law states, shall “promote the establishment and improvement of programs for the management and preservation of local government records with enduring

Town Crier Hugh King Happy In New Role Encourages younger generations to join in preserving history By T. E. McMorrow t.e@indyeastend.com Encouraging younger people to participate in the preservation of historic East Hampton is an important part of his new job as the official town historian, Hugh King said last week. The Amagansett native who lives with his wife, Loretta Orion, in the hamlet, wrote a history column for The Independent for many years, and is already

the official town crier. As town crier, he sometimes starts off the public portion of an East Hampton Town Board meeting by offering a short, humorous historic anecdote. He now assumes a role that is required in every municipality in New York by state law. The East Hampton town historian, unlike other towns on the East End, works for free.

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value for historical or other research; encourage the coordinated collection and preservation of nongovernmental historical records by libraries, historical societies, and other repositories; and carry out and actively encourage research in such records in order to add to the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the community’s history.” The law also calls on the historian “to collect and preserve material relating to the history of the political subdivision for which he or she is appointed, and to file such material in fireproof safes or vaults in the county, city, town, or village offices.” The town is required to provide the said “fireproof safes or vaults.” Geus and board members got into their August kerfuffle over the restoration of the cemetery on Old Northwest Road that was used by the Terry and Van Scoy families, with 19 surviving memorial stones dating from between 1792 and 1884, including a monument to a Revolutionary War

veteran and a rare family obelisk cast in zinc. Lys was spearheading the movement for the restoration. Geus, who is a descendant of the Dayton family, early settlers of East Hampton, said during the public comments portion of the town board Continued On Page 31.

King paid homage to his predecessors when he spoke with The Independent last week. “There was Morton Pennypacker in the 1930s, then there was a man named Kenneth Hedges, then there was the late, great Carleton Kelsey. Then there was Stuart Vorpahl and Sherrill Foster and then there was Averill Geus. It wasn’t their jobs. It was an extra. You are not going to make a living.” King can trace his local roots back many generations, though it is not something he boasts about. He said he learned a valuable lesson when his wife was researching a book she wrote about Goody Garlick, a woman accused of witchcraft in East Hampton in 1652. “Everyone says, I am a 13th generation or I am a 14th generation,” King said, which some say gives them expertise. “When Loretta wrote her book, when she was doing the research, she went back and looked at the old families. Some

of them were bums. They were crooks. So, when you are bragging about, ‘I am the 14th generation,’ and you go back and look at some of your ancestors, they weren’t so great. Be careful. I don’t brag about the Kings. Who knows what some of those Kings were like?” Achieving his goal of involving younger people to record and preserve the history of East Hampton might be aided by his experience as a schoolteacher in Springs for 31 years. King is 78, and he noted that Richard Barons, executive director of the East Hampton Historical Society, is in his 70s. “Everyone who knows is getting old. Who is next?” Barons, King, and the historical society conduct tours throughout the year. The two men have spoken about doing some outreach during those tours, to seek out younger likeminded people. “But you have to start reading right now,” he advised.

Hugh King, seen here in his Amagansett home, was named town historian by the East Hampton Town Board January 7. The position is required under New York State law. Independent/T. E. McMorrow

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14

The Independent

Police DA: Rooney Going 85 MPH At Time Of Montauk Crash Newly revealed blood test shows high level of alcohol in system By T. E. McMorrow t.e@indyeastend.com The 2019 Chevrolet Silverado pickup Lisa Rooney was driving when she allegedly struck and killed 28-year-old bicyclist John James Usma-Quintero was moving at 85 miles per hour at the time, according to prosecuting attorney Carl Borelli. The speed of the truck at the time of the October 30 crash on Flamingo

Picked Up On Shelter Island

FR EE

IN SP W EC HO TI LE ON H –C O AL USE LT OD AY

When Katrina Williams decided to escape jurisdiction in Washington State she picked about as far away as she could get. Shelter Island. As it turned out though, that wasn’t far enough The Shelter Island Police Department arrested Williams January 10 on a warrant. Williams, 30, was arraigned in Shelter Island Justice Court and charged with “Escape, escape from community custody/failure to report as a result of a felony conviction.” Police said she was convicted of burglary there and likely sentenced to serve in some kind of program as a result. Instead, she came back east where she had roots. RM

Lisa Rooney, right, leaving the Central Islip courtroom January 13 after being arraigned on 11 charges, including vehicular homicide. Independent/T.E. McMorrow

Road in Montauk that occurred shortly after dark was determined, Borelli said, by examining the truck’s black box. Rooney was arraigned January 13 in the Central Islip courtroom of Justice Fernando Camacho on six felony and five misdemeanor charges, the most serious of which being vehicular homicide, which is based on Rooney’s alleged .18 of one percent or higher blood alcohol percentage. That level is also the basis of

Accident Leaves Man Dead

A Westhampton Beach man is dead after police said his vehicle was rear-ended by a car driven by a drunken man in Shirley early Sunday morning, January 12. Suffolk County Police said they responded to a two-car crash on William Floyd Parkway north near Rose Executive Boulevard. Police say Jordan Randolph, 40, of Bellport was driving his 2014 Cadillac despite the fact he had been drinking excessively. Police said the Cadillac rear-ended a 2015 Ford, driven by Jonathan Armand Flores-Maldonado, 27, of Westhampton Beach. RM

the first-degree manslaughter charge. The aggravated misdemeanor driving while intoxicated charge she faces is based on the test results of blood drawn by court order three-and-a-half hours after the accident. It was revealed that blood was also drawn at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital, almost five hours after the accident, which reportedly showed Rooney still intoxicated According to Borelli, the northbound Rooney lost control of the truck, veering into the southbound lane, then, overcompensating, swung the pickup across the road and onto the northbound shoulder, striking and killing UsmaQuintero before veering onto the grass further east and striking a guardrail. Borelli said that Rooney appeared drunk to first responders and police. In addition, besides the high alcohol level detected by the blood test, it also revealed the presence of cocaine, Borelli said, adding that police found “several bags” of cocaine in the grass outside the truck, as well as one in the truck's cab, leading to a misdemeanor possession charge. The homicide charge, which carries a potential sentence of up to 25 years in state prison, is not on the list of crimes a judge can set bail on in New York under the new bail reform laws. A lesser felony charge, assault with a weapon — the

truck — does carry the possibility of bail, Borelli said, but asked instead that Rooney be required to wear a remote alcohol-monitoring bracelet, surrender her passport, and be placed in a drug treatment program. Marc Gann, Rooney’s attorney, countered that Rooney is in treatment. “She has been since shortly after the accident,” he said, adding that she is now living in the New York City as part of an in-house program, and is always accompanied by her counselor, who was one of Rooney’s two dozen or so supporters in the courtroom. Justice Camacho agreed to delay requiring the bracelet until after Rooney is discharged from the drug treatment program, and accepted Rooney’s passport from Gann. Rooney is due back in court March 2. Rooney’s supporters were seated on one side of the court room, while UsmaQuintero’s aunt and cousin sat on the other. “She destroyed our whole family,” his cousin Jennifer Cano said after. She and Usma-Quintero’s aunt, Mercedes Geraldo, were the first family members to arrive at the hospital to identify his body. Cano said his ashes were returned to his native Colombia. “We want justice,” Cano said.

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Police

January 15, 2020

Sheriff Toulon Calls For New Bail Law Reform

assault upon a person less than 11 years old, and criminally negligent homicide are just three he cited. Toulon sees the county jail as sometimes being the one place where drug addicts can get treated. Now in his third year as sheriff, he pointed to several initiatives undertaken by his department that offer hope to the hopeless. One such program is called Choose to Thrive. It focuses on women who have committed crimes while being victims of sex trafficking. The women are taught life skills like parenting, and they can, in turn, be helpful in identifying true sex traffickers. Another program is called Choose Your Path, which targets young men between 18 and 25, helping them find a new direction in life. Toulon also points to specific recent cases, where defendants were arrested and released multiple times. Often, these are cases in which the defendant is mentally ill. “Think about all the people who come before a judge, who can redirect

the case to drug court, or veterans court, or youth court,” he said. Toulon pointed to several cases in a recent press release. “Lonnie Pernell, 23, of Centerport was in and out of the Yaphank Correctional Facility five times during November and December for criminal contempt in the first degree. Each Continued On Page 31.

and taken to police headquarters where a breath test allegedly showed a blood alcohol content over twice the legal limit. He was held overnight and arraigned in front of East Hampton Town Justice Steven Tekulsky the next morning. Matthew D’Amato was assigned by Legal Aid to East Hampton to represent Santizo-Escalante. One of the many changes in the law that took effect January 1 was the way a defendant is to be notified of court appearances. Previously, an arraigning judge, besides considering how much to set bail at, a process now non-existent for all but a few crimes, would also ask for contact information before setting the defendant’s next court date, which was written on a pink reminder slip. All reminders of court appearances were mailed to the defendant. Now, the court must contact a defendant in advance of the next court date in a manner

dictated by the defendant, who is given a choice of receiving a text message, getting an email, getting a phone call, or receiving the notice by first class mail. Local courts across the state have had to purchase a dedicated cell phone for those who want to be texted. During Santizo-Escalante’s arraignment Friday, D’Amato informed Tekulsky that his client was declining to provide contact information. He pointed to wording in the law regarding contact information that says that a defendant “may” provide it for the purposes of receiving a court notification. D’Amato said the onus is on the police to obtain that information. Tekulsky asked the police officer guarding Santizo-Escalante to give the contact information form to the defendant, who still declined to provide the data. Santizo-Escalante is due back in court next month.

He said judges need to be able to look at defendant’s criminal history By T. E. McMorrow t.e@indyeastend.com Suffolk County Sheriff Errol Toulon is calling on legislators to return the discretion to set bail on certain crimes to the arraigning judges. He pointed to the inconsistencies in the new criminal procedure laws which went into effect January 1. “It should be a judge’s discretion to set bail,” Toulon said, for several crimes currently not covered by the new law. For example, an assault as a misdemeanor charge is not eligible to have bail set, with police now releasing defendants

with a desk appearance ticket, except in cases where an order of protection is requested by the victim. Toulon believes that a judge, when considering such a charge, should be able to look at the defendant’s history. Does the defendant have a record? Is the person a recidivist? The sheriff listed some of the more egregious crimes over which he believes a judge should have some bail discretion: promoting an obscene sexual performance by a child, aggravated

Odd Arraignment In East Hampton Loophole in criminal procedure law may leave courts in the dark By T. E. McMorrow t.e@indyeastend.com The Legal Aid Society of Suffolk County, as part of its adjustment to the overhaul of New York’s criminal procedure laws, is now advising clients that they may decline to give contact information to the court during arraignment. The new approach came during the January 10 arraignment of the only defendant charged with drunken driving in the Town of East Hampton this past week.

Bauer Santizo-Escalante, of Springs, was arrested around midnight January 9 after being pulled over for swerving across lane lines in a 1998 Honda on Springs Fireplace Road north of North Main Street. He allegedly told the arresting officer he had consumed seven beers “about an hour ago.” Failing sobriety tests, he was arrested, charged with driving while intoxicated,

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Suffolk County Sheriff Errol Toulon is calling for some of the recently enacted bail reform laws to be adjusted. Independent/Courtesy SC Sheriff's Office

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16

The Independent

Editorial

JUST ASKING

By Karen Fredericks

What are your resolutions for 2020? Katherine McMahon For me, it’s all about fitness and health. I’ve been to the gym almost every day and I’m joining a fitness challenge that includes a group of other people.

