Page 1

NEWSLETTER December 2017 “To stand with vulnerable people with a disability through vigorous independent advocacy.”

Disability Service Providers Confidence in NDIS

Losing

Luke Michael: Australia PRObono: 4 December 2017

Business confidence in the disability services sector has slumped due to problems with the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), according to a new report.

In This Issue Disability Service Providers Losing Confidence in NDIS ............................... 1 President’s Report ................................. 3 CEO’s Report ........................................ 4 IAT - A Brief History ............................... 5 Support IAT............................................ 5 Funding .................................................. 5 IAT’s Breaking News ............................. 6 Preparing for the Storm Season............ 6 N D I S Update ...................................... 7 #AdvocacyMatters Campaign ............... 8 From ‘demented’ to ‘person with dementia’: how and why the language of disability changed ................................ 10 Reports ................................................ 12 Useful Resources ................................ 12 Management Committee ..................... 13

Photo courtesy of Australia PRObono

National Disability Services (NDS) released The State of the Disability Sector Report 2017 on Monday, which included a survey of 516 service providers. It found only 58 per cent of service providers were planning to expand services in the year ahead (compared to 68 per cent two years ago), while 57 per cent of providers predicted they would not be able to meet service demand in 2018.

Staff...................................................... 13 Nothing about us without us! ............... 13 Independent Advocacy Townsville 2/179-181 Ross River Road MUNDINGBURRA QLD 4812 PO Box 3067 HERMIT PARK QLD 4812 Phone:

1800 887 688 07) 47 252 505 07) 47 256 106 admin@iat.org.au

This was due in part to the implementation problems with the first 18 months of transition to the NDIS.

Fax: E-mail:

“Most disability service providers support the direction of change, but they feel under immense pressure. The NDIS demands huge growth and change at the same time. As the Productivity Commission observed, this is ‘highly challenging’ for disability service providers,” the report said.

Newsletter Feedback and Contributions Did you find this newsletter useful? Which section or sections were of most use? Is there anything you feel we should include in future newsletters? Do you have something to contribute? We’d love to hear from you so please send your article to: admin@iat.org.au.

Continued over


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 2

Continued “Add to this the implementation problems of the NDIS. These have dogged the scheme since July 2016 when the NDIS moved to full-scheme transition. NDIS systems faltered as the intake of participants dramatically increased. After three years of trial, the NDIS had brought in 30,000 people, 15 months later the number had increased to 113,000.” “The pressure to process people quickly led to short-cuts – phone planning instead of face-to-face planning, for example. Many new planners lacked the skills and experience required. The quality of participant plans fell.” Many service providers expressed concern about their financial sustainability, with issues relating to unrealistic pricing, costly red tape, workforce shortages and uncertainty around policy. Only 40 per cent of disability service providers rated their financial condition as “strong” or “very strong”, compared to 53 per cent last year. The report noted that the National Disability Insurance Agency’s (NDIA) decision to require a quotation for every participant living in Supported Independent Living (SIL) had added to the transition hurdles. “[This decision] has been burdensome for disability service providers. The process requires unnecessary duplication of information already held by the agency and is based on a limited understanding of how shared supported living arrangements work in practice,” the report said. “The time to agree a quote can extend into months and some disability service providers have been without payment for extended periods of time. A better system for determining SIL funding must be found.” “NDS continues to argue that disability service providers willing to accept benchmark prices should not have to submit a quotation and a new quotation should not be required for every plan review.” NDS chief executive Dr Ken Baker, told Pro Bono News that despite the uncertainty, service providers were still committed to the NDIS. “The service providers haven’t lost their faith in the NDIS, they’re just very unsure if they can operate successfully in the scheme,” Baker said. “The service sector doesn’t appear to be moving fast enough to meet demand as it comes into the system and I think there’s a range of factors at play there. Clearly, organisations feel that their financial position is not strong enough.” “They are very worried about the NDIS pricing. They’re having difficulties recruiting workers, and they feel that the policy environment in which they’re moving is very uncertain.” Baker said the extreme pressure placed on NDIS providers was due in part to the government’s focus on the quantity of participants rather than the quality of service. “Governments have focused on getting a lot of people into the scheme and probably not sufficiently on ensuring that the services are there for people to get,” he said. “The systems we know, have had a lot of teething problems, and that’s created additional stress and frustration for providers as well.” Baker said to improve the NDIS “a range of measures” was needed, but he was confident the NDIA was willing to improve the systems in place. “There does need to be more streamlined and efficient systems, so that working within the NDIS is easier than at present and has less red tape. I know the NDIA knows and recognises that,” he said. “I think that we’re looking very closely at the outcomes of the independent pricing review, which is underway at present. We hope that out of that comes more realistic pricing of supports. That would be a very important signal for the sector.” “And we probably need more investment across Australia in assisting organisations to make the very large adjustment required from the old system to the new one.”


