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MAGAZINE

s e p Esca Capri Los Angeles Saudi Arabia Nantucket Tanzania Iceland, and more…

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


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BACK COVER: ANNABELLE MOEHLMANN

Indagare’s mission is to inspire and empower people to change their lives through travel. We believe that travel broadens the mind and enriches the soul. We help our members have authentic experiences and make remarkable journeys with our premium content and high-touch service. With our community of tastemakers and network of local partners, we put the human touch back in travel.

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N T E N T S S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 018 L.A.’s Walt Disney Concert Hall. Read more about the city on page 50.

4-5 On My Mind Growing Indagare

6-13 What’s New On Our Radar

14-17 Cheat Sheet Fantastic Fjords

“Île de Ré is française to its core, with white-washed villages and a bounty of culinary delights.” SIMONE GIRNER, INDAGARE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

To Have & to Honeymoon: Bumble’s CEO Ties the Knot

22-25 Just Back From Tanzania Revealed

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26-29 Why Go Now France’s Belle Isle

30-33 Photo Essay

Snapshots of Ise-Shima

THE RETREAT AT BLUE LAGOON; MICHELLE CHIU

A luxe new hotel in Iceland. Read more on page 6.

18-21 Indagare Honeymoons


Spring flew swiftly by, and summer came; and if the village had been beautiful at first, it was now in the full glow and luxuriance of its richness.” CHARLES DICKENS, OLIVER TWIST

44-49 First Look

60-63 Just Back From

50-55 Spotlight

64-68 Melissa’s Travels

56-59 Insider Journey

70-71 Packing List

A New Frontier: Saudi Arabia

West Coast, Best Coast

An Insider’s India

A World Apart: Faroe Islands

Enlightened at Mii amo

Summer Essentials

72 The Last Word Meet the Team

“India finds its way into your psyche. It embosses visual impressions in your memory.” CHARLOTTE MOSS, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2010

34 Escape

CHARLOTTE MOSS; RICARDO GOMEZ ANGEL

Summer in Jackson Hole

36-43 Iconic Summer Islands of Summer

Melissa in Saudi Arabia. Read more on page 44.

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GROWING INDAGARE O

As we’ve connected with more members and expanded our team, we’ve been able to establish relationships with more partners, from little-known hotels to amazing guides, art curators and restaurateurs. In Colombia, I recently had lunch with a private orchid collector on his farm, and on our Insider Journey to Peru, a top chef took us around the market and then taught us to prepare ceviche and other specialties in her oceanfront apartment. With more than 50 team members scouting the world and designing trips, we can cover much more territory, increasing our network and knowledge. Each discovery allows us to broaden the range of travel experiences we offer our members. I have always believed that there is no one way to approach a destination, that each day should be tailored to the individual. To do that well, we need a lot of boots on the ground to build relationships. Last year, our team spent more than 1,500 days on the road, checking out new hotels and restaurants, checking in on old favorites and test-driving new experiences, from heli-skiing in Iceland and diving in the Red Sea to tracking animals with tribes in Tanzania. From Indagare’s conception, I have believed in the value of leveraging advice from

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a community of like-minded travelers. But the power of thousands of members’ feedback on their journeys has been extraordinary. This crowd sourcing magnifies our ability to keep up-to-date on quality and trends and gives us special access. For instance, it was a member who introduced me to what is now our favorite nightclub in Tel Aviv; another connected me with the Danish chef who helped arrange this summer’s Nordic cuisine trip, which will culminate in a private dinner at Noma, the toughest restaurant in the world to book.

provides an insider’s view of a little-known French island getaway, and I describe how an expert teacher, best-selling author and Omega Institute co-founder Elizabeth Lesser, exponentially improved an Indagare ritual: our Mii amo retreat. It is by expanding our circle—of members, employees and partners—that we have been able to enhance our access to special opportunities like these. Being able to share these rare experiences, as well as many more to come, is why I believe that the more we grow, the more connected we are.

I see daily how the expertise and connections of our team and our members enrich our community. In this issue, Eliza writes about our trip to Saudi Arabia at the invitation of the royal commission formed to advise the kingdom on its high-end tourism program; we hope to introduce our members to this destination soon. Simone

MELISSA BIGGS BRADLEY INDAGARE CEO @INDAGARECEO & @INDAGARETRAVEL

Experience Insider Access at Noma One of our most exciting Insider Journeys this year is a culinary-focused trip to Copenhagen, including cooking classes, private wine tours and an unforgettable dinner at the two-Michelin-starred Noma—the hardest restaurant reservation to get in the world. Contact Indagare to receive the itinerary and join the trip (insidertrips@indagare.com).

When

June 24 – 28, 2018 Length

5 days / 4 nights Type of Traveler

Foodies Style Mavens Ultimate Indulgers

NOMA

ver the past decade, Indagare has grown from a staff of three (me, COO Eliza Harris and Creative Director Simone Girner) to a team of almost 80. As the business has expanded and evolved, members occasionally tell me that they wish we were still small and that I or Eliza could always answer their travel questions personally. Although a part of me would love to weigh in on each trip we plan, I have seen the incredible benefits of growth.


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We’re on the road more than ever, uncovering special experiences for you, whether heli-skiing in Iceland, diving in the Red Sea, exploring in Saudi Arabia or dining at Copenhagen’s top restaurant (clockwise from top left).

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ON OUR RADAR

From a new private island in Panama to the latest hot spots in the Hamptons, the travel news you need to know this season. Plus, our favorite summer reads and must-have products.

The Aman Founder’s Next Act: Azerai

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AZERAI

Aman founder Adrian Zecha’s latest venture, Azerai, is a more price-conscious version of his iconic hotel chain that still offers sleek accommodations, personal service and rich cultural experiences. Azerai already has properties in Luang Prabang and Can Tho, Vietnam, and plans are in the works to develop at least 10 more in such destinations as Iceland and Cuba.


A Star Chef’s San Fran Debut: Che Fico

Heating Up: Iceland Long an adventure spot, the country is in midst of a luxury moment: the recently opened Retreat at Blue Lagoon is one of Iceland’s first five-star properties, boasting a 43,000-square-foot spa, 62 sleek suites and private access to the fabled geothermal waters (above). Once the EDITION opens in Reykjavik later this year, it will be the city’s undisputed top choice. To get behind-the-scenes of this incredible destination, join Indagare’s Insider Journey this October, featuring lots of outdoor exploration and special experiences created exclusively for our group.

The Blue Lagoon is a very special, serene place. It was a great spot to relax before our flight home.”  JEREMY HITZIG, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2014

Chef David Nayfeld, who boasts an impressive culinary pedigree that includes stints at Eleven Madison Park and Nobu, just opened this Italian trattoria with business partner Matt Brewer. Housed inside a former auto shop in San Francisco’s NoPa neighborhood, Che Fico combines an industrial-chic setting with creative spins on traditional favorites like house-made pastas and pizzas and desserts from former Eleven Madison Park pastry chef Angela Pinkerton.

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OTHERLAND CANDLES

Inspired by her travels and the belief that “scent has a special way of reminding one of experiences in a way that photos can’t,” Otherland CEO Abigail Cook Stone recently launched this line of beautifully packaged and affordably priced candles (you can snag a set of three for just $89). One of our favorites is Rattan, which was crafted after Stone visited Tulum and evokes relaxing beach days. 7


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BHUTAN PUNAKHA PARO THIMPHU

BUMTHANG PARO

PARO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Five Reasons to Visit in 2018: Bhutan

Indagare’s safari jackets bring together fashion, travel and positive change. During an Insider Journey to Rwanda, Melissa Biggs Bradley commissioned local designer Joselyne Umutoniwase to create a custom safari jacket. The trip’s participants loved the garment so much, they ordered versions for themselves. Available in khaki and navy, as well as with various embellishments, they are sold on Indagare.com ($298), and a portion of proceeds goes to the innovative Gashora Girls Academy in Rwanda.

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PROVENÇAL OASIS: LA DIVINE COMÉDIE

This bucolic hideaway, located in Avignon, offers an ideal romantic escape, with just five beautiful suites and the largest private garden in the French city.

SIX SENSES; LA DIVINE COMEDIE

Giving Back Through Fashion: Indagare Safari Jackets

The Six Senses hotel group is launching five properties in Bhutan, all offering spacious suites, Six Senses spas, fitness centers and restaurants. Each retreat features a prime location that has its own draws: Thimpu, the capital, has a palace and markets; Punakha is known for its grand temple Puankha Dzons; Gangtey is prime for observing black-necked cranes; Bumthang has the sacred palace Wangdichhoeling; and Paro offers the best access to the famous Tiger’s Nest Monastery. The hotels can be visited independently and we recommend speaking to a specialist who can pair them with the country’s other top hotels to get a varied perspective.


Next to Know: Panama’s Islas Secas Reserve & Lodge Located on a private archipelago, this überluxe retreat will put Panama on the high-end travel map when it fully opens in January 2019. An Indagare staffer will visit the all-inclusive, nine-casita property in May, so stay tuned for a first look at the adventure-focused lodge.

Taking a helicopter to a high-Alpine fly-fishing lake in New Zealand was unforgettable. It was one of our most magical family days.”  SHELBY BUTTERFIELD, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2015

By The Numbers: Virgin Galactic

ISLAS SECAS; ELEVEN MADISON PARK

Set to launch this year, Richard Branson’s line of commercial spaceships will enable aspiring astronauts to fly beyond the stratosphere. Traveling at three and a half times the speed of sound (2,600 MPH), passengers will experience weightlessness and an extraordinary view of Earth.

2,600 Virgin Galactic

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minutes of weightlessness

$250,000 dollars cost of flight

Hot Spots: Hamptons EMP Summer House, last summer’s pop-up from Eleven Madison Park, is returning to East Hampton from May to September. Il Mulino will be offering up classic Italian fare from a new home in Wainscott. The Parrish Art Museum is hosting a retrospective of artist Keith Sonnier that will run for seven months, beginning July 1.

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Upon Arrival: Soho, London

Where to stay and eat and what to do from a base in the eclectic neighborhood. Stay: Operated by the Soho House team, the intimate, 33-room Kettner’s Townhouse, which opened in February, is London’s coolest new property.

Refresh: Combat jetlag with a glass of bubbly at the hotel’s 1920s-inspired Champagne Bar, or indulge in a treatment at its So Spa.

Perfect Lunch: Enjoy French bistro favorites in Kettner’s the Dining Room or sophisticated takes on Sri Lankan street food at nearby Hopper’s.

Visit: Head to Donmar Warehouse for a matinee or view masterpieces by Rembrandt, da Vinci, Picasso and other greats at the National Gallery.

Shop: Swing by OTHER/shop for androgynous fashion and Foyle’s, Europe’s largest bookstore, for new reads.

Refuel: Stroll to Paul A. Young Fine Chocolates for a cup of hot cocoa flavored to taste with cinnamon and ginger.

GOURMET TEMPLE IN THE ANDES Peruvian chef Virgilio Martinez Veliz, the man behind star Lima restaurant Central, brings his talents to the Sacred Valley with Mil. The eatery, which is located 11,500 feet above sea level, is only open for lunch and serves a menu that highlights local speciaties like alpaca and llama.

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Olloclip’s camera lens ($80) connects to smartphones with 2x optical zoom and an advanced wide lens. This enables aspiring photographers to take professionalquality images and makes capturing the panoramic landscapes of New Zealand or big game of Tanzania much easier.