The Whole Truth George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four” remains the book we turn to when truth is mutilated until it disappears. The Town of East Hampton recently issued a proclamation hailing LTV, its public access TV channel, for 35 years of service “of growth and success.” Really? The town proclamation cut about 10 years out of the story like it never happened. What was missing was a scandal chronicled only in The Independent. We revealed a decade-long pattern of spending abuse at LTV involving more than $10 million of taxpayers’ money under Jim Shelly, president and treasurer, and executive director Seth Redlus. LTV purchased, at a significant cost, furniture from its executive director’s parents’ company and a professional fully stocked kitchen from Williams-Sonoma, Redlus’s high-end employer. State-of-the-art electronic equipment replaced functioning pieces that were never accounted for. Staff members came and went as they pleased, often “borrowing” expensive equipment to take with them. Redlus had his own business. A lot of money spent by LTV went to the staff, family members of the executive director, and a friend of the general manager. Shelly responded by taking potshots at this newspaper and its editor in the other papers, with ugly name-calling and smug denials. And then things finally began to come unhinged. A rudimentary audit by the town — instituted by persistent requests from this newspaper — revealed a need for inventory control. The bookkeeper came forward and met the Suffolk DA. Then Shelly and board president Robert Strada clashed; we revealed how LTV execs routinely spent money at restaurants and used the company credit card. As we exclusively reported, $12,000 was given to an electrical contractor who wasn’t licensed to do electrical work. Peter Van Scoyoc, the East Hampton Town Supervisor now and a town board member then, was the LTV liaison, with his son there as an “unpaid intern,” he said. The Independent produced a paycheck he received. That was enough for the town to order an audit and for the Suffolk District Attorney to step in. Redlus left the state. Shelly fired Strada and was forced out. Diana Weir was brought in to be the emergency “fixer.” The entire make-up of the LTV board changed. Only a face or two remain. Hopefully the station is on a new and improved pathway. But this “proclamation,” this piece of paper, is being issued to erase the thousands of dollars unaccounted for and to enable the town to forget its culpability in the matter.

Honey, is your scale misbehaving again?

Summer Jones My resolution? To swim fast. I swim with the Hurricanes. I'm planning to train as hard as I can and I’m hoping to make the Olympics in 2024.

Caroline DiSunno My resolution this year is to train hard for softball and to be the best pitcher I can be. I want to be on the school team, the East Hampton Bonackers.

Casey Stumpf I want to keep getting good grades in school. And I also want to keep getting better at field hockey and at sports overall.

Is it just me? © Karen Fredericks

You rotten lying piece of garbage!

Karen was chosen Best Cartoonist by the New York Press Association in 2017 and again in 2019. She’s the recipient of multiple awards for her illustration of the international bestseller How To Build Your Own Country, including the prestigious Silver Birch Award. Her work is part of the permanent artist’s book collection of the Museum of Modern Art.


January 15, 2020

B1

Arts & Entertainment No Pablum With Judy Licht’s Podcast ‘The News Broads’ take on national news with humor By Bridget LeRoy bridget@indyeastend.com

What does it take for a veteran news hound — one of the first and most feted females in broadcast journalism, who could easily sit on her laurels — to get back in the game with a podcast? Well, for the beautiful Judy Licht (far be it from me to break tradition here), it was the dialing-back from real news, the problem distinguishing the real from the unreal, or sometimes surreal — listen to the show about deep fakes — that got Licht thinking. The result is “The News Broads,” featuring Licht and two other journalist powerhouses, Lynne White and Gina Cirrito. Some titles of past shows, which started last year, include “The Revenge Project,” about Roger Ailes and how Fox News was created, and “Is Journalism Dead As We Know It? Or Does It Just Have A Bad Cold?” featuring news analyst Jeff Greenfield. There’s even “Patient Zero Of Journalism,” about Licht herself, who admits that she was the first person to put Donald Trump on the air. “It was back in 1978, for a news interview,” reads the podcast’s website. “What she learned about the future President provides us with quite an earful. Her husband claims if there ever was a Nuremberg Trial for Journalism, Judy would be the first accused!” Licht’s husband, advertising guru Jerry Della Femina, former owner and columnist at The Independent, makes no secret of hating the name “The News Broads.” “I hate it,” he said. But, Licht parried, “It has an oldtime, newsroom feeling. This represents us. We deal with the hard facts and subjects, but we have fun doing it.” Licht has appeared on many shows and stations, including co-an-

choring “Good Morning, New York” on WABC Channel 7 in the city, and was a familiar face on WNYW, Channel 5 . . . before it became Fox TV. “One of the producers put Lynne White and I on in a thing called ‘The Power Panel.’ The idea was to take one of the leading news stories of the day — national, local, whatever — and have us debate on it, because she’s extremely liberal, and I’m socially liberal, but the idea was to have me as the more conservative voice.” Both Licht and White were products of “the old days” of Channel 5 news journalism, and they clicked. “It was a lot of fun,” Licht recalled. The segment eventually made it to the six o’clock news with Chuck Scarborough, but after a few years, with a changeover in management, the segment was viewed as too divisive. “People really thought Lynne and I hated each other,” Licht said with a laugh, “because we would really go at each other. We didn’t pull any punches. But it was too controversial for them. They wanted pablum. And I didn’t want to be toned down.” “The News Broads” is anything but bland. “What we saw about journalism and media in general was really distressing to us,” said Licht. “And it was distressing in a profound way, which we thought we had a particular insight into,” she said. “We’re not the most famous names in journalism, but we know who they are, and they are coming to us.” “What scares me in this age of post-truth,” she said, “is we’ve gone from Walter Cronkite being the voice of the nation, and you believed what he said, no matter what your politics were, to Kelly Anne Conway saying

Judy Licht. Independent/Gideon Lewin

there were ‘alternative facts.’ Now, with deep fakes, seeing is no longer believing. So how do you educate people who no longer know what’s the truth and what isn’t. We are really tribal, and it’s becoming your tribe against mine. It’s almost like just before the Civil War.” However, there is a bright side to all of this. “I think as we age, we have more perspective,” Licht mused. “Lynne and I don’t go at it with the same intensity, because we have more perspective than we did when we were younger. We should celebrate what we have in common,” something, Licht said, that local journalism does in spades. “The local papers, the local stations, they have their share of bad news, but there’s also that sense of celebrating what we have in common; common goals like improving the school system,

or how your utilities are delivered to you, no matter what your political beliefs are. When you tune that out, or it’s not available to you, all you watch is national news, and that covers the divisiveness. It creates apathy and a sense of tribalism.” But, she pointed out, it’s not just politics. “We want to be entertaining, and we have fun with it,” she said. Recent podcasts include an interview with Alec Baldwin, called, appropriately, “The Broads Meet Baldwin.” The podcasts are available where podcasts can be found, or on the www.thenewsbroads.com website. “There’s more news than ever out there, but there’s less knowledge,” she said. “Hopefully, we can help people understand what they’re hearing, and be able to make more informed decisions on what is real and what is not.”


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The Independent

Distilled Life Carl Scorza’s art portrays bar culture at Sara Nightingale Gallery By Nicole Teitler nicole@indyeastend.com

Bars have always been gathering places, social hubs filled with liquid courage. Walk into any local watering hole to discover all there is to know about a community, from stories told from bar-stool patrons to the labels of liquor bottles on display. This culture has created a symbiotic relationship between the patron and alcohol itself. Now on view through February 12, Sara Nightingale Gallery in Sag Harbor is showcasing works by East Hampton artist Carl Scorza in “Cocktail Hour.” What began as a career painting plein air landscapes has transformed into a new focus, where he depicts bar culture.

How did your work transition from plein air to bar culture? There was no real hook but I spent a lot of time in the scene with friends. I’ve always found it a social environment, an attractive environment that was accommodating. It became part of my life. I’ve always worked from my own personal experience.

How long have you worked on this particular style? It happens in dribs and drabs. The first painting I made of an arrangement of liquor bottles was in 1998 or 1999, when I had my studio in the World

Trade Center. I was part of a group of artists painting plein air. Then my studio era ended and I wanted to do something with a lot of vertical lines. So, I set up all the liquor bottles I had and it looked like all of the buildings. It wasn’t until about three or four years ago that I returned to it. Independent/Carl Scorza

Did the Financial District bars, which can be iconic, influence you at all? It’s hard to say. I spent time in New York, time out east, and I’d meet up with friends in those kind of places. Bars are a reflection of the group of people that patronize them. Some bars will have more selections of beer, others will have more selections of wine, or gin. It’s a reflection of the community, so there’s a contextual nature to the bar. That’s why I include the labels of the bottles; it speaks to the singular nature.

Do these bottles have personalities in your mind? They definitely do. Goslings Dark Rum has a black seal juggling a bar. Every artist is juggling light, composition, geometry, etc. So, it’s like the components of a collage. It’s a metaphor in the bottle, the label. Absolut Vodka has the name; it has something definitive. There’s no relationship

to the content of the bottle but the wording is a declarative statement, part of the abstract vocabulary. The wording in a painting implies that. Another one is Maker’s Mark with the artificial red wax seal that just stands out so demonstratively that it’s a pleasure to insert somewhere in composition. It has that red in it. The bottles are a personification of elements that don’t necessarily relate to that component but they relate with how they behave on the picture plane.

Do you paint from real life, photographs, or memory? All of the above. Drawing is a thinking process and I still do a lot of it. Actually, I’d photograph the drawings and then merge them with photographs from bars. Then, they all get merged together in a collage. Drawing other paintings, cut up sections of photographs, it all becomes this collage of work of 15 to 20 images in my studio. And I’m working

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from my wall and arranging them on a canvas. It’s complicated.

What goes through your mind when you’re at the bar of a restaurant, or a regular bar? Something happens. The language changes. The bottles are a certain way, the drinks, people’s faces. It becomes a glittering moment of a source of inspiration.

What is your drink of choice to paint? I like picking the ingredients of a margarita. There’s two different bottles, there’s a line, a salt shaker, it tells a story. There are a lot of elements. I like painting that one. Then I’ll feel like having one. Sara Nightingale Gallery is located at 26 Main Street in Sag Harbor. Learn more at www.saranightingale.com.

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January 15, 2020

Arts & Entertainment

See The Signs

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Independent/ Courtesy Neil Scholl

Neil Scholl photos set in NYC, North Fork By Nicole Teitler nicole@indyeastend.com

The Suffolk County Historical Society in Riverhead presents a special free artists’ reception on Saturday, January 18, at 1 PM featuring “Urban/Suburban” in the Gish Gallery. The show, which will run through February 29, features street photography by Neil Scholl. It depicts the bustling streets of New York City and rural stills across the North Fork. Scholl is a professor emeritus of New York Institute of Technology, where he taught photography and graphic design. His work has been exhibited along Long Island, including the Montauk Lighthouse Museum and Water Mill Museum. “Though we are primarily a history museum, we do enjoy occasionally incorporating modern artistic themes that evoke nostalgic memories of life in

Suffolk County, and Neil Scholl’s street photography work does just that,” said Suffolk County Historical Society’s executive director, Victoria Berger. “His photography, captured with a skillful eye, was curated to conjure memories of some of our favorite roadside ‘landmarks’ of the North Fork, going as far back as the ’60s, juxtaposed against images of similar sites in more concrete settings. The results make you better appreciate the tranquility of our region, while striking a very nostalgic chord for those who may recognize the local landscapes portrayed in his work,” she said. The Suffolk County Historical Society Museum is located at 300 W. Main Street in Riverhead. Learn more at www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org.