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 3

President’s Report I wish to thank everyone at IAT for their continued dedication to delivering sevices to vulnerable members of our community. We have had a big increase for our services both in Townsville and in the regions that we service. I am happy to announce that IAT will soon be opening our first regional office. The office in Charters Towers, will be situated in the old TAFE building in Church Street. Deborah and Beverley have both done a lot of groundwork in locating suitable premises and negotiating rental arrangements. Thank you for all you have done to get this to fruition. Our first day of operating from these premises will be early in January, 2018. I wish you all a happy Christmas and a Happy and joyful 2018.

Michael Collins President


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 4

CEO’s Report As the votes continue to be countered, it is no surprise that many seats, still remain undecided due to the closeness of the candidates. In fact, only one electoral district in our service area has been confirmed and that is Traegar. Robbie Katter of the Katter Australia Party was the clear winner. The seats of, Burdekin, Hill, Hinchinbrook, Mackay, Mirani, Mundingburra, Thuringowa, Townsville, Whitsunday remain too close to call with no one conceding defeat. During the lead up to the election we met with quite a number of candidates and sitting members who all promised to secure advocacy funding for Queensland. We need this promise to be upheld by whoever holds power. Not only to secure current funding but to give serious consideration and commitment to increased funding for all regional advocacy orgnisations to employ more advocates, secure office leases and in our case, have a larger office in Townsville where we don’t even have room to hold meetings anymore, and to secure the long-term opening of small regional offices in key towns within our extensive service area. Looking back on the year, it has been another long road to improving services and funding for participants under the NDIS. Many are still awaiting for they much needed and necessary Assistive Technology (AT) items, some for 12 months and there are those who are also still waiting for equipment to be repaired. I was speaking with other CEO’s this week at the NDS CEO Meeting held in Sydney and this is not isolated to our region, it is happening everywhere the NDIS has rolled out. Those businesses who building and/or repair wheelchairs for example, have been inundated with orders and simply cannot keep up with the demand. It is quite clear and something we in the sector knew, that the NDIA were and are quite unprepared for the actual number of participants entering the NDIS. So much so that even having your entry application processed can take up to 3 months to process. We as an advocacy organization has felt the brunt of this rushed rollout of the NDIS. The unpreparedness of the NDIA, at times poorly trained staff and a flawed system. Adding to that a former management team who were unwilling to listen and learn from the very ones who the NDIS is supposed to give a better life to or those working in the sector. It was heartening to hear the new NDIA CEO Rob De Luca admit this and hear his commitment to improving communication with and listening to people and the sector to have the NDIS/NDIA deliver what it promised. On that positive note, we have more good news following on in this newsletter and I take this opportunity to wish you all a very Merry Christmas and hope for a wonder New Year. Deborah Wilson Chief Executive Officer