MIL, CÉSAR DEL RIO; KETTNER’S TOWNHOUSE, SOHO HOUSE; OLLOCLIP PHOTO CREDIT TKT

Gadget of the Moment


I always shop for cosmetics at Buly 1803 in Paris, and their new location in the Marais has a lovely café, making it perfect for a mid-shopping treat. ~ CARROLL PIERCE, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2007

FONDATION CARMIGNAC, ERIC VALLIIN FULL FLIGHT

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Summer Reading: What’s On Our List As we dream of warm days, we can’t wait to dig into new books. Top choices include the novel Two Steps Forward, by husband and wife authors Graeme Simsion and Anne Buist, about an unlikely couple’s romance as they trek the pilgrim trail Camino de Santiago through France and Spain; and In Full Flight: A Story of Africa and Atonement, by John Heminway, the true story of a female doctor’s quest for redemption in Africa following World War II. For a light read, we’re reaching for Summer in the Islands: An Italian Odyssey, by Matthew Fort, to get a taste of glorious Italian summer. Another wanderlust-inducing work is Paul Theroux’s essay collection, Figures in a Landscape: People and Places, which takes readers on trips around the world with such figures as Robin Williams and Elizabeth Taylor. Finally, there’s Peter Thomas’s Anywhere That Is Wild: John Muir’s First Walk to Yosemite, which recounts Muir’s journey to the national park.

Now Open: Art Island in the South of France

The nearly 17,000-square-foot Fondation Carmignac, due to open in June, will draw art lovers from all over the world to beautiful Porquerolles island, which is easily accessible by boat from many towns along France’s southern coast. The inaugural exhibition will feature 250 rarely seen works and several outdoor installations. After touring the museum, visitors can explore the beaches, pine tree forests and vineyards of the government-protected island.

THE HIGH SEAS

This June, French expedition yacht line Ponant will launch Le Lapérouse, the first ship in the Explorer series, on a journey around Iceland, with future routes including the Baltic Sea, the Western Mediterranean, the Seychelles and Malaysian Borneo. Each of the four Explorer vessels will hold 88 staterooms and four suites and offer infinity pools, a marina for water sports and two restaurants overseen by Alain Ducasse. 11


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Left Bank Rising: Hôtel Lutetia, Paris

Founded by the Boucicaut family—founders of Le Bon Marché, the first modern department store—this Left Bank landmark has a gilded history, including more than a century as a mainstay of Parisian hospitality. When it opened, in 1910, it turned heads with its fashionable Art Deco style and was frequented by the likes of Ernest Hemingway and Henri Matisse. This May, it will have a grand reopening after a three-year renovation and restoration. A welcome addition to the city’s hotel scene, the Lutetia is expected to join the elite ranks of “palace” properties, of which there are only 10 in Paris. It will be the answer for visitors who want to stay on the Left Bank, but in a five-star hotel with spacious rooms, ample amenities and superb service.

Marrakech’s new Museum of African Contemporary Art Al Maaden is a sprawling trove dedicated to African artists and a must-see for art lovers.” ~ INDAGARE TRIP DESIGNER MISSY WEIL

Swiss Family Robinson– Style Lodge Forest Chem Chem opens this June in Tanzania’s Chem Chem concession. The exclusive-use property, run by the team behind Indagare favorite Chem Chem Tarangire, has two regular tents and one family tent, making it ideal for parents who want to stay with their children. 12

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SUMMER ESSENTIAL

Stay sunburnfree all summer long with Kate Somerville’s soft-focus sunscreen spray ($38), which can be applied over makeup and won’t leave smudges.

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What’s On: NYC Culture Watch Highlights from this season’s jam-packed culture roster include two Broadway dramas—The Iceman Cometh, starring Denzel Washington, and Angels in America, with Nathan Lane and Andrew Garfield— and a pair of highly anticipated exhibitions. The Met hosts “Visitors to Versailles,” which showcases the gifts exchanged at the French palace in the 17th and 18th centuries (April 16–July 29), and the New York Botanical Garden is running “Visions of Hawai’i” a tribute to Georgia O’Keeffe, in tandem with a flower show (May 19–October 28).

Indagare Access The Aman Tokyo just unveiled an über-exclusive opportunity for guests to visit the much-lauded private tea house Tsurunaka ryotei for a special tea ceremony and geisha performance.

HOTEL HASSLER; AMAN; GEORGIA O’KEFFE

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ROOM WITH A VIEW

Rome’s iconic Hotel Hassler boasts a prime location at the top of the Spanish Steps, but it’s the hotel’s Penthouse Villa Medici, which has a private 1,600-squarefoot terrace, that steals the show.

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FANTASTIC FJORDS

Everything you need to know about coastal Norway, one of Europe’s hottest destinations.

Formed during the last ice age, the Norwegian fjords have a raw beauty on par with that of Iceland, Patagonia and New Zealand. One of the world’s greatest off-thebeaten path adventure destinations, the country’s fjord region is defined by staggering peaks, cleft by waterfalls and dotted with old farmhouses, that drop into blue water thousands of feet deep. Despite this spectacular landscape, the area is just being discovered by travelers. Our advice? Go now to enjoy it before the crowds arrive.

tives on the fjords, and visitors should navigate these awe-inspiring features by helicopter, car and boat. In particular, they will want to take the high-speed RIB boat tour, during which they will cruise at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour and see porpoise, seals, eagles and more, all while learning about the Vikings who once dominated these waters. Other thrilling ways to explore include hiking, mountain biking, sailing and kayaking, which are just a few of the outdoor activities on offer.

Commit to a full-on adventure or abbreviated luxury experience.

Hit the road.

Norway’s luxury tourism market remains rough around the edges. The country has no five-star hotels, but this is part of its allure. It is an unspoiled paradise that welcomes adventurers and rewards intrepidness. Visitors should opt either for a thrilling weeklong adventure with a mix of nice and midrange hotels or a shorter trip exploring the surrounding countryside from a base at the plush 30-room Storfjord hotel.

Most itineraries in this region will involve significant time on the road. But don’t worry: Norway has 18 National Tourist Routes, highways that are particularly scenic and feature architecturally interesting viewpoints, like the one on the famous serpen-

tine mountain road Trollstigen, that break up long drives.

Splurge on a sky-high experience. The natural landscape of these coastal features, from the iconic Geirangerfjord to the less-visited Storfjord, is both majestic and diverse. Viewing it from the air allows visitors to experience the beauty without having to deal with crowds. Indagare can arrange private helicopter tours upon request, complete with picnic baskets or lunches at remote restaurants.

Go when the days are long. Peak season in the fjords is June to August, when the sun sets around 11 P.M. and the days are warm, around 60 degrees on average. This is also the preferred time for cruise ships to visit, so many of the most

Air, land and sea all offer unique perspec-

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Did You Know? The fjords run along the entire coast of Norway. However, it is the western coastline from Stavanger in the south to Molde in the north that is most commonly referred to as the fjord region.

VISIT NORWAY

Experience the landscape in every way possible.


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Overlooking the town of Ã…lesund from Aksla Mountain

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Clockwise: A room at Storfjord hotel; the viewing platform at Trollstigen; a waterfall at Geirangerfjord; bread and butter at Storfjord

Combine a visit with the right addon destination. Bergen is a great jumping-off point for touring the region and a necessary stop for those wishing to see the Sognefjord, which is the second-largest fjord in the world. For travelers who just want light fjords immersion, however, it’s not worth spending an overnight in Bergen. Instead, they should begin their journey in the charming town of Ålesund, which has a small international airport with direct flights to and from Oslo and Amsterdam, both of which offer city experiences that perfectly complement an adventure-focused fjord trip.

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THE PERFECT DAY IN: ÅLESUND Perhaps Norway’s most beautiful city, Ålesund has a population of just over 40,000 and is known for its distinctive Art Nouveau architecture. It was rebuilt in that style, with lovely pastel structures, after being almost entirely destroyed by fire in 1904. A perfect base for exploring the fjords, the city also boasts local attractions worth touring for at least a day. Morning: Get a caffeine fix at Invit Espressobar before hiking the 418 steps to the top of Aksla Mountain, which offers beautiful panoramic views of Ålesund. Then rent a kayak to tour the town by water and take in the scenic surrounding countryside. Midday: Stop for lunch at Molo Brew, a hip microbrewery and restaurant that serves inventive burgers and has a lounge area with shuffleboard tables. Afterward, learn about Ålesund’s historic fire at the Art Nouveau Centre (don’t miss the noteworthy gift shop), and embark on a sea safari to see puffins, seals and eagles. Evening: Dine at MAKI, known for its upscale fjord-to-table cuisine, including fish soup and crab cakes with foam dill mayonnaise. Those not tired out from a day of adventure should swing by the trendy MILK Bar & Lounge for a nightcap.

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beautiful fjords can be slightly crowded. May, June and early September are much quieter and still stunning.


VISIT NORWAY; STORFJORD HOTEL

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The Storfjord Hotel was the perfect base for exploring the Norwegian fjords. With stylish but understated décor, delicious local food and friendly service, it felt like a friend’s country house. The cuisine was particularly noteworthy; breakfast had both healthy and indulgent options and the dinners were equally delicious with a set menu each night. The sauna is beautiful and has a huge window overlooking the countryside. My family has spent a lot of time in mountains all over the world, but the fjords—with striking peaks dropping to meet the water—have a truly unique landscape.” ~ GWENN CAGANN, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2012

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I N DAGA R E

H O N E YM O O N S

TO HAVE & TO HONEYMOON How Whitney Wolfe Herd, the founder and CEO of Bumble, a dating app used by 23 million people, built her empire, met her dream man and celebrated their union with a buzzworthy Indagare honeymoon.

Having met while vacationing in Aspen, Whitney and Michael thought it fitting to travel for their wedding. So they mapped out an extravagant weekend at Villa TreVille, in Positano, Italy, with the help of famed planner Diana Sorensen and wedding

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stylist and Indagare member Cynthia Cook Smith. Sorenson and Smith conjured up a paradisiacal parade of lemon grove dinners, candlelit boat rides and Aperol Spritz–fueled evenings culminating in a wedding ceremony on a cliff overlooking the sea and a night of dancing (and pasta). The newlyweds then departed for their Indagare-planned honeymoon, which included stays at the Four Seasons Bora Bora; the Brando resort, in French Polynesia; and the Four Seasons Maui, in Hawaii. When they weren’t snorkeling, swimming with sharks and enjoying spa treatments, the couple dined at top restaurants and drank in their romantic surroundings. Get an inside look at Whitney’s stunning journey and learn how one of the U.S.’s busiest women plans a destination wedding.

Our honeymoon was perfect, and we couldn’t have done it without Indagare.” ~ WHITNEY WOLFE HERD, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2017

What inspired your choice of Positano for your wedding? After we got engaged, we visited Italy and fell in love with Positano. We just knew it would be the perfect place to get married. Plus, it was an unforgettable experience for our friends and family. We wanted to give our

WHITNEY’S POSITANO HIT LIST RESTAURANTS:

For People-Watching: Chez Black For a Romantic Setting: La Sponda at Le Sirenuse For Dramatic Views: Zass For Waterfront Dining: Rada For a Traditional Italian Feast: La Tagliata SHOPS: For Beach Fashions: Antica Sartoria For Sandals: Sandali tipici di Alfonso Dattilo For Ceramics: Laboratorio Fes Conterraneo

BAARON DELESIE; LE SIRENUSE

At age 28, Whitney Wolfe Herd is CEO of a company valued at more than one billion dollars and ranked with Snapchat’s Evan Spiegal and Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai on Forbes’s prestigious “30 Under 30” list of young innovators. The founder of Bumble, America’s fastest-growing dating app, the young executive has broken boundaries in the technology sector and achieved astronomical success. Launched in 2014, the company added two new platforms in 2017: Bumble BFF, for making friends, and Bumble Bizz, for professional networking. Also last year, Whitney tackled a personal milestone, her marriage to Texas oil heir Michael Herd and their honeymoon, with the same gusto as she approaches professional ones, enlisting the assitance of experts and selecting two romantic locales for the celebratory occasions.


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Positano at sunset

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Q&A

H O N E YM O O N S

LE SIRENUSE; THE BRANDO

Clockwise: Dining on the Amalfi Coast; paths at the Brando; sunset in Positano; an aerial view of the Brando; boating on the Amalfi Coast

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guests the most authentic Italian experience possible, and we tried to integrate the local culture into each part of the celebration, from the menus to the décor.

How did you pick a beach-themed honeymoon? We were coming from our whirlwind wedding and looking for the ideal place to unwind, where we could take in the sun and swim. Our favorite moments were just relaxing and appreciating each other in such beautiful locations.