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The Independent

SAND IN MY SHOES By Denis Hamill

No Escaping Reality In The New Year Looking for change denishamill@gmail.com I rang in the New Year in Dublin. There was a rock concert on The Quays and a fireworks show that ignited the winter Irish sky as tens of thousands of the young people that populate this hip European capital cheered in a new decade — even if it wasn’t yet a new decade. I went to the land of my parents to escape the tireless rancor of the USA, to walk the ancient cobbled streets where James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, and Sean O’Casey found inspiration for timeless words, and to visit museums and bullet-pocked historical sites, traditional Irish music pubs, and a few fine restaurants of the new Dublin. Mostly I wanted to put an ocean between my daily commute on the LIRR to Penn Station, where I catch a downtown subway to a cross-town bus. I wanted to put 3000 miles between me and the endless sad parade of homeless in New York, from the East End to the Lower East Side. No longer is it just “spare change” on the subway. On several LIRR commutes, next-level panhandlers have perfected a new spiel saying they have half the fare to get home to Long Island but need the other $5 or $9 on peak trains. I guess when the minimum wage went up, so did the minimum panhandle. Most homeless are not, of course,

scam artists. Most are part of an ever-expanding industry of despair that moils for dimes and quarters in the tunnels and doorways of a forgotten netherworld in the richest city in the world. Sad, pathetic, lost souls, most of whom suffer from mental illness and addiction, many from both. Some are violent and scary. To each other and passing citizens. There are 20,000 children living in homeless shelters in NYC. One in 10 public school kids is homeless. This is a problem that has plagued the last four mayors of New York with no solution in sight. So, I spent Christmas with family and flew out of JFK on December 27 and landed in Dublin on the morning of December 28. The cabbie raced through the empty, overcast morning streets, passing places I remembered from when I went to high school here for six months when my older brother Pete bum-rushed me from the late-1960s Brooklyn drug scene to live with him in a Dublin that was then an innocent drug-free backwater as he wrote his first novel. It’s not innocent anymore. After checking into a hotel overlooking St. Stephen’s Green, I took a hot shower — a rarity in the Dublin of the rare auld times. I ventured out into

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the new Dublin that today boasts great, eclectic food cooked by chefs from all over continental Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. I also noticed a much more diverse town, with service workers and cabbies speaking Polish, Portuguese, Albanian, Italian, Spanish, and various African dialects. Many young people of color spoke with native Dublin accents that are part of the new century. In Bewley’s Oriental Café, I ate a wonderful breakfast of smoked Irish salmon and scrambled eggs with delicious Irish brown bread and Kerry Gold butter and raspberry jam and a flat white coffee. Then I walked to the National Library, where there was an exhilarating tribute to Yeats, featuring artifacts from his life, notebooks and handwritten manuscripts, first volumes of his and photos and love letters written to Maude Gonne, the flame-haired, six-foot-tall unrequited love of his life. Scholars deciphered his work in films playing on loops in ante-rooms, sketching in biographical information about his obsession with spiritualism and his frustrated failure to ever “lift the elusive veil” to the next dimension of life that he was convinced existed. Little did Yeats know that he revealed another dimension of the human heart in his poetry that flashed on large screens as famous thespians read aloud his poems.’ His famous “Easter 1916” was a ballad to Ms. Gonne but also the battle hymn that fueled the Irish rebellion. I don’t drink, but that evening when I sipped a Diet Coke in the outdoor section of Mc David’s pub speaking to a young couple who worked in the financial district about the Irish economy, three different adult panhandlers, two women and a man, approached us asking for money. “Ach, give us a few wee Euros, lug,” one said. I looked around and saw the homeless of Dublin were filling the touristy

night streets as 2019 dwindled like the dark foamy Guinness from pint glasses all around me. I ate tender fried calamari and a bowl of delicious beef stew in The Bailey, the pub where Luke Kelly first sang “Raglan Road.” Tired, I walked back up Grafton Street and saw the lost souls of the night spreading out sleeping bags in doorways and alleys, most young and suffering from addiction and mental illness. Some slept on the steps of a church and others in the doorways of tony boutiques and health food stores. At a corner convenience store, I saw a girl of maybe 15 sitting with a coin cup. With a full belly, stoned on Yeats and the holidays, I gave her a handful of change and asked why she was there. “We were evicted in July when we couldn’t afford the rising rent,” she said. The next few days I would go to the National Gallery, the Irish Literary Museum, the glorious seaside of Hot — the Hamptons of Dublin — and Killmainham Gaol, the grim prison where the patriots of the 1916 Easter Uprising we jailed and executed, triggering the Irish revolution. I learned that it was also the jail where the “mugshot” was invented, where the faces of prisoners were first photographed for identification. But every night I stepped past the faceless homeless of the Dublin night, which made me feel sadly like I had never left New York. Don’t get me wrong: I loved New Year’s Eve in Dublin. But you can’t escape reality in this crazy old world. When I arrived back in New York, one of the first stories I read was about a homeless man who’d been assaulted in Riverhead on January 2, literally kickstarting 2020. A week later he was dead from the assault. On Monday, I boarded a LIRR to Penn Station and passed the homeless on my way to work. I needed a poet to make sense of it. Happy New Year.

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Arts & Entertainment

January 15, 2020

Gallery Events

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Art by Keith Ramsdell at White Room Gallery.

Compiled by Jessica Mackin-Cipro jessica@indyeastend.com

AAEH Members Show The Artists Alliance of East Hampton is hosting its first members show of 2020, “Walls of Dreams II,” over Martin Luther King, Jr weekend at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, from January 18 to 20. An opening reception will be held Saturday, January 18, from 5 to 7 PM. On Sunday, from 11 AM to 1 PM join to share your dreams on the Dream Walls and enjoy treats provided by Bostwick’s Catering and Goldberg’s Bagels.

Winter Blues The White Room Gallery in Bridgehampton presents “Winter Blues.”

The show will open on Saturday, January 18, and run through March 1. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 PM. Artists include Kat O’Neill, Seek One, Lynn Savarese, Keith Ramsdell, Martha McAleer, and Dinesh Boaz.

Halsey McKay Gallery Halsey McKay Gallery in East Hampton presents Colby Bird’s “Unavoidable Blemishes” and Christian Little’s “Well Maintained.” There will be an opening reception on Saturday, January 18, from 2 to 4 PM. The shows run through March 28.

Sweet Charities Compiled by Jessica Mackin-Cipro jessica@indyeastend.com

Benefit For Ruby A benefit for Ruby June Cotter, a local infant from Wading River who recently received a heart transplant, will be held at Moustache Brewery in Riverhead on Tuesday, January 21, from 7 to 9 PM. One hundred percent of the proceeds will go to the Cotter family

to help with Ruby’s medical expenses and the family’s living expenses. The event is hosted by Meg Howard of NoFoMamma.com and Kelly Lyons of NoFo DoCo. The cost is $25 per person or $45 per couple and includes one beer. Wear red to receive one free raffle ticket. For more information,

email nofomamma@gmail.com.

www.ellenhermanson.org.

Tickled Pink

Rock Your Heart Out

The Ellen Hermanson Foundation presents Tickled Pink, a night of comedy featuring Jessica Kirson and special guest Andrina Wekontash Smith on Saturday, February 8, from 6:30 to 10 PM at LTV Media Center in Wainscott. The event will honor Cheryl Babinski, Christopher Robbins, and Charlotte Sasso. The event supports life-saving breast health care. Visit

Rock Your Heart Out, a concert to benefit ELIH Foundation, will be held on Saturday, February 8, from 6 to 8 PM at Heron Suites in Southold. There will be live music by POC, featuring Stony Brook Eastern Long Island Hospital’s own Dr. Lawrence Schiff, Dr. Ryan Zapata, and John Fazio, CRNA. The cover is $50 per person and includes buffet, raffle prizes, and cash bar. Visit www. elih.stonybrookmedicine.edu.

seasonality of our region, it’s a very impactful 72-hour experience,” said Glenn Vickers, board president for the East Hampton Chamber of Commerce.

If you are interested in participating, email the Chamber office at info@ easthamptonchamber.com or call 631324-0362.

New York Times Travel Show The East Hampton Chamber of Commerce, partnering with Hamptons Visitors Council, will represent the Hamptons at the The New York Times Travel Show from January 24 to 26 at the Javits Center in Manhattan. In addition, title sponsor StayMarquis and winter tourism partner Long Island Winterfest will join the festivities all three days of the show. The Travel Show reached a record 35,568 participants last year — the highest attendance to date. The chamber will have an interactive exhibitor booth with large digital video displays and entertainment to feature local businesses. With prime location with state and regional tourism leaders I Love New York and Discover Long Island, the business community is invited

to come and promote their business to attendees looking for visits and vacations to the Hamptons. Inns, eateries, stores, and services catering to tourists are all invited to bring promotional material and meet scores of potential new customers and potential collaborators when they register to attend. Look for over 700 exhibitor booths and over 250 travel industry speakers and experts. Over 175 countries are represented from around the world. It’s the largest travel trade and consumer show in North America. “This unique opportunity to network with national media, consumers, and industry peers makes this show a ‘must attend’ experience for local businesses. Especially given the unique


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The Independent

MARKET PAGE By Zachary Weiss

Retro Snow Gear Styles for the ski lodge

Whether you’re hitting the slopes or spending the day with a Hot Toddy in the lodge, there’s no doubt that retroinspired ski gear will be out in full

force. Here we’ve selected a handful of our favorites, all from heritage brands hailing from both home mountains and those further afield.

Vuarnet Glacier Sunglasses, $690

Golden Metallic Moon Boots via Net-A-Porter, $160

Frame “Apres Ski” Cashmere Sweater, $295

Navy Houndstooth Ski Suit, $900


Travel

January 15, 2020

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City Dock Coffee

— all day, every day. Each morning the entire restaurant stands to recite the Pledge of Allegiance, and they’ve done so since 1989.

HAMPTON DAZE By Jessica Mackin-Cipro

Hampton Daze Goes To Annapolis A quick weekend trip from New York jessica@indyeastend.com @hamptondaze Annapolis, the capital of Maryland, is also known as the sailing capital of the world. But no matter what time of year you go — for the sailing or because it’s known as one of the top Christmas destinations in the U.S. – it makes a great weekend getaway from New York. I spent some time there over the holidays and really got a feel for the small city. When you’re not on the water or strolling City Dock, here are five places to visit while you’re in town.

Reynolds Tavern Reynolds Tavern is a historic landmark. It was opened in 1747 by William Reynolds, where he conducted his hat

business, rented rooms, and operated a tavern. Today it serves as a restaurant, pub, inn, and event venue. You’ll feel like you’ve been transported back in time. The building hosts a pub in the cellar. The first floor houses a delightful tea room. Head to Reynolds for a beer in the pub, an afternoon tea, or dinner at the restaurant.

Hats In The Belfry Speaking of hat making, Hats in the Belfry offers a large selection of hats made in Italy. From baseball to flap caps, fascinators to fedoras, this shop on Main Street is crazy about hats, and has been for almost 40 years.

I found the perfect latte and it was at City Dock Coffee. Stop here before strolling City Dock for an added experience. The service is extra friendly as well.

Chick & Ruth’s Delly Chick & Ruth’s is a famous Annapolis dining spot. This luncheonette offers fabulous sandwiches, handmade pies and breads, old-fashioned milk shakes, and so much more. It also boasts that you can dine without breaking the bank, with any beer or wine only $2.99

Vida Taco Bar Vida Taco Bar offers a fantastic “farm to taco” menu. Try the sweet potato and black bean or the baja fish taco, they will not disappoint. The cocktail menu offers the freshest margaritas and dozens of craft tequilas to choose from. On “Sunday Funday” the house margarita is only $7.

ARTISTS ALLIANCE OF EAST HAMPTON Presents

WALLS OF DREAMS II Martin Luther King, Jr. Weekend

January 18-20, 2020 Ashawagh Hall, Springs, NY

Gallery Hours: Saturday & Sunday 10 am-6 pm Monday 10 am-4 pm Receptions: Saturday January 18, 5 pm-7 pm Sunday January 19, 11 am-1 pm On Sunday January 19, join AAEH to share your dreams on our Dream Walls. Enjoy treats provided by Bostwick’s Catering and Goldberg's Bagels. The Alliance thanks them for their generosity. We will donate 10% of sales to The East Hampton Food Pantry.


