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WHY GO NOW

FALL/WINTER 2018

MARRAKECH PARIS LONDON EGYPT ETHIOPIA FRENCH ALPS AND MORE…


MADRID

theprincipalmadridhotel.com 2  I N D A G A R E . C O M

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Marqués de Valdeiglesias, 1 (esq. Gran Vía)


Your travel time is precious.

We help you make the most of it.

SCOUTING FOR YOU: Our Trip Designers scout more than 70+ countries per year,evaluatingdestinations, hotels, restaurants and

experiences, always with you in mind. REAL-TIME INTEL: We amplify our expertise withfeedbackfrommembers and global insiders in real time, so you experience only the best parts of a place. HONESTY IN EVERY RECOMMENDATION: If we think a destination or hotel won’t meet your

expectations, we let you know. We provide context so you can make an informed decision for your travels. MATCHMAKING: Together we select the ideal destination, whether you want a weekend in Rome or a year-long sabbatical. We fill your itinerary with experiences and tips that can’t be found through a simple Google search.

PEACE OF MIND: We prepare you for every trip with everything from travel insurance and flight bookings to curated reading materials that enhance your on-the-ground experience. POWERFUL PERKS: From room upgrades and spa credits to opening doors to coveted experiences, our global network gives you access to the best, every time.

Make travel time the best time, every time. Contact us to get started: indagare.com/go 3  I N D A G A R E . C O M

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BUILDING TOGETHER: Everythingstartswithgetting to know you. Beyond your hotelpreferences,we want to know what motivates you to travel, whether you’re going to Paris or Tanzania. With us, you have a partner for life.


O N

M Y

M I N D

SHARING MEMORIES O

Often, however, it is at the end of a trip that we receive the most moving missives—when the thrill of discovery morphs into memory, like fixer setting an image in an old-fashioned photograph. In July, I opened my email to find pictures from the Canadian holiday of Rick and Elissa Phillips, longtime Indagare members based in L.A. The one that stuck with me was of their daughter in the bow of a rowboat (right). Surrounded by turquoise Moraine Lake, she looks like a female figurehead on the prow of a ship. The picture beautifully captures a quintessential childhood experience: summer discovery. And it isn’t just the photos that give me a window into our community’s travels. I also love getting reviews and accounts of new finds. The Delafield family, from Seattle, for instance, were the very first guests to stay at a new lodge in Namibia. “The Nest is hard to describe,” they reported back. “The house, the decorations, the food, the service were impeccable. Of course, Sossusvlei was incomparable—oldest desert, tallest dunes. Hoanib was just as fascinating. Riding the riverbed, tracking lions and viewing the

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coast filled two perfect days. We saw every animal you could hope to see, including ones you probably won’t in other countries, such as black rhinos and desert lions and elephants. We will be going back to Africa.” Of course, member feedback is only one part of the story. Our own team spends hundreds of days a year scouting destinations around the world, bringing back the nuanced intelligence that powers our travel coverage. Among highlights in this issue are a review of a gorgeous French ski chalet (page 24); an adventure in Ethiopia (page 86), which we predict will emerge as a major destination; a first look at a reopened palace hotel in the center of Paris’s Left Bank (page 50); and a tour of Panama (page 80), including a visit to a new private island that is an ideal site to take over for an incredible celebration. I like to think of each travel revelation— whether it comes through a single image or a feedback email, from our team or from a member—as a strand in a complex web that connects us to the world and to one another. The image I have is of a globe glowing with illuminated pins that show where each member of the greater Indagare family is traveling on any given day. This ever-growing network of knowledge and contacts forms the basis of our travel wisdom. In our office, we often speak about the importance of “context” in gaining a deeper understanding of a destination. Because

pulling the relevance from those thousands of touchpoints—and knowing how to thread them together for individual trips—is what we do. Context begins with curiosity and exploration and is shaped by understanding the destination, as well as the person considering the trip. When this kind of thoughtful contextualizing is brought to trip planning, the resulting journeys are unforgettable. I was reminded of this powerful proposition when I recently cohosted an Insider Journey to Milan (page 74). Led by experts who literally unlocked the doors to some of the city’s most fabled locales, we bonded through our shared passion for discovery and learning. Sabina Schlumberger, one of the attendees, later wrote to me: “The Milan trip offered a bountiful visual feast, but the Indagare group truly fed my soul.” I could not have expressed it better myself. May your fall and winter travels be full of beauty and inspiration. I look forward to hearing about them all.

Length

5 days / 4 nights

MELISSA BIGGS BRADLEY INDAGARE CEO @INDAGARECEO & @INDAGARETRAVEL

ELISSA PHILLIPS; HOPE WOLFE; ZACHARY MADIN; AFSHAN AHMAD ORNAN

ne of the best parts of my job—if not the best part—is sharing in other people’s travels through images and stories. Many members send us pictures from their trips. Sometimes they arrive, like postcards, while the journey is still unfolding, allowing us to follow the adventures in real time as they occur. This summer, a family traveling in Italy sent us daily shots of their favorite views. Honeymooners visiting Southeast Asia for the first time sent us joyous images of themselves at temples, in jungles and at rooftop bars. Indagare family the Wolfes (right) showed their landing on a glacier in New Zealand’s Milford Sound.


Zach Madin and his husband, Chris Baker, on their honeymoon in Hanoi, Vietnam. Clockwise from above: Afshan Ahmad Ornan and her husband, David Ornan, at Deplar Farm in Iceland; Alexis Phillips on Moraine Lake in Canada; the Wolfe family on a glacier in Milford Sound in New Zealand.

PHOTO CREDIT TKT

Indagare is a members-only boutique travel-planning company. Weoffercuratedcontent,customizedtrip-planningandgrouptrips around personal passion points. Indagare Magazine is published twice annually exclusively for Indagare members. Š 2018 Indagare. All Rights Reserved. See the magazine online at indagare.com. Reproductioninwholeorinpartwithoutwrittenpermissionisprohibited. Trip inquiries and change of address requests can be made by phone or by emailing info@indagare.com. Indagare Membership Office: 212-988-2611 950 Third Avenue, 16th floor New York, NY 10022

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ON OUR RADAR

Culture Watch: V&A Dundee London’s belovedVictoria and Albert Museum opens its first location outside EnglandonSeptember15inDundee,Scotland.TheworkofJapanesearchitect KengoKuma,thebuildingwillpresentpermanentdisplaysofScottishdesign,as well as rotating exhibits.

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PHOTO V&A MUSEUM CREDITOF TKT DESIGN DUNDEE, ROSS FRASER MCLEAN

From two new gorgeous tented camps in Southeast Asia to our favorite carry-on bag, the travel news you need to know this season


Next Up: Belize

Central America’s only English-speaking country is boostingitstourismprofilewithtwo standoutproperties.Theromantic Itz’ana (left) and Blackadore Caye, Leo DiCaprio’s lavish and sustainability-minded retreat in a protected wildlife reserve, both set to open soon, are primed to become top beach resorts.

We are so glad you arranged a dinner with a local Druze family for us in Israel. It was extraordinary, and even with the language barrier, it was so fun to cook with them.”

ITZ’ANA, EILEEN CHANG; PARAVEL; MORI

~J.H., MEMBER SINCE 2014

TOKYO’SMUST-SEEMUSEUM

The 107,000-square-foot MORI Building Digital Art Museum has 50 interactive digital installations, including the highly InstagrammableForestofResonatingLamps (above),whichfeatureshundredsoflightbulbs that change color as you approach them.

Carry It On: Paravel Bags Indagare’s founder, Melissa Biggs Bradley, loves Paravel luggage, which can be customizedwithinitialsoremojis.Thebest-selling canvas Stowaway suitcase, seen here, folds flat, making it great for extra purchases on a trip. $325, tourparavel.com.

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Room with a View: Sheldon Chalet, Alaska The Summit room at the just-opened Sheldon Chalet has—fittingly— panoramic views of Denali, the highest mountain in North America. Thehotel,whichsitsontheonlyprivatelyownedpropertywithinDenali NationalParkandisreachedbyhelicopter,offersadventurousactivities,

Ireland’s legendary Ballyfin hotel, located 90 minutesfromDublin,hasjust debuteditsfirstprivatevilla– style accommodation. The Gardener’s Cottage, once thehomeofthe19th-century estate’s groundskeeper, includesacozysittingroom with a fireplace, a kitchenette and a patio with a hot tub for relaxing after a day of riding or shooting. Upstairsisaspaciousbedroom withhisandhersbathrooms and beautiful views.

Shanghai Style: Middle House China’s futuristic city has a sleek new design hotel. The latest property from the Swire group, which also operates Hong Kong’s adored Upper House, Middle House has three great restaurants, a 28,000-square-foot spa, a swimming pool and a gym with high-tech Hypoxi machines. 8  I N D A G A R E . C O M

THE MIDDLE HOUSE; BALLYFIN; SHELDON CHALET, JEFF SCHULTZ

Now Open: Ballyfin’s New Cottage


Trending: Glamping Prolific hotel designer Bill Bensley is the creative force behind two spectacular new tented camps in Asia: Capella Ubud (seen here), now open in Bali, and Shinta Mani Wild, launching in late 2018 near Cambodia’s Angkor Wat temple complex. The two resorts, each with fewer than 25 rooms, have safari-chic décor and a romantic atmosphere, making them ideal for couples and honeymooners.

Our favorite part of staying at Lake Como’s Il Sereno is that they have gorgeous wooden riva boats for guests to rent. All you need is a driver’s license, and you can cruise around on your own.” ~R.P, MEMBER SINCE 2007

CAPELLA UBUD, KRISHNA ADITHYA

WELLNESSESSENTIAL:SAKARALIFESOURCE

Ourlatesthealthytravelstaple,thisnutritionalpowderispacked with 12 grams of plant protein, collagen-boosting amino acids for glowing skin, digestive enzymes designed to ward off bloating and vitamin B12 and L-theanine, for energy. From Sakara—a plant-based-meal delivery program available in all 50states—thepowdercanbemixedwithcoconutwaterforan easy, on-the-go energy burst. $45 for a pack of 10, sakara.com

On the Horizon: The Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection Travelers wishing to sail the high seas in style will soon be able to do so with Ritz-Carlton, which is launching a fleet of 149-suite yachts in 2020 (and taking reservations now). The 625-foot-long ships—which are also available for private charter—offer cuisine by Michelin-starredchefs,as well as such facilities as a pool, spa and gym with floor-to-ceilingwindows.

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Detox on the Beach

Some of our favorite long weekends are focused on wellness, and a number of our top beach properties offer both five-star facilities and the ability for guests to come home healthier and happier. Park Hyatt St. Kitts, which opened last November, has a 37,000-square-foot Miraval Life in Balance Spa with treatments that honor the mind-body connection and private yoga and meditation classes. In the Turks and Caicos, a longtime favorite, Amanyara (seen here), has one of the most beautiful beaches in the Caribbean, as well as a newly renovated spa and fitness center, boxing and Pilates studios, daily complimentary workout classes and a raw food menu for guests who prefer vegan dishes like zucchini noodles with pesto. Both are a short direct flight from NYC, making these two properties go-tos for seaside luxury and a light detox experience.

The Long Weekend: Blackberry Mountain

FASHIONSTATEMENT:AETHERJACKET

Suited equally to rainy days in New York City or an adventure in Chile, the waterproof and wind-resistant Soho jacket is made from a lightweight polyester fabric and is one of our favorite piecesofstylishactivewearrightnow.$265,aetherapparel.com 10  I N D A G A R E . C O M

AMANYARA; BLACKBERRY FARM, BEALL & THOMAS; AETHER

One of our favorite rustic U.S. retreats—Tennessee’s Blackberry Farm— is debuting a neighboring property. Located on 5,200 acres, Blackberry Mountain will open this winter and have cottages and larger homes, farm-to-table restaurants and serious wellness-focused offerings: a spa with ayurvedic services, fitness classes like Zumba and treetop yoga and such activities as mountain biking, horse-


3 Reasons to Visit South America Now

We loved the Sanders Hotel in Copenhagen! The trip highlight, however, was dinner at Koefoed— one of the 10 best meals I’ve ever had!”

AWASI IGUAZU, FEDERICO GARCIA; CHE ARGENTINE GRILL

~C.S., MEMBER SINCE 2018

Anoutstandingtrioofhotels is drawing us south. 1. &Beyond Vira Vira: Highly regarded safari lodge company &Beyond introduced its first property outside Africa on September 1 in the Chilean Lake District. On offer: farm-to-table cuisine and activities such as horseback riding, hiking and fly-fishing. 2. Awasi Iquazú: When this 14-villa lodge (left) opened, in early 2018, it provided the first fivestar accommodations near Argentina’s Iguazú Falls, the largest waterfall system in the world. Guests get their own private guides for exploring the region, visiting local tribes and more. 3. Eleven Experience Rio Palena: When it begins welcoming guests in early 2019,thisadventurelodge, located in a remote corner of Chilean Patagonia, is sure to become a destination for heli-fishing and

NEIGHBORHOODWATCH:MABONENG

Johannesburg’s dynamic Maboneng district has blossomed sinceApartheidended,in1994,cultivatingalivelyartsceneand restaurants featuring fusion cuisine. Don’t miss the Museum of African Design, the Arts on Main complex—a series of formerly dilapidated buildings that now house cool galleries—and Che ArgentineGrill,whichservesempanadasandotherArgentinian specialties (right) to the accompaniment of a tango band. 11


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LONDON’S LATEST AND GREATEST

Ourcuratedrosterofplacestosleep,eatandplayintheBritishcapitalrightnow. Indagare’s Emma Pierce reports.

Hot Hotels Never short on luxury hotels, London is welcoming properties that aim to challenge the city’s classics. Situated between Knightsbridge and Chelsea, the Belmond brand’s Cadogan Hotel opens later this year with 54 rooms and suites in an 1887 residence that was once home to Oscar Wilde and socialite/actress Lillie Langtry, Edward VII’s mistress before he became king. Offering a charming escape for couples and families, it will include a fine-dining restaurant, a bar, a tea lounge and a spa and fitness center and also provide access to the private Cadogan Place Gardens and tennis courts. Located in the Holborn neighborhood, the just-opened L’oscar is a sexy boutique property housed in a former Baroque church and designed by the acclaimed Jacques Garcia,

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who has also worked on Paris’s Hôtel Costes, Marrakech’s La Mamounia and New York City’s NoMad Hotel. Its 39 guest rooms are individually appointed and feature such elements as oversized headboards in black, gold and crimson, fringed velvet settees and vintage moldings. Late last year, the glitzy Bloomsbury hotel relaunched following a transformative renovation. Housed in a 1928 brick building, it has 164 elegant, classically designed rooms, but the pièce de résistance is the Coral Room bar. Designed by Martin Brudnizki (who also did the interiors of London’s legendary private club Annabel’s), the space is decidedly bold, with high ceilings, jewel-toned velvet couches, sparkling chandeliers, a crackling fireplace and bright red walls. Offering an extensive menu of playful, pretty cocktails, it’s a perfect predinner option for hotel guests and locals alike.