The Brando is one of Indagare’s alltime favorite properties. What was your favorite thing about it? Everything about the Brando is incredible. From the moment we arrived, we had no doubt that we had picked the right place for our honeymoon. The service was incredible, the food was amazing and the weather was perfect. I was blown away by the natural beauty at every turn. It also felt very secluded and private, which was so relaxing.

What was a typical day like at the Brando? We would wake up, have coffee and read the newspaper on our patio overlooking the ocean. After having fresh fruit for breakfast,

we would head to the beach to get some sun and swim in the ocean. In the afternoon, we would hike, go snorkeling or head to the spa before going back to our villa to relax, soak up the sun and take a swim before getting ready for the evening. It became a routine to go to Te Manu Bar for a few pre-dinner drinks and stargazing. It was such a romantic setting!

How did you approach your honeymoon-planning process? I think being flexible is important, especially since, with everything that comes with a wedding, the honeymoon is often not the top priority.

Do you have any advice for other brides who need to balance their careers and wedding/honeymoon planning? Have fun with it. Don’t let the planning distract from what the special day actually means. And it is okay to ask for help!

What are four things you wouldn’t travel without? EltaMD Sunscreen, Krewe sunglasses, plenty of swimsuits and a Bumble hat, of course!

We are madly in love with the Brando and are moving there in our next life. The resort tops everything we’ve ever seen.” ~ WHITNEY WOLFE HERD, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2017

AARON DELESIE

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THE HONEYMOON MEMBERSHIP Our special honeymoon membership is ideal for couples planning a romantic getaway—be it a long weekend mini-moon in Capri, an extravagant honeymoon safari or a last-minute baby-moon in the Maldives. Our team of expert travel designers can work with you to plan the vacation of your dreams, with personalized recommendations and special upgrades. Contact membership@indagare.com to learn more, inquire about gifting a membership to newly engaged friends and receive our Honeymoons Brochure.

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TANZANIA REVEALED

When most people think of the East African country, they conjure up images of iconic sights like Mount Kilimanjaro and the Serengeti plains. But, as Indagare’s Eliza Scott Harris discovers, it’s the little things the country reveals that leave you feeling alive and connected.

Part of Tanzania’s appeal for visitors is surely the lifestyle of being on safari. We spent entire days watching and listening, by our tent, on foot, in the vehicle. On bush walks, we paid careful attention to the direction of the wind and the behavior of the game;

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when the animals stop grazing and stare fixedly in one direction, it is a sign a predator is near. You are alive, alert and present on safari—entirely in sync with your environment. On foot, our guide taught us the magic of smaller creatures, like the dung beetle patiently rolling a ball 10 times its own weight on the dirt and stopping periodically to climb atop and navigate by the stars, using the Southern Cross and the polarization patterns in moonlight. We watched the sunset every night, sundowner in hand, and admired the graphic silhouettes of the acacias against the dimming sky. A huge part of our experience was the wonderful people we befriended. The Maasai warrior with the wicked sense of humor who loved to catch scorpions. Our safari guide, who had the most contagious laugh and knew everything about everything. The helicopter pilot who told us about having trouble in high school but then finding a job that he does for the sheer joy of it and the thrill of seeing the plains from above. Like most safari goers, we started our trip craving the thrill of big game. We saw herds of elephants, a duo of cheetahs, lions napping in trees and thousands of wildebeests running in unison. We walked with giraffes and zebras. Then we became obsessed with birds, their bright colors flitting through the tawny landscape: iridescent blue starlings,

Our visit to a local school and Maasai family was unforgettable. Observing a different culture and way of life was as thrilling as the safari. We often get caught up in our own routines, so it was eye-opening to interact with the tribespeople and hear their stories.” ~ SAMANTHA GRIFFITH, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2011

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So many experiences glide through my memory when I think of Tanzania: watching a jackal streak in and try to snatch a baby warthog in its jaws before being chased off by the mother in a loud scuffle and plume of dust; learning from a Maasai warrior how to make a fire using tufts of grass and two sticks; seeing a lioness with three cubs rolling and tumbling over each other; flying over hundreds of elephants and thousands of wildebeest in a helicopter, then swooping through a canyon past a hidden waterfall before stopping for sundowners atop a mountain ridge. But when I close my eyes and think of East Africa, what I miss most is what it felt like to sit outside with my husband in the morning. Each day, we would wake before dawn and watch the sunrise from bucket chairs, with cups of strong local coffee in our hands. The air hummed with sounds at all frequencies, made by hundreds of birds, grasshoppers and other insects. There was the earthy smell of long grasses. Our eyes scanned the horizon as zebras and wildebeests slowly moved from the grazing area to the lake for a drink and then back again.


MWIBA LODGE; CHEN HU; RICHARD FAMILY

Clockwise: A bathroom at Tanzania’s Mwiba Lodge; a Maasai warrior; an afternoon game drive; a lion stretching

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yellow weavers and lilac-breasted rollers with yellow crowns, pink breasts, royal blue wings and teal tails. They are prettiest in flight and almost impossible to photograph on the wing—too small and fast. You must let go and just watch, knowing they will disappear in a moment, an evanescent joy.

Every morning in Tanzania we woke up with new adventures awaiting us. We would drive in our jeep for several hours a day, with zebras, wildebeests, giraffes and elephants grazing in the savannah alongside us. Hours were spent without seeing any signs of human life.� ~ THE RICHARD FAMILY, INDAGARE MEMBERS SINCE 2016

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Spending a week or two unplugged from civilization and its discontents and plugged in to the Serengeti was a gift that awed, inspired, thrilled, moved and graced us. Immersed in the wilderness, in the words of John Muir, we washed our spirits clean.

MWIBA LODGE; SINGITA SASAKWA

Then we began to learn and appreciate the stories and relationships behind everything. Zebras and wildebeests like to travel together because zebras are great at spotting predators and warning the group, while wildebeests, able to smell the rain, have a knack for finding water. By the end we were just so grateful for the wide-open plains of the Serengeti, the feeling of freedom and possibility, the rawness of it all, the sound of birdcalls heard from our tent and the occasional roar of a lion or hyena.


AFRICAN SAFARI PACKING TIPS Get the most out of your once-in-a-lifetime trip with these helpful hints for what to bring in your suitcase. Contact Indagare for a full, itemized packing list. •Pack a soft duffle bag rather than a hard case with wheels. It will fit better in small bush planes and, because it’s comparatively light, will help keep your luggage under the maximum weight limit. •Bring what you will need for full days spent on game drives, including a day pack to carry on the truck. •Bring a durable jacket that doesn’t show dust, has lots of pockets for gloves, sunscreen and bug spray and is easy to layer. In warmer months, you may prefer a vest to a full jacket. •Dark khakis are better than light ones. You might want to consider purchasing pants that zip off into shorts or taking a few pairs of safari shorts. •Some camps have pools. Check your itinerary to see if you need a swimsuit. •Bring individual laundry detergent packets. Although most camps offer laundry service, many will not wash women’s underwear, so bring a small bottle to do your lingerie yourself.

PHOTO CREDIT TKT RICHARD FAMILY; CHEN HU

Clockwise from left: Mwiba Lodge; the Great Migration; the Richard family; sundowners at Singita Sasakwa; the Serengeti; Eliza and her husband

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FRANCE’S BELLE ISLE

Île de Ré, the so-called white island, a biker’s paradise on the Atlantic, is one of France’s loveliest summer secrets. Indagare’s Simone Girner explores.

“L’Île de Ré, c’est un privilège,” I was informed on a recent visit by an oyster vendor at the daily market in the village of La Flotte, scenically tucked beneath wooden arcades that date back to medieval times. And that’s just what the small Atlantic island, some three hours by train from Paris, feels like: a privilege, a discovery, a well-kept secret even among French visitors. Only 19 miles long and three miles wide, Ré is often called France’s version of Nantucket. And the two islands do indeed share certain characteristics, including wind-swept sand beaches, a moody Atlantic coastal climate and spectacular light, especially during the picture-perfect sunsets. But Île de Ré is française to its core, with white-washed villages, incredible daily food markets and a bounty of culinary delights, including some of the world’s best oysters.

The countryside is exquisite, studded with pines and palms and encompassing large expanses of unspoiled vineyards, wildflower fields and salt marshes, all competing for attention. Because the island is flat as a crêpe, moreover, the expansive blue ocean is always nearby, sparkling like a shimmering backdrop in the distance. Don’t expect the pomp and glitz of the French Riviera—Île de Ré is for those who appreciate understatement. But it does have style, as is evident in hotels like Villa Clarisse and Le Sénéchal, the lovely homeware boutiques of St.-Martin-de-Ré, and the breezy seaside fashion on display—espadrilles instead of stilettos, sarongs instead of designer dresses. Days are full of wonderful rituals of the sort that come naturally to the French: a sunrise beach walk followed by strong

2. Pick the Right Village. Day trippers can clog the towns directly after the bridge. So book a hotel in St.-Martin-de-Ré or

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Ars-en-Ré, or rent a villa in secluded Les Portes. From a base in one of these, you can bike around to explore other towns, including La Flotte, which has an amazing medieval market, and Le Bois-Plage, with its expansive Plage des Gollandières. 3. Bike Everywhere. Île de Re has more than 60 miles of bike paths connecting its 10 quaint villages and snaking through beautiful countryside.

Don’t miss the route from Ars-enRé to Les Portes, which traverses the stunning Lilleau des Niges nature reserve. 4. Make Reservations. Even during the shoulder seasons, you should make reservations for lunch and dinner. That goes double if you’re planning to bike to an oyster cabane like Feneau, Ré Ostréa or Cabanajam. During the high season, it’s equally important to book your bike.

5. Don’t miss these foodie favorites. For oysters in a beautiful setting, reserve at La Cabane du Feneau, La Rhétaise or Ré Ostréa. Book dinner at a classic hot spot like Le Bistrot du Marin, L’Avant Port or O Parloir, in St.-Martin; Aux Frères de la Côte, near Arsen-Ré; or L’Océan, in Le Bois Plage. Those craving a frozen treat should head to ice-cream parlor La Martinière.

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1. Timing is Key. Avoid July and August, when the small island bursts at the seams with visitors. It’s better to plan a trip for late June or September, when it’s easy to get reservations, the bike paths are mercifully uncrowded, and the temperature hovers in the seventies.

VILLA CLARISSE; HOTEL DE TOIRAS

FIVE TO KNOW


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Clockwise from top left: The bustling harbor scene at St.-Martin-de-RĂŠ; the view from the Baleines lighthouse; biking is the best way to get around the island; the atmospheric market at La Flotte; a room at Villa Clarisse.

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coffee, shopping for a picnic at the morning market, walking to the beach past wild hollyhock and bougainvillea-draped façades, sussing out the perfect oyster shack (here more elegantly termed cabane), strolling harbor-side in the early evening, dining alfresco at small tables set too close together, biking home through salt-laced air. In short, Île de Ré is the kind of place that reminds you that life’s simplest pleasures are often the most powerful. And at some point during your stay, you realize that rediscovering yourself in this state—sun-kissed, windblown, happy—is the greatest privilege of all. Getting There: A three-hour ride on the TGV from Paris brings you to La Rochelle, from which it’s a 45-minute drive across the bridge to Île de Ré. Getting Around: Many of the towns, such as

St.-Martin-de-Ré, are car-free, and once on the island, most visitors abandon their cars in favor of bikes. Taxis, however, are expensive, so if you’re planning to travel between villages at night for dinner, you may want to rent a car. Island Memento: Salt. For centuries, this was the island’s major product, and today 2,000 tons (down from 30,000 in the early 1900s) are still harvested from the salt pans that dot the island. Buy small pouches of the “white gold” at the self-serve stands beside the bike paths that connect Ars-en-Ré and Les Portes. The daily produce markets in various villages are also worth a visit: many also sell accessories, like fouta beach towels. Indagare Tip: If you see a dish of vanet on the menu, order it. A distant cousin of the scallop, this delectable seafood is smaller, sweeter and does not travel well, meaning you can only get it here.