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The Independent

RICK’S SPACE By Rick Murphy

Of Meat And Fish Lives are at steak rmurphy@indyeastend.com

My mother used to say in the course of a week she would serve everything we needed to grow up healthy and happy. Being from Italy, she was a proponent of the Mediterranean diet, though she didn’t know it had a name. She knew we were poor, though. Basically, Papa grew most of the stuff we ate, like vegetables and fruit, and we had chickens and thus eggs, and Cilli’s dairy farm right down the

block. Life centered around meals, and they were lavish by any standards. Things have changed. They’ve made it so we feel guilty about eating some things, and others things we enjoy can kill us. This puts Karen in a quandary. She used to be carnivorous, which means a meat eater. She wrote a headline for an ad (for Peter Luger’s Steak

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House, I think) that read: “So big you need an order of protection!” It featured a picture of a huge Porterhouse steak. Something had to give, and the first thing to go was the meat. They wear you down. First, it’s the bacon that kills you. Then, you had to stop eating veal for humanitarian reasons. I didn’t get it at first, until an animal lover explained what happens to them. Then I realized: I have never seen grown-up veal. They kill every one when they are still babies. If any one of us ever wants to live in a world where veal become productive members of our society, now is the time to just say no. Someday, veal will graze in our fields and ride on our buses and be free to live the way other animals we eat live, like cows. What are cows, exactly? Cows are red meat. And why is red meat bad for us? Because our hearts have trouble digesting it. Consider the range in our country’s formidable years. Bison rumbling; wild horses and deer, sleek and beautiful, leaping and prancing. Cheetahs, purring one moment, striking with fury a few moments later. Cougars, picking up handsome young men. And then you have the cows. They stand there, chewing. They are chewing what appears to be themselves. “Yo. Give me a piece of that bubble gum.” “I ain’t got no gum. It’s my cud.” “Curd?” “Cud.” “Give me some.” No, they don’t they just keep standing there, tail flicking, mouth chewing, awaiting their ultimate destiny on the wrong side of a gun. Don’t keep feeling sorry for them. They embrace their fate. I asked this guy what he wanted to be when he grew up and he said, “A Kansas City burnt end.” Say goodnight, Gracie.

We ate fish twice a week. I don’t know what, but we always had it on Friday, when the Catholic church decided it was a sin to eat red meat. Mom would get Mrs. Paul’s fish sticks, meanwhile there would be a bay full of fresh fish right down the block. So I’d get home Friday after a long day of stealing, using god’s name in vain, coveting my neighbor’s wife, and soon my mother would point out we had to eat fish or we’d be committing a sin. I’m thinking, “One more ain’t gonna hurt.” I leave the head on the fish when I eat it just because it annoys Karen. She lines up the ketchup bottle, the napkins, the wine bottle, the pepper mill, and anything else that obscures the view. Still, the thing stares at her. Let’s face it, fish eyes only come in one model. And they don’t blink, folks. Recently a letter writer to the newspaper referred to fish as “sea kittens.” Cute little sea kittens who want to be our friends. “No problem. I’ll bring home a salad.” “Are you nuts?” Karen cried out. “Are you reading what’s going on?” No, I get it, and I said this all along: You try and keep romaine lettuce down for too long, and it’s going to come back at you. It’s gonna go all veal on you. In this case, we call it Montezuma’s revenge, even though he had nothing to do with it. That brings us to chicken, which at this moment is the only socially acceptable food we are allowed to have. You can grill it. You can fry it. You can make salad. You can eat the breast, or the wing, or the leg, or the thigh. People eat the gizzard. PLEASE DON’T DO THAT. Yet we must eat, and eat we must. The trick is to find something politically correct that is good for our body, souls, and minds, easy on our pocketbook, and acceptable to our mates. Maybe the cow is onto something.

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January 15, 2020

Arts & Entertainment

KISS & TELL By Heather Buchanan

Love Spells Are For The Birds The swan king meets his queen kissandtellhb@gmail.com

As my readers will remember, I wrote a few months ago about my concerns for the single swan I had been watching on Otter Pond. This species is known to mate for life, and while a female swan who loses her mate will usually leave to find another, the male tends to stay in his own stomping or swimming ground in hopes that a lady will find him. His slow, solitary, sunset swims were breaking my heart. I had thought about creating my single swan a profile for a fowl dating site. “Has prime waterfront real estate in the Hamptons. Prefers Nestflix over flightclubs. Trumpeter swans swipe

left.” I hoped both our lonely souls were cheered a bit by the triumphant, lighted Christmas tree in the middle of the pond which had been restored to its annual glory. (Thank you to whoever was responsible!) On the winter solstice, I created a special ritual and was planning to read my favorite Mary Oliver poem called “Swans,” which is really about faith. In the poem’s honor, I found a beautiful swan king ornament to put on the altar in the middle of the circle. It just happened that I put him next to the green candle, which I had anointed with rose essential oil to manifest love. The sol-

stice is actually the equinox when the days become longer and light triumphs over dark so it is a good time to work positive energy which I desperately needed, especially in the love arena. Well in the days following I didn’t exactly have men showering me with gifts and attention but on Christmas Eve day, I was walking by the pond and stopped in my tracks. Shut up. There, in the middle of the pond, my single swan had a mate! This was a Christmas miracle, better than any Hallmark movie where the time-travelling prince who had to fulfill his quest to find his true love ran afoul of the curse and ghosted the girl only to appear under her tree Christmas morning with a diamond ring and gluten-free baked goods and a pony. As I stood there, the two swans looked right at me and swam right up to the cattail reeds with a sunburst on the water perfect for the Instagram photo. Of course, I thought. I put the swan next to the love candle and he was the one who received the magic of the spell. I believed they were swimming over to thank me and not because crazy ladies in odd hats calling to the birds are the most likely type to have a little bread to throw their way. I couldn’t wait to spread this good news and the amazing, although not

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exactly intended, consequence of my love spell. When you look at various love spells it is easy to see why you might think they’re for the birds: Carry a whole nutmeg in your armpit for 48 hours, grind it up, and add it to a bottle of red wine and serve it to your heart’s desire. Pick up his shoes as soon as he takes them off and put yours inside of them and leave them like this until morning. And there’s something about fingernails and no underpants in a cemetery but I think I will not go there. All I can say is if, in the end, what I accomplished is to bring two swans together who fly off into the sunset to Boca Raton, I am satisfied.

There, in the middle of the pond, my single swan had a mate!

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B10

The Independent

Entertainment Guide

WORDS BookHampton

Compiled by Nicole Teitler nicole@indyeastend.com

COMEDY All Star Comedy Joseph Vecsey returns with All Star Comedy at Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor on Friday, January 17, at 8 PM. Buy tickets at www.baystreet.org.

FILM Fire In Paradise Hamptons Film presents a screening of “Fire in Paradise” at Tutto il Giorno in Sag Harbor on Wednesday, January 15, at 7 PM. It’s part of a dinner and the “Air, Land, and Sea” movie series. There is also a panel of experts on wildfires for a Q&A afterward. Learn more at www.hamptonsfilmfest.org.

Girls Gaze On Thursday, January 16, at 6 PM, LTV in Wainscott will have a free screening of short films created during East Hampton High School’s pilot program for Girls Gaze, led by the Neo-Political Cowgirls’ founder, Kate Mueth. Following the screening will be a Q&A

with the participants. Learn more at www.npcowgirls.org.

Louise Bourgeois Co-presented with Hamptons Doc Fest, Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will have a screening of “Louise Bourgeois: The Spider, the Mistress, and the Tangerine” on Friday, January 17, at 6 PM. Learn more at www.parrishart. org.

Les Misérables Hamptons Film presents Now Showing: “Les Misérables” at Guild Hall in East Hampton on Saturday, January 18, at 6 PM. Buy tickets at www.guildhall. org.

Inglourious Basterds On Sunday, January 19, at 2 PM Sag Harbor Cinema will screen Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds” at Pierson High School, followed by a conversation with Peter Josyph, a New York actor, author, painter, and filmmaker. Learn more at www.sagharborcinema.org.

On Saturday, January 18, at 4 PM, BookHampton in East Hampton welcomes Amanda Vaill reading from her book “Jerome Robbins, by Himself” and Laurence Maslon from Peconic Public Broadcasting’s “Broadway to Main Street.” Learn more at www. bookhampton.com.

THEATER A Delicate Balance Center Stage at Southampton Cultural Center presents Edward Albee’s “A Delicate Balance” through Sunday, January 26, at the Levitas Center for the Arts. For tickets and showtimes, go to www.scc-arts.org.

Admissions Playing the diversity card cuts both ways in this “hilarious and provocative drama” by Joshua Harmon, presented by the Hampton Theatre Company in Quogue from Thursday, January 16 through February 2. For more information, visit www.hamptontheatre.org.

Picasso At The Lapin Agile The North Fork Community Theater in Mattituck will present Steve Martin’s “Picasso at the Lapin Agile” from

SEASONED PROFESSIONALS

Friday, January 17, through February 2. For all tickets and showtimes, visit www.nfct.com.

MUSIC Fireside Sessions Nancy Atlas will perform at Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor every Saturday at 8 PM through January 25 in Fireside Sessions. Buy tickets at www.baystreet. org.

Suffolk Theater On Friday, January 17, at 8 PM will be a Johnny Cash birthday celebration with “Johnny and June” at The Suffolk Theater in Riverhead. Grab tickets at www. suffolktheater.com.

Stephen Talkhouse Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett will jam out to The Nancy Atlas Project on Friday, January 17, at 8 PM. Then, on Saturday, January 18, at 8 PM, Hopefully Forgiven will be followed by Conga Cartel at 10 PM. See more at www. stephentalkhouse.com.

Masonic Music Series On Saturday, January 18, at 8 PM Steve Skoldbeg will perform as part of the Masonic Music Series above the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum. Learn more at www.masonicmusicseries.com.

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January 15, 2020

B11

Dining For The Sake Of Good Sake

Independent/Hannah Selinger

Greenport restaurant serves 25 varieties on its menu By Hannah Selinger

Sometimes it feels like the East End is part of another planet. I don’t mean that pejoratively. I’m sure other planets are nice. What I mean is that it feels removed. We are far out. Other people have to plan elaborate trips and transit hijinks to get to us. We steel ourselves against outside influence, creating a community that functions on its own out here. We don’t need big box retailers, or chain restaurants. We can exist on our own, thank you very much. All of that is well and good until you get to my favorite subject: food. Out here, the breadth and variety of ethnic food is still an uphill climb. There are Italian joints as far as the eye can see. But Korean? You’ll have to head up-island for that. But you won’t have to for great Japanese food. That’s a fact. Stirling Sake provides Greenport with a solid backbone when it comes to sushi. Housed in a charming converted house on Main Street, the restaurant is a fine example of food that transports us to a different place. Come for the food, of course. But the sake you should defi-

nitely stay for. Speaking of sake, it’s a wine made from polished rice. I won’t get too wonky about sake here, but grades and styles have to do with the level of polish on the rice grains, as well as the filtration methods. It can be served warm or cold, can be clear or cloudy in appearance, and can invoke everything from fresh apples to wildflowers on the nose and palate. The broad category of Junmai accounts for sake that has been brewed with rice and koji — a specific fungus that excretes an enzyme that reacts with yeast. Ginjo sakes are sakes with a polish ratio of 60 percent or less, while Daijingo sakes have 50 percent or less. And you’ve probably seen Nigori sake before: when poured, it’s as cloudy as the midwinter sky. I mention all of this because Stirling Sake is just as much a sake purveyor as it is a Japanese restaurant. There are somewhere around 25 sakes offered on the restaurant’s menu, available in different sized pours (four-ounce, 12-ounce, and whole bottle are some

of the more common sizes). There is shochu, too: a distilled spirit not unlike vodka, which can be made from any manner of fermented ingredient, including barley, sugarcane, or sweet potato. Back to that food for a minute. Stirling Sake offers a fairly comprehensive overview of Japanese cuisine. There is sushi, naturally, a curated list of rolls that showcase the fish rather than the pyrotechnics of non-fish ingredients. There are sashimi selections, too. Stirling Sake also places a heavy emphasis on noodles, which have their own dedicated category. In it, you’ll find compelling duck ramen, served with a yuzu salt-based broth and Crescent Farms duck from Long Island; a niki udon, served in a dashi broth with

beef; and shirataki noodles, made from tofu, which float in a vegetable broth alongside cabbage, onion, carrot, bean, and mushroom. Of the appetizers, the kaburamaki is particularly lovely: salmon, avocado, and fragrant shiso, all wrapped together in thinly sliced turnip. But the big eye tuna kakuni, simmered in soy sauce and ginger, is equally impressive. There are vegetarian and vegan options for everyone (see those shirataki noodles, above), making Stirling Sake a flexible place that can suit a whole host of palates. But, more importantly, it can suit the intrepid drinker who wants to delve into the complexities of sake wholly and without hesitation. And to think, you don’t even need to leave the East End to do it.