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 5

IAT - A Brief History IAT has been incorporated for nearly 30 years, providing advocacy support to people with disabilities and are an Accredited Disability Advocacy Organisation under the National Standards for Disability Services. IAT is located opposite the Cathedral School, in Mundingburra. We have a number of Advocates\NDIS Appeals Support Officers providing advocacy support to vulnerable individuals, and information to family, friends and other community members. Our service area covers rural and regional areas from the Cassowary Coast in the north, east to Palm Island, south to the Burdekin, and west through the Charters Towers region, Hughenden, Richmond and Mckinlay Shires. Within our NDIS Appeals Advocacy Support service, this also includes the Mackay, Isaac and Whitsunday regions. We provide information sessions and presentations to answer any queries and welcome any questions relating to providing an information session about us and advocacy. As economic and political situations change we are maintaining a positive outlook and continue to support people with disabilities during the introduction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and other changes within the sector. IAT stands with people with disability to promote, protect and defend their welfare, rights and justice. We do this by: being on their side and no-one else’s and advocates speak, act and write with minimum conflict of interest. We continue to stand for people’s rights and freedoms.

Support IAT You can make a real difference to the lives of vulnerable people with disability by financially supporting IAT to make sure our advocacy efforts continue in the future. As a registered Charity, all donations over $2.00 are tax deductible. You can choose to make a one off donation or a recurrent donation. The giving of gifts are also welcome. For further details on supporting IAT, please contact us on (07) 4725 2505.

Funding Funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services. www.dss.gov.au for more information.

Go to

Funded by Queensland Health. Go to www.health.qld.gov.au for more information. Funded by the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services. Go to www.communities.qld.gov.au for more information.


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 6

IAT’s Breaking News New Advocate for Townsville We welcome the appointment of Joanna Mullins as an Advocate\NDIS Appeals Support Officer in our Townsville office. Joanna (Jo) has been working for the past few weeks on a casual part-time basis and will commence full-time with us on 2 January 2018. Joanna has extensive Tribunal experience both with QCAT and AAT matters and has also worked for the Commonwealth Ombudsman. While Jo has not worked within the disability sector, she is keen to use her extensive knowledge and experience in Tribunals and Policy Development to improve outcomes for those living with disability.

Opening soon in Charters Towers As of 2 January 2018, we will have a full service office in Charters Towers, which will help us serve our extended western corridor region. On 1 July 2017, our western region was extended past Flinders Shire to encompass both Richmond and Mckinlay Shires (all of the Northern Highlands). We have leased offices in the building formerly occupied by TAFE at 11-15 Church Street. Here we will have a reception area, small offices and a large meeting room, which can be made available for those needing to have a place to hold “neutral territory meetings”, network or other meetings or training. Our staff who travel to Charters Towers will also now have a place to work from and we will have a place to hold both staff and management committee meetings on a regular basis. Joining us in Charters Towers is someone very familiar to those in the disability sector and someone we have had our eye on for quite some time wishing we could have them join our team. Without further ado, we are pleased to announce that Jason Thomas was our successful applicant for the Charters Towers position of Advocate\NDIS Appeals Support Officer and with his wealth of knowledge in advocacy, the sector and this extended region, he is a great asset and fit for our team.

Preparing for the Storm Season As we enter the height of the storm season here in Queensland, it is a timely reminder for all to ensure they have the information they need to stay safe. The Queensland Government have a comprehensive range of information broken down into steps with factsheets available. https://www.qld.gov.au/emergency/dealing-disasters/prepare-for-disasters Preparing for disasters      

Prepare your emergency plan Prepare for evacuation Emergency kit: essential items, all times Prepare your home Tune into warnings Check your neighbours

     

Pet emergency plan Other languages Get Ready REDiPlan Food during a disaster Accessing medications

If you have no one to assist you to download and print this information, please call our receptionist MJ for assistance. Remember also to check with your local Council for helpful information and assistance.