Trending Restaurants Brigadiers, the latest from the team behind Gymkhana and Hoppers, has several dining spaces, all serving dishes inspired by the bars and taverns of India. Patrons can feast on tandoori chicken club sandwiches, chili cheese naan, Afghani lamb kebab skewers and more while

playing pool or billiards, lounging on the terrace, watching live sports on the telly in the bar or catching up with friends in the dining room. In Fitzrovia, lauded Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s Rovi offers a café atmosphere and lighter, veggie-focused fare, including slow-roasted cauliflower with crispy chickpeas, tahini and fermented chili salsa. Two debuts are impressive successors to established hot spots. The twostory Covent Garden restaurant Cora Pearl, the second restaurant from the team behind Kitty Fisher’s, offers snacks like Montgomery cheese toasties and larger dishes such as fish stew. In the City, Bob Bob Cité, sister to the lavish Bob Bob Ricard (best known for having a “Press for Champagne” button at tables), serves French-Russian plates such as brioche chicken dumplings and steak tartare. Making some of the biggest news last summer was the arrival of Gazelle, an all-day Mayfair restaurant from two El Bulli alumni. Reached by a private elevator, the stylish space, which includes both a restaurant and a cocktail bar, feels like a member’s club and offers a menu of modern European dishes, all of which are meant to be shared. Another big-name Mayfair newcomer is Hide by Ollie Dabbous,

THE BLOOMSBURY

ONE OF THE WORLD’S most dynamic capitals, London is always buzzing with news, and hotels and restaurants open at an astonishing rate. This season, the diverse highlights include everything from a highly anticipated hotel and a stylish Indian barbecue spot to an architecturally stunning shopping complex. Plus, we round up the shows and exhibits to see now.


PHOTO CREDIT TKT

The Coral Room Bar at London’stheBloomsbury

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comprising a bar, a bakery and a restaurant, each occupying a different floor in the three-story building and named appropriately, Below, Ground and Above, respectively. For the past 75 years, the Lina Stores delicatessen has been a Soho staple for gourmet Italian groceries. Now, just a few doors down is a restaurant of the same name where visitors can indulge in a proper meal. The menu focuses on handmade pasta, but don’t miss the antipasti, which includes delicious plates like baby octopus with crispy lemon and garlic. For a dose of London history, enjoy a meal at the esteemed Brown’s Hotel, once frequented by Winston

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Churchill, Rudyard Kipling, Agatha Christie and the like. The property recently launched Beck at Brown’s, helmed by Michelin-starred chef Heinz Beck, which serves such Italian fare as cacio e pepe with lime-marinated shrimp and grilled Ibérico pork tenderloin with mashed potatoes. Before or after dining, pop next door to the hotel’s speakeasy-style Donovan Bar, which was just renovated and has the largest privately owned collection of photographs by Sir Terence Donovan.

Culture Kick The show everyone is discussing this fall is the National Portrait Gallery’s “Michael Jackson: On the Wall,” on view through October 21.

The exhibition, which opened this summer in conjunction with what would have been Michael Jackson’s 60th birthday, showcases art inspired by the music icon. On through January 2019 at the Victoria and Albert Museum, “Fashioned from Nature” examines the relationship between fashion and the environment and how they have influenced each other, from the 1600s to the present day. Photography is having a moment in the British capital. The V&A Photography Centre launches on October 12 and will showcase the museum’s collection of more than 300,000 works, including some of the most famous images in the world, such as Cecil Beaton’s portrait of Queen

THE BLOOMSBURY; BECK AT BROWN’S; COAL DROP YARDS, KING’S CROSS; THE SHOP AT BLUEBIRD

A drink at the Coral Room. Clockwise from top left: The Shop at Bluebird; pasta at Beck at Brown’s; the lounge at the Bloomsbury; An Illuminating Path at Michael Jackson: On the Wall; Donovan Bar; The Shop at Bluebird; Lina Stores; Coal Drop Yards; the Club Bar at the Bloomsbury.


LINA STORES; THE SHOP AT BLUEBIRD; DONOVAN BAR; NATIONAL PORTAIT GALLERY, DAVID LACHAPELLE

Elizabeth II and Lewis Morley’s of Christine Keeler. Later in the year, Stockholm’s Fotografiska museum is opening a 89,000-square-foot outpost, the largest institution dedicated to photography in the British capital. It will display works by the same big names that have been exhibited in the original location, including Helmut Newton, David LaChappelle and Annie Leibovitz. In the West End, Tina: The Musical, which chronicles Tina Turner’s life and musical career, debuted last spring to great acclaim and continues to draw crowds. Opened in July and directed by Sam Mendes, the three-actor play The Lehman Trilogy recalls the lives of bankers

Henry, Emanuel and Mayer Lehman, and their firm’s collapse into bankruptcy. With brilliant turns from actors Simon Russell Beale, Adam Godley and Ben Miles, the play runs through October 20. One of the fall’s most anticipated shows is Company, a gender-reversed production of Stephen Sondheim’s 1970 musical that will star Patti LuPone and open on October 10. And now through November 3, Ian McKellen revives the lead in Shakespeare’s epic tragedy King Lear.

DID YOU KNOW?

Our team has spent 52 nights in London this year. Visit indagare.com/go or call us at 212-988-2611 to tap our intel and get special amenities.

Best Shopping Concept store The Shop at Bluebird has launched a flagship in Covent Garden that is a shopper’s paradise with three floors filled with curated women’s clothing, accessories and home goods. But the fall’s most talked-about style debut may be Coal Drops Yard, designed by Heatherwick Studio, the firm behind Cape Town’s Zeitz MOCAA. In the 1850s, the yard received trains of coal from northern England, and remnants from its former use—cobbled streets, ironwork, viaducts—have been incorporated into the complex, which will comprise 65 shops, including a Tom Dixon flagship boutique, restaurants and an elevated walkway similar to New York City’s High Line. 

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M E M B E R T R AV E L S

ADVENTURE OF A LIFETIME

CHILE IS A BUCKET-LIST destination that wows even the most seasoned outdoor enthusiasts with its wild landscapes. From the mist-covered mountain ranges and glacial lakes of Patagonia to the red-rock canyons and sand dunes of the Atacama Desert, it offers guided activities and cultural experiences for visitors of all ages and interests. Indagare member Jeremy Hitzig and his family recently returned from the spring-break adventure of a lifetime, during which they stayed at two of the region’s best lodges: Awasi Patagonia and Awasi Atacama. Here, he shares the highlights of their Chilean escape, which is sure to inspire your next expedition to the Southern hemisphere. “The Awasis hit every possible high point, especially for families. We are still basking in the glow from our extraordinary visit, and I don’t think I can find enough superlatives to describe these two very special properties. They were far beyond special places to stay. They were destinations in their own right. We were stunned by the vistas at Awasi Patagonia, as well as by the design of the main lodge and our cabins. Most of all, we were struck by the team. We were treated with genuine hospitality; every person there

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welcomed us warmly and showed true interest in and attention to our family. Our guides, Josefina, Jose Tomas and Cata, were such fun to be with. They were flexible and tailored our excursions to the interests (and stamina) of our family—a notso-simple challenge, as we have four boys aged between nine and 14. The guides shared their passion for the region and engaged our kids in discussions on everything from geology and animals to ecotourism and music.

and Jean, shared their passion for the outdoors and were incredibly accommodating and good-humored with our boys. An especially fun excursion was horseback riding and sandboarding in the Valle de Marte. We also loved how we were made to feel truly at home there—for instance, the dining room always prepared personal predinner drinks and housemade potato chips for us, which we enjoyed fireside before sitting down to dinner.

Each day at the end of our activities, we returned to the lodge to a welcome predinner “mocktail” made just for the boys. The meals were very special, and we loved the evening wine service, which included a discussion of the wines and a color-coded map of the regions that we could consult. We also appreciated the accommodations made in the meal choices, which gave the boys the opportunity to try new things—they loved the guanaco (an animal similar to a llama)—with the option of falling back on a simple but tasty pasta. The dining staff took particular care with our two youngest. I will always remember the post-hiking treat of just-melted provoleta prepared for us on an outdoor grill!

In short, I can’t say enough about how wonderful our experience at the Awasi properties was. We were humbled by the care and genuine hospitality shown to us. Our family debated the matter endlessly, but I think Awasi Patagonia and New Zealand’s Kauri Cliffs are in a dead heat for our favorite lodging experience ever. We’ve put ourselves in Indagare’s hands for our travel-planning for several years now, and you’ve never let us down. It was truly an outstanding experience from beginning to end.” 

The service at the Awasi Atacama was equally superb. Our guides, Mabel

The Awasi properties were far beyond special places to stay. They were destinations in their own right.” ~JEREMY HITZIG, MEMBER SINCE 2014

AWASI PATAGONIA; JEREMY HITZIG

IndagarememberstheHitzigfamilyhighlighttheir triptoChile,aknockoutdestinationforanyonein search of adventure.


BOOK NOW

PHOTO CREDIT TKT

A bedroom at Awasi Patagonia. Clockwise from top left: Awasi Patagonia; a tea break; an afternoon trek; exploring the grounds.

Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Chilean Patagonia.

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FIVEEASYFALL GETAWAYS

From Miami to Mexico and Savannah to Sonoma, we’ve scoped out five perfect places for weekends away, all with new hotels and restaurants and activities galore.

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Savannah

Epicureans and art lovers now have plenty of reasons to visit this coastal Georgian city, where traditional historic antebellum architecture and warm Southern charm are complemented by renowned galleries and trendy restaurants offering innovative, farm-to-fork Southern cuisine. Husk, led by James Beard Award–winning chef Sean Brock, opened to much fanfare earlier this year in an elegantly restored home in the Historic District and, like its sister restaurant in Charleston, sources all its ingredients from the South. The American Prohibition Museum—the country’s first dedicated to the Prohibition era—debuted late last year, and its full-service speakeasy has been earning praise for the Jazz Age cocktails it serves to museumgoers and evening revelers. Yet another reason to visit is chic new boutique property Perry Lane Hotel, which celebrates the city’s roots and culture in its eclectic décor, including works by local artists, while bolstering Savannah’s culinary renaissance with its foodie focus: in addition

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to a restaurant and wine market offering locally sourced fare, it has two cocktail bars, one inside and one on the spacious roof.

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Napa and Sonoma

After last year’s devastating wildfires, California wine country is again welcoming travelers seeking to relax at romantic retreats among the vineyards. In addition to classic properties like Meadowood, Auberge du Soleil and Farmhouse Inn, they’ll find new gems, such as Luxury Collection hotel Las Alcobas, overlooking the Beringer Estate vineyards, and Francis House, an old-world bed-and-breakfast in a refurbished 19th-century mansion. Slated to open in Napa in 2019 is Four Seasons Calistoga Resort, with a winery led by acclaimed winemaker Thomas Rivers Brown on the property. On the dining front, Charlie Palmer, the celebrity chef behind New York’s popular Aureole, unveiled a new steakhouse in downtown Napa’s Archer Hotel last winter. And making headlines in the valleys are two San Francisco transplants: Ristorante Umbria, which closed last year after two decades in the city, has brought its beloved Italian cuisine to Sonoma County, while the owner of San Francisco’s brunchtime favorite Zazie recently launched Lovina in the

PHOTO CREDIT JEREMY SWANSON TKT

THESE DYNAMIC DESTINATIONS guarantee something for all types of travelers—whether you’re looking for a retreat in the sun or the next foodie hot spot in which to wine and dine— all within a short flight or drive from either U.S. coast.


PHOTO CREDIT TKT

Biking on Castle Creek road in Aspen

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BOOK NOW Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your next long weekend trip.

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PHOTOSEASONS FOUR CREDIT TKT THE SURF CLUB; VISIT NAPA VALLEY; ACRE, GINA & RYAN PHOTOGRAPHY

The pool at the Four Seasons at the Surf Club in Miami. Clockwise from left: Cabo’s Acre; hot air ballooning in Napa; a cozy table at Acre; a room at the Four Seasons.


space formerly occupied by Calistoga Kitchen. And for activities, oenophiles will want to spend their days roaming the vineyards and tasting the local reds and whites, but there are plenty of other options for gourmets, shoppers and families, including restaurants, artisanal boutiques, fun cooking classes, lush bike trails and watersports on the Russian River.

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PHOTOSEASONS FOUR CREDIT TKT THE SURF CLUB

Aspen

The restaurant at the Four Seasons at the Surf Club is excellent, and the hotel draws a sophisticated crowd for cocktails in the evening. We would absolutely come back here!” ~MINDY AND J.M. SCHAPIRO, MEMBERS SINCE 2016

Aspen is heaven for outdoor enthusiasts, even when its slopes aren’t covered in snow. Seemingly infinite miles of wilderness, 14,000-foot-high mountains and roaring rivers, not to mention resorts, provide ample opportunities for hiking, biking, golf, paragliding, white-water rafting, horseback riding, rock climbing and, of course, top-notch skiing. For those looking to indulge in aprèsski (or après-hike) dinner and drinks, Aspen has always offered a surprising number of top restaurants, and a new one is joining the fold this year. The acclaimed Manhattan restaurant Eleven Madison Park is launching a cold-weather counterpart to its popular summer pop-up in the Hamptons that will be named EMP Winter House; it will be overseen by much-lauded chef Daniel Humm, who is expected to mine his Swiss heritage for culinary inspiration. Last summer, the stylish and historic Hotel Jerome unveiled a series of expansions, including two 2,000-square-foot, three-bedroom residence-style suites, each on its own private floor, and a 60-person event space in the converted 140-yearold Aspen Times printing house, complete with a cool basement bar, Bad Harriet.

a new era of luxury with a development currently underway at Costa Palmas. This includes a members-only yacht club, a Robert Trent Jones II golf course, private villas and residences, a full-service marina and two much-anticipated resorts from the Four Seasons (opening early 2019) and Aman (opening 2020). Meanwhile, Ritz-Carlton Reserve is adding the oceanfront Zadún, which emphasizes tranquility with private villas featuring plunge pools. Nobu’s first Mexican hotel is also slated to open on Cabo’s beachfront this year, and a new Montage resort just debuted at Santa Maria Bay with one of the area’s only swimmable beaches. Cabo’s current lineup of pampering resorts, meanwhile, continues to improve. Las Ventanas al Paraíso recently introduced Arbol, where the chefs use woks imported from Hong Kong and tandoor ovens from India to craft Asian fare. Plus, longtime favorite Flora Farms recently opened a second restaurant, Acre, a beautiful spot for alfresco dining.