18 Park Place East Hampton 324-5400 Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner Take Out Orders


B12

The Independent

RECIPE OF THE WEEK Chef Joe Cipro

Rigatoni With Sausage, Cherry Tomatoes And roasted shallot cream sauce Ingredients 4 c dried rigatoni pasta 1 qt cherry tomatoes 1/2 lb ground sausage 10 oz arugula 3 Tbsp butter 3 shallots 1/2 c heavy cream 1/2 c grated parmesan cheese 2 sprigs of rosemary (chopped) 1 handful of parsley (chopped) 1/4 c olive oil 1/4 c white wine 1 Tbsp ground black pepper Salt

Directions (serves 4) Bring a medium-sized pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Set your

oven to 400 degrees. Peel the skins off the shallots and coat each in a bit of olive oil. Wrap them in tin foil and roast for about 45 minutes. While this is happening, par cook the ground sausage in a sauté pan over medium-high heat for about eight minutes or until the sausage begins to brown. Strain the fat and set aside for later. While the shallots roast, chop the herbs and cut your tomatoes in half so that you’re ready to assemble the pasta. When the shallots come out of the oven, soft and golden brown, you can put them into the food processor and puree them with a bit of warm water and a touch more olive oil, if necessary. To put everything together, start

by heating a large sauté pan and add the pasta into the boiling salted water. The pasta will need eight to 10 minutes. Add the olive oil to the hot pan and begin to crisp the ground sausage. When the sausage begins to brown, deglaze the pan with the white wine and allow it to reduce for one minute before adding the cream, butter, cheese and roasted shallot puree.

Allow these ingredients to incorporate and reduce until a creamy sauce consistency is achieved. The pasta should be strained and added to the dish, along with the tomatoes and arugula. Toss in the final ingredients and allow them to simmer together in the cream sauce for another three minutes or so before finishing with the chopped herbs.

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Fine Dining Specializing in Japanese Cuisine & Sushi Offering Lunch & Dinner Menus and Exotic Cocktails We also have a Tatami Room

Open 7 Days for Lunch & Dinner

631-267-7600 40 Montauk Highway Amagansett, NY


Dining

January 15, 2020

B13

Springs Tavern Curates Pollockinspired Menu Recipes from Robyn Lea’s cookbook grace birthday celebration By Nicole Teitler nicole@indyeastend.com

Had Jackson Pollock lived, Tuesday, January 28, would be his 108th birthday. To celebrate the late artist, the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center will host a special three-course meal on Sunday, January 26, at The Springs Tavern. Owners of the restaurant, Dan and Charlene DeSmet, will host the evening based on pages straight from Robyn Lea’s book, “Dinner with Jackson Pollock.” Pollock resided in Springs from 1945 until his fatal car crash in 1956, and was always recognized as a master in the art community as an abstract expressionist. However, lesser known was his affinity for cuisine. With a forward from Helen Harrison, director of Pollock-Krasner House, Lea’s book depicts a different side to the splatter

Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock with his mother, Stella. Independent/Helen Harrison

painter — baker, gardener, and dinner host. Along with the influence of his wife, Lee Krasner, and mother, Stella, handwritten pages of recipes and newspaper clippings once filled cookbooks belonging to the family. Harrison said, “Until Robyn Lea’s beautiful book was published, few people realized that both Jackson and Lee were great cooks. They collected recipes from family and friends, and preferred fresh local ingredients, including vegetables from their own garden.” The culinary records list over 50 menu items, many of which were traded with the local community, such as Jackson’s spaghetti sauce, Elaine de Kooning’s fruit and grain salad, Stel-

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la’s potato pancakes, and Perle Fine’s bouillabaisse. “My favorite is the cream onion soup and the cross-country Johnny cakes,” Charlene DeSmet said. The book gives a deeper insight to the artist and flavors of the area at the time. Fast forward over half a century, Springs Tavern will take select recipes from Lea’s in-depth volume and present an artfully curated menu. The first course will be cream onion soup served with cross-country Johnny cakes, wild forest greens topped with tomato chutney, and shaved Brussels sprouts with smoked bacon and parmesan; the second course is Jackson’s whiskey soaked chicken with

wilted collard greens and Southern style cornbread, meatloaf and mashed potatoes, with roasted root vegetables drizzled with walnut and maple dressing, Perle Fine's bouillabaisse, and Jackson’s famous spaghetti; the third and final course lists brandied peaches with soft custard, rustic almond cake with raspberry sauce, and warm bread pudding with honey bourbon sauce. Reservations are required. Tickets are $40 per person. Seating begins at 7 PM. The Springs Tavern is located at 15 Fort Pond Boulevard in East Hampton. Call 631-527-7800 for reservations. Learn more about Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center at wwww.pkhouse.org.

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B14

The Independent

Guest-Worthy Recipe: Chef Marc Vidal Bacon-wrapped dates By Zachary Weiss

Who: Chef Marc Vidal, Executive Chef of Boqueria in NYC and DC

Instagram: @MarcVidalChef

Chef Vidal’s Guest-Worthy Recipe: Datiles con beicon (bacon-wrapped dates)

Why? “You only need four ingredients for these simple crowd-pleasers. We first served these at Boqueria over 10 years ago at our first friends and family preopening meal. Every single diner raved about them the first night. They’re a

great party dish because they’re so quick to prepare, and you can make as many as you want! Just pop them in the oven when you’re ready to serve.”

Ingredients: Medjool dates Marcona almonds, roasted and salted Valdeón cheese, or other mild creamy blue cheese, such as Gorgonzola Applewood-smoked bacon (1⁄2 slice per date) Small skewers (1 for every 3 dates); soak the skewers in water for at least 30 minutes

Directions: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a half sheet pan with foil.

Cut a slit lengthwise in a date and pull out the pit. Put one almond inside the date, then spread a half-teaspoon of cheese in the cavity. Close the date around the stuffing, completely sealing the edges as tightly as possible by pressing the cut edges of the date together. Wrap half a slice of bacon tightly around the date; the slice should overlap itself by at least one full rotation. Repeat to

make as many as you’d like. Place three bacon-wrapped dates side by side, close together. Insert a skewer through them. Repeat with the remaining bacon-wrapped dates. Place the skewers on the prepared pan, spacing them an inch apart. Bake, turning once, until the bacon is evenly browned and its fat is rendered, about 12 minutes each side.

103 MAIN ST, SAG HARBOR, NY 11963

631.725.3167


Dining

January 15, 2020

Long Island Restaurant Week

Long Island Restaurant Week is hosting the fourth annual winter campaign from Sunday, January 26, to Sunday, February 2. The now tri-annual and award-winning promotion is offered for eight days. Participating restaurants will serve a three-course dinner prix fixe for $29.95 all night, every night they are open except Saturday when the menu may only be offered until 7 PM. Restaurants will each serve a unique menu with a minimum choice of three appetizers, three entrées, and three desserts. “Winter Restaurant Week is designed to help customers combat ‘cabin fever’ and bring excitement and revenue to our restaurant participants,” said Steve Haweeli, president of Long Island Restaurant & Marketing Hospitality Group, the business-to-consumer promotions division of WordHampton Public Relations. “With more than 2.8 million residents and 1000 restaurants with varied cuisines, concepts and price points, Long Island Restaurant Week remains a win-win for Long Islanders and Long Island restaurants,” he added. A full participant list is available at www.longislandrestaurantweek.com. JM

B15

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B16

The Independent

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Real Realty

Real Realty

Asher Lipman:

Carving a unique niche as a renovation coach

Independent/Courtesy NY Renovation Coach

January 15, 2020

17


18 C-2

The Independent

Deeds

Min Date = 12/14/2019 Max Date = 12/20/2019

Source: Suffolk Research Service, Inc., Hampton Bays, NY 11946

Area

Buy

AMAGANSETT

Caplan, M & C

15 Catalpa Place LLC

4,993,763

15 Catalpa Pl

BRIDGEHAMPTON

First Blue East LLC

Jolli Real Estate LLC

3,900,000

2006 Scuttlehole & lots 17 & 18

CALVERTON

Jahn, M & Lynch, J Andrews, T & N

Manzi Homes East LLC Ehlich, D & R

499,939 482,000

64 Mastro Ct 346 Twomey Ave

CUTCHOGUE

Barnes, J & S Edgett, D & C

Rimor Development LLC JJS Edgewater LLC

730,000 675,000

Harvest Pointe Home #3 225 Willow St

EAST HAMPTON

Richter, F & S H.A.Y.R. LLC Struble, R & K House, T & Cary, J East Hampton Golf Club SRB Holdngs & Bernstein

Clementine Property Borzon, C Appel, R & J Trusts Conlin, N & K Krupinski, B&B by Exr Colacino, M & D

1,142,500 975,000 745,000 725,000 1,960,000 3,400,000

54 Long Woods Ln 25 Oyster Pond Ln 11 Peters Path 628 Stephen Hands Path 259 Abrahams Path 8 Fieldview Ln

EAST QUOGUE

Greenwald, M Garcia Alarcon, A JP Morgan Chase Bank

Novak, J & E Rogozinski, A & Geib, R Belmont, G by Ref

980,000 700,000 1,571,963

12 Bluejay Way 643 Montauk Hwy 25 Indian Run Rd

FISHERS ISLAND

Harbor View Cottage

Arnold, K Trust

775,000

Sterling St

GREENPORT

Rosa, J & Satterwhite, E

Dwyer, J & A

555,000

550 Wood Ln

HAMPTON BAYS

Schaefer, J & H 278 E Montauk LLC Kirby, A & L Spellman, K

Wilmington Savings Rubino, G & Martinson, K Matts Day Care LLC Rammy LLC

676,000 387,000 600,000 700,000

25 South Peninsula Dr 278 E. Montauk Hwy 63 Palo Alto Dr 21 Rampasture Rd

MATTITUCK

White, J & Warren, E

Melan LLC

600,000

230 Lesters Rd

MONTAUK

Hinchen, L 6 Tara Road, Montauk

Herrmann, M Somerville, S

815,000* 3,550,000

26 Seaside Ave 6 Tara Rd

PECONIC

Schiefele, J & H

Higgins III, W & M

655,000

25 Miami Ave

QUOGUE

Procaccino, J & E

Matz, S & Katz, B

2,200,000

3 Pine Ln

REMSENBURG

Frankman, K & M Lamar-Rignola, M

Foulsham, A Zeman, R & V

1,700,000 610,000

3 Fish Creek Ln 55 Halsey Rd

RIVERHEAD

Segarra Torres & Clavij

Phung, N & H

580,000

19 Meadow Brook Ln

SAG HARBOR

2761 Deerfield LLC Watson Atlantic LLC 268 Division Realty Mann, T & d’Amboise, C LaSalle, R & L

Cornell University St John, L & Patterson Grimm, W by Admr Gentile, D & Navarro, K Feldman, M & Naturman, L