STAYING IN STYLE

The Grande Dame: Hôtel de Toiras With a prime location overlooking the lovely harbor of St.-Martin, this Relais & Châteaux property occupies a 17th-century mansion that has been restored with great taste and style (see Island Insider, p. 35). Each of the 20 rooms is unique in layout and design, but all are graced with such details as precious fabrics, gorgeous wallpapers and antique furnishings. The best ones have views of the harbor. Although the Toiras’s ambience is decidedly grand and old-world, the warm staff makes it feel welcoming. Fine dining restuarant La Table d’Olivia is one of the island’s most acclaimed for a romantic big night out. hotel-de-toiras.com.

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The Designer Retreat: Villa Clarisse This sister property to De Toiras, this hotel could not be more different in character. Housed in a former convent away from the bustle of the port (but still centrally located), it has an exquisite garden with a small pool and sitting nooks surrounded by planters containing flowers and fragrant herbs. Serenity continues in the nine rooms and suites. Created in collaboration with star designer Jean-Yves Rochon, they are white, contemporary and spacious. St.-Martin’s restaurants and shops are just steps from the property (which does not have a restaurant), but what’s best about Villa Clarisse is the sense it gives you of hiding out. villa-clarisse.com

The Village Beauty: Hôtel Le Sénéchal Presided over by the dramatic Gothic spire of Église Saint-Étienne and boasting a refined port scene, the western village of Ars-en-Ré is the island’s intellectual capital. If you choose this as your base, you must stay at the stylish, cozy boutique Hôtel Le Sénéchal. Composed of a cluster of fishermen’s cottages stitched together by narrow stairways, it has 22 guest rooms, all different in layout but sharing a modern-meets-seaside-chic style, with exposed brick walls and unfussy décor (the owner is a local architect). The interior gardens are a marvel, and there’s a small pool. Book early: during the summer Le Senechal is always full. en.hotel-le-senechal.com.

VILLA CLARISSE; HOTEL DE TORIAS

Hotels on Île de Ré are small, privately owned and book up fast during the high season.


ISLAND INSIDER: OLIVIA LE CALVEZ

Clockwise from top: Île de Ré is full of idyllic harbor vistas; a sunset at Plage des Gollandières; Ré Ostréa, an oyster restaurant near St.-Martin; the local bounty; La Cabane du Feneau, an oyster shack in the marshes.

The mastermind behind Ré’s Hôtel de Toiras and Villa Clarisse, Olivia Le Calvez has an innate talent for preserving a property’s sense of place while also imbuing it with contemporary flair. Here, the stylish Parisian shares her island picks and tips. What made you fall in love with Ré? Its beauty, purity and very preserved landscape with over eighty percent protected. Also, my husband Didier is from here [his mother was the mayor for years], so we love to take our three children. There are plenty of activities for the entire family. What is your vision for the hotels? De Toiras, located in a 17th-century ship-owner’s mansion, was restored in a traditional local style, very cozy in winter, with great views on Saint-Martin’s harbor. Villa Clarisse, meanwhile, is extremely peaceful with an all-white design scheme. It occupies a former monastery, so has an ultra-serene ambience but is still located in the center of town. What are some of your favorite island secrets? Le Bistrot du Marin, in Saint-Martin, for delicious fresh oysters; La Baleine Bleue, a landmark for many years; and Le Taxi Brousse, near La Couarde, in the woods by the sea. I also love the nine-hole golf course at Les Portes en Ré and many boutiques in Saint-Martin (don’t miss Comme Ça Les Filles). Off-island, the Musée du Nouveau Monde in La Rochelle is worth a visit. What should first-time visitors do? Bike along one of the 100-kilometers of bicycle paths, stopping to sample oysters directly from the producers in the salt marshes with, of course, a glass of our own wine, Château Clarisse.

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SNAPSHOTS OF ISESHIMA

Through her beautiful snapshots, Indagare member and travel photographer Julie Helfrich captures the subtle details that make Japan’s coastal city of Ise-Shima so special.

“I am inspired by the light, color and texture found in quotidian scenes, and my hope is to convey a sense of place. What moves me is when I find vestiges of former lives having been lived,” explains Julie Helfrich, a San Francisco–based photographer and Indagare member since 2008. “I’m driven to get off the beaten path and discover the treasures that you won’t see unless you really look—or get lucky.” By capturing subtle, intimate scenes—laundry hanging out to dry, sailboats docking, a young girl digging for crabs—Julie’s photographs allow viewers to feel the spirit of each place that she visits. Nowhere is this more evident than in her collection from a recent family vacation to Ise-Shima, Japan.

“I discovered this region and Amanemu thanks to Indagare’s recommendation,” says

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A serene coastal region renowned for its cultivation of fine pearls and boasting a stunning Aman property, Amanemu, Ise-Shima is a little-known but worthwhile destination that travelers should be incorporating into their Japan itineraries. Many visitors will delight in the exceptional seafood of the region, which is Japan’s lobster country and the imperial family’s sushi supplier. Others will be drawn to Ise Jingu, a holy Shinto complex that contains more than 100 shrines and meditation courtyards, as well as the mysterious and revered Sacred Mirror, one of the Three Sacred Treasures of Japan, which were presented to ancient emperors ascending the throne.


AMAN; JULIE HELFRICH

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Scenes from Julie’s visit to the pearl harvester

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Ise-Shima is the other side of the world in every way. And that’s why we travel.” ~ JULIE HELFRICH, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2008

No trip to Ise-Shima would be complete without a visit to Ago Bay, where world-famous female divers scour the blue waters that are home to Japan’s first pearl farm, founded by Kokichi Mikimoto in 1888. Ise-Shima has since become the “pearl capital” of the world, the seat of a multibillion-dollar industry—as well as the area’s primary attraction. “Of course, we wanted to buy some pearls,” recounts Julie, “but the Mikimoto tour sounded too commercial. Instead, we decided to check out a tiny, family-owned harvester we’d heard about.”

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When the Helfriches arrived at the small house of the harvester, a woman emerged and invited them to enter. Julie took in every detail with her camera. “All around the place, there were so many interesting things to discover. I love the photo of the stove. Tea is such an important ritual in Japan that it seemed fitting to find a teakettle anchoring the room.” They joined the woman at a table covered with trays of freshly gathered oysters and began cracking open the briny shells to examine the soft gray pearls hiding inside. As her daughter searched for a matching pair, Julie continued exploring the house. “I found a tiny lunch room, where I took those shots of the portable grill, with the scallop shells from that afternoon’s meal

still hanging out.” It is this simple, rustic elegance that makes Ise-Shima—even next to Tokyo, with its lights, and Kyoto, with its temples—a place that lingers in the traveler’s memory. Through her photographs, Julie attempts to capture destinations as they truly are. “I try not to touch anything. I don’t adjust the scene unless it is absolutely essential.” In Ise-Shima, she recalls, no styling was needed. “The lighting was so pretty, and all the colors seemed to coordinate naturally. It was so quiet. I hope the pictures reflect that—that all you heard were a few gulls and maybe the sounds of some people working, but barely. I just sat there on the dock and captured life as it was around me all afternoon.”

JULIE HELFRICH

Julie, who counts Mexico’s Oaxaca and Ireland among her favorite destinations. “To be based at such an incredible hotel in such a culturally rich, beautiful, remote place was the ultimate getaway.”


AMANEMU: JAPAN’S NEWEST “IT” HOTEL

AMAN

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Opened in March 2016, Amanemu is a secluded resort nestled in the rolling hills of Ise-Shima National Park and overlooking the cerulean waters of Ago Bay. In addition to its proximity to the pearl capital of the world, the property offers premier access to the UNESCO World Heritage– designated Kumano Kodo pilgrimage trails and the holy Ise Jingū shrine complex. The serenity of the resort’s sprawling grounds also imbues the 24 minimalist ryokan-style suites and villas, with their partial glass walls affording glorious views of the surroundings. The Amanemu’s true treasure, however, is its vast award-winning spa, which features traditional onsen baths fed by the nutrient-rich waters of nearby thermal hot springs. Around the baths and tucked into intimate alcoves are luxe daybeds where guests can lounge and relax. There are also four treatment suites and a fitness area with views of the forest. This coastal sanctuary, surrounded by verdant forests and with constantly changing sea views, is a must-visit for spa-loving, discerning travelers who want an off-thebeaten path retreat with cultural immersion in an otherwise bustling country.

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In the summer, I would recommend being in Jackson on a Wednesday, since that’s when they have a rodeo.” ~ LIZ LANGE, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2007

SUMMER IN JACKSON HOLE

Clockwise: Amangani; Anvil’s lobby and restaurant; a Jackson scenic

Long adored by winter visitors for its world-class skiing, the cowboy resort town of Jackson shines as a vibrant summertime destination.

Where to Stay Jackson is known for its superb hotels, among them luxury legends Four Seasons and Amangani, but two cool new entries have emerged as trendy competitors: the Anvil, a motel turned hip retreat—imagine an Ace Hotel in the Wild West—and the

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members-only Caldera House, a collection of alpine-style condominiums.

Where to Eat Jackson Hole’s bevy of fine-dining and casual eateries are sure to satisfy the appetites of hungry hikers. Tried-and-true favorites include the homey Il Villaggio Osteria and rustic Snake River Grill, and the local favorite, Old Yellowstone Garage, reopened this year at Caldera House after a 10-year hiatus. This slope-side eatery with a wood-fired oven and elevated comfort food is sure to be a year-round hotspot. Another buzzed-about newcomer is Glorietta Restaurant at the Anvil hotel, a handsome wood-paneled trattoria where Italian classics like cacio e pepe, eggplant parmesan and grilled artichokes are complemented by craft cocktails. For an après-ski glass of

vino (or two), Bar Enoteca opened in 2017 and offers a delicious menu of Italian bites including bruschetta and charcuterie.

What to Do Jackson Hole is part of Wyoming’s national park system and thus offers a host of outdoor activities, from white-water rafting and fly-fishing to hiking, horseback riding and mountain biking through the region’s majestic landscapes. Via Ferrata (“the iron way”) is a favorite climbing route, and in 2017 guided hikes were added, including one for adrenaline junkies that extends 500 vertical feet. Less of a thrill seeker? Take the aerial tram down the mountain for sublime views. To enjoy more postcard-perfect scenery, visitors can charter a boat across Jenny Lake, which makes for a gorgeous sunset cocktail cruise.

AMAN; ANVIL, MIKAEL KENNEDY, READ MCKENDREE

Jackson Hole’s summer season, with its gorgeous wildflowers, warm, bright days and cool nights, beckons nature enthusiasts, active travelers and families looking for a low-key alternative to Aspen and Park City. The charmingly understated town of Jackson has recently upped the ante with more flight routes, an extensive network of bike paths and some exciting new properties, giving travelers all the more reason to soak up the Wyoming sun this June, July and August.


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Pink Sands Club Canouan. The idyllic tropical island getaway.

Carenage Bay, Canouan Island, Saint Vincent VC0450

1 (784) 431 4500

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Islands of Summer

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This season, we’re practicing the art of slowing down—and think you should, too. Let us inspire your summer holiday plans with the best places to stay, eat and explore on six of our favorite sun-soaked islands.

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Iconic Italy:

CAPRI

Breakfast with a view at Tiberio Palace

There is no better place to live la dolce vita than on Capri, whose picture-perfect hilltops, blue Tyrrhenian waters and fabulous beach clubs have lured movie stars and dignitaries for centuries. But despite its reputation as a jet-setter’s paradise, the ethereal island’s atmosphere is that of a laid-back Italian village, making it one of the Mediterranean’s most captivating, soulful locales.

Who Should Stay Travelers who like a see-and-be-seen destination, where days are filled with boating, indulgent meals, high-end shopping and people-watching.

Stay Capri is known for its fine roster of luxury hotels, from legendary grand dames to intimate boutique properties with to-die-for décor, such as J.K Place and Tiberio Palace. The most important consideration when deciding where to book is location: some visitors will want to be within a stone’s throw of the bustling main square, while others might prefer more secluded retreats, like those in the lowkey village of Anacapri. Our team can help you choose.