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Miami

With its avant-garde art and design districts, fusion culinary scene and seven-square-mile stretch of white-sand beach, Miami lures sun worshippers and culture hounds. And thanks to last year’s opening of the Four Seasons Hotel at the Surf Club, the property is on everyone’s must list, because of its elegant yet family-friendly atmosphere, luxe rooms and high-touch service, not to mention the first-ever offshoot of the Amalfi Coast’s Le Sirenuse restaurant, complete with a Champagne bar. 

4

Cabo

This longtime retreat for jet-setters and celebrities is ushering in

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AT HOME IN THE FRENCH ALPS

Indagare’s Emma Pierce practices the art of getting away from it all at a high-design chalet in a little-known corner of eastern France.

Such a respite is a rare luxury these days, but travelers looking to disconnect should add Le Miroir, France, to their to-visit lists. Situated in the Savoie region, this alpine village— with just over 500 residents and little presence on the international travel radar—is home to Chalet Pelerin, a villa with serious style. The Alpinechic accommodations, welcoming staff and almost overwhelming abundance of activities ensure that guests

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are fully present each day, engaging with their surroundings and enjoying a vacation that is all about experiencing the world around them. It comes as little surprise that Chalet Pelerin is managed by Eleven Experience, which was founded in 2011 to serve “adventure capitalists”: highend, intrepid travelers with a passion for the outdoors. The company manages a handful of properties scattered around the world, from a duo of hotels in Colorado to a soon-to-open lodge in Chile, each of which is staffed with world-class guides and outfitted by the founder’s wife, who owns an interior design firm in London. What makes Chalet Pelerin so special is that it combines six-star amenities with a low-key, homey atmosphere. Often used by the owner and his family, the 5,500-square-foot chalet has four king bedrooms and a bunkroom with four twin beds, an indoor pool, an outdoor hot tub and a sauna and steam room. Guests can arrange for massages and yoga classes, and the chalet comes with a sommelier and a chef, who whips up a delicious breakfast spread in the morning and a seasonal dinner in the evening. Guests usually have lunch off-property, during activities, but any who

decide to stay home for the day can put the on-site pizza oven to use. Thanks to the chalet’s location near the Italian and Swiss borders and a 30-minute drive from seven ski resorts (including Val d’Isère), guests never lack for activities. Winter pursuits include on- and off-piste skiing, heli-skiing, dog sledding and more. In the warmer months, guests can bike, kayak, horseback ride, whitewater raft and paraglide. Every excursion is led by one of Eleven Experience’s guides, and since the villa provides a private car and driver, it doesn’t really matter that it is not ski-in/ski-out. It is, however, snowshoe-in/snowshoe-out. Perhaps Chalet Pelerin’s most unique amenity is the Alpage, a renovated farmhouse that is a 30-minute snowshoe from the lodge. The electricity-free abode is illumined by candles and has a dining room, kitchen and cozy nooks furnished with fur throws. After drinks by the bonfire outside, guests are treated to a fondue dinner by the fireplace. Here— from a perch high in the mountains, surrounded by flickering lights and far out of range of cell service—you can experience the ultimate luxury: being disconnected from the rest of the world, if only for a little while. 

Emma Pierce Indagare’s Destinations Editor While at Chalet Pelerin, I learned... that heli-skiing is prohibited in France because ofenvironmental concerns. But, because Chalet Pelerin is located near the Italian border, the hotel will transfer guests to Italy where they can heli-ski.

CHALET PELERIN

THESE DAYS, it is almost impossible to truly unplug. No matter how far we travel, technology keeps us at least partially connected to the very things that stress us out at home: news alerts, incessant emails and social media. So, on a spring trip to the French Alps, it was with some wonder that I realized I’d managed to shed my technology shadow for 17 hours. During this time, I skied across the French-Italian border, indulged in truffle pasta for lunch, navigated a near whiteout on La Rosière, thanks to my skilled ski guide, snowshoed to a mountain hut for fondue and trekked down the slopes by moonlight to a soundtrack of 1980s hits that blared from my guide’s backpack speaker. There was simply no time— nor longing—to check electronic communications of any sort.


BOOK NOW Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan a villa vacation.

PHOTO CREDIT TKT

A Le Miroir scenic. Clockwise from left: the Alpage; off-piste skiing; a breakfast crĂŞpe at the Chalet; the indoor pool; alfresco drinks at the Chalet.

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ISRAEL REVISITED

Although most often cited for its powerful history, Israel is a dynamic, foodie-friendly destination, where the ancient and modern intertwine. Indagare’s Eliza Harris reports.

stove chatting with us, stirring, slicing and meticulously plating while we feasted on dish after dish. He interspersed stories from his childhood with explanations of his cooking technique, demonstrating how he made a stock from shrimp shells and aromatics, then used it in blanching vegetables for extra flavor. Everything was homemade, down to the challah, served with coarse sea salt. The courses kept coming: shrimp with sautéed spinach and leeks, a delicate

ROB BYE

Dressed in his professional whites, he was grasping a handful of thin branches he had foraged earlier that

day. “Here, rub these between your fingers and taste,” he said, picking off a few leaves. “This shrub is indigenous to Israel. The leaves are tangy, like lemon. They’re great with fish.” With his small dog trailing behind him, he led us down the cobblestoned streets to his home and welcomed us into his kitchen for dinner. Next to a small stove laden with simmering pots, a long table had been set, complete with flickering candles. Over the next few hours, Zook stood at the

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DUSK WAS FALLING ON JAFFA, the oldest neighborhood in Tel Aviv, when Israeli celebrity chef Nir Zook met up with our group of six. The handsome and charismatic Zook, who at 42 already has under his belt restaurants, books and a TV show, has been called “one of the chefs defining modern food in Israel.”


artichoke soup, roasted beets, fresh fish carpaccio, risotto made with farro and a sprinkling of almonds. It was a quintessential Israeli experience, full of openness, generosity and abundance, and the perfect way to kick off a week in the country.

standing waist-deep, letting the strong waves crash against her, undeterred by risk or brisk temperature. Live like that, I thought to myself. You can feel the energy throughout Tel Aviv, from the packed alfresco restaurants along Rothschild Boulevard to the bikers by the beach to the overflowing bars in the evenings. I felt it again in Jerusalem, where, at hot spot Machneyuda, the most coveted restaurant reservation in town, music blasts, food is theater

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I went to Israel because I was drawn to its history, but I left enchanted by its modernity and vitality. It has an energy that is palpable. I noticed it the day after

I arrived, when I woke at sunrise and got my first taste of Tel Aviv people-watching. My room at the Dan Tel Aviv had huge plate-glass windows overlooking the beach. I cracked them open and felt the chilly morning air, then noticed how much was happening below me. I counted no fewer than a dozen surfers catching waves in the area marked “Dangerous, No Swimming.� Next to one of the warning signs, a woman who looked to be in her seventies was

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B A C K

F R O M

Our favorite meal in Tel Aviv was at the Salon. Thanks to a tip from Indagare, we had an experience we’ll remember for years. By the time dessert was served, everyone was dancing!” ~LIZA NUGENT, MEMBER SINCE 2013

In Jerusalem, of course, the energy is also deeply spiritual. When I travel, I try to arrange my trip so that I see the sites while encountering as few tourists as possible—by visiting during the off season, for instance, and touring early in the morning. In Jerusalem, I was surprised to find that the tourists actually added to my experience: it was evident that the holy city made a profound emotional impact on everyone present. I was transfixed by the way people stretch out their arms to lay their palms and foreheads on the Western Wall, holding them there for as long as they can, pressing deeply into the stone. My favorite site was the Basilica of the Agony on the Mount of Olives, an intimate Byzantine church with exquisite cobalt blue and gold mosaic ceilings that shimmer in the soft light. It was so beautiful I cried, at which point a random tourist came up and hugged me. Only in Jerusalem! What’s fun about Israel is how easily this kind of historic and cultural exploration can be combined with outdoor adventure. The country is small but

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encompasses a wide geographical range: mountain and beach, lush farmland and desert. Splitting our time mostly between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, we had a huge variety of experiences with minimal moving around. In the former city, we based ourselves at the Dan; in the latter at the King David. Both are very centrally located–the Dan right on the beach and the King David just outside the gates of the Old City–and are especially memorable for the views from the rooms and the quality of the food. The breakfast buffet at the King David, in particular, is outstanding, with a juice bar and amazing smoked fish and cheeses. In Jerusalem, we were able to walk to the main historical and religious sites one day and make an excursion to the desert the next. We

explored the 2,000-year-old mountaintop fortress of Masada and then went swimming in the aqua water of the Dead Sea. In Tel Aviv, our group took a cooking class and a street-art tour, went biking and visited markets to sample street food. The emphasis on small plates makes it easy to share: each meal we savored was communal, delicious and perfectly Israeli. 

ALENA; LIBRARY BAR, SIVAN ASKAYO; DANA FRIEDLANDER

and the waiters take breaks to dance on the bar.


BOOK NOW Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Israel.

A woman at Jerusalem’s Western Wall. Clockwise from left: A fresh pita; a Tel Aviv beach; Library Bar at Tel Aviv’s Norman Hotel; cauliflower, the terrace and Shakshuka at Tel Aviv’s Alena.

ISRAEL’STOPTABLES The ever-evolving food scene is now a bona fide reason to visit. These are the spots not to miss.

ALENA

IN TEL AVIV… The Salon: Upscale dining and a lively atmosphere Alena: Seasonal Mediterranean fare Santa Katarina: Trendy seaside eatery Hotel Montefiore: Chic bistro Herzl 16: Classic all-day dining Library Bar: Buzzy after-dinner drinks Taizu: Delicious Asian fusion IN JERUSALEM… Adom: Sophisticated Mediterranean fare Eucalyptus: Traditional local food Machneyuda: Buzzing hot spot Machne Yehuda Market: Must-visit food mart (don’t miss sampling falafel) Mamilla Hotel: Rooftop bar Marzipan: Israeli baked goods

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T R I P T I P S

TOP TIPS FOR BEATING JET LAG

Having logged more than 1,000 hours in the air this year, the Indagare team has compiled our ultimate guide to fighting frequent flyers’ No. 1 enemy: jet lag.

EVERY TRAVELER KNOWS that jet lag can have a significant impact on the first days following a long flight. According to the National Sleep Foundation, this common ailment occurs when the sleep-wake cycle determined by your body’s circadian clock conflicts with the daytime and evening hours of your new destination. You may not be able to avoid the symptoms entirely, but there are several steps you can take before and after your arrival to mitigate the effects of crossing time zones. Here are our best tips and tricks for combating the dreaded jet lag.

so you can hit the ground running when you arrive in the morning. Our team uses noise-canceling headphones, eye masks, natural sleep aids and sleep-inducing playlists to transform less-than-ideal airplane seats into restful oases. We also recommend waking up extra early on the day of your flight, so you’ll feel more tired than usual by the time you board. If you’re in the air during your destination’s daylight hours, keep yourself awake by walking in the aisles, stretching frequently and hydrating often, then head straight to bed upon arrival at night.

Upon Arrival

Before You Go

Drink plenty of water but avoid eating on the plane. Many flight attendants swear by this trick: eat something healthy and easy to digest before your flight, then stick to water while in the air. The idea is that avoiding salty airplane food prevents bloating and lethargy, while drinking only water keeps your digestive system from working extra hard once you land, reserving your body’s energy for helping you stay awake. Try to drink at least eight ounces of water every hour of your flight. If you need a snack during a long trip, consume unprocessed, light foods like unsalted nuts or fruit and juices at a time when you’d be eating at your destination.

Spend time in the sun. Maximize your exposure to natural light during your first days on the ground. This helps reset your body’s circadian rhythm to match the daylight hours of your new time zone. 

En Route Commit to a sleep plan. If your flight takes place during your destination’s evening hours, do your best to sleep on the plane,

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Whether you use natural sleeping aids, like melatonin and magnesium, or prescription ones, try to sleep when you would be sleeping at your destination, and stay awake when it is daytime there.” ~MELISSA BIGGS BRADLEY

CALEB WOODS

Adjust your body clock in advance. A few days prior to your departure, begin slightly shifting your sleeping and eating schedules to be closer to those of the time zone you will be entering, so the adjustment will feel less abrupt after touchdown. Immediately upon boarding the plane, set your watch or phone to your destination’s time, so you can plan your in-flight meals and sleep accordingly.

Embrace your new time zone immediately. If you arrive during your destination’s daytime hours, resist the urge to nap, as this will only disrupt your sleep schedule further. Push through the day by remaining moderately active, perhaps exercising or enjoying a spa treatment. If you must close your eyes, sleep for no more than an hour or two. If you arrive at night and need help falling asleep, take a warm bath and avoid caffeine, alcohol and any cellphone or computer screens for at least an hour before bed.


INDAGARE’SAIRPLANERESCUEKIT A well-stocked carry-on is key for traveling in comfort, so scoop up these in-flight essentials before your next trip. Hill House Home baby pillow, $90 Tiny pillows that are in a completely different league from those offered on planes and come in crisp, finely woven pillow cases. Bose noise-canceling headphones, from $249 High-qualityheadphonesthatblockoutsleep-disruptingsounds—from the purring engine to crying babies. Saje Pocket Farmacy oil blend kit, $60 Five roll-on oils that promote relaxation, relieve pain and release stress.

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Ursa Major Essential face wipes, $24 Individually wrapped bamboo face wipes that are infused with natural ingredients like aloe and green tea and will clean, exfoliate, soothe and hydrate your skin all in one swipe. Lululemon Refresh hot/cold bottle, $38 Double-walled,stainless-steelbottlethatkeepsliquidscoldfor24hours and hot for nine. Natural Calm Packets , $24 Magnesium powder that mixes with water for a natural sleep aid.

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H O N E Y M O O N S

UNEXPECTED ROMANCE

While tried-and-true honeymoon destinations never go out of style, there issomethingincrediblyromanticabout venturing off the beaten path with your new spouse.

WHETHER TRAVELING TO an up-and-coming African safari location or lesser-known Italian beach retreat, newlyweds who opt for an under-the-radar honeymoon destination can expect to bond through the shared thrill of discovery. Here, we recommend trips where adventure and romance—not to mention a lack of crowds—are almost guaranteed.

