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N EWSLETTER September 2016 “To stand with vulnerable people with a disability through vigorous independent advocacy.”

A letter to Australians with disability, their families and carers Posted on 05 September 2016 NDIS Website

As I am writing this letter to you, I can hear my two adult sons with disability in our kitchen. They are with my wife, preparing our Father’s Day lunch. I am grateful they have allowed me time today to write to you, my NDIS family; the thousands of Australians with disability, their families, friends and carers. As I travel across Australia, and speak to and receive many letters and emails from the NDIS community – whom I now call family – I am constantly reminded of the daily and lifelong struggles you face with great courage and determination. This makes me acutely aware that the past few weeks must have been very difficult. Each time the NDIS experiences challenges, hundreds and thousands of Australians fear the worst: that the NDIS won’t reach them and help change their lives for the better.

In This Issue A letter to Australians with disability, their families and carers ............................... 1 Chairperson’s Report ........................... 3 Funding ................................................ 3 CEO’s Report ....................................... 4 Special General Meeting & AGM .......... 5 General News ...................................... 6

Reports ................................................ 9 Useful Resources ................................. 9 N D I S News and Updates ................... 9 New ECEI resources now available .... 10 Management Committee .................... 12 Staff.................................................... 12 IAT - A Brief History ............................ 13 Support IAT ........................................ 13 Nothing about us without us! .............. 13

I assure you, the NDIS will be delivered in full, right across Australia.

Independent Advocacy Townsville Office

From July 1, there have been some significant issues, with the introduction of the new portal and our communications with stakeholders. I apologise for the stress this has caused.

PO Box 3067 HERMIT PARK QLD 4812

Now the portal is operating successfully with 96 per cent of payments being processed and paid within 48 hours. I thank you for your patience while we have been working to improve the new portal. What has given me great confidence during these last few weeks has been the commitment and high capability of our staff, the culture we have built of learning as well as performing and the expertise and commitment of our many partners. Continued over

2/179-181 Ross River Road MUNDINGBURRA QLD 4812 Phone: Fax: E-mail:

1800 887 688 07) 47 252 505 07) 47 256 106 admin@iat.org.au

Newsletter Feedback and Contributions Did you find this newsletter useful? Which section or sections were of most use? Is there anything you feel we should include in future newsletters? Do you have something to contribute? Please send your response to: admin@iat.org.au


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Letter concludes

Minister Porter, our staff, other members of the public service, our partners, and many service providers have all united to overcome this challenge. It is shared commitments, like we have seen in recent weeks, that will ensure that the NDIS is delivered successfully. During the trial phase of the NDIS, we also experienced and overcame many challenges. Looking ahead, some of the risks and challenges will be big. Others will be small. Not everything will be right first time. However, our track record of agile, measured and highly effective responses should give you and the Australian community confidence that we are building the NDIS successfully. Getting back on target On Friday, I was invited to speak to all the Ministers responsible for the development and delivery of the NDIS at the Disability Reform Council Meeting in Sydney. I advised the Ministers that I have full confidence in the National Disability Insurance Agency and our ability to deliver the Scheme on time and on budget, because our loyal and dedicated staff and partners are our greatest asset. The CEO of the Agency, David Bowen, and I presented our strategies to get plan approvals back on track by the end of this year. We expect that by the end of this calendar year up to 38,500 more participants will have approved plans, provided we get the data we need on time. This will amount to more new participants in six months than the total that came into the NDIS during the three-year trial period. We will be greatly assisted in meeting these targets, as a result of significant additional resources that have been allocated to the Agency by Minister Porter. All the Ministers responsible for the NDIS gave their strongest support and assurances that they and their Departments will work cooperatively with the Agency to deliver the full NDIS. The high level of goodwill between governments and strong commitment and collaboration from everyone who is contributing to the roll-out of the NDIS will need to continue and, indeed, strengthen for us to realise the vision of a better life for thousands of Australians with a disability. Unity, singularity of purpose and mutuality are the foundations on which the NDIS is being built. We need to remain united – to continue with our shared vision, purpose and actions. The best thing you can do to help us deliver the NDIS is to give us your feedback directly at Feedback@ndis.gov.au (link sends e-mail) On behalf of the National Disability Insurance Agency, you have our unwavering commitment to deliver the NDIS in full. I have included in this letter a personal photo of me and my sons today. They are my absolute joy and enable me, in so many ways, to contribute to building the NDIS. With my best wishes to you, your family and friends,