995,000 750,000 825,000 1,390,000 1,450,000

2761 Deerfield Rd p/o 8 Palmer Terr 268 Division St 171 D N Ferry Rd 15 Dickerson Dr

SOUTHAMPTON

Tuzzi, C & D Koutsos, G & J Bustamante, D PS1946 Properties LLC 412 First Neck Lane Whiskey Tango 115 Hampton Monkey Busines M4950 LLC OT 5 Owner LLC

McMullan, D & E Trust Vikse, K & T Sanchez, J & J Zaneski, M by Admr Harkonnen & Atreides Pari LLC Little Plains Sthptn Jordan, M Trust Olde Towne Development

549,000 1,775,000 780,000 400,000 22,000,000 8,950,000 11,350,000 29,875,000 13,000,000*

14 Oak Grove Rd & lot 14 723 Seven Ponds Towd Rd 11 Valorie Rd 224 North Sea Rd 412 First Neck Ln 115 Wyandanch Ln 209 Little Plains Rd 950 Meadow Ln 5 Olde Towne Ln

SOUTHOLD

Mastrella, P & M

Catania, J & D

799,000

760 Oakwood Dr

WAINSCOTT

Lutz, A & S

Friedland, S & Freeman

1,624,000

3 Foxcroft Ln

WATER MILL

51 LNP LLC Gorman, K & K Tymeck, J Flying Point Sands

Hathaway, J & J Saturno & 1748 Montauk Michaels, G 561 Daniels Lane LLC

1,790,000 935,000 1,650,000 11,000,000

51 Little Noyac Path 1748 Montauk Hwy 45 Fairbanks Ct 1131 Flying Point Rd

WESTHAMPTON

Cassidy, M & Hammond, K

Pizzi, M & A

1,175,000

4 Bayview Dr

WESTHAMPTON BEACH

Kariuki, T Trust Bekman, P & Silvers, J Shah, M & J

Snead, J & P Stratta, J & D 13 Dune Lane LLC

1,350,000 1,460,000 1,500,000

1 Jeffrey Ln 16 Seafield Ln 13 Dune Ln

SHELTER ISLAND

*Vacant Land

Sell

Price

Location


Real Realty

January 15, 2020

Asher Lipman:

ment they want.

from an architect and or contractor.

Are you involved with permits, architects, interior designers?

You’ve coached through nine New York Philharmonic members’ home renovation projects. How did that come to be? What were the challenges?

Carving a unique niche as a renovation coach By Ty Wenzel ty@indyeastend.com

As high-end homeowners find themselves buying and selling in exclusive locations like Manhattan and the Hamptons, Asher Lipman has been supplying the demand of handling the grueling process of renovation and remodeling homes. By founding “NYC Renovation Coach,” the developer turned his deep knowledge of everything from permits to working with interior designers and architects into a singular career that offers taking on the headaches that plague the process. We caught up with Lipman to find out more about this innovative way of taking on such projects for those who would rather put their trust in someone who has experience.

Asher, why did you move into renovation coaching? My renovation career dates back to my college years when I flipped row houses near the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. After graduating from Wharton, I put my business degree to work, focusing on real estate development mostly in California and in the Midwest, working on projects that included The Forum Shops at Caesar’s Palace, and serving as a strategy consultant for several national real estate companies. I moved back to NYC after my father had a stroke. My intention at that time was to help my parents build a new home in Connecticut and possibly develop some properties in New York and New Jersey. One night I was out to dinner with my wife’s boss, who was about to start renovating his apartment on the Upper West Side. He was completely lost, with no idea how to even start. I offered to come up to the apartment to take a look and help him sort through the bids. It was supposed to be a favor for a couple of hours, and next thing I knew I was overseeing the whole project for him. The renovation was finished early and under budget. And NYC Renovation Coach was born. I ended up helping to renovate three more apartments in his building.

Can you describe the process from when the client signs on? Is this like a wedding planner, but for home renovations? Like planning a wedding, most people have never renovated before and don’t really know what they are getting into. Both weddings and renovations take thoughtful pre-planning, frank discussions about what is important and also what isn’t, budgets, and a strict timeline. The wedding planner must analyze the data, identify the potential pitfalls, deal with the unexpected, manage the stress, problem solve, and make sure the day goes on without a hitch. And for those who have been married before or who have renovated before, they have a better understanding of the process and realize that having an outside party in their corner from start to finish can make the process much smoother, saner, and ultimately less expensive. Ideally, I meet with the client as early in the process as possible. Either before they’ve even closed on a new apartment or house or before they’ve made any renovation plans. We start with a walk-through and sit down talking about how they live and how they want to live. It is almost like a therapy session. We talk about what they need to have in their home and they want to have. Sometimes these things combine well and sometimes they don’t. Sometimes couples agree but most often they don’t. So, I work with them to compromise and also fit their budget and timeline. This thoughtful preplanning and time spent learning about the client is time consuming but crucial. The process from here stays the same: team assembly, finalization of plans and budgets, material selections, bid negotiations, permitting, and construction management. Knowing that I am in their corner, advocating and making sure the job is completed on time, on budget, and to their satisfaction, gives them the freedom to decide what level of involve-

Yes, I provide full service. NYC Renovation Coach manages your entire renovation: establishing realistic plans and budgets, interacting with building management, the board, and neighbors, and overseeing the construction. I use a five-step action plan which demystifies the process and allows clients to leverage NYC Renovation Coach’s deep knowledge and experience thereby eliminating the guesswork, vulnerability, and stress so often associated with apartment renovations.

Do you get involved with the design stage? Yes, that is really the fun part! Well, the most fun part for all parties involved. The best time for NYC Renovation Coach to get involved is when the project is still just an idea. When I can sit with a client, understand the way they live and how they dream to live, we can execute these visions immaculately, without stress. The first step of the NYC Renovation Coach process is to explain the sequence of events, what to expect, and how to avoid some of the common pitfalls.

How might this save money for someone on the verge of a renovation? Where is the return on investment? ROI can be measured by time, money, and sanity. Renovation is stressful. It is a big undertaking, very expensive, time consuming, and very personal. Many people have not renovated in New York before or even if they have, they often underestimate the human toll that it takes. What often happens, especially in apartment renovations, is that homeowners end up wasting time and money. Having worked in many buildings and with many managing agents, and understanding the nuances of the constraints of the building, either boardimposed (no wet over dry, no central AC) or due to underlying construction (pre-war versus white brick, or structural constraints of removing a wall,) I am able to streamline the alteration approval process. Understanding the nuances of construction and the value add of certain decisions is important. Identifying potential problems and solution paths help speed up the construction timeline maintain the budget is also key. Renovators in New York are often given unrealistic expectation and budgets

C-3 19

An old boarding school friend is a real estate agent and had just sold an adjoining apartment to chamber music power couple, David Finkel and Wu Han. They wanted to create a family home as well as a salon for intimate chamber music concerts. Together, they travel over 200 days a year and couldn’t envision how they could manage combining two NYC apartments while on the road. My friend recommended me, and it eventually became one of my most rewarding projects to date. Not only did I help give them their dream home and concert space, but I was also treated to wonderful impromptu concerts along the way! Once they settled back in, they recommended me to many of their philharmonic friends who had wanted to renovate for years but thought it was impossible because of their complex travel schedules. Working with clients who travel more than they are home introduces a separate set of challenges, but it is also where I can provide a great deal of value. iPhones help! I frequently Facetime clients updates from the job site. Additionally, NYC Renovation Coach had to determine strategies to integrate their ability to practice in their apartment without disturbing the neighbors or turning their apartment into a ‘cold’ studio. This is both an acoustic and architectural challenge. The result was a ‘flex’ space, which serves as an integrated studio and living space.

Are there any East End projects that you’ve completed? I have worked with several of my NYC clients on homes out on the East End, which is also my second home.

What do you like about the Hamptons? The Hamptons truly is a magical escape. My wife’s family has been coming to the East End for over 45 years. Growing up in NYC, I have many friends out here and it is nice to reconnect in a more casual environment. To reach Lipman or inquire about his properties, visit www.nycrenovationcoach.com or call 917-740-5779.


20

The Independent

North Fork THE

1826

Island’s End Golf Course Preserved Southold protects 126.71 acres in Greenport By Nicole Teitler nicole@indyeastend.com

From left to right: Scott Russell, Southold Town Supervisor; Holly Sanford, project manager, Peconic Land Trust; Catherine Chaudhuri, president, Island’s End Golf & Country Club; Meinrad Danzer, treasurer, Island’s End Golf & Country Club; Mary Pacinda-Turner, owner; Mark Levine, legal counsel advisor; Toni Hoverkamp, Esq., legal counsel. Independent/Peconic Land Trust

After four years of negations, the Town of Southold officially purchased the development rights to 126.71 acres of what is now known as Island’s End Golf and Country Club in Greenport. “This is an exciting purchase and a great opportunity,” said Southold Town Supervisor, Scott Russell. “Not only was this the largest preservation project in the history of the town program, it ensures that the last remaining public golf course on the East End continues to operate for all to enjoy.” Russell said the $5.1 million purchase announced December 6 could not have been done without the property owners and the Peconic Land Trust. Town of Southold’s Community Preservation Fund made the acquisition possible, protecting all waterfront

and shoreline within the Greenport property. Two separate development areas, nearing eight acres in total, are being allowed for limited development in relation to the overall property. Ownership of the land itself will be in the hands of the King and Turner families, along with Island’s End Golf and Country Club. “This is a great outcome,” William King said, “and something my father would be proud of and always hoped would happen.” “My late husband, Robert Turner, would be very proud that his father’s legacy will now continue to be enjoyed by the community that he so loved,” said Mary Pacinda-Turner. Island’s End Golf and Country Club is the only 18-hole golf course on the North Fork open to the public,

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and is expected to be used by the local high school golf teams. Historically, Island’s End leased 93.85 acres from the two families and retained the golf property as a semi-private club, opened in 1961. It retains 800 feet of shoreline and 40,000 trees dotting the fairways, boasting mature wildlife, and is maintained through environmentallyfriendly practices. “We at Island’s End are most grateful to the Town of Southold, the staff at Peconic Land Trust, and the King and Turner families,” said Catherine Chaudhuri, president of Island’s End Golf and Country Club. “The Island’s End board and shareholders are thrilled our public course has been preserved.” The vast acreage offers employment opportunities for new residents.

Now, the Red Tail Hawk, Grey Horn Owl, foxes, and deer can keep the place they call home. The Peconic Land Trust has worked to preserve over 13,000 acres across Long Island since it was founded in 1983. This endeavor marks another successful moment for the nonprofit, as it works with landowners to protect wildlife while creating an equitable future for the community. “For over half a century, Island’s End has provided a wonderful recreational resource for the residents and visitors to the North Fork,” said John Halsey, president of the Peconic Land Trust. “The conservation of this land — including all acreage along Long Island Sound and the mature wildlife habitat that is established within the fairways — is an extraordinary conservation outcome for all.”