Indonesia

Rwanda and Zimbabwe

With its staggering natural beauty and distinctive culture, Bhutan appeals to both landscape lovers and spiritual seekers. The country, which strictly limits tourism, is ideal for newlyweds interested in broadening and deepening their understanding of the world and each other. 

Alaska Remote, exotic and full of adventure, Alaska provides adrenaline-pumping activities and astounding landscapes that rival those of popular overseas destinations—and you don’t need a passport to get there.

Puglia Puglia has all the attractions of better-known Mediterranean honeymoon destinations—a warm climate and miles of beautiful beaches, numerous country inns and charming villages with Baroque churches and tiny piazzas—minus the tourists.

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Bhutan

PHOTO CREDIT SINGITA; LINKWASHA TKT CAMP, DANA ALLEN; PALAZZO MARGHERITA

Observing endangered mountain gorillas in Rwanda is a profound wildlife experience. Zimbabwe, meanwhile, offers adventurous honeymooners a wealth of UNESCO sites like Victoria Falls, as well as luxurious lodges.

Comprising more than 17,000 islands, Indonesia promises romantic days spent hiking volcanoes, visiting temples and sampling delicious fusion cuisine. A can’t-miss for adventurous honeymooners: chartering a sailboat to explore the islands of Komodo, Java and Moyo in near seclusion.


Our safari honeymoon was equal parts adventure, romance and inspiration—trulyonce-in-a-lifetime. Thank you for making it so perfect.” ~SAMANTHA, MEMBER SINCE 2011

GIVE THE GIFT OF AN ULTIMATE HONEYMOON

Our Honeymoon Membership is the perfect wedding or engagement gift for newlyweds planning a romantic getaway—fromalong-weekendmini-moonin Capritoanextravaganthoneymoonsafari or a last-minute baby-moon in the Maldives. Learn more at indagare.com/honeymoons.

PHOTO CREDIT TKT AMANIKAN

Sunset on a private boat in Indonesia. Clockwise from opposite left: a starry night at Zimbabwe’s Linkwasha Camp; a break on a game drive at Zimbabwe’s Singita Pamushana; a Puglia scenic.

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J O U R N E Y

GETTING PERSONAL IN SEDONA

DaniShapirohasauthoredninebooks,chattedwithOprah and led workshops around the world.This November, she is hosting an Indagare Insider Journey. Here, Indagare’s SimoneGirnertalkswithheraboutthetripandthecourage that comes from telling our stories.

The author of five novels and four (soon five) memoirs, Shapiro is the kind of writer that makes readers feel an immediate, deep connection. In fact, in describing her oeuvre, one longs for a better descriptor than memoir, a word habitually trailed by a whiff of narcissism, because what she does is so much more sophisticated. On the page, Shapiro is fearless, tackling complex themes—love, longing, memory, aging—with humility and curiosity. Hers are the kinds of books that you highlight, mark up and pull from the shelf years later to search for that one quote that shifted something in your heart. She also often steps back from her own narrative, allowing other voices to weigh in, creating an illuminating

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exchange with writers, poets, dreamers and thinkers across time. When your deepest fear is shared and beautifully expressed not only by Dani Shapiro but also by Virginia Woolf and Grace Paley—well, suddenly, you’re in marvelous, eloquent company, and the fear itself is a little lighter to carry. For Shapiro, who has explored spirituality and personal transformation in her work, the line between her writing life and her regular life is blurred, if it exists at all. “I’ve come to know myself, always, by facing the blank page,” says the author, who lives in Litchfield County, Connecticut, with her filmmaker husband, Michael Maren, and their son, Jacob. “It’s about that sense of discovery, but also about the satisfaction of taking what is chaos in my life, especially the painful bits, and assembling them so that they mean something greater and have the possibility of connecting with others.” Inspiring others to courageously dive into their own “painful bits” is something Shapiro has done not only in her books but also in the many writing workshops she has hosted through the years. Even while teaching in elite programs, like those

at NYU and Columbia, Shapiro has developed a unique approach that is totally accessible to nonwriters as well as more established ones. “All that is required is curiosity and a desire to explore,” she says. “The beautiful thing is to have a group of people all engaged in trying to understand themselves and what it is to be a human being. It’s the self-expression of it, the desire to connect. That word is really important to me: connecting to oneself and to others through the act of writing.” In many ways, Mii amo and Shapiro, a dedicated yogi and meditator, were fated to meet. One can hardly imagine a better place in which to take the leap into what Shapiro calls “memory excavation”—especially since Mii amo has long championed the body-mind connection, balancing healing spa treatments with more spiritual work, like astrology and aura readings. “Our stories live in our bodies,” says Shapiro, who will be leading writing sessions every day of the trip. “To be in a place that allows you to focus on your body and mind—that gives you the luxury of time and space to sink into your own experiences and memories. It’s just full of possibilities.” 

MII AMO

“WRITING SAVED MY LIFE,” says Dani Shapiro, a best-selling author, most recently of Hourglass, who will be hosting a powerful writing retreat– meetswellness getaway with Indagare this November at Mii amo, a hotel nestled in the red rocks of Sedona, Arizona. “[It] has been my window—flung wide open to this magnificent, chaotic existence—my way of interpreting everything within my grasp.... It has softened my heart and hardened my intellect.”


People misunderstand courage as the absence of fear, when really it’s quite the opposite. You acknowledge the fear and then actively choose to step out of your comfort zone anyway, to take that flying leap. That is courage.” ~DANI SHAPIRO

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Book Now: Insider Journeys at Mii amo Host: Writer Dani Shapiro When: November 4 through 8, 2018 What: Four-day retreat, with transformational workshopsledbyShapiro,eightspatreatments from Mii amo’s acclaimed practitioners, meditation and true relaxation. Perfect for: Those who want to tap into the power of writing to clarify and illuminate their own life stories. Cost: from $3,900

Host: Author and Omega Institute co-founder Elizabeth Lesser When: January 6 through 10, 2019 What: Four-day retreat, with reflection workshops and discussion sessions led by Lesser, eight spa treatments from Mii amo’s acclaimed practitioners, meditation and true relaxation. Perfect for: Those who want to focus on mindfulness and wellbeing. Cost: from $3,900

Book one of these trips: 212-988-2611; insiderjourneys@indagare.com

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There’s never been a better time to visit Helsinki, with its cutting-edge Design District, chic shopping, vibrant food scene and island fortress UNESCO site. Noelle Salmi heads north.

LOCATED ON A PENINSULA jutting into the Baltic Sea’s Gulf of Finland, Europe’s northernmost capital is equally well known for its distinctive blend of Western modernism and traditional Eastern European architecture as for its iconic designers, such as Alvar Aalto, Marimekko, Artek and Arabia. Autumn, when the Helsinki Design Week takes place (from September 6 through 16 this year), spring and summer are all good times to visit the city, which is an easy add-on from Stockholm and St. Petersburg. Given the extreme winters, Finns’ reputation for quiet persistence is not surprising, although their creativity and quirky playfulness may be. Finland has the distinction of hosting the world championships for air guitar and mobile-phone throwing. It is also known as a tech disruptor and a leader in 3-D-gaming optimization: Nokia phones and the Angry Birds app have their origins here. But exploring Helsinki’s design aesthetic, its many parks and its vast archipelago are the best ways to take it all in.

Lay of the Land: Where to Stay, Eat and Drink The Esplanadi, a green space flanked by cafés and boutiques, with Market Square at one end and Erottaja

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Diana Li Indagare’s Director of Marketing A can’t-miss for anyone visiting Helsinki is... a day excursion to Suomenlinna, an 18th-century fortress built on several islands. Don’t miss having a drink at the charming Café Piper, which overlooks the Gulf of Finland.

square at the other, is the city’s cultural center. Several excellent hotels are located here and nearby. The 130-year-old Hotel Kämp, situated right on the Esplanadi, was a favored meeting place for politicians, artists and writers of the Finnish Golden Age and remains the top choice for international executives. Hotel Haven, one block from the park, has sea views from some of its top-floor rooms. Other options in the Design District, which surrounds the Esplanadi, include Hotel Lilla Roberts, with its Art Deco-inspired interiors, and the stylish Hotel St. George, which opened last May and has a spa, restaurant and bakery on-site. A lesspricey option just a short walk from the Esplanadi is the Hotel Fabian. The area contains many good restaurants. At Ora, chef Sasu Laukkonen’s creations using seasonal ingredients have earned the petite restaurant a Michelin star. Savoy is a classic with a tightly curated menu and interiors designed by Alvar Aalto. Taking a more rustic approach, Michelin-starred Grön offers a menu that is largely vegetable-focused but includes fish and meats prepared with as much reverence as the “roots and plants.” Juuri also celebrates Finland’s local ingredients in its low-key

dining room. After dinner, the terrace at Grotesk is lovely for a late-night sip during the warmer months, while the rooftop Sky Terrace at Klaus K Hotel serves cocktails with a 360degree view of the city.

Day 1: Coffee Culture, Design and Shopping Start your day with coffee and Finnish pastries, such as a cinnamon-cardamom scented pulla roll, at the elegant Strindberg café on the Esplanadi, which opens at 9 a.m. From there, walk to the diminutive Designmuseo. After a primer on the history of Finnish design, walk a block to Lokal, a concept store with a selection of Finnish ceramics, jewelry, artwork, kitchenware and furniture. Close by is Common, with ceramics and paper products from Japan inspired by the similarity between that country’s aesthetic and Nordic design. On the Esplanadi itself are Marimekko outposts selling the company’s classic clothing, bags and fabrics. Its products are also among the ceramics and housewares at Iittala, along with such iconic Finnish designs as Alvar Aalto’s undulating vases. In 1935, Alvar and Aino Aalto opened Artek, and you can peruse housewares and furnishings at its store just off the park.

LOYLY, JOEL PALLASKORPI

I N D A G A R E

HELSINKI IN 2 DAYS


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A bird’s-eye view of Helsinki’s Löyly sauna and spa

Overall, our trip to Helsinki was fantastic. I felt a bit like an adventurer. I have been fortunate enough to travel to many European capitals, and this was an entirely different type of experience. It wasn’t just looking at touristy sites. It was learning about history, culture, design and food. It was a true education.” ~ADELE HELMERS, MEMBER SINCE 2016

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I T I N E R A R Y

For lunch, a fun choice is Finlandia Caviar, a refined but casual restaurant located where the Esplanadi meets the harbor market, or Yes Yes Yes, a hip vegetarian spot near the Designmuseo. Also good for a light meal is the café upstairs at Kiasma, a branch of Finland’s National Gallery that is housed in an unusual glass-walled building and showcases the work of Finnish and international contemporary artists. If you prefer to keep your attention on shopping, try Schoffa and Fere, for men, and Andiata, for women, all on the Esplanadi. Located outside the Design District but close by, Mycoko sells bohemian-chic clothing and accessories for women. On the north side of Senate Square is Helsinki Cathedral, a gleaming white structure built in the mid1800s and topped with striking green domes that can be seen from the sea; its relatively austere interior, apart from the gold-leaf altar, reflects its Lutheran past. From there, a short

walk on Kirkkokatu or Hallituskatu toward the water provides an overview of the area’s handsome prewar architecture. At Pohjoiossatama (North Harbor), you’ll see the imposing icebreakers that keep Helsinki’s waterways open during the frigid winter months. Design lovers will want to make time for the impressive Kamppi Chapel, constructed as part of the World Design Capital program with an exterior of Finnish wood and intended to be a place for quiet reflection. They might also arrange a tour of the Aalto House and studio space, located just outside the city. If you’ve timed it right, you’ll be at Allas, a wooden-and-glass structure housing public swimming pools and saunas near the Market Square on the main harbor, at cocktail hour. Take a steam first or just order drinks and admire the hearty Finns swimming outside in warmer months, with the backdrop of the sea and city behind them. If you’re ready for dinner (and have reserved well in advance),

Michelin-starred Olo, in a 19th-century house across from Allas, provides a fantastic culinary experience. The multicourse menu features locally sourced produce, fish and game, such as elk or moose. For an exceptional meal without the white tablecloths, try the more low-key Chapter— located across from the Helsinki Cathedral—which serves five-, sevenand ten-course tasting menus. For more casual options, walk back toward the icebreakers, where a refurbished warehouse is now filled with bustling restaurants, including the eclectic Holiday. Among the wine bars that have taken root in Helsinki, Le Petit Chaperon Rouge serves European vintages and small plates.

Day 2: Islands and Parks Go to Robert’s Coffee, in the Old Market Hall, next to the harbor market, to get a strong Finnish brew and perhaps a sweet, donutlike munkki, or pick up a juice and

JUSSI HELLSTEN HELSINKI MARKETING,

Temppeliaukio Church in Helsinki’s Töölö neighborhood

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Helsinki City Hall. Clockwise from right: Artek; Helsinki Art Museum.

The Inside Take

HELSINKI MARKETING, EETU AHANEN, LEENA KARPPINEN; ARTEK; EEVA MUSACCHIA

Eeva Musacchia, a Finnish stylist involved in design who collects vintage textiles and fashion in Finland and the U.S., shares her picks. Shops Bisarri: Vintage classics, glass, ceramics and textiles Artek 2nd Cycle: “Re-discovered” furniture and lighting by Finnish designers Fasaani: Vintage design pieces Lapuan Kankurit: Beautiful contemporary Finnish textiles

Restaurants Baskeri & Basso: A wine bar favored by locals Bronda: Shared plates and a lively scene

Ekberg: Old-school café and patisserie with the best pastries and breads Fazer: Café close to Hotel Kamp that also sells candy and chocolate. Palace: Gastronomic restaurant with water views, helmed by star Finnish chef Hans Välimäki. Restaurant Ultima: A new restaurant from talentedFinnish chefs Henri Alén and Tommi Tuominen,whogrowingredients in a hydroponic garden.

Galleries Galerie Forsblom: Nordic art gallerywithmostlycontemporary paintings and sculpture Helsinki Contemporary: A gallery highlighting works by emerging and established artists,withafocusonpiecesthat engage with social issues Helsinki Art Museum: Cityownedinstitutionwithacollection of more than 9,000 works, many of which are on display in parks andgardensthroughoutthecity.