Bruce Bonyhady AM Chair National Disability Insurance Agency


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Chairperson’s Report I had the privilege to attend Independent Advocacy Townsville's NDIS expo at the Oonoonba Community hall recently. I was impressed with the positive feedback I received from the participants from organizations exhibiting on the day. The day itself was significant as I saw just how well our people worked together to make the day such a success. Such teamwork is essential to the success of any organization and on behalf of our members I wish to congratulate each and every member of our IAT's NDIS Expo –participants and exhibitors with more photos below. team on such a professionally run event. I also spoke to visitors to the expo. One lady said to me “This is such a wonderful idea to have these service providers all in one location. I can obtain the information I want without having to go up and down Ross River Road to various addresses.” I thought that perhaps an activity such as this expo could become an annual occurrence. Our organization was fortunate in that the funding for this event was sponsored through a grant from Queensland Community Foundation and the Australian Government, Department of Social Services. Deborah and Tania have been undertaking visits to our regions to make presentations to organizations and communities about what our services are and how they can be accessed. In particular, our appointment by Department of Social Services to conduct advocacy for participants of National Disability Insurance Scheme and of our role in applying for review of decisions and appeal avenues. Now that the funding portal is operating more NDIS related work will be coming our way. Again I wish to thank Deborah and her team for their continued dedication to make Independent Advocacy Townsville as successful as it has become. Thank you. Michael Collins Chairperson

Funding Supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services. Go to www.dss.gov.au for more information. Supported by Queensland Health. Go to www.health.qld.gov.au for more information. Supported by the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services. Go to www.communities.qld.gov.au for more information.


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CEO’s Report Wadda Mooli, This month I celebrated my first year here at IAT and it has been a whirlwind of a year! We have just completed our first quarter delivering advocacy in general and for participants transitioning to the NDIS and those already with plans. During these three months we have seen a huge increase in the demand for our services. At the end of September, we had already assisted 67 clients (nearly 59%) of the 114 clients we are funded to assist. Hopefully you may have come across some of our newspaper editorials and advertisements which marked the start of our new marketing campaign. Each week we will run an ad in one of the following papers – Townsville Bulletin, Innisfail Advocate, Northern Miner, Herbert River Express or the Burdekin Advocate. Commencing in October we will also be hitting the airwaves here in Townsville on 4TTT. I was lucky enough to accept an invitation to attend the Child Protection Week 2016 Remembrance Day Luncheon hosted by Micah Project’s Lotus Place here in Townsville. Remembrance Day acknowledges adult survivors of childhood abuse in institutional settings including out-of-home care. It’s a time to remember the failings and neglect of past governments, churches and non-government organizations to ensure this never happens again. This was a very moving and emotional ceremony with each Commitment Reader lighting a candle and at the end of the ceremony the candle on each table around the room was also lit and we observed a minutes silence. Thank you to Kylie-maree and Remembrance Candles - Remembrance Luncheon Jarrod from Lotus Place for organizing this wonderful - 7 Sept 2016 lunch. During Disability Action Week Tania Brown and I were lucky enough to be conducting our 3 day Hinchinbrook – Cassowary Coast Road Trip. During this trip we visited many service providers to update them on our continued advocacy services and how we are advocating for this transitioning to the NDIS. We were in Tully on the day service providers and others undertook a walk through the streets using wheelchairs and wearing special glasses to give them a sense of the difficulties people with disabilities face every day accessing their community. This finished with a morning tea at the Tully Library and we were very fortunate to be able to speak to many locals. Thank you to the Disability Awareness Group and Disability Action Week morning tea at Tully Library others who helped organize this event. During October, I’ll be attending the Griffith University AMPARO NDIS & CALD Communities:Aiming high for equitable access Symposium in Brisbane which we sponsored. With our increasing client base including members of our own CALD communities, it will provide us with further insight into the increased difficulties for these members of our communities. Wadda Mooli everyone Deborah Wilson Chief Executive Officer