Eat Dining is a serious activity on Capri. Lunch is best enjoyed at iconic beach clubs like La Fontelina or in Capri town at classic eateries like Aurora, both of which serve delectable pizza and pasta. For dinner, opt for a meal of seafood with a sensational view at Da Giorgio or JKitchen.

Shop Style mavens flock to Capri town’s most glamorous shopping streets: Via Camerelle, Via Vittorio Emanuele and Via le Botteghe, where everything from designer boutiques to local gift shops can be found. Those who want to follow in Jackie O’s footsteps should pay a visit to Canfora and pick up a pair of handmade sandals.

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“My favorite way to get around Capri is by red Fiat taxi. You can’t help but feel like a movie star when you’re in one,” shares Indagare member and photographer Karyn Millet.

CAPRI TIBERIO PALACE

Island Secret


Who Should Stay Those interested in active pursuits (the lush landscapes provide excellent hiking), as well as Champagne sipping and time spent wandering the labyrinthine streets of Palma, the island’s charming capital city.

Stay

Clockwise: A late lunch; the pool at Cap Rocat; strolling around La Residencia; a boat day

With its relatively large size and topographic diversity, Mallorca accommodates a large variety of luxurious hotels, from elegant countryside retreats like La Residencia and Castell Son Claret to sexy coastal properties like Cap Rocat and trendy urban refuges like Sant Francesc. We recommend splitting up your time and staying a few nights inland and a few by the ocean.

Eat The island’s restaurants all benefit from the bounty of local produce—including oranges, lemons, almonds and olive oil—and seafood, prawns, in particular. Diners should sample a few trendy restaurants, such as Simply Fosh and Tast Club, plus local eateries like La Bóveda and Patrón Lunares.

Shop

Balearic Beauty:

CAP ROCAT; LA RESIDENCIA; JOHNCANELIS

MALLORCA

Occupied over the ages by Moors and Christians, German sun worshippers and royal entourages, the Spanish island of Mallorca is a chameleon, reinventing itself from century to century. Its dramatic landscapes and rugged coves have drawn international celebrities since the early 19th century and today attract travelers in search of glamorous but relaxed vacations.

Palma’s cobblestoned alleys and wide boulevards are lined with shops selling local honey, olive oil and fine houseware. Among our favorites: design havens Rialto Living and Estilo Sant Feliu. And don’t leave the island without a pair of espadrilles, which are sold in many stores in the capital.

Island Secret “No trip to Palma is complete without a visit to its oldest gelateria, Ca’n Joan De S’aigo,” advises Indagare’s Blair West. “They also serve delicious ensaïmades (flaky pastries made with a variety of sweet and savory fillings).”

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Clockwise: The dock and beach club at Cala Rossa; Domaine de Murtoli

French Hideaway:

CORSICA

With powdery white-sand beaches, rugged mountains and turquoise waters, Corsica has all the makings of a modern-day Eden. But although the French island has remained largely crowd-free, it boasts a slew of luxury hotels and Michelin-starred restaurants that make it one of the Mediterranean’s most alluring destinations.

Couples and families in search of a quiet coastal escape with opportunities for myriad activities, such as boating, winery visits and hiking, from seaside walks to long-distance treks.

Stay Like the island itself, the best hotels on Corsica are laidback but extremely glamorous. Favorites include Grand Hôtel de la Cala Rossa, beloved for its picture-perfect sandy cove and family-friendly atmosphere; and Domaine de Murtoli, an exquisite country hideaway set on a sprawling estate surrounded by olive orchards.

Eat For its size, Corsica has an impressive number of Michelin-starred eateries—and no wonder, considering the abundance of fresh seafood and local produce. Of course, meals

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are best eaten alfresco with sea views. For traditional rustic cuisine, A Pignata is as authentic as it gets, while the fantastic beach club Les Trois Deux is perfect for those seeking a scene.

Shop Many of the most coveted Corsican finds are in the gourmet category, including its incredible wines. But the town of Porto-Vecchio also has a host of boutiques selling relaxed island fashion. Don’t miss Casanera, which offers beauty creams, essential oils, candles and soaps, all of which are crafted using local products.

Island Secret Indagare’s Marley Lynch encourages travelers to “book a charter to explore Corsica. Its diverse landscapes—the rugged peaks of the north, granite mountains on the west coast and powdery whitesand beaches of the south—are best visited from the water.”

CALA ROSSA; DOMAINE DE MURTOLI, CAMILLE MOIRENC

Who Should Stay


A terrace at Melian

Greek Up-and-Comer:

MILOS

Although many Greek islands have succumbed to summer crowds, a few still offer a quintessential Grecian getaway off the tourist track. Chief among these is Milos, which boasts brilliant turquoise waters, white and green hilltops and some of the most pristine beaches in the Aegean.

Who Should Stay Couples and families seeking an off-the-beaten-path getaway where days are spent boating and exploring picturesque villages.

Stay Echoing Milos’s casual vibe, its hotels are simple, charming and very small (usually about 10 to 25 rooms). Our top picks are Melian and Salt, both of which are located in Pollonia, a small fishing village. For more privacy and additional amenities, like a personal chef and babysitter, renting a private villa is a good option.

Eat Milos offers some of the best food in all the Greek islands and incredible meals can be had at even the simplest tavernas; a favorite is Astakas, which has beautiful ocean views. And be sure to try the local specialty karpouzopita, watermelon pie.

MELIAN

Island Secret Indagare’s resident Greece expert, Gabrielle DuCharme (who has been to Milos five times), champions the island for having some of “the most interesting historical sites in the Mediterranean. Don’t miss the eerie Catacombs of Milos and the Greek Amphitheater in Plaka, which has been impressively restored and is still used for performances. Most notably, the island is where the famous Venus de Milo sculpture was discovered and from which it was later stolen before finding its present home in the Louvre.”

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New England Escape:

MARTHA’S VINEYARD

Lying off the Massachusetts coast, the Vineyard is as famous for its A-list patronage—the Obamas are frequent visitors—as for its delightfully mellow scene.

Who Should Stay Travelers, especially families, who will appreciate the classic summertime pleasures found on Martha’s Vineyard and want to log some serious beach time.

Stay

From above: An island scenic; the café at Magnetic North

Newcomer Nobnocket Boutique Inn offers chicly appointed accommodations just a block from Vineyard Haven, the island’s most charming town. The old-fashioned Charlotte Inn, in Edgartown, is preferred for a romantic escape.

Eat

A perfect day on Martha’s Vineyard begins with a sugar fix at Back Door Donuts, Oak Bluffs’ baked-goods mainstay; be sure to get there before 7:30am to get the treats hot out of the fryer. For lunch, pay a visit to the Larder, to purchase provisions like charcuterie and homemade cookies for a beach picnic, or the retro ArtCliff Diner, to sample temptations like tacos and garlic fries. Helmed by a vet of Alice Waters’s famed Chez Panisse, Behind the Bookstore Café is a favorite for an alfresco dinner.

Shop Martha’s Vineyard is more about the great outdoors than designer outposts, but it has a few stores that carry unique items. Vineyard Haven’s Main Street has the most concentrated collection of shops, including fabulous lifestyle boutique Magnetic North. Art lovers should make a point to visit Granary Gallery.

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“A favorite activity is to take the bike ferry from Menemsha to Aquinnah, which is famous for its beaches,” says Indagare member and Magnetic North owner Maggie Towles. “And for the best on-island wake-up, head to Little House Café for its breakfast egg wrap with goat cheese and harissa aioli in a warm pita.”

MAGNETIC NORTH

Island Secret


Clockwise: A day at the beach; lunch at Topper’s; the patio at Greydon House; Sankaty Head lighthouse

Who Should Stay Couples, groups, active and easygoing travelers—who will all find plenty to do, whether their ideal day means sunbathing, sailing, shopping or wine tasting— plus foodies and style mavens.

Stay The best choice is a boutique hotel within walking distance of the town’s harbor. The uberchic Greydon House, which opened in 2017, is located in the heart of downtown and has an excellent restaurant helmed by a Michelin-starred chef. The White Elephant Residences is a classic option with a beautiful nautical design and luxurious rooms.

Eat Nantucket is teeming with fine-dining restaurants offering fresh seafood and classic New England cuisine. First-time musts include local institution BlackEyed Susan’s, for a hearty breakfast, and Topper’s or the Pearl, for an upscale dinner.

NANTUCKET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, MICHAEL GALVIN; GREYDON HOUSE, DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; TOPPER’S

Shop

Coastal Classic:

NANTUCKET

Nantucket is to New England what the Hamptons are to New York: an elite, elegant weekend escape. With nary a traffic light in sight, it entrances visitors with its old whaling community charm and surprisingly relaxed glamour.

Nantucket has a multitude of chic boutiques for serious shoppers, including Gypsy and Serenella. Nantucket Bookworks and Parchment, an exquisite paper store, are also worth a visit.

Island Secret Indagare’s Remi Evarts, a Nantucket regular for over a decade, advises: “Rent a boat, pack a picnic and head to Tuckernuck Island—a tiny, 1.5-square-mile island off the coast—for a private experience in the Atlantic. Keep an eye out for the seals that swim in the waters just off shore.”

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A New Frontier

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On an exclusive trip to Saudi Arabia to consult with the Crown Prince on the nation’s new tourism program, Indagare’s founder, Melissa Biggs Bradley, and COO, Eliza Scott Harris, uncover the tourism blockbuster of the next decade.

Qasr al-Farid, a tomb in Mada’in Saleh

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n some journeys, the real magic is being in a destination at a certain moment, when you have been lucky enough to slip in through a window of opportunity and it seems as if you blink, it will close. Sometimes it’s when things are changing so rapidly that you know a place will be radically different in a year. That was how it was for me in Shanghai in 2014: As I stood on the Bund looking across the river at the Pudong skyline, with its imaginative, futuristic architecture and cranes scattered in every direction, I had an intense feeling of watching the city transform before my eyes. Sometimes, it’s the opposite, when globalization and commercialization haven’t arrived, as when you notice the lack of American brands in Havana or the small-town vibe of Harbour Island. Sometimes it’s when a place is just welcoming Western tourism, as Myanmar was five years ago, and you have a sense of being let in on a wonderful secret. And sometimes it’s just going to a place where nature is still so pure and unspoiled that being there feels like winding back the clock. That’s how I felt the first time I went to New Zealand.

Saud’s ambitious blueprint for the kingdom’s future, Vision 2030. By that date, the 32-year-old Crown Prince projects that at least 50 percent of Saudi Arabia’s revenue will come from sources other than oil. One of those sources will be tourism centered on the kingdom’s rich cultural heritage. As part of this, the government plans to allow tourist visas starting this year, a sea change for this famously private country, where visas have been extremely limited and tightly controlled. To get to Al-’Ula, Melissa and I flew to Riyadh and then headed 600 miles northwest, deep into the desert, by plane and then car. We didn’t know what to expect, as in our 11 years at Indagare, we had never planned a trip to the kingdom. Before starting out, we’d read books on the destination and scoured the Internet for information, but discovered little. Melissa found some friends who had been who assured us that we would feel safe as two women traveling alone (we did) and that, although donning an abaya (the long black Islamic dress that is the customary attire for women) and headscarf was recommended in public places, there would be plenty of more-private settings where modest, loose-fitting Western clothes (covering wrists and ankles) would be appropriate. We knew we were in for a special experience when we met our guide, Ahmed, at the airport and immediately sensed his tremendous pride of place. “My family has lived in Al-’Ula for 597 years,” he told us as we drove through the desert toward our tented camp.