Espoo Museum of Modern Art: A museum with spectacular holdings,particularlytheRutBryk and Tapio Wirkkala collection

Bookstores Akateeminen Kirjakauppa: The spot for Alvar Aalto design books C. Hagelstam: A trove of rare and out-of-print design, art and fashion books Nide: A well-edited selection of volumesonFinnishart,designand fashion, as well as magazines

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gluten-free baked goods at Mari’s Smoothie before buying tickets for the scenic 20-minute ferry ride to Suomenlinna, an 18th-century fortress built across several connected islands. A one-mile “blue route” passes various historic points in this UNESCO World Heritage site, which is now home to several artist studios. Back on the mainland, take in more of the city’s beautiful greenery as you walk to Kaivopuisto, perhaps Helsinki’s loveliest park. On the gently sloped hill leading to it, you’ll see elegant homes and several embassies, including those of the United States, Great Britain and France. From Kaivopuisto, a quick trip on a ferry takes you to the restaurant Uunisaari, which melds Finnish and far-flung flavors in such dishes as ceviche and cauliflower with hummus. Or

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cross the bridge to another mini-islet to order wood-fired pizzas at Skiffer. If you’d rather enjoy the sea view from the shore, walk along the water to Birgitta, which has freshly prepared salads and sandwiches. Don’t miss a look at Löyly, an architecturally striking sauna just next door. With views of the Baltic Sea, Löyly is a favorite detox spot for locals. A short taxi ride takes you to the Töölö neighborhood, where the impressive Sibelius Monument, Eila Hiltonen’s sculpture of Finland’s renowned composer, sits in another verdant (or, in winter, snowy) park. Finland still lends its conductors and musicians to many of the most important orchestras in the world. A visit to Töölö is yet another reminder of Helsinki’s affinity for culture, nature and the sea.

Summer Side Trip If you are in Helsinki between May and September, reserve a sauna and dinner on the island of Lonna, easily reached by ferry. When you arrive, you’ll be given everything you need to enjoy a Finnish sauna experience in a roomy, two-story structure tucked into the woods with a view of the Helsinki Archipelago. When your session is finished, cool off in the bracing seawater and then enjoy refined local cuisine at the restaurant. Menu options might include a baked-carrot salad or local pike with wild herbs. After dinner, take the ferry back to Helsinki and observe the still bright skyline. Onshore, walk along the water to the restaurant Mattolaituri, grab a seat upstairs, order a glass of rosé and watch the small boats navigate the narrow straits between the shore and the islets beyond. 

HELSINKI MARKETING, JULIA KIVELA, EETU AHANEN

I N D A G A R E


BOOK NOW

ST. GEORGE HOTEL, MIKKO RYHÄNEN; STRINDBERG, ROYAL RAVINTOLAT

Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Helsinki.

A sky attic studio room at St. George Hotel. Clockwise from left: Sibelius Monument; on the waterfront; Allas sea pool; toast skagen at Strindberg.

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Indagare’sTherese Mueller shares Indagare’s easy four-day itinerary. It’s all you need to know about where to stay, shop and eat in Colombia’s historic city.

BORDERED BY THE Caribbean Sea and reachable by frequent direct flights from New York and Miami, Cartagena is ideal for a long weekend away. The 16th-century port city, graced with beautiful Spanish colonial architecture, world-class restaurants and chic hotels and shops, offers a unique mix of Colombian and Caribbean flavors, evident especially in its food. Get lost in the Old City, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with its curious maze of cobbled alleys and balconies overflowing with bougainvillea and streets lined by gorgeous churches, monasteries and brightly colored mansions. Although the city is small and manageable, we suggest staying for at least four days to enjoy the eternal summer weather and the nearby islands. Here is our ideal itinerary.

Day 1: Explore the Old City Cartagena’s main attraction is its historic Old City, which is surrounded by walls that stand 65 feet high and extend for almost seven miles. The quarter, bursting with vibrant colors and charm, is home to the lovely hotel Casa San Agustin, a perfect base for your visit. Composed of three connected 17th-century whitewashed mansions, it has 30 guest rooms and

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suites and features original frescoes, wood-beamed ceilings and colorful tiles, as well as a breathtaking pool, situated in a pretty courtyard, that wraps around the remnants of a 400-year-old aqueduct. After settling in, take a tour of the city and its intimate squares with your guide, strolling around the Old City and taking in the colonial churches, monasteries, plazas, mansions and nearby Plaza de Bolívar (also known as the Parque de Bolívar), where local dancers take over after 6 p.m.

Therese Mueller Indagare Trip Designer The best thing I drank in Cartangea was... coconut lemonade with a splash of rum at Casa San Agustin

Spend the afternoon by the pool, grabbing a snack at Alma, which serves handmade lobster empanadas. Or pop into El Boliche, a 16-table gem located a few blocks away. The restaurant puts an upscale spin on South American classics, infusing its ceviches (the best in the city) with ingredients like tamarind and coconut and also serves such elevated dishes as grilled octopus with a light potato foam. In the evening, head to El Baluarte, a bar on the fortified wall, or to the Movich Hotel rooftop to watch the sun set over the clear blue water, casting a glow on the Old City cupolas. For dinner, go to Carmen. The cuisine is contemporary, inspired by local flavors—the pez negro is delicious—the atmosphere serene,

and the service personalized.

Day 2: Historical Tour of Cartagena Begin your second day with a visit to the whitewashed fortress Castillo San Felipe de Barajas, which dominates the cityscape. Built in the 1600s, it is Cartagena’s largest historical landmark and still looks impenetrable. With your private guide, explore the interior corridors and tunnels. End the tour with lunch at Vera, an Italian restaurant located in the fashionable Tcherassi hotel, which is owned by a local designer. Try the risotto with portobello mushrooms or tuna carpaccio and chopped asparagus tossed in olive oil and parmesan. You might also want to visit the Palacio de la Inquisicíon, a museum showcasing the city’s history, with displays of pre-Columbian pottery, torture instruments, armor, paintings, furniture and maps from the colonial and independence eras. Also worth checking out is Getsemani, an up-and-coming neighborhood where local families have lived for generations and where you’ll find street art and chic eateries, such as Café del Mural. Before dinner, enjoy a private rum tasting at the intimate cocktail bar El Barón, which is great for small

CARMEN

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CARTAGENA IN 4 DAYS


PHOTO CREDIT TKT

A drink at Carmen in Cartagena’s Old City

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Cartagena’s Casa San Agustin is one of the prettiesthotelswe’veever stayed in and I would highly recommend it. The blend of old and new architecture is breathtaking and our room was lovely.” ~HALLIE FERGUSON, MEMBER SINCE 2014

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groups. Larger groups should head to Alquimico—the newest and hippest bar in the city, housed in a two-story 1910 mansion—for drinks on the roof. Have dinner at Donjuán, which draws a crowd of smartly dressed locals. We recommend ordering the grilled grouper on lemon parmesan risotto or pork chops with fried yucca and artichoke aioli. After dinner, you might go out for a mojito at an authentic bar with salsa or champeta dancing, such as Bazurto Social Club, which can get crowded, or

Donde Fidel and Quiebra Canto, where you’ll find plenty of people-watching opportunities.

Day 3: Day Trip to Rosario Islands The beaches in and around Cartagena are not the best for sunbathing or swimming, so take a break from the city and spend a day in the Colombian Caribbean National Park of Islas del Rosario (also known as Rosario Islands). A private boat will carry you to the 30-island archipelago, which lies an hour off the coast of Cartagena.

CASA SAN AGUSTIN

I N D A G A R E


BOOK NOW Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Cartagena.

CASA SAN AGUSTIN

Clockwise from above: Alma Bar and the pool at Casa San Agustin; a city scenic; the bar and daybeds at Casa San Agustin in Cartagena.

There, you can sunbathe and snorkel and swim around the coral reef and have lunch at Matimbá, a private beach club. We recommend returning around 3 or 4 p.m., before high tide and the high waves that accompany it. Return to your hotel to freshen up for dinner at Marea by Rausch. Located on the water, with views of the Bahía de Animas and the charming Old Town, this seafood restaurant serves dishes highlighting Mediterranean and Caribbean flavors.

Day 4: Coffee Tasting, Shopping &

Cooking Class On your last day, spend the morning browsing the chic boutiques that line the colorful streets near Casa San Agustin. Don’t miss St. Dom, a concept shop selling clothing, accessories and home décor by Colombian designers. Then stop in next door at Mercedes Salazar for some lavish costume earrings. Casa Chiqui offers incredible home furnishings and accessories from Bali, Thailand and Morocco. In the afternoon, take a cooking class in a colonial mansion to learn more

about Colombian culture and local specialities like ceviche. Or participate in a coffee tasting and learn why Colombian beans make some of the highest-quality brews in the world. End your trip on a high note with dinner at the elegant María, enjoying Bogotá-born chef Alejandro Ramirez’s carefully crafted cocktails and inventive seafood dishes like cured salmon served with a jalapeño infusion and grilled sea bass with bacon succotash. 

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Few destinations have the scale, scope and history of Egypt, and there are more reasons to visit now than ever before. We’ve mapped out anitinerarywithallthehighlights—fromCairoand thepyramidstotheValleyoftheKingsandmore.

TRAVELERS HAVE LONG been drawn to Egypt and its legendary past. It is home to one-third of the world’s antiquities and one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World: the Great Pyramid at Giza. Although visitor numbers fell after the 2011 revolution, the country has seen increased political stability under the military-backed administration of president Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, along with game-changing tourism developments in Cairo and beyond. The newly opened St. Regis Cairo, situated near Khan-el-Khalili bazaar and Old Cairo, has staked a claim to the title of top luxury property in the city with its 39-story tower overlooking the Nile. Less than 15 miles away, the Grand Egyptian Museum at Giza is slated to replace the much smaller Egyptian Museum in Cairo by year’s end, opening in a sprawling 650,000-square-foot complex that is just as dramatic as the nearby pyramids, incorporating a 3,200-year-old, 30-foot-high statue of Ramses II and displaying thousands of ancient artifacts that have never been seen before. Follow our ideal Egypt itinerary to enjoy the best of the country’s offerings, from the alleyways of Cairo to the banks of the Nile.

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Egypt: Fast Facts

•Egypt is 95 percent desert. •The Nile is the world’s longest riverandflowssouthtonorth. •Each ancient mummy requiredhundredsofyardsof linen wrapping. •While building the pharaohs’ tombs, ancient Egyptian laborers organized some of the first workers’ strikes on record.

Queen Hatshesput’s Temple, located on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings.

PHOTO STORM JASON CREDIT TKT

I N D A G A R E

EGYPT IN 11 DAYS


Everyone should go to Egypt—it offers the greatest history lesson in the world. My family loved it and it is a fascinating place.”

PHOTO CREDIT TKT

~LAUREL KENNER, MEMBER SINCE 2010

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I T I N E R A R Y

Spotlight on the St. Regis OpeninginDecember,theSt.RegisCairowill be the city’s top hotel and have 226 guest rooms, 60 suites and 80 two- and three-bedroom apartments, plus seven restaurants, including a steakhouse from Jean-Georges Vongerichten,atwo-floorspa,twoswimming pools and a kids’ club.

With an expert guide, delve into the fascinating complexities of ancient Egyptian history and culture at the Grand Egyptian Museum, one of the world’s largest archaeological museums, whose extensive collection includes more than 5,000 treasures from King Tutankhamun’s tomb. Next, explore Cairo’s Islamic quarter and the Khan-el-Khalili bazaar. Believed to be the largest in the Middle East, the bazaar was founded in the 14th century as a watering stop and has grown into a labyrinth of stalls selling glassware, perfumes, pharaonic curiosities and more. At Giza, enjoy a tour of the pyramids— including the Great Pyramid, the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still surviving—and the temple of the mysterious Sphinx. Equally imposing are the pyramids at Saqqara and at Dahshur, site of the unusual Bent Pyramid, the world’s first freestanding stone structure.

Days 4–8: Nile River Cruise Fly south to Abu Simbel, the site of some of the greatest examples of ancient Egyptian art: the colossal statues of Ramses the Second and the awe-inspiring temples built to honor the legendary ruler and his wife. Then travel to Aswan to embark on a Nile cruise. Each stop along the river is more spectacular than the

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last and includes visits to some of the country’s best-preserved temples and only-in-Egypt sites, such as a museum of mummified crocodiles. You’ll also have ample opportunity to relax onboard between excursions.

Days 9–10: Luxor Luxor’s East and West Banks are troves of ancient wonders. Explore the Valley of the Kings and Valley of the Queens, where pharaonic tombs were carved into the desert rocks and filled with treasures for the afterlife. The right guide gets you special access to the Tomb of King Tut and a private tour of the Tomb of Nefertari, considered one of the world’s most beautiful burial sites. And don’t miss the Luxor Temple at sunset, when it is romantically illuminated.

Day 11: Cairo Before you leave Egypt, wend your way through Cairo’s bustling souks with a personal shopping guide to pick up a few local treasures, then take in a performance by the Whirling Dervishes, a traditional dance troupe whose name refers to the members’ incredible spinning (originally a Sufi method of entering a trance-like state for mystical purposes). If you have the time and the desire to explore other parts of the country, extend your trip with a stay in the beach resort town of Sharm el Sheikh (which has incredible snorkeling) or an active adventure at an eco-lodge in the Siwa Oasis. 

PHOTO STORM; JASON CREDIT TKT CALLY PIRRUNG; ST. REGIS HOTELS & RESORTS

Days 1–3: Cairo and the Pyramids


Hot air balloons over Queen Hatshesput’s Temple. Opposite, clockwise from bottom left: hieroglyphs; a Nile cruise; a temple in the Valley of the Kings; the Sphinx; locals at the Temple of Kom Ombo.

Book Now: The Best of Egypt

PHOTO STORM JASON CREDIT TKT

ExperienceEgypt’sbesttemples on a luxury Nile cruise with the option to add time in Cairo to see the pyramids. This special packaged trip comes complete withaccommodations,cocktail cruises, guided tours of the top attractionsandprivatetransfers.

WHEN:

February 23-March 2 February 26-March 2 March 17-25 or 20-25 TYPE OF TRAVELER:

Explorers, History Buffs COST:

From $5,180 per person

Book this or a custom Egypt trip: 646.787.8947; insiderjourneys@indagare.com.

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RIVE GAUCHE RENAISSANCE

PHOTOLUTETIA HOTEL CREDIT TKT

A gorgeously renovated hotel ushers in a new era for Paris’s Left Bank. Local Mara Hoberman gives the inside scoop.