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Special General Meeting & AGM

Independent Advocacy in the Tropics Inc. To stand with vulnerable people with disability through vigorous independent advocacy

IAT’s Management Committee invites you to attend a Special General Meeting followed by the 2015 – 2016 Annual General Meeting of the Association. Members must hold current membership to vote at both the Special General Meeting and the AGM. Date:

Friday 21st October 2016

Time:

10:00am – 1:00pm (AGM commences at 11:00am)

Place:

The Salvation Army, Townsville Riverway Recovery Mission, 49-61 Beck Drive, Condon Qld 4815

RSVP:

18/10/2016 to 4725 2505 or admin@iat.org.au


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General News Wearable diagnostics and self-driving cars signal future of tech in aged care By Darragh O'Keeffe on September 30, 2016 in Industry, Technology

Ageing in place at home is giving way to ageing in place anywhere, thanks to the emergence of a new wave of assistive technology and so-called mobile health, says a top expert in the field. Professor Greg Tegart, a leading scientist and advocate for smart assistive technologies for the aged and disabled, said that the traditional barriers to greater uptake of the technologies were changing as large atypical healthcare players such as Google and Apple came into the market. These barriers included a lack of integration among technologies and devices, insufficient funding for large-scale trials to provide evidencebased proposals, and a lack of business plans to attract investors into the installation of major systems. These players, which also include Telstra Health, Philips, HCF and even some retailers, are prepared to provide products and strong service, he said. “This is coupled with the dramatic increase in mobile health as mobile smart phones become ubiquitous, to the extent that many experts are predicting the demise of home-based devices for measuring vital Professor Greg Tegart parameters,” Professor Tegart told Australian Ageing Agenda. “This can be done unobtrusively with wearable devices and data transmitted from mobiles,” he said. Mr Tegart, who was awarded ACT Senior Australian of the Year in 2015 in recognition of his work in assistive technology, spoke to AAA ahead of his appearance at the upcoming ITAC conference. What’s the next disruptive technology? Discussing the technologies that had the greatest potential to impact the care of older people, Professor Tegart pointed to wearable diagnostics, robotics and social media. “Wearable diagnostics are clearly a significant disruptive technology. A wide variety of these are under development such as wireless skin sensors which fix to the skin like a tattoo and measure heart rate muscle activity and temperature; other sensors can monitor glucose levels and deliver insulin on demand,” he said. Other movement sensors could be built into jewellery or fabrics, and powered by flexible woven fabrics generating electricity, he said. “The development of suitable and reliable apps for smart phones supports innovation in wearables,” he added. Robotics were another major disruptive technology in a number of ways, he said. “One is to provide companionship and safety through humanoid or animal robots. This becomes important as the ratio of carers to patients decreases as the numbers of older people increase, which impacts on both home and hospital care,” Professor Tegart said. “Another is the use of robots in hospitals for selected surgery and for analysing medical imaging records to free doctors to deal with the increasing numbers of older people with chronic conditions requiring hospital attention.” Similarly, Professor Tegart said that autonomous vehicles could significantly change the quality of life for older people. Continued over


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Story concludes

“People with minor disabilities, mild dementia and anxiety about public transport could have new fields opened to them by the development of UBER systems using electric autonomous vehicles to transport them. This is an added benefit of the worldwide thrust towards autonomous vehicles arising from success in the mining industry.” Elsewhere, social media would continue to be a major driver of change, through the sharing of information on areas including healthcare, the performance of institutions in dealing with older people, new products and new approaches. “This links to the empowerment of the patient and a drive to use new assistive technologies,” he said. Supporting innovation, uptake Asked what role government had in nurturing greater ICT adoption, Professor Tegart said that as a major provider of funds for healthcare, the government needed to be aware of where economies and increased efficiency could be achieved in a changed healthcare system. “Clearly the technologies and their applications all stem from innovation. They are driven by different sources – companies looking to improve existing business or looking to new opportunities, academic researchers seeking new knowledge or seeing new applications and entrepreneurs with new ideas,” he said.