In January, Indagare CEO Melissa Biggs Bradley and I had the opportunity to visit another destination at a crossroads, a place that combines an opening up to the West, memorable culture and pure natural beauty. The latter is most evident in Al-’Ula, a region about the size of Belgium in northwest Saudi Arabia, centered on a gorgeous ancient oasis and containing a wealth of 2,000-year-old archaeological sites that are treasures of human history. The heart of this region is Mada’in Saleh, home to a breathtaking Nabatean The landscape in Al-’Ula is stunning and well worth a visit by itnecropolis of more than 130 rock-hewn tombs self. A bit reminiscent of Arches National Park that recall of those at Petra, in Jordan. Aland the Grand Canyon, it contains red rock though named a UNESCO World Heritage Site canyons, craggy mountains, endless lava fields in 2008, it has attracted few Western visitors. atop high plateaus, sandstone pillars silhouettCurrently, it attracts none at all, as the governed against the sky, huge rock formations and By 2030, Saudi ment officially closed it, along with two other rolling dunes. Because of the oasis, there are Arabia’s Crown sites, while a royal commission decides how also abundant date farms, with rows and rows best to protect and preserve the magnificent of palms (more than 2 million), their fronds Prince projects tombs, some of which are still being excavated. bright pops of green in the desert. On foot, you that at least 50 notice exquisite natural details, like the swirlpercent of the The entire country is on the cusp of change, ing stripes of color formed by the sedimentary country’s revenue implementing economic and social reforms, layers of the rocks and the honeycomb effect will come from including allowing women to drive for the first created by the wind eroding the sandstone. We sources other time. A key impetus for this is Crown Prince stayed at a tented camp in a box canyon. It had Mohammad bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Alevidently had very few Western travelers, as than oil.”

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Clockwise: Graffiti from the 1400s; a helicopter tour; Melissa in Mada’in Saleh; locals in Al-`Ula

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Scenes from Al-`Ula

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indicated by things like an English breakfast menu that had clearly relied on Google Translate, to comical effect (would you prefer the “I am from olives,” the “turkey turkey cheese” or the “Foul Dump My Liver”?). The setting, however, was spectacular. In the evenings, the camp lit the rocks from below, and this, combined with a night sky strewn with stars and free from any light pollution, made for a magical experience. The best part of our visit was learning about the expansive history and culture packed into this one place. For thousands of years, this desert oasis was a favored resting spot for travelers on all sorts of journeys. As part of the Dedanite Kingdom in the sixth century BCE, it was a key stop on the incense trade route connecting the Arabian Peninsula to Mesopotamia. Millennia later, Akra Mountain, in the north of the region, was a landmark where Muslim pilgrims doing the Hajj would stop on their way to Mecca to rest their camels in the shade. They inscribed their names on the rocks there, along with phrases like “May Allah bless my journey,” “I am Abdullah asking Allah for forgiveness” and “Anyone who comes here without water has no one but himself to blame.” Today, half a millennium later, the whole mountain is still covered in this 15th-century graffiti. The pilgrimage site was uncovered by archeologists only a year ago, and when we went, we were the only ones there. It is this sense of discovery that makes visiting Al-’Ula so exciting. Our days were filled with adventures. We took a helicopter ride over dunes and the Hijaz Mountains, swooped past bedouin camps and the sandstone rock formations of Al Ghrammel (“the pillars”) and landed on a basalt plateau. We hiked through hidden canyons and scrambled up rocky outcrops to take in views of the countryside. We climbed to square-cut Lihyanite tombs from the fifth century BCE and wandered through a partially excavated city. We saw rock inscriptions written in Dedanitic script from the first century BCE and toured the Al Deerah heritage village, which has its origins in the Islamic period. Our guide’s family grew up there, and he easily navigated the maze of alleys to show us where they had lived, where his grandfather’s shop was and where they kept their goats.

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The highlight of our trip was our time in Mada’in Saleh. Built by the Nabateans, this 2,000-year-old necropolis was the second largest city in their kingdom after Petra, their capital. Its 131 tombs—some small, some hundreds of feet high—are well preserved and breathtaking in their beauty. The sun and shadows play on the red sandstone surfaces. The largest and most impressive is Qasr Al Farid (“lonely castle”). The height of a four-story building, it is hewn from a giant rock. Melissa and I agreed that our visit to Mada’in Saleh was one of the most memorable travel experiences of our lifetimes and that we were privileged to be there. We have no doubt that Al-’Ula will become a blockbuster destination in the coming years. As soon as we can possibly arrange trips, we will introduce our members to this incredible place.

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West Coast, Best Coast

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JACOB REPKO

Los Angeles is, unabashedly, the place to be these days. By Tanvi Chheda


PHOTO CREDIT TKT MICHAEL SLEBODNIK

INSIDER L.A.: STAR HAUNTS

“I love the rooftop at the Peninsula because it’s quiet, the food is amazing, there are great views of L.A. and Beverly Hills and it’s a lovely spot in the evening.” - MICHAEL S. SMITH, INTERIOR DESIGNER AND INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2007

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os Angeles is in super bloom and getting some much overdue credit. L.A.’s seaside and desert backdrops, giving the sprawling 500-square-mile metropolis its unique light, have long attracted artists. Legendary chefs draw from the city’s many cultures and the region’s farms to create flavors that both honor the various heritages and challenge the palate. And midcentury modern architecture comingles happily with a new wave of design. Long derelict, L.A.’s downtown is turning around, thanks in part to the recent arrival of such cultural heavyweights as the Broad museum and an outpost of the Hauser & Wirth gallery, which are helping to solidify the city’s status as a contemporary art capital. On the Westside, beachy Venice and its Abbot Kinney Boulevard remain an epicenter of cool. And Silverlake, if you’re willing to drive there, might even be cooler.

The Hotel Scene Marrying California coastal style with a minimalist Japanese aesthetic, the year-old Nobu Ryokan, located on Malibu’s Carbon Beach, is a serene escape. Formerly the Casa Malibu motel, the 16-room oceanfront property was fully renovated and redesigned with natural materials. Such Japanese touches as tatami mats, shoji screens, limestone walls and teak soaking tubs enhance the Zen vibe. At the inn’s core is omotenashi, the Japanese art of hospitality, which might translate as anticipating and serving a guest’s needs through quiet observation and heartfelt personal service.

Also downtown is the Hotel Figueroa, a 1926 fixture that in previous incarnations was a women’s hostelry and Moroccan-themed oasis. It has just emerged from a two-year renovation that imbued its 268 rooms and suites with a contemporary, artistic feel, with

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“Every collection I produce is inspired in some way by Los Angeles, from the city’s rich and varied cultural heritage, to the hand-painted signs and pedestrians walking the streets. Most of all, I’m continually enthralled by L.A.’s indescribable and indefatigable light, which continues to transfix me all these years later.” - CLARE VIVIER, FASHION DESIGNER

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A New York City transplant, the second location of the NoMad Hotel opened with 241 cozy rooms and suites in Downtown L.A. in March. Located in the original Bank of Italy, the building has been fully restored and now features a rooftop pool and myriad dining venues, including another outpost of chef Daniel Humm’s NoMad restaurant—famous for its truffle chicken—a trendy rooftop bar with glorious city views and an outdoor café and cocktail bar.

INSIDER L.A.: STAR HAUNTS

EMMA FEIL; NOBU RYOKAN

In posh Beverly Hills, the 150-room Waldorf Astoria Beverly Hills is the new kid on the block, taking design cues from Hollywood glam and Streamline Moderne architecture. Swathed in golds and creams, rooms are elegant and bright, with floor-to-ceiling windows and marble baths. Each also features a balcony of its own. The on-site La Prairie Spa offers the brand’s signature caviar treatments. But the pièce de résistance is a rooftop pool and Jean-Georges Vongerichten restaurant and bar with views of the Hollywood Hills (and Hollywood Sign), Beverly Hills and Century City.


PHOTO CREDIT TKT THE BROAD, IWAN BAAN; FELIX, WONHO FRANK LEE; HAUSER & WIRTH, MARIO DE LOPEZ

Clockwise: Nobu Ryokan; dining at Felix; shopping at Hauser & Wirth; The Broad

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Culture Connection Since opening in December 2015, the Broad museum, located downtown on Grand Avenue, has been a game changer for both L.A. and the contemporary art world. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the building, with its striking honeycomb-like concrete exterior, provides a stunning backdrop for the 2,000-work collection of philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad. Among the artists represented are Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ed Ruscha, Jeff Koons (whose blue Balloon Dog is on display), Jasper Johns, Cindy Sherman, Robert Rauschenberg and many more. The museum also boasts a permanent mirrored Infinity Room by Yayoi Kusama. Just a mile east, in L.A.’s gentrifying Arts District, is the L.A. outpost of Zurich-based gallery Hauser & Wirth, which showcases such artists as Louise Bourgeois, Dieter Roth and Mark Bradford. This is part of a larger arts complex, housed in a former flour mill, that also includes a bookstore, a gift shop, a restaurant and a courtyard ideal for activities and events. L.A.’s Hancock Park neighborhood is home to brothers Maurice and Paul Marciano’s Marciano Art Foundation, accommodated in an abandoned Scottish Rite Masonic temple. The structure itself is as worth a look as the 1,500 installations, sculptures, paintings and videos inside.

Food First A restaurant, bakery and artisanal market all rolled into one, Jeff Cerciello’s Farmshop, in the Brentwood Country Mart, offers such flavorful, seasonally driven dishes as chickpea fritters with beet hummus and broccoli. After a scrumptious lunch, grab some edible souvenirs in the market, such as dried fruit and nuts from Peacock Family Farms and chocolates by Compartes. For a casual Mexican meal,

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try chef Ray Garcia’s downtown B.S. Taqueria, starting with the Oaxacan Bramble (a drink combining mezcal, seasonal fruit, lemon and habanero peppers) followed by cauliflower al pastor tacos, tostadas or churros, accompanied by más bebidas. For a more formal, modern experience, Garcia’s dinner-only Broken Spanish takes the tres leches cake. North of downtown, near Dodgers Stadium, the hipster community of Silverlake boasts some of the city’s best eats for those willing to make the trek. At family-run Taiwanese eatery Pine & Crane, crowds line up just before noon to dig into sesameand cucumber-laden dan dan noodles and mapo tofu speckled with Sichuan peppercorns and pea shoots from the owners’ farm. New to the scene is Botanica, a pint-sized vegetable-centric restaurant on Silverlake Boulevard started by two food writer-editor friends. The sunlit, airy space is matched with bright and healthful plates like a rice noodle salad with mint, honey-roasted beets and fried shallots. Leave room for Magpie’s Soft Serve, a Silverlake scoop shop that will take you back to your childhood with its refreshing blood orange Creamsicle.

Design Finds

Anchored by such boutiques as Heist, Huset and Burro, Abbot Kinney is still fabulous for strolling and shopping. In recent years, nearby Rose Avenue has been on the rise, with shops like Lily Ashwell and Parachute Home, known for its dreamy linens. Australia’s Bassike now has a store on Lincoln Boulevard a few doors down from Merchant Modern, with its collection of design objects, furniture and rugs. The Platform, a six-building complex in Culver City with a central courtyard, houses outposts of Blue Bottle and Aesop, the curated INSIDER L.A.: menswear boutique Magasin, deSTAR HAUNTS sign emporium Poketo and Mon“Downtown L.A. is exploding; row, home to super-soft Ts, in adit’s gone from almost a dition to several eateries. A similar forgotten landscape to this colossal downtown complex, the uber-hip place to be. Church Row, recently debuted as the home & State is a favorite restaurant of design brand A+R’s flagship store, along with other boutiques, of mine and I love shopping at like footwear purveyor Bodega, Hammer & Spear.” and such eateries as San Francisco’s  MOLLY LUETKEMEYER, INTERIOR DESIGNER AND INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2012 Tartine, coming soon.

MARC ROYCE

hand-painted floor tiles, custom fig-motif wallpaper and loads of drawings, paintings and photographs by Southern California–based artists. On the food and cocktail front, big names Casey Lane, of Tasting Kitchen, and Dushan Zaric, of New York’s Employees Only, helm the various drink and dining options.


Clockwise:189 Dominique Ansel; a drink at Botanica; pasta at Felix; Broken Shaker; shrimp at Inko Nito

L.A. DINING:

6 NEW RESTAURANTS NOT TO MISS

L.A. is a crucible of the new and hot—from real estate to entertainment to fabulous food. These are the eateries we’re salivating over now.