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PHOTO CREDIT TKT

Rooftops on Paris’s Left Bank

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W

The Lutetia has kept its iconic Art Deco design while undergoing significant structural improvements and cosmetic upgrades. The lobby lounge, jazz bar, brasserie and guest rooms have been enlarged and brightened with oversized windows. Public and private areas have been redecorated with chic modernist furnishings. Among the most exciting innovations is the Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Center, a 7,500-square-foot spa clad entirely in Italian white marble, including the 55-foot-long sky-lit indoor pool. Indeed, incorporating natural elements— light and greenery—was a top priority for French architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte, who was in charge of the hotel’s makeover and added glass and plants throughout. A grand salon formerly used for private events has been transformed into a verdant interior courtyard where guests can sip cocktails or enjoy an alfresco meal. The airy, allday lobby restaurant, Le Saint-Germain, is flooded with light, thanks to a large skylight that has been painted in bright translucent tones by local artist Fabrice Hyber. Here, guests can enjoy afternoon tea and seasonal fare like stracciatella with heirloom tomatoes and strawberries and tuna tartar with avocado and ponzu dressing. In its new incarnation, the Lutetia is in the running to receive the prestigious Palace Hotel rating from the French government. If it achieves this coveted status (a property must be

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A street in Paris’s 7th arrondissement. Clockwise from above: the Hôtel Lutetia façade; the Eiffel Tower; Bar Joséphine at Hôtel Lutetia; fish at Racines des Prés.

PHOTOLUTETIA HOTEL CREDIT TKT

hen the Hôtel Lutetia reopened this summer on Paris’s Left Bank, following a painstaking renovation and restoration that kept it shuttered for more than four years, locals were delighted to see the beloved institution returned to its original splendor. Since 1910, the property has been a neighborhood mainstay on the Rive Gauche and a haunt for artists and intellectuals, including Ernest Hemingway, André Gide, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and Josephine Baker, who were all regulars. And now, the lavish property is drawing a new generation of luminaries to the area, who are bringing exciting new developments with them.


BOOK NOW

PHOTO CREDIT RACINES DES PRES; TKT HOTEL LUTETIA

Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Paris.

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open for at least six months before becoming eligible), it will be the first—and only—Rive Gauche hotel to do so. While aiming for the same standard of excellence as its ten Palace confrères across the river—including icons like Le Bristol Paris, Four Seasons George V, Le Meurice and more—the Lutetia remains true to its roots. Neither trendy nor froufrou, it is refreshingly restrained and modern, with no Empire-style furniture or Philippe Starck design in sight. Furnishings are characterized by clean lines, geometric shapes and sumptuous materials, such as polished eucalyptus and white Carrara marble (400 tons were used). Handsome but not ostentatious, the new decorative elements complement the original Art Deco flourishes, which include impressive mosaics, floral moldings and intricate frescoes. Although luxury touches abound—the duplex penthouse suite on the seventh floor has a private roof garden with 360-degree views over Paris— the vibe is more discreet than that of many of the Right Bank Palaces. While the Rive Droite has long been the land of trendy eateries and buzzy nightlife—with new hot spots popping

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up seemingly overnight in boho neighborhoods like the Marais, Oberkampf and Belleville—the Rive Gauche is typically celebrated for its classic Parisian charm. According to the Lutetia’s chief concierge, Bastien Lalanne, the hotel’s style reflects the “esprit du Rive Gauche,” which he defines as more authentic in terms of local culture, food and history. Among Lalanne’s favorite institutions are classics like the Musée Rodin and the Musée Maillol. But he also regularly sends clients to the new Monnaie de Paris, where contemporary art is displayed in the former Paris mint. And while a coffee en terrasse at Les Deux Magots or Café de Flore, a stroll through the streets of the Latin Quarter and visits to the Eiffel Tower and the Musée d’Orsay are definitely Left Bank musts, there are fresh places to try as well, like restaurateur David Lanher’s neo-bistro, Racines des Prés. In fact, a recent flurry of restaurant openings on the south side of the Seine is helping to reinvent this area as a nouvelle foodie destination. Opened in August 2018, the Beaupassage is a ritzy urban renewal project that has reinvented a charming pedestrian

HOTEL LUTETIA

The pool at Hôtel Lutetia. Clockwise from right: La Felicità; coffee at Café de Flore; Musée Rodin.


Indagare Perks: Hôtel Lutetia

BookastayatHotelLutetiathroughus and receive the following amenities:

LA FELICITÀ, JÉRÔME GALLAND; MUSEE RODIN, JÉRÔME MANOUKIAN; ATOUT FRANCE, NATHALIE BAETENS

•Guaranteed room upgrade •American breakfast for two •Early check-in at 9:00 a.m. •Late check-out at 6:00 p.m. •100€ credit for the spa or any hotel restaurant •A round-trip airport transfer or private Left Bank tour, with a Deluxe Room or higher Book Now: indagare.com/go

street in Saint-Germain-des-Prés as a gourmet food court. The architecture of existing buildings on Rue Grenelle (just a few blocks from the Hôtel Lutetia), including an 18th-century convent, has been retrofitted to accommodate upscale restaurants helmed by Michelin-starred chefs Yannick Alléno, Anne-Sophie Pic, Olivier Bellin and Thierry Marx. In addition to this impressive cluster of hot spots, Beaupassage is home to world-class artisanal-food purveyors. For the finest French cheeses, head to Nicole Barthélémy’s eponymous fromagerie. Japanese coffee impresario Junichi Yamaguchi’s brûlerie sells beans and freshly brewed café to go, and carnivores won’t want to miss Alexandre Polmard’s boucherie. A feast for the eyes as well, Beaupassage showcases site-specific artworks by Fabrice Hyber, Stefan Rinck, Eva Jospin and Marc Vellay. Farther afield, another foodie mecca has recently drawn hipsters to a formerly sleepy quarter in the 13th arrondissement. Located in Station F (a massive start-up hub housed in a refurbished 1920s shipping depot called

Halle Freyssinet), La Felicità is the first Left Bank outpost of the Big Mamma group, whose wildly popular restaurants include East Mamma, in Bastille; Ober Mamma, in Oberkampf; Mamma Primi, in Batignolles; Big Love Caffè, in the Marais; Pizzeria Popolare, in Bourse; and Pink Mamma, in Pigalle. Opened this past May in a sprawling, 50,000-square-foot space decorated with old train cars, painted balloons and plenty of greenery, La Felicità is the largest restaurant in Europe (it seats over 1,000 people) and has five kitchens, an alfresco beer garden, two cocktail bars, a seasonal food market and a roving icecream cart. The cuisine is mostly Italian inspired—think truffle and vongole Neapolitan pizzas and caprese salads— although there is an American-style burger shack among the pizza and pasta restaurants. It also offers an enormous terrace, DJ sets, live concerts, rotating art exhibitions, film screenings and a full roster of activities for children. Vive la Rive Gauche! 

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WHERE TO BE THIS WINTER

The season’s top destinations for all types of travelers— from the culture hound to the fashionista to the foodie. 54  I N D A G A R E . C O M

PHOTO CREDIT HAWAII TOURISM TKT AUTHORITY, TOR JOHNSON

T R E N D I N G


PHOTO CREDIT SWITERLAND TOURISM TKT

Skiing in St. Moritz. Opposite: Sunset on Kauai.

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A villa at Le Barthélemy hotel. Below: Fireworks at El Paradiso in St. Mortiz.

St. Barth’s

Many of the island’s best hotels used the destruction wreaked by Hurricane Irma as an opportunity to renovate. Eden Rock has added pools to many of its suites, Le Toiny has built a new pool and eight villas and Cheval Blanc St-Barth Îsle de France recently acquired neighboring hotel Taiwana and is renovating its 20 rooms to join Îsle de France. Meanwhile, they’ve been joined by two competitors: the nautical-chic Hotel Manapany and Le Barthélemy, a retreat with a restaurant overseen by the chef of Paris’s Grand Véfour. It Spot: Shellona serves Mediterranean fare accompanied by live music. Stake out one of the white

St. Moritz

PHOTO EL PARADISO; CREDITLETKT BARTHÉLEMY

This Swiss resort town, with its upscale hotels, slope-side restaurants and state-of-the-art spas, combines challenging athletic pursuits for both couples and families along with leisurely pampering. One of its most glamorous ski areas is Corviglia, which offers 62 miles of groomed trails, accessible from ski-in/ski-out Suvretta House, and gorgeous views, not to mention 15 mountain restaurants, including the glitzy El Paradiso, sceney Alpina Hütte and local favorite Trutz Hütte. It Spot: A handful of stylish pop-ups appear at the top hotels like Badrutt’s Palace and Kulm

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Fly-fishing in Patagonia. Below: An aerial view of Kauai.

ChileanPatagonia

This bucket-list destination is perfect for travelers with a sense of adventure and an appetite for exploration. Outdoor enthusiasts can trek, bike or horseback ride through mountains ranges and glacial valleys that are home to wildlife like condors, guanacos and pumas. Plus, when Rio Palena opens in early 2019 it will offer plush lodgings and excellent fly-fishing in a remote corner of Patagonia. What to Pack: The weather can change drastically in the course of a few hours, so on excursions bring extra layers in your daypack. On your plane ride here, consider wearing your hiking boots, to free up space in your luggage.

Hawaii

PHOTO CREDIT SINGULAR PATAGONIA TKT

The 50th state abounds in breathtaking natural beauty as well as spectacular ways for active travelers to experience it, from surfing on Oahu and snorkeling on the Big Island to hiking through Kauai’s jungle and climbing Mauna Kea volcano on the island of Hawaii. What to Pack: Protect your skin and the Hawaiian ecosystem with reef-safe sunscreen, made without the ingredients oxybenzone and octinoxate, which havebeenshowntostuntthegrowthofjuvenilecoral and cause bleaching.We recommendThinksport Sunscreen SPF 50.

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New York City

The Big Apple continues to impress with its ever-growing list of cultural offerings. This winter, don’t miss the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Andy Warhol retrospective, Aaron Sorkin’s To Kill a Mockingbird at the Shubert Theatre and the new Fotografiska, an outpost of the Stockholm-based photography center of the same name, which is set to open in early 2019. Don’t Miss: Go beyond the obvious offerings with unique experiences like a cooking class at a bakery or pizzeria, Broadway dance lessons, a food tour in Brooklyn, an architecture tour of Flatiron or a private, curator-led tour of the Metopolitan Museum of Art.

Mexico City’s Museo Soumaya. Above: NYC’s The Whitney Museum at sunset.

The oldest capital in the Americas is currently enjoyingarenaissance,attractinghistorybuffswith suchancientruinsastheTeotihuacanpyramids(just 25 miles to the north of the city) and contemporary art and design lovers with fairs like Zona Maco and top galleries like LABOR and Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura. Don’t Miss: Casa Azul, or the Blue House, the birthplace and lifelong home of Frida Kahlo, was transformed into a museum following her death in 1958. The walls are covered with the artist’s evocative paintings and mementos of her life. After visitingthemuseum,exploretheneighborhoodand markets around it.

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PHOTO THE WHITNEY CREDITMUSEUM TKT

Mexico City


Lima

The Peruvian capital is a mecca for travelers who plan their itineraries around a destination’s gastronomic delights. Such a schedule here might include a food tour of a local market to sample exotic produce, a cooking class with an expert chef and meals at the city’s top restaurants—don’t miss El Mercado, Isolina Taberna Peruana and Osaka— whose chefs give their own innovative twists to the country’s indigenous cuisine. Local Specialties: Be sure to try Peru’s national cocktail, the pisco sour. Ceviche, another national obsession, is traditionally eaten only at lunch, to ensure that the fish is fresh.

Sushi at Lima’s acclaimed El Mercado restaurant. Below:YellowPotRestaurantat Singapore’s Six Senses Duxton.

PHOTO SIX SENSES CREDIT DUXTON, TKT SETH POWERSEL MERCADO, PIERRE MONETTA

Singapore

’Mod-Sin’ (modern Singaporean) cuisine is having a moment and there are 29 Michelin-starred establishments in Singapore, including a street food vendor at one of the city’s famed hawker centres (open-air food complexes). And now is the time to go, as 2018 welcomes the arrival of the Six Senses—the luxury brand’s first urban resort—as well as the world’s longest commercial flight on Singapore Airlines (8,277 nautical miles from Singapore to New Jersey). Local Specialty: Try Singapore’s national dish, Hainanese chicken rice, at the lauded Hong Kong Soya Sauce Chicken Rice & Noodle. The dish costs just $1.85, making it the cheapest Michelin-starred meal in the world.

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Tokyo

With its numerous subcultures and trendy cult fashion, the Japanese capital offers shoppers everything from antique tea sets to the latest J-pop fashion, as well as clothing and accessories from every European and American designer of note. As an added delight, the packaging is often just as exquisite as the purchases. What to Bring Back: Among the best Japanese finds are paper goods, kitchen knives, matcha tea, sake, handmade fans, kimonos, pottery and snacks like matcha tea Kit Kats.

Marrakech

A Moroccan tea set. Above: Tokyo’s Shinjuku street.

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PHOTO CREDIT TKT

Marrakech’s legendary souk—an atmospheric and labyrinthinemarketplace—isashopaholic’sdream, where you can pick up everything from latticed lanterns and Berber kilim rugs to argan oil and leather bags. Marrakech also has plenty of upscale boutiques, in Gueliz and near the Majorelle Garden. What to Bring Back: Travelers should take the time to siftthroughthebazaarandboutiqueofferings.Locally made treasures include embellished kaftans, glassware, ceramics, slippers and one-of-a-kind furniture. Visit indagare.com/go to book a shopping tour.


SpiritualCleansing Wellness involves both body and mind, and those looking to focus on the latter should visit a holistic spa. Located in northern India, Vana offers meditation, yoga and Ayurvedic treatments, and Ananda wellnessresorthastreatmentslikearomatherapyfor emotional balance. In the Berkshires, an outpost of the acclaimed Miraval spa will open in 2019. How to Prep: To get in the right mindset for your trip, look for books by Deepak Chopra or Thich Nhat Hanh. Plus, reach out to us for advice on the best hotel for you.

ANutritiousReset

PHOTO CREDIT ANANDA; THE RANCH TKT AT LIVE OAK MALIBU

Those looking to revamp their diets should visit a spa that makes eating healthy easy. California’s The Ranch at Live Oak Malibu has an intensive exercise program and gourmet vegan food. Spain’s SHA Wellness Clinic touts a macrobiotic menu and services like genetic testing and massages. California’s pampering Cal-a-Vie offers excellent fitness classes and gourmet food that is so delicious you won’t even realize you’re on a diet. How to Prep: Eliminate toxins pre-trip: cut down on

Chickpea cakes at The Ranch at Live Oak. Above: Yoga at Ananda.

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HOTTER THAN EVER: ICELAND

PHOTO CREDIT TKT

With otherworldly landscapes, an emerging foodie scene and a sleek new design hotel—Iceland is heating up and shows no signs of stopping. Indagare’s Marley Lynch and Elise Bronzo report.