The ITAC conference runs 28-30 November in Melbourne. http://www.itacconference.com.au/

Justice for WA’s mentally impaired is a matter of urgency OPINION: Taryn Harvey and Alison Xamon - The West Australian on September 29, 2016, 2:11 pm

Last week saw the handing down of a highly significant decision by the United Nations. The decision came after a complaint by Marlon Noble to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities about his treatment by the WA Government under the Mentally Impaired Accused Act. The ruling by the UN was damning in regards to the treatment suffered by Mr Noble and according to human rights lawyers it is the most significant criticism of Australia’s record on disability rights ever made. It should be the kind of finding that compels parliaments to act urgently. But the UN ruling is just the latest in an embarrassingly long line of reports highlighting the inherent injustice of the laws affecting people with mental impairment who have been charged with an offence. We are yet to see whether it will be a catalyst for WA’s Attorney-General Michael Mischin to finally introduce reforms into the WA Parliament after Premier Colin Barnett’s 2013 commitment to do exactly that. He’s quickly running out of time. WA’s “fitness to stand trial” law was passed in 1996 ostensibly to balance community safety with the protection of people found unfit to stand trial because of their disability or mental illness.


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Continued over Story concludes

It was expected the law would be a safeguard for those found unfit to plead but it soon became obvious that instead it was an instrument for meting out serious injustice. No testing of evidence of charges against a person, mandatory custody for a wide range of alleged offences yet to be proved, indefinite custody, and all with an absence of judicial discretion and oversight. There have been consistent criticisms of this law for most of its 20 years. But WA’s Parliament and consecutive Labor and Liberal governments have failed in their duty to uphold fundamental principles of law and resolve this. State parliamentarians bear a collective responsibility to ensure legislation they pass meets standards of natural justice and procedural fairness, and respects the division of powers. In this instance they have failed on every front. Mr Noble was released from prison in 2012 after 10 years imprisonment for a crime he was never convicted of. But despite the charges against him being dropped he continues to live under strict conditions and his freedom is ultimately subject to political whim. It wasn’t due process that saw Mr Noble released. It was media scrutiny and public outrage. These decisions are highly politicised and therefore open to great injustice. A Perth Senate hearing last week on indefinite custody of people with disability heard leaders in WA’s legal and corrections systems testify to the corrupting influence this law has on our legal system and the vulnerability of these people in prisons. Senators were told that last year’s opening of WA’s first declared place as an alternative to prison was no remedy for the indefinite nature of custody. Neither would it be suitable for the majority of those found unfit to plead. And no declared place has yet been built for those unfit to plead due to mental illness. What we know, and what the UN has now determined, is continuing human rights abuses against some of our most vulnerable Australians, those with disability or mental illness, is happening right now. It has been happening for decades, and there is no indication that the situation is going to change in this term of government. Perhaps part of the reason for this is that it becomes easy to dismiss those people who are so badly affected, largely Aboriginal people, people with disability or mental illness as different or unworthy. How else to explain our Parliaments’ persistent failure over 20 years to collectively demand change as a matter of urgency? Taryn Harvey is CEO Developmental Disability WA and Alison Xamon is President WA Association for Mental Health,

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 General Assembly resolution 217 A as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into almost 500 languages.