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Sports

January 15, 2020

21

Sports Mendoza’s 20 Pts Propel Hurricanes Past Elwood-John Glenn Senior perfect from the free-throw line in Westhampton’s seventh-straight win By Desirée Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com They don’t call her Layla “Mad-Hops” Mendoza for nothing. In a 61-51 win over Elwood-John Glenn January 13, the Westhampton Beach senior was jumping all over the court, racking up 20 points and going 8-for-8 from the free-throw line in her Hurricanes’ seventh straight win. “It feels good to be back — I’m getting stronger,” said Mendoza, who missed the second half of last season because of a torn ACL. “We had a lot of good passes, a lot of fast breaks and rebounds.” The senior secured five rebounds and three steals, but in total the Hurricanes (10-2 overall and 8-1in League VI) grabbed 32 rebounds and forced 14 turnovers. Classmate Belle Smith, who scored her 1500th point in the win, finished with a double-double off 17 points and 10 rebounds, stole the ball three times, and had three assists. Head coach Katie Peters said when the two of them are on, they’re unstoppable. “Layla and Belle have a nice little thing at times,” she said. “They look for each other, know how to feed each other, have learned to play off each other. It will help us through the tail end of our season here.” But things didn’t start off so smooth for Westhampton. After Mendoza sank her first two free throws to tie the game at 2-all, the Knights

(9-5, 7-3) went on a 12-0 tare before Molly McCarthy (7 points, 6 rebounds, 5 steals, and 3 assists) swished a three-pointer to stop the bleeding. Mendoza added a threepoint play with 2:06 to go in the quarter and assisted Smith on a layup after a steal to make it 18-11, but the Hurricanes remained down 21-15 at the end of the quarter. “Our coaches motivated us,” Mendoza said during the break between stanzas. “It was a little bit of a rocky start, but we ended the game strong.” Smith scored on a breakaway off her own steal to open the second and hit her career milestone, and with that layup and another at 3:34 wound up starting and finishing a nine-point scoring streak that gave her team the lead for the first time, 24-23. Junior Caroline Henke (8 points, 5 rebounds) knocked down a long field goal, and sophomore Olivia Rongo (6 points, 6 rebounds, 3 steals, 3 assists) also lit up the scoreboard during the spurt. The Hurricanes ended the second on an 8-0 run, highlighted by a Smith layup off a behind-the-back pass from McCarthy who was racing toward the hoop, and capped the third on a 6-0 run for a 10-point lead. With 4:48 remaining, Mendoza’s bucket off a send-in from he left side of the court put the Hurricanes up by their largest margin, 54-41, and she did

Senior Layla Mendoza (20 points, 5 rebounds, 3 steals) missed the second half of last season with a torn ACL. Independent/Desirée Keegan

it again on a three-point play with three minutes remaining to bring the score to 57-44. “Watching my teammates is exciting — Layla grabbing the offensive rebounds, Molly McCarthy hitting threes, Caroline Henke and Olivia Rongo getting insane steals up the court. Everyone has a role and we play them really well,” Smith said. “The team is so close this year.” The girls switched up the defense following the first to try to block primary scorers Madison Mullmanand and Samantha Groark from getting the ball.

Mullman still managed a game-high 24, and Groark was limited to seven. “They came out hot in the first quarter,” Peters said. “Our girls have a really nice off-court chemistry that transitions onto the court. We weren’t in positions we should have been, and it took us a little while to get into the game, but they’ve had a ‘we over me’ mindset all season and they really live it every game. I’m proud of them for that. They all want what’s best for the team and the best shot. This has been a fun group to watch and be a part of,” she said.

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22

The Independent

Smith Hits 1500 Points Senior adds to historic high school record By Desirée Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com

For Belle Smith, the accolades she’s garnered across her athletic career have as much to do with her teammates as they do with her. Last year, the senior broke Lauren Mallor’s 1,273 point total to become the highest-scoring girls basketball player in Westhampton Beach history. With a layup off her own steal, 16 seconds into the second quarter of a 61-51 win at Elwood-John Glenn January 12, she added to that record by scoring her 1500th career point. Smith finished the game with a double-double on 17 points and 10 rebounds, and had three steals and three assists. She said she didn’t even know her bucket off a breakaway opportunity had been the milestone-

maker. She’d even just found out prior to the game she was five points away from history. “To break your own record is pretty cool, but the team comes first,” Smith said. “And I couldn’t have done it without them. They’re always so supportive, and none of my points would’ve been possible without their help. So, this recognition isn’t just for me, it’s for my whole team. We all make each other look good.” Senior Layla Mendoza, who worked with Smith under the boards all evening and racked up a team-high 20 points in the win, said she couldn’t be happier for her teammate. “I love her so much,” Mendoza said. “We both have a ton of athleticism. We

just click.” Smith started playing for head coach Katie Peters in eighth grade. The coach said back then Smith was a phenomenal All-American lacrosse player — who won a national championship with Team USA last summer and surpassed 200 digs as a libero on the volleyball team — who happened to play basketball. “At this point, she’s a basketball player who also happens to be an All-American lacrosse player,” Peters said, smiling. “Her milestones are phenomenal. She’s a competitor. She refuses to lose. Every night she gives all her effort. I couldn’t say enough positive and great things about her as a student, as an athlete, as a human being. She’s a really special kid.” Her mother Jen Smith said she knew from a young age her daughter had it in her. “She always seems to rise to the occasion,” Smith said. “Put aside that I’m her mom, my husband and I look at her and are just in awe of her athletic abilities and the way that she conducts herself. Most people would say when you see Belle, and you talk to her, you wouldn’t know she has such athletic prowess. She’s kind, she’s giving, she’s a team player.” See photos online at www. indyeastend.com.

Brooks Breaks 1000

Henry Brooks needed six points to earn a spot in the 1000-point-scorer record book. But for the Pierson senior, it was more about what he could do to help facilitate a win over Smithtown Christian Monday. He racked up eight points behind Wilson Bennett’s 18 in the 64-54 Whalers win January 13, the team’s third straight, hitting his 1000th on a free-throw in the first quarter. “He was calling the shots, moving the ball well, did a great job on the defensive end,” first-year head coach Will Fujita said. “He’s a scoring machine, but he knows team ball was the mission of tonight, and he sacrificed scoring some more points to get the win. What more can you ask for?” Brooks is a four-year varsity player who is also a standout golfer and first baseman, making it to the state championships in both sports last season. “He’s hungry. He wants to win,” Fujita said. “He’s well-rounded, and he leads by example.” For more photos and the full story, visit www.indyeastend.com. DK

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Sports

January 15, 2020

Hampton Bays Bounces Back

23

East Hampton's Santiago Maya takes down his Eastport-South Manor opponent. Independent/Gordon M. Grant

Wrestling team earns first League VII win By Desirée Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com

East Hampton Does, Too The Bonackers fell on the losing side of a 48-33 matchup against Eastport-South

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Westhampton Beach almost reined in its first win of the season. The Hurricanes (0-4 League VI) fell 39-33 to Kings Park January 8. Ian Recchion, at 138 pounds, came away with Westhampton’s only pin, taking down Aiden Franzone at 3:24. Gavin McIntyre (145 pounds) turned out a 15-0 technical fall over Jack Bruetsch, James O’Neill (152) a 15-2 major decision over Michael Molina, Jason Montagna (126) a 4-1 decision over Vincent Stazzone, and Jackson Hulse (170) a 4-2 decision over Kiernan Derway. Kings Park forfeited two matches to Westhampton’s one.

matches. Lombardo, at 195 pounds, immediately pinned Eastport-South Manor’s Brian Insogna; Maya, at 113, secured a 16-1 technical fall over Troy Fiume; and Usma, at 152, came away with a 17-8 major decision over Justin Rathje.

EC

Westhampton Comes Close

Manor January 8. The team (1-3 in League V), comprised of students from East Hampton, Bridgehampton, and Pierson high schools, came away with points from Nicholas Lombardo, Santiago Maya, and Brahian Usma. Each team had to forfeit three

S

(120) pinned his opponent at 5:31, Max Gallagher (113) ended up with a 19-2 technical fall, and Colin Gallagher (132) a major decision.

CO M M

Nick Pacheco and River Orlando led Hampton Bays to its first dual meet win of the season. The Baymen (1-3 overall, 1-1 League VII) pinned their January 8 BayportBlue Point opponents during a 54-23 bounce-back win. The team suffered its own 51-25 before-the-break loss to Elwood-John Glenn. Orlando pinned the Phantoms’ 138-pound challenger Jack Brzozinski in one minute, 51 seconds, and Pacheco, at 126, pinned James Jones at 4:02. Although Bayport-Blue Point had to forfeit in six slots — five the uppermost weight classes — the Baymen came away with a few other big wins. Willy Kraus (145 pounds) tackled a 21-6 technical fall over Josh Stumpf, Dakota Thompson (152) finished with an 8-0 major decision over Luke Olsen, and Alex Velasquez (160) edged TJ Spano with a 9-8 decision. Angel Peralta (106) came close in his match, but ended up on the losing side of a 4-3 decision. Bayport-Blue Point’s Joe Sparacio

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*Effective January 13th, 2020 the purchase of a regular Long Island Rail Road ticket is all that is needed to use both the train and connecting shuttle bus.

Most riders will also now be able to purchase their LIRR tickets via vending machines at the stations; or the LIRR MTA e-Tix app; or via mail. Most riders can also now purchase daily tickets; weekly and monthly passes. Speonk Riders: To take advantage of the $3.25 reduced fare on South Fork Commuter Connection trips, those traveling to or from Speonk should purchase ‘South Fork Commuter Connection’ special promotion tickets at station vending machines featuring the “Deals & Getaways” ticket offers. For information on LIRR ticket purchasing go to: www.sfccLIRR.com.

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24

The Independent

Suffolk Honors ‘Father Of Baseball’ Sag Harbor's Henry Chadwick is county hall of fame's 2020 historic inductee By DesirĂŠe Keegan desiree@indyeastend.com Henry Chadwick, known as the “Father of Baseball,â€? was a pioneering journalist and historian credited with editing the first guide about baseball, creating the box score, abbreviating “Kâ€? for strikeouts, and creating batting average and earned run average statistics. In May, he will recognized as the Suffolk Sports Hall of Fame historic inductee during a ceremony at Watermill Caterers in Smithtown. “I learned about Chadwick’s connection to the East End while working on a different history project in Sag Harbor, and knew immediately we had to honor him through the Suffolk Sports Hall of Fame,â€? hall of fame executive director Chris Vaccaro said. “Last year we inducted the New York Cuban Giants as our historic inductee,

and Chadwick was next on our list. His place is so unique in baseball history.� When Vaccaro took over in 2017, he wanted to ensure the hall dove into different areas of history not often remembered or even known. Chadwick, who was born in the United Kingdom in 1824 and died in Brooklyn in 1908, was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1938 and in 2009 had the Henry Chadwick Award created in his name by the Society for American Baseball Research to honor outstanding contributions of baseball researchers. The sportswriter called Sag Harbor his summer home for decades. “I would like to consider placing one of our Suffolk Sports Hall of Fame historic markers near the location he lived in Sag

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Harbor in the future,� Vaccaro said. “We started that program in 2019 and put our first marker at Bethpage Ballpark where the Long Island Ducks play.� Chadwick played ball games like rounders and cricket before moving to the United States in 1837, and was a cricket reporter for The New York Times in 1856 when he witnessed his first game of baseball. From that point on he wrote regular columns about the sport. “Americans do not care to dawdle over a sleep-inspiring game, all through the heat of a June or July day,� Chadwick wrote. “What they do they want to do in a hurry. In baseball, all is lightning; every action is as swift as a seabird’s flight.� In 1859, he formulated his first modern box score, documenting statistics like runs, hits, put-outs, assists, and errors for the dominant Brooklyn Excelsiors club. “The box score was the only way of showing the game — there really was no photography,� said Chadwick biographer Andrew Schiff, who wrote “The Father of Baseball.� “The writer really was the person at the center between the fans and the player at the game.� “Chadwick was an influence for good at a time when the game badly needed such a person,� said National Baseball Hall of Fame historian Lee Allen. “For years he kept pounding away in print on such subjects as the desirability of temperance and the need for fair treatment of umpires, and he lived to see improvements in those and other areas.� The Suffolk Sports Hall of Fame is celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2020 with its May 26 ceremony. Among the