The Northern Lights above Deplar Farm

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N THE PAST few years, Iceland—the slam-dunk adventure destination of the Atlantic—has become a sleeper hit for honeymooners and families alike. While the country once lacked the creature comforts of more established European destinations, in 2018 it has truly arrived on the luxury scene. Here are four compelling reasons why you should visit now.

Two new destination hotels are proving to be game changers. Thrill seekers looking for a far-flung playground with exceptional restaurants, top-of-the-line amenities and creatively designed, adrenaline-pumping activities will find them all at Deplar Farm, which opened in the north of the country in 2016. Operated by luxury adventure specialists Eleven Experience, the 13-room resort combines plush, stylish design with an all-star team of enthusiastic guides dedicated to customizing experiences to each guest’s desires and skills. Activities include heli-skiing in the winter and fly-fishing in the summer, plus hiking, whale watching, horseback riding and plenty more. The geothermal-heated pool, with its swim-up bar and underwater music, is a perfect spot from which to observe the Northern Lights, which occur year-round in Iceland but are best viewed between October and March. Combine an action-packed stay at Deplar Farm with the ultimate indulgence at the brand-new Retreat at the Blue Lagoon, located next to the iconic geothermal baths of the same name. This luxe sanctuary has the sleekness and serenity of an Aman hotel but with a thoroughly Icelandic sense of place: every window reveals otherworldly vistas of rugged lava rock, green moss and ethereal steam rising from the bright blue water. Offering guests access to a private section

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of the lagoon, an exquisite restaurant, Moss, and a convenient location just 20 minutes by car from the international airport, the Retreat at the Blue Lagoon is an ideal grand finale to an active Iceland itinerary.

Reykjavík is coming into its own. Long overshadowed by such trendsetting Scandinavian capitals as Copenhagen and Stockholm, Reykjavík is finding its own brand of cool these days. The small city feels on the verge of a massive boom, with cranes dotting the harborfront and new restaurants debuting daily. Its blossoming style is perhaps best seen in the Grandi district, just a ten-minute walk from the main shopping street, Laugavegur. Once a strip of booths where fishermen sold their daily catch, it is now home to fusion eateries and local boutiques. Be sure to stop at Farmer and Friends for chic woolen finds, Valdis for ice cream (don’t miss the waffle cones) and LAMB for Mediterranean-style pitas. Another Reykjavík must-see is the Marshall House cultural center, which houses two contemporary art galleries, Studio Olafur Eliasson and an eponymous bar and restaurant with a Brooklyn vibe. The city’s hotel scene is becoming more and more robust, with the addition of a slew of properties beyond the new ultra-luxe ones. Perhaps the most anticipated arrival is the Edition Hotel, set to open in 2019 across from the Olafur Eliasson–designed Harpa Concert Hall. In the meantime, IcelandAir has set the standard for boutique offerings with hip newcomer Canopy, sophisticated sister property Konsulat and Parliament, slated to launch next year, all located downtown.

A culinary movement is well under way.

DEPLAR FARM; BLUE LAGOON ICELAND; KOPAR; KONSULAT; HARPA

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PHOTO CREDIT TKT

Surfing at Deplar Farm. Clockwise from top left: yoga at the Retreat at the Blue Lagoon; Harpa Concert Hall in ReykjavĂ­k; the catch of the day at Kopar; the lobby at Konsulat.

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Reykjavík’s Hallgrímskirkjachurch. Below right: Icelandic horses.

BOOK NOW Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Iceland.

Many restaurants showcase traditional Icelandic ingredients, among them, the seafood-centric Kopar, which serves up dishes like lobster risotto, crab cakes and grilled monkfish. Others incorporate playful elements, such as trendy Mediterranean restaurant Sumac’s creative cocktails and 12-seat speakeasy-style dining counter. Stars at high-end hotels include the dining room at Deplar Farm, which flies in top Icelandic chefs and mixologists for one-week rotations in which they have carte-blanche

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to show off their skills, and Moss, at the Retreat at the Blue Lagoon, which has set its sights on a Michelin star, an honor thus far bestowed on only one restaurant in the entire country: Dill, in Reykjavík.

It’s one of the safest places to visit right now. In an era in which travelers consider the safety of a destination before making plans, Iceland offers peace of mind. Most residents leave their doors unlocked and backpackers sleep in their cars without worry, and all the prisons combined hold a mere 77 incarcerated individuals. Domestic airports require only a quick passport check before boarding—no metal detector needed—and the security staff is remarkably jovial. A recent study found that Icelanders are among the world’s five happiest citizenries. We are surprised only that it did not earn the top spot, which went to the people of Finland.

THE OFFICIAL GATEWAY TO ICELAND; DEPLAR FARM

Despite its capricious weather and long, dark winter days, Iceland grows nearly all its own produce, thanks to greenhouses fueled by geothermal energy that are nestled among the lava rocks on its South Shore. Here, ambitious farmers have created the ideal year-round climate for crops like tomatoes, cucumbers and strawberries—and this bounty is reflected in the food scene in both Reykjavík and at the country’s luxury properties.


Behind-the-Scenes with Indagare

While scouting Iceland and writing their news article, Elise and Marley found time for adventure. Get a glimpse of the day-by-day highlights from their week-long trip.

DAY 2: DEPLAR FARM Paddle boarding in the Arctic Ocean wasn’t on our bucket list but it should have been. The dry suits and paddling kept our body temperatures high!

DAY 3: DEPLAR FARM The table is set for our dinner of roasted goose, prepared by one of the top chefs in Iceland.

DAY 1: DEPLAR FARM Upon arrival, we snowmobiled to a secret location for nordic skiing and an axe-throwing contest.

DAY 4: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE A horizon-to-horizon rainbow over the Gullfoss waterfall. The hike to the top was worth it.

PHOTO CREDIT TKT

DAY 6: THE BLUE LAGOON Geothermal steam rises from the turquoise waters at the Blue Lagoon, which is framed by lava rock covered in green moss. We spent the entire afternoon soaking in the lagoon.

DAY 5: THÓRSMÖRK VALLEY Our guide drove us through a glacial valley in a super Jeep that he built himself before grilling us a lamb lunch.

DAY 7: THE RETREAT AT THE BLUE LAGOON After a week of activities, ­­­­we indulged in a spa day at the Retreat, including lava scrubs and silica mud masks—a divine finish to a divine trip! 67


M E M B E R T R AV E L S

OUT OF AFRICA

NamibRand Nature Reserve

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PHOTO TOM STRINGER CREDIT TKT

Indagare member Tom Stringer, founder and president of Tom Stringer Design Partners, recently traveled to Namibia. Here, he shares his photographs and trip highlights.


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M E M B E R T R AV E L S

In Namibia, it really is extraordinary to experience a landscape so unusual in its features and so vast in its expanse.” ~TOM STRINGER, MEMBER SINCE 2016

BOOK NOW

PHOTO TOM STRINGER; CREDIT TKT HOANIB SKELETON CAMP, DANA ALLEN

Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Namibia.

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A springbok on the Skeleton Coast. Clockwise from bottom right: Driving on the Skeleton Coast; a Himba village; Hoanib Skeleton Camp; Stringer and his husband, Scott Waller; a sunset

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ow many times have you been to Africa? I’ve done several trips to the northern regions for architecture, design and food; southern Africa for safari. Namibia promised another kind of adventure: one centered on landscape and isolation. What does Namibia look like? It really is extraordinary to experience a landscape so unusual in its features and so vast in its expanse. The isolation and, ultimately, the quiet, are palpable. The landscape varies widely, from mountains and sand dunes in the north to the almost Martian sand dunes in the south. In the north, we saw desert-adapted giraffes, elephants and lions. In the northeast, with the help of our guide, we had an experience with a clan of the nomadic Himba tribe. How has Namibia influenced your work? Everywhere I go influences my work. In this case, the quiet and the vistas are powerful elements of the experience, and I can’t help but think about how both are vital in design. What was the most memorable moment of the trip? The morning spent with Vengipo, the matriarch of a Himba clan, was the most cathartic moment of our journey. For me, the most memorable moments of any trip always center on human interaction. Meeting new people is simultaneously the most threatening experience, because it forces us to drop our barriers, and by far the most rewarding, because it’s the people who make places real and the moments tangible. I always come away with a renewed faith in humanity. Safari secret? Bring a camera with a flexible zoom lens, but don’t go crazy with a giant telephoto number—they are too high maintenance and require absolute stillness.

PHOTO TOM STRINGER CREDIT TKT

Why is travel important to you? Travel satisfies my thirst for experience. I visited Japan shortly after our journey to Namibia. That’s an entirely different culture with a very different sense of space, but an understanding of the power of stillness pervades that culture as well. I might be developing a theme here.

DID YOU KNOW?

Indagare founder Melissa Biggs Bradley has been on more than a dozen African safaris in eight countries. Visit africa.indagare.com for more safari inspiration.

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SECRETS OF MILAN

Lake Como’s Villa del Balbianello. Opposite: An interior at Milan’s Villa Necchi.

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PHOTO CREDIT TKT

On a recent Insider Journey to Milan and Lake Como, Indagare’s Melissa Biggs Bradley teamed up with Martina Mondadori Sartogo, editor of Cabana magazine, to unlock some of the Italian style capital’s best-kept secrets.


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J O U R N E Y

Studying Mongiardino through Martina’s eyes was extraordinary, and every villa we toured was more beautiful than the last. I have signed up for my next Indagare adventure...first class travel in every way.” ~HELEN OVERSTREET, MEMBER SINCE 2017

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Melissa Biggs Bradley and Martina and the Insider Journey group at Villa Necchi. Clockwise from right: Piero Portaluppi’s former residence; Martina Mondadori Sartogo; a home designed by Renzo Mongiardino; a sculpture at Lake Como’s Villa del Balbianello; the group at Villa del Balbianello


This trip was a treat for the eyes. We had incredible access, from private visits to the Last Supper and Milan’s chicest homes to a trip to a villa on Lake Como. It was the ultimate design lover’s journey.” ~HEATHER GEORGES, MEMBER SINCE 2012

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ILAN HAS LONG BEEN known as Italy’s style and design capital, with season after season of readyto-wear shows and the Salone del Mobile design fair attracting devoted fashion and design crowds. This year they were drawn as well to the recently opened Fondazione Prada Torre, in a once-dilapidated southern district of the city, which showcases a massive collection of 20th- and 21st-century art. But Milan also contains many hidden treasures—apartments designed by Renzo Mongiardino, houses by Piero Portaluppi, a tiny shop that sells exquisite bronze accessories—that take a little more work to uncover. On Indagare’s recent Insider Journey, Martina Mondadori Sartogo, editor of Cabana magazine and author of The Interiors and Architecture of Renzo Mongiardino: A Painterly Vision, enabled us to see Milan as she does, through the eyes of an insider. “Some of the most renowned designers of the 20th century lived and worked in Milan, helping to create the design-city environment that one experiences today with Salone del Mobile,” says Mondadori Sartogo. However, she explains, much of their legacy is invisible to the casual visitor: “This is a city that lives behind closed doors. Many of its greatest treasures and pleasures are hidden in private homes to be shared only with close friends and family.” Through her generosity, we were able to meet her friends and their families in their homes, view hidden gems by Mongiardino, Portaluppi and Giò Ponti and meet some of her favorite designers, dealers and

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The best part of the trip was meeting people from all over the world. At breakfasts, lunches, house tours and cocktail parties, Indagare connected us with wonderful Milanese people. Getting to meet top designers and artists was so special and a benefit of traveling with Indagare!” ~HEATHER WELLS, MEMBER SINCE 2013

The ceilling at Lake Como’s Villa Erba. Clockwise from left: Casa degli Atellani; dinner at Martina Mondadori Sartogo’s home.

collectors. There were many moments of beauty—from seeing Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper and visting the Palazzo Crespi and Villa Necchi, where I Am Love was filmed, to our day on Lake Como. Mondadori Sartogo led us on several tours to amazing private homes in Milan, including her own and others designed by Mongiardino, the favorite decorator of such arbiters of taste as Lee Radziwill, Guy de Rothschild and Marella Agnelli. As a result, the city unfolded to us in what felt like a revelation provided by an old friend rather than a simple discovery. By the end of the trip, it was the personal connections that made the biggest impact for many of us. “The Milan trip offered a bountiful visual feast, but the Indagare group truly fed my soul,” said Sabina Schlumberger, capturing beautifully what I think many felt. That combination will certainly provide memories to return to for inspiration and appreciation. 

Meet our Milan Host

Our savvy trip leader, Martina Mondadori Sartogo, sounds off on why she loves her home city and more. Why Milan for design lovers? The city offers a vibrant mix of old and new. It is a real style capital and was home to such lauded designers as Lorenzo Mongiardino and Piero Portaluppi. Destinations that inspire you? Istanbul, Marrakech and Eastern European destinations, such as Transylvania and Hungary.

Martina is hosting two more Insider Journeys in 2019. Contact insiderjourneys@indagare.comto learn more and book a trip.

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Favorite long-weekend getaway? ThesouthernpartofTuscany.Thelandscapeisgorgeousandthefoodandsightseeingarewonderful. Favorite Italian hotels? Il San Pietro, in Positano, and Il Pellicano, in Porto Ercole.

FILIPPO PINCOLINI

DID YOU KNOW?

Top design tips? I believe good homes need to have good“bones.”I always start with a color palette or a collection of objects, such as ceramics or vintage fabrics. These items give personality to a new home.


Zona Maco. Clockwise from top right: a private home in Mexico City; Rosetta restaurant.

Book Now: Art & Design in Mexico City The 2018 World Design Capital, Mexico City is one of the hottest destinations right now. In February, you’re invited to join other art and design enthusiasts on an Insider Journey hosted by Design Miami/ that will unlock the doors to top galleries, artists’ studios, private collections and homes that you can’t see anywhere else.

PHOTOMACO; ZONA CREDIT ROSETTA; TKT ANA ELENA MALLET

ITINERARY HIGHLIGHTS: • A 5-night stay at the Four Seasons, a landmark of luxury in Mexico City

• Touring the Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo museum, led by its director

• Tours of contemporary art museums and architectural projects, including Museo Tamayo and Casa Prieto López, with local curators

• Tours of private houses designed by Pritzker Prize–winner Luis Barragán

• Access to a collectors’ preview of the international art fair Zona Maco

• A visit with artist-designers Carla Fernández and Pedro Reyes in their home, a monument of Brutalist architecture

• S tudio visits and shopping excursions with artists and designers

•Meals at the city’s best restaurants, includingTetetlán,ContramarandPujol

WHEN:

February 4 – 9, 2019 LENGTH:

6 days / 5 nights GROUP SIZE:

25 TYPE OF TRAVELER:

Art and Design Lovers, Foodies, Style Mavens HOST:

Design Miami/ is the global forum for design, bringing together the most influential collectors, gallerists, designers,curatorsandcritics from around the world in celebration of design culture and commerce. COST:

From $6,770. Includes accommodations and all itineraryactivities,transportation and meals. Excludes international airfare.