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Reports Queensland's Wellbeing 2016 Report (QCOSS) https://www.qcoss.org.au/sites/default/files/The%20QCOSS%20Queensland%20wellbeing%20201 6%20report%20%28word%29%20%28June%29.pdf

Dept Justice and Attorney-General 2015–16 Client Complaints Annual Report https://publications.qld.gov.au/dataset/c84c2dee-fc76-4502-ad28fe58420295ab/resource/e5b0b560-f45d-45ad-a406-9ce8d478564a/download/2015-16-djag-clientcomplaints-annual-report.pdf

Queensland Health Annual Report 2015-2016 https://www.health.qld.gov.au/publications/portal/annual-report/15-16/doh-annual-report.pdf

Royal Commission The civil litigation recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse: Redress and Civil Litigation Report - understanding the Queensland context Consultation expiry: 25 October 2016 http://www.justice.qld.gov.au/corporate/community-consultation/community-consultationactivities/current-activities/the-civil-litigation-recommendations-of-the-royal-commission-intoinstitutional-responses-to-child-sexual-abuse-redress-and-civil-litigation-report-understanding-thequeensland-context

Useful Resources My Child has: Information for Queensland families of young children A series of booklets aimed at informing parents of children with disability. The booklets provide information on topics such as: diagnosis, early intervention services, early childhood education and care, starting school, and aids, equipment and assistive technology. The resource also provides contact details including website information for government and non-government agencies. Visit the website to download the various publications: https://publications.qld.gov.au/dataset/my-child-has-information-for-queensland-families-of-youngchildren

N D I S News and Updates NDIS Lift Out Our NDIS Lift Out Š published with the June 2016 Newsletter has been so popular that we are now in its third print! For your convenience it is available in PDF format on our website at https://independentadvocacy.org.au/ndis. Printed copies are available from our office for you to collect. To order quantities of the Lift Out, please phone us on 4725 2505 or email us at reception@iat.org.au to place an order. We will shortly be producing the next version which will contain more information particularly in relation to how we can assist you.


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Australia’s First National Guideline for Autism Diagnosis Posted on 06 October 2016

A major study has been launched to develop Australia’s first national diagnostic guideline for autism led by The Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC). NDIA Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Louise Glanville, said the Agency was committed to co-design and recognised the design of the Scheme must be informed by the lived experiences of participants and people with disability. “Working with Autism CRC provides the Agency with an opportunity to participate in an exceptional collaboration with the autism community, researchers, practitioners and service providers to improve the diagnosis and early identification and understanding of autism,” Ms Glanville said. While access to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is not dependent on a diagnosis, the team will be working closely with the NDIA to ensure the guideline aligns with the processes for entry into the NDIS. View the full article on the Autism CRC website.

http://www.autismcrc.com.au/news/australia%E2%80%99s-first-national-guideline-autism-diagnosis

New ECEI resources now available Posted on 14 September 2016

Did you know research suggests developmental delay occurs in up to 10% of kids under eight? Early intervention for a child with a developmental delay or disability in their early years is critical to achieving the best outcomes. Providing quality intervention early in a child’s life reduces the possible need for longer term intervention. The NDIS is committed to giving children with developmental delay the support they need to reach their full potential. Earlier this year, we released our Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) approach – the first nationally-consistent approach to supporting children under the age of six with developmental delay or disability. The ECEI Approach is designed to support children with developmental delay or disability and their families achieve better long-term outcomes through support services in their local community. The approach is in line with our focus on individuals – every child and their family will receive the right support to meet their goals and aspirations based on their needs, regardless of diagnosis. We have recently released a range of new ECEI resources to help explain how the NDIS can help children with developmental delay or disability. Learn more today, visit the ECEI page of our website https://www.ndis.gov.au/ecei.html.

Update on NDIS portal There are a series of updates and instructions below to assist participants working with the myplace portal. We want to stress that no participant should go without a service, or a provider face financial stress for services they have provided to participants, and to contact the NDIA on 1800 800 110 if these circumstances arise (Monday to Friday 8.00am - 5.00pm local time). We thank you for your support as we work in partnership to deliver the NDIS.


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Outstanding Payment Requests The Agency is seeking the co-operation of self-managed participants to now upload outstanding Payment Requests in the portal. If a participant received an advanced payment, please do not submit a Payment Request for these services, the Agency will manage the reconciliation of these payments on the participant's behalf. If self-managed participants need support using the new portal there are resources available on the participant section of the website and you can call 1800 800 110 (Monday to Friday 8.00am - 5.00pm local time).