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 7

N D I S Update WA moves to federally-run National Disability Insurance Scheme Dylan Caporn, PerthNOW, 12 December 2017

WA will move to the federally run National Disability Insurance Scheme, a step which will save the State Budget more than a billion dollars over the next decade. The decision, announced by Premier Mark McGowan this morning, will see the Federal government assume responsibility for the rollout from July next year. Under the move, more than 25,000 people with disabilities will be granted access to individual packages, allowing them to control which care provider they sign up with. The NDIS will continue to roll out on a geographic basis and will be fully rolled out across the State by 2020. People already taking part in the WA NDIS will transfer to the nationally delivered scheme in a phased approach from April 2018. The transfer will conclude by December 2018. Premier Mark McGowan said the State Government had been ensuring the best outcome for West Australians with disability. “After careful deliberation, we have concluded that joining the national Scheme will provide the best foundation for Western Australians to benefit from the NDIS, now and into the future,” he said. “Western Australians with disability need, and will now have, certainty that their care and supports are provided for.” “This decision demonstrates my Government’s commitment to being part of a once in a generation change that can only be truly successful as a national endeavour.” National Disability Services WA manager Julie Waylen said the decision was an important step in providing certainty for people with disabilities. “The disability sector and people with disability in WA have waited a long time for the NDIS and today’s news clarifies the way forward,” Ms Waylen said. “However, we can’t ignore the significant implementation and transition challenges ahead. “The NDIS will bring increased demand for services in more locations and disability services must be supported to build a knowledge base, build capacity and capability of providers, strengthen the regions and address potential market failure issues.” “We must also support organisations and the people with disability to transition from the WA scheme to one run by the Commonwealth.”

Upcoming Rollout Regions

Rockhampton, Gladstone and west to the borders – 1 January 2018 From November, Queensland Government disability clients living in the Rockhampton region started to enter the NDIS. Other eligible people will begin to enter the NDIS from January 2018. The Rockhampton, Gladstone and west to the borders region covers the local government areas of: Banana

Central Highlands

Longreach

Barcaldine

Diamantina

Rockhampton

Barcall

Gladstone

Winton

Blackall Tambo

Livingstone

Woorabinda

The ECEI partner, BUSHkids as well as our LAC partner, Carers Queensland Incorporated will support the rollout of the NDIS in this region.


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

#AdvocacyMatters Campaign

Page | 8


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 9

www.change.org/p/premier-of-queensland-advocacymatters-tosafeguard-the-human-rights-of-queenslanders-with-disabilities


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 10

From ‘demented’ to ‘person with dementia’: how and why the language of disability changed Author: Roland Sussex, Professor Emeritus, The University of Queensland

In the second half of the 20th century, we came to accept that in certain cases we should avoid deliberately hurtful language. While many deride political correctness for going too far, its initial aim to establish non-hateful language was, and still is, admirable. In the early 20th century, “moron” was a medical term for someone with a mental age of between eight and 12. “Mongol” was a person with Down syndrome, and also was indirectly a slur on people from Mongolia, some of whose features were supposed to resemble those with Down syndrome. “Retarded” described someone mentally, socially or physically less advanced than their chronological age. We know these terms now primarily as pejoratives. “Mongol”, following the Australian tendency to form diminutives, has even given us “mong”, meaning someone who is stupid or behaves as such. Yet there is also a consensus such language is unacceptable. How did we get here?

The path to dignified language In December 1948, the United Nations passed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Affirming the dignity of all humans, Article 1 of this landmark document states: All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. Article 2 goes on to specify this should apply without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. The declaration, prompted by the dehumanising events of the second world war, soon led to concerted initiatives to avoid hurtful and denigrating language. Race and ethnicity was the first area to be addressed in Australia, where the philosophy of respect was enshrined in the Racial Discrimination Act of 1975. This included the currently controversial section 18C, which made it an offence to offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate someone else on the basis of race or nationality. Read more – What is Section 18C and why do some politicians want it changed? In the 1980s the scope was expanded in Australia to include gender and sexuality, with the legitimisation of terms like

“queer”, and an increasing range of different kinds of sexuality now evident in the LGBTQI designations. Words like ‘deaf’ and ‘blind’ are commonly used in negative ways. from shutterstock.com The third big change involved the language for people with disabilities, whether cognitive or physical. Here the English vocabulary was full of terms that mixed description with pejorative overtones.