INKO NITO; 189 DOMINIQUE ANSEL, JAKOB LAYMAN; BROKEN SHAKER, WONHO FRANK LEE; FELIX; BOTANICA, ALAN GASTELUM

For Excellent Farm-to-Table Fare: Momofuku’s Majordomo The first L.A outpost of David Chang’s Momofuku brand, one of the city’s biggest openings of 2018, serves his signature cuisine, including a mix of such seasonally inspired dishes as a vegan vegetable pot plus meat-heavy courses like a beef short rib for two served with rice cakes and melted raclette. Don’t miss trying the kakigōri, Japanese shaved ice, for dessert. NEIGHBORHOOD: DOWNTOWN

For Perfect Pasta: Felix Bon Appétit just named this elegant eatery’s tonnarelli cacio e pepe “Best Pasta of the Year.” Other Italian classics on offer include antipasti, pizza and entrées like Roman-style braised beef, but the star dishes are the

pastas, which are handmade in a temperature-controlled room with a window, so patrons can watch the magic happen. NEIGHBORHOOD: VENICE

For a Great Brunch: 189 by Dominique Ansel Celebrity pastry chef and creator of the cronut Dominique Ansel made his L.A debut this year with a bakery-restaurant at the Grove. Serving sophisticated comfort food (fettuccine carbonara, rotisserie chicken) in an inviting, airy dining room and on an outdoor terrace, Ansel proves he is far more than a one-trick pony. Don’t miss the delightful weekend brunch, called the Weekend Table, during which there are no menus and dishes are served family-style. NEIGHBORHOOD: BEVERLY GROVE

For a Special Occasion: Dialogue This 18-seat Santa Monica restaurant is the brainchild of chef Dave Beran, the James Beard Award–winning chef who conceived a tasting menu celebrating seasonal Southern California cuisine. Diners do not make reservations but purchase tickets, which is only fitting, since a meal here is a full-on culinary performance. NEIGHBORHOOD: SANTA MONICA

For a Cocktail with a View: The Broken Shaker at the Freehand Hotel The youthful Broken Shaker

rooftop bar has all the ingredients of an L.A. hotspot: bohemian-chic décor, a rooftop with hanging string lights and a pool and an impressive cocktail menu. Come

in the early evening, order a fruity elixir and some guacamole to share, and enjoy the gorgeous sunset views, live music and people-watching. NEIGHBORHOOD: DOWNTOWN

For a Japanese Fix: Inko Nito This highly anticipated eatery brings inventive robatayaki—Japanese-style barbecue, consisting of grilled meats and skewers—to L.A.’s Arts District. The menu features dishes like baby back pork ribs and beef cheeks, plus classics like nori and sushi, all served in a sleek yet casual dining room. Those wishing to forgo meat will enjoy veggie-friendly courses like roasted sweet potato with chili nori butter and chives. NEIGHBORHOOD: DOWNTOWN

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An Insider’s India

Traveling on an Indagare Insider Journey, celebrated interior designer Charlotte Moss visited a country that had long been a source of inspiration. “India finds its way into your psyche,” says Moss, the author of nine books on interior design and a contributing editor at House Beautiful. “It gets under your skin. It embosses visual impressions in your memory. In a word, its effect is seismic.” Last fall, Moss journeyed to the country’s Golden Triangle with a group of Indagare members on an Insider Journey led by fellow interiors maven and textile designer Lisa Fine. Under her expert guidance, the group learned about the intricacies of Indian crafts, from block prints and mirror work to fine embroidery. We asked Moss, who is lauded for her own flair for patterns and old-world décor, to share with us some of her most memorable moments and photographs from her trip through this bold, chaotic and utterly beautiful place.

“Witnessing the translucence of the Taj Mahal at sundown and sunrise and the canopied boats gliding through the morning mist over Lake Pichola in Udaipur were near spiritual moments.” 56

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ICONIC AND UNFORGETTABLE


LOCAL ENCOUNTERS

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“I will remember the groups of women in brilliantly colored saris with gold earrings, nose rings and bracelets and their smiling faces. We were charmed by their curiosity about us as they requested having their photos taken with us as a group. All of us giggled, and in the same language, a magical unifier.�

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BUYING MEMENTOS

“The art I purchased for my office will remind me of Udaipur and Dawali and the caftans of warm Indian nights. The textiles will drape tables, be made into bedcovers and lampshades and will stare at me through a cabinet, beckoning ‘another trip’? Or will they settle being a memory of a trip not to be forgotten.”

UNPARALLELED CRAFTSMANSHIP

“The level of craftsmanship in marble, stone, carved wood, decorative wall painting, inlaid stones, colored glass and mirror work are humbling in their volume and scope. It is a visual assault that seeps in slowly, is digested and stored and will express itself one day.”

“Travelling with a group of women, some you know, some you don’t is simultaneously a challenge and a surprise gift. Experiencing different perceptions and expectations expands the travel experience. Deja vus, clarifying moments, moments of distillation, eurekas, all happening simultaneously.”

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CHARLOTTE MOSS

TRAVEL COMPANIONS


Join Our Next India Journey Join globetrotter and textile designer Lisa Fine on a stylish adventure through India’s mesmerizing cosmopolitan centers. On this journey, we will experience the best of India’s vibrant landscape, culture and fashion with an engaging itinerary that features time in Mumbai, Jaipur and Varanasi, with the possibility to add on additional time in Delhi and Agra, where you can see the Taj Mahal at sunrise. We will visit lavish palaces, tour historical museums and enjoy behind-the-scenes access to bustling markets and influential ateliers under the guidance of Fine, who has visited India dozens of times. Special shopping experiences will allow us to peruse an incredibly varied array of jewelry, home goods and textiles, featuring both traditional and innovative interpretations intended to give you a glimpse of the richness and diversity of Indian craftsmanship. The itinerary will offer many opportunities for insight in this life-changing destination, with an insider who knows its stylish secrets.

INDIA ST YLE FILE OCTOBER 2018

When

Main Trip: Oct 7 – 15, 2018 Post Trip: Oct 15 – 18, 2018 Length

Main Trip: 9 days / 8 nights Post Trip: 3 days / 3 nights ITINERARY HIGHLIGHTS

•Meet with a group of cutting-edge designers who are shaping India’s current fashion scene •Private walking tours of Mumbai and Varanasi, as well as Jaipur, the center for crafts and commerce in Rajasthan •Curated shopping experiences in top stores and local markets, focused on exploring Indian textiles, jewelry and artwork

•Insider tours of historical monuments like the Jaipur City Palace, including access to private rooms that are offlimits to the public •Accommodations at the acclaimed Taj Rambagh Palace, in Jaipur •The chance to add on time in Agra, where you can visit the majestic Taj Mahal at one of the best times of day to see it: sunrise

•Lavish private dining experiences

Host

Lisa Fine Group Size

Up to 16 travelers Locations

Mumbai; Jaipur; Varanasi; Delhi; Agra Type of Traveler

Adventurers Style Mavens Soul Searchers

INDIA DELHI

THIS JOURNEY’S HOST

PHOTO CREDIT TKT BLAINE DAVIS

Lisa Fine A textile designer and an Indagare ambassador, Lisa Fine has traveled to India more than 50 times in search of inspiration and transformation. She learned her craft in its cities, and she now returns to share them with Indagare members. Lisa Fine will impart an insider’s perspective of India and open members’ eyes to its incredible customs, colors, flavors and more.

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A World Apart

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From left: Mykines Holmur lighthouse; traditional fish soup

VISIT FAROE ISLANDS

A remote archipelago in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Faroe Islands boasts a spectacular rugged landscape, ultra-fresh seafood and an ancient culture that goes back to the Vikings. By Amelia Osborne Scott


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he residents of the Faroe Islands seem to be somewhat surprised by their country’s recent popularity—appreciative and maybe a bit chuffed, but definitely confused.

The 18-island archipelago is taking its place on the world’s stage as a knockout destination. Visitors are drawn to its dramatic landscapes, its phenomenal and much-lauded cuisine and its culture, one of Europe’s most ancient. The people are understated, polite, reserved and, notably, endearingly modest. Although they are guardians of a spectacular, jaw-droppingly beautiful domain, the Faroese lead a generally simple life. Daily rituals have changed little in the millennium or so since the Vikings settled the windswept land. The primary source of income continues to be fishing, and sheep roam freely over hill and vale and across roads. The villages are isolated from one another, the populations of some of them numbering only in the double digits. The cuisine consists mostly of seafood, much of it salt-cured, dried or fermented, and people spend their free time knitting, creating the nation’s distinctive folk music and drinking home-brewed libations. The islands’ remoteness, along with the people’s fierce national pride and the healthy economy boosted by the strong fishing trade, have enabled the Faroese to keep their rich culture largely unadulterated by foreign influences and thus rewarding as a subject of anthropological study. The Faroese way of life may be simple, but the landscape is not, with cliffs that plummet thousands of feet into roaring seas, dramatic gorges that appear formed by dynamite, fjords like optical illusions and miles of windswept vistas cut by roaring waterfalls. Running through it are roads that switch back and forth, winding like a toddler with a mind of its own. Tiny ponies, fluffy sheep and families of puffins keep warm in clusters, uncon-

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Clockwise: Faroese cows; a lunch of couscous and cheese

cerned by the heavy fog that rolls in and out and occasional brutally strong gusts of wind. The few towns are composed of brightly painted saltbox houses arrayed along narrow, winding paths, their grass roofs blowing in the wind like bad toupées.

The Faroese way of life may be simple, but the landscape is not, with cliffs that plummet thousands of feet into roaring seas and gorges that appear formed by dynamite.”

Ask the locals what they’re most proud of, however, and it’s not the views but their culture, which is linked to the Vikings more closely than that of any other modern-day country, even Norway, Sweden and Denmark. Tórshavn, the capital, contains at its center ruins of the Norsemen’s first parliament, while remains like children’s toys, chessboards and oil lamps have been found during private-home construction. The Faroese language is descended from Old Norse, a venerable lineage connected with a significant literature. And rather than merely celebrate their history, the Faroese honor the heritage of their Norse ancestors by keeping it alive in their culture—one that is at once rich and simple and, like the stunning landscape, needs to be seen to be believed.


TOP CHEF POUL ANDRIAS ZISKA

Ziska helms the islands’ first Michelin-starred restaurant, Koks, which serves cuisine using locally sourced ingredients. Where are you from? I was born and raised in the capital of the Faroe Islands, Tórshavn. I started as an apprentice at the first fine-dining restaurant on the islands, Gourmet. I have also worked abroad at Mugaritz in Spain and Geranium in Copenhagen.

What prompted you to open Koks?

VISIT FAROE ISLANDS; PANAME CAFE; CLAES BECH POULSEN

I wanted to create a platform for the fantastic Faroese raw materials and to tell our story through 18-course meals.

What does it mean to you to live and work in the Faroe Islands? I think what people find surprising is how many quality resources we actually produce here, from art and music to food. And obviously the nature is spectacular.

Koks could exist only on the Faroe Islands, because the islands’ resources are the concept behind it. We try to source all our ingredients from our land and sea. Being on location is essential to our work and as an added plus, the nature here is spectacular.

What are some of the privileges and pitfalls of living in the Faroe Islands? And the challenges? The close-knit community makes it easy for people to be heard. I also really like the mentality of the Faroese people—we are very downto-earth. But because we are so secluded, it can be a challenge to make things happen as quickly as we want them to. And, the long, hard winters can be rough too, both for the people and the raw materials.

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T R AV E L S

Enlightened at Mii amo

Mii amo’s location is one where the soul of the earth beats powerfully. It is a fantastic place in which to dive deep into oneself.” ~ ALEXANDRA GIFFORD, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2011

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The Insider Journey at Mii amo has become an annual ritual for starting the new year among the red rocks of Sedona with renewed perspective and growth. This year, Elizabeth Lesser, the godmother of mainstream enlightenment, joined the fifth annual Mii amo retreat. Melissa Biggs Bradley reflects on the life-changing experience.