Plan reviews - continuity of support We know that some plan reviews are due soon. To ensure continuity of services and payment during this time the Agency will extend expiring plans, including the value of the plan. This will ensure services are continued and Payment Requests can continue to be processed. If your circumstances have materially changed, please get in touch with your local Regional Office for a plan review.

Providers claiming against self-managed participants Only self-managed participants can submit their own Payment Requests in myplace. If a provider has taken on a participant that was previously self-managed, the participant will need to approve this in the portal before a provider can submit a Payment Request on their behalf.

Useful Resources - NDIS Participant Portal User Guide https://www.ndis.gov.au/participant-portal-user-guide.html

The National Disability Abuse and Neglect Hotline (The Hotline) – a telephone service for reporting cases of neglect and abuse of disabled members of the community. Hotline: 1800 880 052 TIS: 13 14 50 TTY: 1800 301 130 NRS: 1800 555 677 Email: hotline@workfocus.com For more information, visit the Website: http://www.disabilityhotline.net.au/

Welcome to the Disability Lawyer. The goal of this site is to provide a searchable, indexed resource of information about disability and the law.

http://www.thedisabilitylawyer.net.au/

NDIS Update Links Queensland Government’s disability website www.qld.gov.au/disability Phone: 13 QGOV (13 74 68) Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services (Disability Services) www.communities.qld.gov.au/disability Phone: 13 QGOV (13 74 68) Email: disability@communities.qld.gov.au National Disability Insurance Agency www.ndis.gov.au Phone: 1800 800 110 Sign up to receive regular email updates at: www.ndis.gov.au/sign-updates


Newsletter: September 2016

Management Committee Chairperson and Public Officer: ..................................... Michael Collins Vice-Chairperson............................................................. Tania Hornberg Secretary: ........................................................................ Beverly Smith Treasurer: ....................................................................... Aime Nganare Ordinary Members: ......................................................... Richard Cordukes .......................................................................................... Maria Hutton

Staff Advocacy Manager: ......................................................... Deborah Wilson Advocates: ...................................................................... Anne Hansen .......................................................................................... Helen De-Campo Advocate/EMR Support Officer: ..................................... Tania Brown Office Administrator:....................................................... Beverly Smith Admin Assistant/Receptionist: ....................................... Kim Nicholls

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IAT - A Brief History IAT has been incorporated for over two decades, providing advocacy support and high quality services to people with disabilities in the Townsville and surrounding districts. Covering rural and regional areas from the Cassowary Coast in the north, east to Palm Island, south to the Burdekin, and west to Hughenden. IAT is located opposite the Cathedral School, in Mundingburra. We have two Advocates and continue to offer advocacy support to vulnerable individuals. We also provide information to family, friends and other community members. We continue to stand for people’s rights and freedoms. We also provide information sessions and presentations to answer any queries and welcome any questions relating to providing an information session about Independent Advocacy Townsville. As economic and political situations change we are maintaining a positive outlook and continue to support people with disabilities during the introductory phase of new schemes and other changes within the sector. IAT’s advocacy speaks, acts and writes with minimum conflict of interest by standing with, and for people with disability to promote, protect and defend their welfare, rights and justice by: being on their side and no-one else’s, without jeopardy to the most vulnerable being primarily concerned with their fundamental needs: and remaining loyal and accountable to them in a way which is emphatic and vigorous and which requires the bearing of costs by the advocate or advocacy group.