Book now at indagare.com/insiderjourneys or call us at 646.787.8947. 77


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PANAMA RISING

A lounge at Sweet Bocas, off Panama’s southern coast. Opposite: The entrance to Islas Secas.

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PHOTO BOCAS SWEET CREDIT TKT

A host of new developments, including an incredible private island reserve, is making Panama a major player. Indagare’s Simone Girner explores.


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PHOTOSECAS; ISLAS CREDIT AMERICAN TKT TRADE HOTEL;

A deserted beach at Islas Secas. Clockwise from opposite right: Octopus for lunch at Islas Secas; a room at the American Trade hotel; a villa at Islas Secas; the bar at the American Trade hotel.

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O

H, HOW BEAUTIFUL IS PANAMA! is the name of a German children’s book found in most households (equivalent, in terms of familiarity, to Goodnight Moon in the U.S.). It tells of a bear and a tiger convinced that where they live pales in comparison to the adventure that awaits in the Central American country, and they set off to find the “land of bananas.” I thought of this staple of my childhood over breakfast in Panama. Every bite of pineapple, papaya and (yes) banana was so full of flavor that I had to admit the little bear and tiger might have had a point. Like that fruit plate, the country packs a punch. Although Central America’s narrowest nation, it charms and ultimately bowls you over with its larger-than-life natural scenery, both on land and at sea.

PHOTO CREDIT AMERICAN TRADE TKTHOTEL, LAUREN COLEMAN; ISLAS SECAS

Looking strictly at the numbers, Panama is baffling: wedged between Costa Rica and Colombia, it is only slightly larger than Ireland, but it has more plant species per square mile than Brazil. In one day, you can drive from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean, which are separated by just 31 miles at the country’s slimmest point. It is home to 125 animal species found nowhere else in the world, while its human population numbers only some 4 million. An inefficient government, red tape and corruption have threatened Panama’s natural splendor, especially in the past decade, as the country has slowly found its way onto the international travel scene. For now, it remains best suited to adventurous travelers who don’t get stressed if an itinerary detail changes. But luxury tourism is on its doorstep: Ritz Carlton is building a Reserve on the southeastern Pearl Island that is expected to open in 2020, and some other big-name developers have been investigating. For those who like to brag about visiting a place before it becomes mainstream, now is the time to go. Most visitors immediately feel protective of Panama, whose turbulent history is intimately linked with U.S. interventions and the Panama Canal, an engineering feat that forever changed the way we crisscross the world. What you wish for Panama is thoughtful development

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that protects and cherishes its most precious assets: its natural beauty and the incredible diversity of its citizens. Luckily, two very different properties are already doing just that: newcomer Islas Secas Reserve & Lodge, an ambitious conservation project that transports clients into a nautical wonderland off Panama’s southern Pacific Coast, and Sweet Bocas, a four-year-old private villa in the gorgeous northeastern Bocas del Toro archipelago. (They follow in the footsteps of Panama City’s stylish American Trade Hotel, which seriously raised the bar on the country’s hotel scene when it opened in 2014. Located in the center of the charming Casco Vieijo neighborhood, it is still the single-best place to stay in the city.) On my last day, my guide took me into the rainforest, located a 35-minute drive from the capital. Standing on a 100-foot viewing platform, we looked out over miles of tropical trees and listened to bird calls, some as intricate as if they were performing at Carnegie Hall. It was easy to picture the little bear and the little tiger from my old picture book making their way through the jungle, as delighted by the plate-size blue butterflies as I was. Oh, how beautiful is Panama! After this visit, I wholeheartedly agree. 

The terrace at Sweet Bocas. Opposite: A path, villa and fish dish at Islas Secas. Below: A room and a view of the patio at Sweet Bocas.

Sweet Bocas, in the Caribbean’s Bocas del Toro archipelago, is a perfect spot to celebrate a special occasion with familyandfriends.Inadditiontotheseven-bedroomluxuryvilla,builtacrossabeautifullagoon,thepropertyincludesa gym,poolandclaytenniscourt.Activitiesabound,fromsnorkelingandscubadivingtojunglehikesandswimmingoff pristine beaches. But this is the type of retreat that makes everyone want to come together and stay put. Sweet Bocas mustberentedinitsentiretyforstaysoffourorsevennights.Itcanaccommodateupto12adults;children10yearsold or younger are complimentary. 82  I N D A G A R E . C O M

SWEET BOCAS

A Splurge-Worthy Villa


BOOK NOW Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Panama.

ISLAS SECASV

Panama Newcomer: Islas Secas Sailing up to Islas Secas Reserve & Lodge, a gorgeous new property off Panama’s southern Pacific Coast, you may well have theJurassicParksoundtrackpop into your head. Frigate birds soar overhead, pelicans glide beside the boat and every now and then a fish or stingray cuts through the turquoise waters, as if they, too, were joyfully aware of the privilege of being in such a special place. Occupying an archipelago of 14 densely forested islands located some 22 miles off the mainland,thepropertycallsitself a “reserve and lodge,” and the word order is not arbitrary. Louis Bacon,theconservation-focused billionaire behind Alaska’s

Tordrillo Mountain Lodge and the Taos Ski Valley, is fiercely focused on sustainable, off-thegrid luxury. Some 75 percent of the Islas Secas archipelago has already been conserved in perpetuity, assuring that its diverse marine ecosystem will be safeguarded. Bacon could have easily made it his family’s personalplayground.Insteadhe has allowed his passion project to be experienced by a small numberofguests—nomorethan 18 at a time. The main Isla Cavadta contains all of the man-made structures, which are designed for minimal impact and blend seamlessly into the verdant landscape. They include the La

Terazza restaurant, a cozy bar and library, an activities center stocked with scuba and snorkel gearandthefourhumblynamed guest “casitas.” These one-, two- and three-bedroom villas, which are built on the cliff side to maximize views, have open floor plans and stylish interiors in line with the eco-friendly island concept.Lovelytouchesabound: there’sasmallkitchenette,homemade snacks, beach bags, sun hats and binoculars for whaleand bird-watching during the day and star-gazing at night. In many ways, Islas Secas is a nautical version of an African safari lodge, in tune with the naturalsurroundingsandoffering a host of guided activities.

Guests have no set schedule and can map out their days with the staff, deciding whether to go snorkeling, scuba diving or fishing. The last is a particular draw, as the Gulf of Chiriquí has a bounty of sea creatures like marlin, tuna and snappers. Less strenuous activities include private island picnics on a white sand beach and jungle walks led by a naturalist guide. Unlike some flop-and-drop destinations in the Caribbean and Mexico, Islas Secas takes timeandpatiencetoreach—and that’s precisely the point. As it says on the welcome cards in the rooms for new arrivals: “Sometimesit’sthejourneythatteaches us about the destination.”

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ETHIOPIA: A WORLD AWAY

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Five things you need to know about the East African nation that is blossoming into one of the world’s next best cultural destinations. Indagare’s Janine Yu reports on her recent journey.

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PHOTOHOLLANDS DAVID CREDIT TKT

A woman from the Nyangatom Tribe in southwestern Ethiopia. Opposite: Simien Mountains National Park.

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Janine hiking in Gheralta. Clockwise from opposite right: The Church of Saint George in Lalibela; Gheralta; the Kara tribe; Gheralta; frescoes and a monk at Daniel Korkor church.

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n countries like India or Mongolia, visitors can still witness, respectively, authentic local traditions or remote landscapes. But where can they do both? The answer is Ethiopia, an East African nation that is emerging as a destination for travelers in search of an unspoiled place on the verge of a tourism discovery. In the past two years, Ethiopia has seen the advent of plush properties and direct U.S. airline flights. Meanwhile, a steadily growing economy and a reform-minded prime minister have increased stability. Intrepid travelers to the country can engage with tribes almost entirely untouched by modern civilization and see churches holding 1,500-yearold relics—without any crowds. Few destinations offer such a strong sense of place, together with the luxury of disconnecting from the rest of the world.

Ethiopia is a cultural destination.

The people live today as they have for centuries, and the best way to witness this is by visiting the remote Omo Valley. Spending time with the tribes there is genuine, challenging and enriching. They are subsistence farmers with their own traditions, including body painting, scarification, the use of lip plates and the wearing of beadwork and metal jewelry to indicate wealth and marital status. There is a wrong way to experience the tribes. Some charge a pay-per-click fee for photos, and they pose and perform ceremonies for money. Indagare can offer a more

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ETHIOPIA: FAST FACTS • Ethiopia is the only country still on the Julian calendar, whichiseightyearsbehindthe Gregorian one used by the rest of world: the current year in Ethiopia is 2010. • Ethiopia is where paleoanthropologistDonaldJohanson discoveredLucy,thefossilized skeleton of one of the earliest human ancestors. • Ethiopia is one of the only Africancountriesnevertohave been colonized, although it was occupied briefly by the Italians.

PHOTOHOLLANDS DAVID CREDIT TKT

Ethiopia is not a top safari destination, but the country more than makes up for this with its unique culture and people. Christianity, Judaism and Islam all have roots here, with the Oriental Orthodox church being the dominant faith today, although animism is practiced in the Omo Valley. In the northern Tigray Region, 120 rock-hewn churches are perched high on the sandstone cliffs of Gheralta. The most spectacular of these, including Maryam Korkor and Daniel Korkor, can be accessed only by a climb of 1,000 feet, some of it involving scaling the rock wall. But the payoff is incredible: extraordinary views and the chance to explore ancient structures, carved into a rock face and containing relics from the 4th and 5th centuries. The most touristed site in Ethiopia is Lalibela, home to a complex of 11 monolithic rock-hewn churches, each an ancient engineering marvel.


Intrepid travelers to Ethiopia can engage with tribes almost entirely untouched by modern civilization and see churches holding 1,500-year-old relics— without any crowds.” authentic experience at Lale’s Camp, named for one of its co-owners, who is a member of one of the tribes and acts as a guide. Lale returned to his community after attending college and is respected among all the tribes, which allows for more meaningful connection with the locals.

The landscapes are incredible. For a landlocked country, Ethiopia has a wide variety of landscapes, from the mountains of Gheralta and the canyons of the Simien Mountains to the jungle and mighty river of the Omo Valley and the fertile Great Rift Valley in the south. Among its most notable features is the Danakil Depression, a lava field that is the hottest place on earth and sits 410 feet below sea level.

You need time to properly experience it.

BOOK NOW Call us at 212-988-2611 or visit indagare.com/go to plan your trip to Ethiopia.

Ethiopia’s history is long and rich, its expanse huge and its topography varied, so we recommend trips of 12 nights or more. If you add on another destination like the Seychelles, up to three weeks of travel is required. Ethiopian Airlines has lots of flights within the country, but getting to and from airports can take a lot of time. Charter flights here are relatively cheap and worth looking into, since they can simplify logistics.

Keep preconceived notions at home. Ethiopia is a developing country, and there are signs of poverty everywhere. It’s important to keep in mind, though, that this can be a matter of perception. The Omo tribes measure wealth in goats and cattle. A man who owns 300 goats is rich and can pay a substantial dowry for his daughter to marry a high-ranking tribe member.

PHOTOHOLLANDS DAVID CREDIT TKT

Go now, but avoid the rains. Ethiopia’s temperature is consistent year-round, but the rainy season extends from June through August. When planning a trip, also keep in mind the major religious festivals: Ethiopian New Year (September 11); Meskel, celebrating the discovery of the True Cross (September 27); Timkat, the Epiphany celebration (January 19); and Ethiopian Easter (usually one week after western Easter). The festivals are colorful, but they are also crowded, so it’s best to avoid them if you want to experience Ethiopia as it is most of the time, a seemingly undiscovered destination.

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THE LAST WORD

Emily in Japan. Clockwise from top left: Alex; Brian; Iva.

MEET THE TEAM

Visit Indagare’s office in midtown Manhattan, and you will quickly see that our 85 employees, all with unique backgrounds, live and breathe travel. Get to know the people behind your trips.

Alex Clifford

Iva Therene

Brian Spurr

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

JOURNEY OPERATIONS MANAGER

TRAVEL OPERATIONS

TRAVEL OPERATIONS

I was bitten by the travel bug when I... was a small child and visitedmygrandparentsinPuerto Rico. I have vivid memories of the oldcity,runningaroundtheSpanish forts and trying new foods.

One of my many hidden talents is... speaking Norwegian, in addition to my native language, Croatian.

I can’t even think about getting on a plane without... having a project to keep me busy. My favorite flights are return trips, because I get to go through the footage I collected on my trip and edit a video.

I was bitten by the travel bug when I... backpacked around Japan for a year. I ate at just about every local ramen shop I could find!

My craziest travel experience was... with a Turkish cab driver who asked me to drive his cab for him so he could relax and smoke a cigarette while we listened to Willie Nelson’s greatest hits. The perfect travel day includes... getting lost exploring and having a meal at a local restaurant where we are the only people speaking English.

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After years of traveling, I have learned... that people make places. Living abroad and meeting locals is the best way to fully understand a foreign culture. My craziest travel experience was...havingmyfuturepredicted in the home of an Indian guru in Goa. I was 26 and sat on his sofa while he explained how many children I would have and how I would die! I still get goosebumps every time I think about it.

The perfect travel day includes... sunshine, snow and my skis. After years of traveling, I have learned... that in order to grow it is vital to step out of your comfort zone. Fear is a vehicle for growth and it is something I push myself to experience when I am on the road.

Emily Priebe

The best meal of my life was... a grilled seafood dish in Hvar, Croatia. We stumbled on the most charming mom-andpop restaurant with panoramic views of the turquoise water. My craziest travel experience was... canyoning in Dalat, Vietnam. I’m deathly afraid of heights, so rappelling down waterfalls in the jungle was quite the rush!


Introducing the newly restored Suites and Heritage Park View Rooms at Dublin’s most distinguished address.

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Luxury guestroom accommodation within a historic 200 year old building, overlooking the iconic St. Stephen’s Green. Your lavish gateway to an enigmatic city.

Embracing the future, Reflecting the past

The Shelbourne Dublin, 27 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland. Telephone +353 1 663 4500 Facsimile +353 1 661 6006 www.theshelbourne.ie 3

Profile for Simone Girner

Indagare Magazine Fall/Winter 2018