Clockwise: Mii amo’s Crystal Grotto; Indagare members on a hike; alfresco yoga; Indagare members; the red rocks behind Mii amo

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On our first evening at Mii  amo, best-selling author Elizabeth Lesser admitted that over the past 40 years, she had met just about every celebrated guru of living well, including the Dalai Lama, Deepak Chopra and dozens of others. She also knows Pema Chodron, Brené Brown and Elizabeth Gilbert. After all, she has spent decades hosting them at the renowned Omega Institute, which she co-founded at the age of 22. (A college student in New York in the early 1970s when one of the first emissaries of the Dalai Lama arrived in the U.S. to teach Tibetan Buddhism, she became one of his students.) Today, more than 30,000 people a year study at the Omega Institute, which is focused on “awakening the best in the human spirit” through education, inspiration and community. Over the past 40 years, millions have been influenced by the people who were launched or have taught at Omega, from the top teachers of yoga, detox and meditation to experts on trauma, grief and healing, as well as on the institute’s newer offerings in environmental sustainability and women’s leadership. “I have met so many teachers,” Elizabeth said—either through Omega or during her stint working with Oprah on her spirituality initiatives, one of which inspired such a deluge of online sign-ups that it crashed internet service for the entire city of Chicago—“So, of course, you’d assume I would know the secret to an enlightened life. Well, I do, and I will share it with you, but it may surprise you.”

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So in the second week of January, our group of 35 gathered at Mii  amo. It was here that, 10 years earlier, I found the courage to leave my prestigious magazine editor position and do what I really wanted to do: launch a new kind of travel company, taking a really crazy leap into uncertainty. The spa is set in Boynton Canyon, which is known for its sacred vortex and intuitive healers. We gathered there each morning and afternoon for an hour and a half with Elizabeth. Beforehand, some hiked in the red rocks; others took yoga classes, had spa treatments or slept in. Everything was optional, nothing required. We did have a code of conduct, which included commitments like “Quiet the inner critic.” We practiced meditation, listening more closely to our bodies and speaking difficult truths. We’d all come with our own issues or questions. Some excavated in silence, while others found catharsis in sharing. We adopted a mantra that Elizabeth had learned from her sister, Maggie, whose cancer diagnosis and struggle inspired Elizabeth’s latest book,  Marrow, a memoir of their journey shedding family baggage and seeking healing. The mantra: “Do no harm, but take no shit.” Not what you might expect on a

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Mii amo is one of those places that meets you where you are. Spending time with Elizabeth, someone so accomplished yet so humble, helped me reach into my own core more intentionally to a place of radical self-compassion and selfacceptance.” ~ LINDSAY BOMSTEIN, INDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2017

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I felt that Elizabeth had already let me in on a lot of secrets. A dear friend I met eight years ago on an Indagare Journey gave me Elizabeth’s memoir Broken Open, which conveys such profound courage and honesty that it has become my go-to gift for anyone I know who is in a period of serious struggle. Its premise is that we are all born in pure states with clean souls, but over time, nature and nurture encase us in habits, biases, insecurities, armor and what Elizabeth calls ADD (Authenticity Deficit Disorder). Yet, sometimes, a cataclysmic event can break us open. In that moment lies the opportunity for growth and even rebirth to our truest self. It is a poetic and persuasive ode to the notion that it is through pain that we realize the ultimate gain. I send  Broken Open  regularly to those who are in distress or despair, because I cannot think of anything more helpful. It feels like handing a flashlight to someone who is lost in the dark. Last year when I was on our annual  Mii  amo  wellness retreat, which has always attracted an incredible group of people seeking a recalibration of both their inner and outer selves, it occurred to me that having a warm and wise teacher like Elizabeth to help formalize this process would add to an already magical ritual. I sent an email to the address on her website and received an automatic reply thanking me for my email but explaining that due to the volume of correspondence she receives, she cannot reply personally. A few hours later, though, she  did respond. We talked, then met for lunch, and she agreed to host workshops during our retreat.


Clockwise from below: Robert, “the heart man,” of Sedona; the organic garden at Mii amo; a Sedona scenic; Indagare members on a hike

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TRANSFORMATIVE WORKSHOPS We have learned firsthand that the Mii amo experience, which is always focused on mindfulness and wellbeing, is exponentially improved when you get to share it with other Indagare members. It rises to an even higher level when we invite a special teacher to join our retreat, so we’ve developed two exciting trips this year led by pioneering women. Dani Shapiro (November 4-8, 2018). The bestselling author of nine books including the memoirs Devotion and Hourglass: Time, Memory, Marriage, Dani Shapiro has explored emotions, spirituality and personal transformation in her own work as well as by teaching around the world. On this four-day retreat she will conduct workshops designed for those who want to explore the power of illuminating one’s life story through writing. From $3,900 per person. Elizabeth Lesser (January 6-10, 2019). Author and Omega Institute co-founder Elizabeth Lesser will be returning to lead her second retreat with a slightly revised program to include one daily group session and informal conversations in the evenings. This retreat is suited for anyone who wants to greet the New Year with less fear and inertia and more confidence and creativity. Using meditation, writing, spiritual practice and sharing, participants will chart their own unique course forward. From $3,700 per person.

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Sunset over Sedona

spiritual retreat, but Elizabeth used the slogan along with a meditation posture in which the Buddha is often represented. In it, one hand is extended to signal “stop” and the other held open, like a cup, to indicate that we can be both strong and open, noble and kind, powerful and compassionate.

enced at Mii  amo  with Elizabeth was community in its truest form. It was a bounty that left all of us feeling nourished with camaraderie, compassion and commitment to bringing out our best selves in the year ahead.

And the secret to enlightenment? Elizabeth revealed it on the first People who were strangers on Sunday  had, by  Thursday, become night we were together, when she divulged that she has met monks friends, comforting companions or loving witnesses. By the end of with big egos, depressed happiness researchers, peace brokers who our four days together, we proudly called ourselves members of a are full of anger and declutterers whose cars are piled with junk. tribe. On our last night, we gathered in a “That used to upset me” she said, “but circle, spoke our intentions for the year now I know that no one has it all figured ahead and supported one another as we out. We are all flawed. That’s the big setossed pinecones (which Elizabeth had cret to enlightenment: putting down the brought from the trees on her property expectation that enlightenment means at home) into a fire. It was a phoenix perfection and realizing that we are toI felt the strength ritual of letting go and rebirth, with the gether on a search, that it’s not a race, and energy of aim of releasing what we want to leave that each of us, at our own pace and in behind and welcoming in new, bold exour own way, is trying to become our the earth and our pectations. best self, our most authentic self—not surroundings at Mii a perfect self but a person striving to amo, but the group These days, the word community is be free, happy, forgiving, compassionand sessions with heavily used—and, increasingly, it refers ate and generous. The secret is that it Elizabeth Lesser to virtual networks of isolated people. is a practice, an ongoing practice, to be were what made This doesn’t impart what I feel is the who we know we can be, without shame, true meaning of the word, which derives blame or impatience. You have to just the journey truly from communion: coming together and keep working at it.” With the support of special.” sharing, recognizing a mutual benefit to a tribe, that practice becomes a lot more ~ STEPHANIE COUGHLAN, giving and receiving. What we experiINDAGARE MEMBER SINCE 2012 enjoyable.

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Hit the Road With Indagare This Summer Your one-stop travel resource, Indagare was built on the belief that travel can change your life and the world. Each year, we plan thousands of incredible itineraries to destinations in this issue—Capri, Tanzania, India— and more. Here’s how we can help craft your travel this year. Custom Itineraries

Working with our team of expert Trip Designers, you choose the destinations, the dates and how you want to spend your time while on the road. We work with you to design tailor-made itineraries and experiences–thinking through the logistics and taking care of your every need along the way so you can travel worry-free.

Insider Journeys

These behind-the-scenes journeys are hosted by Melissa Biggs Bradley, an Indagare Insider or team member and offer unmatched access through partnerships, such as those with Design Miami and legendary art historian Olivier Bernier. 2018 destination highlights include Helsinki, Egypt, Sicily and Morocco.

Anytime Trips

We partner with select properties to develop anytime packages, which are getaways members can take throughout the year. These trips are often 3- or 4-day escapes, including discounted hotel rates, insider access at local attractions, guided tours and more.

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QUESTIONS ABOUT JOINING OR ABOUT YOUR EXISTING MEMBERSHIP? CALL 2129882611, OR EMAIL MEMBERSHIP@INDAGARE.COM.

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In the Bag: Summer Essentials

Lululemon Refresh Hot/Cold Bottle $38, shop.lululemon.com Brandless Trail Mix $3, brandless.com Cotopaxi Batac 16L Backpack $50, cotopaxi.com Ursa Major Essential Face Wipes $24, ursamajorvt.cpm Herban Essentials Lemon Towelettes $16, herbanessentials.com De Mamiel Altitude Oil $39, demamiel.com Roka Phantom TI Aviators $310, roka.com Beekman Pure Goat Milk Lip Balm $8, shop.beekman1802.com Apple AirPods $159, apple.com Instax Mini 9 Camera $69, instax.com Gore R3 Women Gore Windstopper Zip-Off Jacket $200, gorewear.com Lululemon Baller Hat $38, shop.lululemon.com

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The products, gadgets and accessories we’re loving this summer, whether you’re headed to the beach or the mountains.


Herbivore After Sun Mist $12, herbivorebotanicals.com Krewe St. Louis Sunglasses $235, krewe.com Outdoor Voices Hatters Magic Hat $85, outdoorvoices.com Matta Yamini Dress $257, mattany.com Ancient Greek Thais Sandals $235, ancient-greek-sandals.com Lo & Sons Catalina Tote $118, loandsons.com La Bella Donna Mineral Waterproof Powder Sunscreen $65, labelladonna.com Coyuchi Mediterranean Organic Beach Towel $68, coyuchi.com Flagpole Lynn Swimsuit $375, flagpolenyc.com Matta Bapana Tassel Bracelets $19, mattany.com

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15% off

any Flagpole purchase, use code IndagareFlagpole15 at checkout. Code expires May 31. 71


THE LAST WORD

MEET THE TEAM

Visit Indagare’s office in midtown Manhattan, and you will quickly see that the 80 vibrant employees, all with unique backgrounds, live and breathe travel. Get to know the people behind your trips.

Janine Yu

TRIP DESIGNER One of my many hidden talents is calligraphy. The most interesting food I’ve eaten while traveling was monitor lizard in Manila, where I attended college.

Emma Pierce

DESTINATIONS EDITOR Not many people know this, but I was going to be a chemical engineer before I got into writing. The perfect travel day for me includes waking up early, going for a run, enjoying breakfast, then hitting the pavement to do as much shopping, sightseeing and dining as possible. I usually rack up around 20,000 steps per day when I’m on the road!

Diana Li

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING I’m currently binge watching The Crown—and adding more destinations to my bucket list from Prince Philip’s 1956 around-the-world royal tour, featured in season two. After years of traveling, I have learned to be as spontaneous as I am prepared. Although I plan all my must-see activities ahead of time, I build in just as much time to wander, follow a local’s recommendation or do something completely unexpected.

Ried Stelly

TRIP DESIGNER The best book I’ve recently read is Call Me by Your Name by André Aciman. I was bitten by the travel bug during my first airplane trip, when I was six years old. I flew first class on a Delta L-1011 to Los Angeles with my godfather and remember sitting in an oversized burgundy leather seat, pressing the call button repeatedly to ask for another Coke.

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Making every stay unique

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S I R RO C C O F O RTE A R R I V I N G AT B ROW N ’ S H OT EL M AY FAI R, LON D ON

ROCCO FORTE HOTELS HOTEL DE ROME BERLIN HOTEL AMIGO BRUSSELS THE BALMORAL EDINBURGH HOTEL SAVOY FLORENCE VILLA KENNEDY FRANKFURT ASSILA HOTEL JEDDAH BROWN’S HOTEL LONDON THE CHARLES HOTEL MUNICH HOTEL DE RUSSIE ROME VERDURA RESORT SICILY HOTEL ASTORIA ST PETERSBURG FUTURE OPENINGS: ROME & SHANGHAI ROCCOFORTEHOTELS.COM

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Indagare Magazine Spring/Summer 2018  
Indagare Magazine Spring/Summer 2018