Support IAT You can make a real difference to the lives of vulnerable people with disability by financially supporting IAT to make sure our advocacy efforts continue in the future. All donations over $2.00 are tax deductible. All gifts are also welcome. You can choose to make a one off donation or a recurrent donation. Alternatively, for further details about supporting IAT contact us on (07) 47252505

Nothing about us without us! This was the theme of the United Nations Assembly to ratify the Convention on the Rights of People with Disability. IAT works on the same principle – we are run by, and for, people with disability. This ensures that the agency is driven by people with a lived experience of disability and how societal values around disability impact on people’s lives. We are therefore able to remain relevant and focussed. Organisations like IAT can only survive with the involvement of community. We know there are many people with skills and experience that would be an asset to our organisation. Membership is open to anybody who supports the values, mission, and work of this agency. It is from the membership that we draw our management committee, which is the governing body of our organisation. Therefore, we are especially interested in people who want to become involved, who could contribute to the agency by supporting the work we do and the values we hold. In return, IAT offers the opportunity to be involved expand on and develop skills and experience relating to the governance of an organisation, and to be involved with like-minded people in a supportive environment.


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Mission Statement “To stand with vulnerable people with a disability through vigorous independent advocacy.”

What we believe IAT believes all people have the right to:  Be treated with respect and dignity  Be valued as individuals  Participate in the decisions and choices that effect their lives  Be involved in and contribute to their community  Safety and protection from abuse, neglect and exploitation  Live the life they choose

Key Elements of Advocacy      

Functioning by speaking out, acting and writing Minimal conflict of interest Sincerely perceived interests Promotion of the person’s welfare, wellbeing and justice Vigor of Action Costs

Membership is free for both ordinary and associate members. Ordinary Membership   

Ordinary Membership is open only to people with disability. Ordinary members have voting rights and can nominate for positions on the management committee. Ordinary members make up the majority of positions on the management committee.

Associate Membership  

Associate membership is available to any person concerned with issues affecting people with disability. Positions on the management committee (other than that of chairperson) are available to associate members; they have voting rights only for the period of their inclusion on the committee.

What membership does not include:  

Automatic or preferential approval for advocacy support – all members, should they require advocacy, would be subject to the same entry criteria and referral process as any other person requesting advocacy support Automatic approval for membership of the management committee – any person nominating for membership of the management committee must nominate and address a set of selection criteria. This is to ensure that members are able to support the values of the organisation, and assists us to determine how we can assist the management committee members to increase their skills and knowledge in relation to the management of this agency

If you would like to become a member of IAT, please complete one of the membership application forms at the back of this newsletter and return to the office for processing. If you would like to discuss membership or joining the management committee, please call us on (07) 4725 2505 or toll free on 1800 887 688.


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ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM I would like to apply for Associate Membership of

Independent Advocacy in the Tropics Inc. Name: .................................................................................................................................. Signed: ........................................................ Address: .............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................. Postal Address: ................................................................................................................... .............................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................. Phone Number: ........................................... Date: ............................................................

On completion, please return to Independent Advocacy Townsville 2/179-181 Ross River Road MUNDINGBURRA QLD 4812 PO Box 3067 HERMIT PARK QLD 4812

Phone: Fax: E-mail:

1800 887 688 07) 47 252 505 07) 47 256 106 admin@iat.org.au

OFFICIAL USE ONLY Proposed by:

........................................................

Signed: ..........................................

Seconded by:

........................................................

Signed: ..........................................

Accepted by Meeting of the Management Committee. Date of Meeting: .....................................................


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ORDINARY MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM I would like to apply for Ordinary Membership of

Independent Advocacy in the Tropics Inc. Name: .................................................................................................................................. Signed: ........................................................ Address: .............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................. Postal Address: ................................................................................................................... .............................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................. Phone Number: ........................................... Date: ............................................................

On completion, please return to Independent Advocacy Townsville 2/179-181 Ross River Road MUNDINGBURRA QLD 4812 PO Box 3067 HERMIT PARK QLD 4812

Phone: Fax: E-mail:

1800 887 688 07) 47 252 505 07) 47 256 106 admin@iat.org.au

OFFICIAL USE ONLY Proposed by:

........................................................

Signed: ..........................................

Seconded by:

........................................................

Signed: ..........................................

Accepted by Meeting of the Management Committee. Date of Meeting: .....................................................

Profile for Independent Advocacy in the Tropics Inc.

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