Manning On A Roll

Henry Chadwick. Independent/Courtesy New York Public Library

other 19 inductees are Northport native and U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team 2019 World Cup winner Allie Long, Stony Brook University women’s lacrosse coach and Major League Lacrosse New York Lizards General Manager Joe Spallina; Northport native and current head coach of the NBA’s Brooklyn Nets Kenny Atkinson, West Islip Hansen Award winner and three-year NFL player Kevin Riccio, and Shoreham-Wading River High School student Thomas Cutinella, who died as the result of a traumatic brain injury following a head-to-head collision with an opposing player in 2014, and as the result of a then-recent organ donor registration saved multiple lives. “This is a very special year for the Suffolk Sports Hall of Fame,� Vaccaro said. “We are celebrating a major anniversary while honoring an all-star induction class. These are some of the finest individuals to represent not only Suffolk County, but their respective sports and organizations at-large.�

It is unheard of for a basketball player from the East End to play in a top echelon Division I program, but Charles Manning Jr is doing that and then some. Manning, a junior transfer who played in Bridgehampton, a Class D Suffolk County school, is the sixth man for the powerful Louisiana State University Tigers team — yes, the same LSU that won the national championship in football Monday, January 13. Manning, a 6’-5’’ leaper who can play every position is the first player off the bench, and is usually on the floor from then on. The Tigers are on a roll with four straight wins, and their 3-0 Southeastern Conference mark is good enough for a share of the lead in the standings with Auburn University and the University of Kentucky. The Tigers (11-4 overall) trailed 53-44 with five minutes remaining in a game against Mississippi State University January 12 when Manning Jr. and company got hot. LSU scored seven straight points and took a 57-55 lead on a three-pointer by Manning with one minute left in the game. Manning, who ended the contest with 15 points, sent an inbounds pass to Skylar Mays after Mississippi State grabbed a 59-58 lead on a basket by Reggie Perry with 4.6 seconds left, who used a spin move to get rid of his defender and nailed a buzzer-beating jumper in the 60-59 win to keep the streak alive. For the season, Manning, whose father Charles “Mo� Manning was a legend at Bridgehampton, is shooting the lights out at LSU — shooting a blistering 52 percent from the field, 42.9 percent from three-point range, 71 percent from the free-throw line, and is averaging 8.5 points per game. RM


January 15, 2020

25

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1998 RED JEEP WRANGLER SPORT - High miles, Overhead valve 6 (fully rebuilt less than 10,000 miles) Comes with Full Metal Top and Full Soft Top, excellent tires, CD Radio, extra lighting, a must see. $6,000 or best reasonable offer. Call and 631-749-0258 leave message. UFN

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Help Wanted

The largest circulation weekly newspaper on the East End of Long Island.

Ad Sales Representative Be a part of the largest circulated weekly newspaper on the East End of Long Island. The Independent is the go-to weekly read for both year-round and summer residents alike who want to stay on top of Everything East End. And we’re hiring! We are looking for Advertising and Special Events Sales Representatives who enjoy meeting with local businesses and helping their businesses grow. If you have Sales Experience, energy and are looking to be a part of an exciting and fun team – we’re looking for you. You will handle all aspects of advertising for local businesses: print, digital, sponsorships and events. Previous media sales is a plus. If you’re interested in learning more please send your information to Dan Schock, Head of Sales at dan@indyeastend.com.

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herein you are my mother. Oh Mary conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse in three (3X). Holy Mother, I place this cause in your hands (3x). Holy Spirit, you who can solve all problems, light all roads to that I can attain my goal. You who gave me the devine gift to forgive and forget all evil against me and that in all instances in my life you are

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For Sale

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Call or text at 917-744-1447


26

The Independent

East End Business & Service Air Cond & Heating

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27

East End Business & Service Estate Management

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28

The Independent

East End Business & Service House Cleaning

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To Advertise In This Directory, Call The Independent at 631 324 2500 www.indyeastend.com

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30

The Independent

Letters

ter. Chickens’ excessive anxiety and depression levels create negative energy resulting in negatively-altered biochemistries within the chicken, which is transferred to the person consuming it. How could good vibrations come from consuming any animal knowing the terror imposed upon it during its abbreviated, imprisoned lifespan? Consuming antibiotics the chickens were subjected to and the chlorine the chickens were dipped into at the slaughterhouse doesn’t seem very good either. Felicity Lawrence said, “If con-

Continued From Page 4. Diet for 2020� stated “absorbing energy is just like ingesting food.� The intent of the article was to promote “picking up good vibrations,� yet the article actually promoted negative vibrations from food via the comment about “perfecting your home-made chicken pot pie . . .� Almost 100 percent of domestic chickens in the United States lead tortured lives until their brutal slaugh-

Roofing

Roofing

sumers knew how farmed chickens were raised, they might not ever eat their meat again.� The same is true if consideration is given to any domesticated farm animal. The only difference between a pet, a farm animal, and a fish is your perception, and that perception can either create positive or negative vibrations/ energy. Ms. Buchanan mentioned yoga as a means of creating good energy. I would have to agree, but yoga isn’t something you do, rather, it is a state of being based upon the eight limbs of yoga. In

Weather Protection

the United States, a large majority of yoga classes are asana classes, the third limb of yoga, and are promoted as yoga. The first limb of yoga is the yamas, and the first yama is ahimsa, which effectively means nonviolence. Iyengar, Jois, Gannon, Adele, and other traditionallytaught yogis agree you can’t achieve a yoga state of being when ignoring ahimsa (or the other four yamas), and making the choice to consume animals. Yet, Ms. Buchanan promoted chicken consumption and yoga as though they can coexist. Randy Johnston

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News & Opinion

Shinnecock Protest Continued From Page 5.

Archeology, Inc. executed a Phase I archaeological survey of the site — to determine if there is a presence of archaeological resources within a project area — and found no prehistoric artifacts, according to a planning board resolution. The level of effort necessary to reliably document this is largely dependent on the extent of ground surface visibility, and in this case a few test pits were shoveled out, extending into the natural subsoil. “They didn’t find anything, and the Shinnecock are suspect of the result,” Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman said. “To have a member of the nation there would go a long way, but at this point it’s not the law.” That’s why he said members of the town will be meeting with tribal leaders this week to create legislation the supervisor said would address a series of steps to be taken when human remains are encountered. Schneiderman said the town has been in talks with the property owner to preserve the parcel, but that it “may not work in this case.” “We’re aggressively buying what we can, but that doesn’t mean we’ll be able to buy everything,” he said, adding while the owner has a buyer and he doesn’t “think we’ll be able to do anything about that lot,” the town is in conversation with the gentleman over two other lots the town is appraising. One is behind the current construction site. Southampton also has a 3D imaging system — ground-penetrating radar — a geophysical method that uses radar pulses to image the subsurface that can detect remains without disturbing the area. The supervisor said the town currently needs property owner consent to bring the equipment to the worksite. “We don’t want people to fail to report these incidents, and that’s the fear,” Schneiderman said. “Some people look the other way and that’s the worst thing that could happen. We certainly want to make sure no development occurs in an area where there may be human remains.” Gumbs said because the site has been labeled sensitive it should have required at least a Phase II archeological survey, where additional background research is done and designed to formulate specific questions to be addressed during fieldwork. Instead of a set of guidelines for when remains are found, he’d like to see regulations similar to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The law, although not pertaining to private property, protects the land while establishing ownership of cultural items excavated or discovered on federal or tribal land. The

January 15, 2020

council’s vice chairman and other tribal leaders, though, are fearful conversation will once again stall. After the town purchased the Hawthorne property last year a committee was created that included three Shinnecock members. Gumbs said the group met twice since the purchase, and said these individuals, who were working with those managing the town’s Community Preservation Fund department, were not notified of the construction either. Photos from previous protests have been displayed on the tribe’s 61-foottall billboard-like signs, known to the tribe as monuments, and the issue was also highlighted in the recently-released documentary “Conscience Point,” which followed tribal member Rebecca Genia’s years-long battle with the town over protecting Shinnecock gravesites. “You have a lot of powerful people with a lot of money in this town who want things done and get it done. It’s this whole rubber-stamping process,” Gumbs said. “They’re disturbing our ancestors and that goes right to the core of who we are as Indian people and it is disturbing and heartbreaking to us to watch the continued desecration of these areas. The town knows them and we’ve identified them; they’re on a sensitive site map. We’re going to continue the fight no matter what. We’re going to continue to be out there protesting anyone that wants to try to continue to do this.”

EH Town Historian Continued From Page 10.

meeting August 6 that Lys had no real interest in the proper preservation of the cemetery, because “he has no ancestors planted there.” When Van Scoyoc tried to intercede on Lys’s behalf, Geus questioned whether Van Scoyoc really was a true descendant of the Van Scoy family. Past the August verbal fracas, it appears that Geus, who had been the historian for several years, had failed to comply with a basic section of the state law, which requires that the historian file, every January, a detailed report with the town supervisor on what he or she had done the preceding 12 months to further the law’s objectives. When The Independent recently filed a Freedom of Information Act form requesting the annual reports from the past few years, there were none to be found, according to the town clerk’s office. If the town got nothing regarding annual reports from Geus, it was getting what it paid for. East Hampton Town is the only one of the five towns on the East End that does not pay its official historian a part-time salary. While the law states that the position of historian is an unpaid one, it also makes clear

that a municipality can compensate its historian. Shelter Island’s 2020 budget includes $4684.15 for its historian, W.Y. Clark III. Riverhead budgets $7000 per year for Georgette Case. Case has written on the history of Riverhead. In 2019, Southold budgeted $17,550 for its historian, Amy Folk. Southampton Town outdoes them all, budgeting $31,212 for its part-time town historian, along with over $7000 for a parttime secretarial assistant. The town historian, Julie Greene, will “continue the digitization of Southampton Town’s historical holdings to preserve the town’s heritage and treasures for future generations,” the town’s budget states, as well as working with the Southampton’s Historic Burying Grounds Committee to preserve and restore the 10 cemeteries Southampton Town owns. The state law also covers the transition from one historian to another, in cases where a former historian has either retired or been removed from office. The departing historian is required to “turn over . . . to his or her successor in office, if one has been then appointed, all materials gathered during his or her incumbency and all correspondence relating thereto.”

31

Sherriff Toulon

Continued From Page 15. time, he was released on his own recognizance under the guidelines of the new bail reform law,” he said. Pernell, Toulon added, is reportedly homeless, and “was arrested for continued intentional disobedience or resistance of the lawful order of the court by violating that court’s order. After each arrest he was released on his own recognizance just to reoffend again. In the past, the judge could have used this information to set a higher bail each time or even remand him to jail.” According to online court records, Pernell has been arrested almost a dozen times since November, sometimes twice in the same day. Another case is that of Dwayne Ross, 46, of Shirley. He was charged with strangulation, a felony, on December 10. A $20,000 bond was set and posted, and Ross was released. Two weeks later, he was charged with violating a court order of protection as a misdemeanor, and was eventually released. The judge in the case could not reference the strangulation charge in order to set bail. “The new law makes it clear: Mr. Ross must be released on his own recognizance, regardless of his criminal history or threat to the community,” Toulon said.


32

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