People first Words like “deaf”, “blind”, “dumb” and “lame” are not only descriptions of physical ability and disability, but are commonly used in negative ways. For instance, “deaf as a post”, “blind Freddie”. We have now moved away from such language. Especially unacceptable are nouns like “retard” or adjectives like “demented”. In their place we have the principle of people first. The person and the disability are separated.


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 11

Instead of a phrase like “demented person” we have “person with dementia” or “person living with dementia”. The New South Wales Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care has a list of such terms. We should avoid terms that suggest deficit in a negative way, such as “disabled”, “invalid”, “retarded”, “handicap”, “spastic” and “cripple”. We should also avoid terms that explicitly specify limitation like “confined” (say, to a wheelchair). “Suffering from” is to be eschewed for the same reason, since it suggests the person is passive and incapable. Read more – Redefining the (able) body: disabled performers make their presence felt at the Fringe

A number of paraphrases allow us to avoid sensitive terms. Instead of “blind” we have “visually impaired”. People are not “disabled” but “differently abled”. Some of these terms can go too far and are effectively euphemisms because they sound overdone and excessively delicate, like “intellectually challenged”. It is preferable to use language that doesn’t exclude people with these conditions from society. A good example of such inclusive language is “ambulant toilet”, often found in airports and public places, which simply indicates the toilet is suitable for anyone able to walk. The Disability Discrimination Act 1992 consolidated these issues in Australian legislation, which now forms part of an expanding suite of anti-discrimination legislation both here and overseas. Ambulant toilet is a good use of inclusive language. Image courtesy of shutterstock.com

Talking to someone with a disability A general guideline for talking to someone with a certain condition is to ask that person how they wish to be described. In some cases, words like “deaf” have been reclaimed by bodies like the National Association of the Deaf in the US. The presence of the capital letter legitimises the term’s use, so long as it is done respectfully. In a similar way, various gender groups have reclaimed the word “queer”, and the fact they use it licenses others to do so too. The requirement for respectful and considerate speech is not just a matter of good manners; it has teeth. Governments, education systems, companies, societies and other bodies often have guidelines for language use for people with disabilities. Read more – Political correctness: its origins and the backlash against it The US National Institutes of Health recommends “intellectually and developmentally disabled” or “IDD” for people with Down syndrome. Bodies like Dementia Australia have language recommendations. Institutions and governments can apply a variety of sanctions to people who violate this principle in a persistent and hurtful way. These principles are now common in the English-speaking world and countries of the European Union, especially as enshrined in its Charter of Fundamental Rights. In little more than a generation and half, we have become a more caring and inclusive society, and one much more aware of the importance of avoiding hurtful language. We don’t always get the expression right. But we are getting better at seeing the effect of what we say and write from the point of view of others.


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 12

Reports State of the Disability Sector Report 2017 https://www.nds.org.au/news/state-of-the-disability-sector-report-2017-reflects-sectorunder-pressure

NDIS Costs – Productivity Commission Study Report – October 2017 https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/completed/ndis-costs/report/ndis-costs.pdf

Consultation Report – Review of the National Disability Advocacy Program – July 2017 https://independentadvocacy.org.au/upload/files/ConsultationReport-ReviewOfTheNDAPJuly2017.pdf

Useful Resources The National Disability Abuse and Neglect Hotline (The Hotline) – a telephone service for reporting cases of neglect and abuse of disabled members of the community. Hotline: 1800 880 052 TIS: 13 14 50 TTY: 1800 301 130 NRS: 1800 555 677 Email: hotline@workfocus.com For more information visit the Website: http://www.disabilityhotline.net.au/

Welcome to the Disability Lawyer. The goal of this site is to provide a searchable, indexed resource of information about disability and the law. http://www.thedisabilitylawyer.net.au/

NDIS Updates Queensland Government’s disability website www.qld.gov.au/disability Phone: 13 QGOV (13 74 68) Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services (Disability Services) www.communities.qld.gov.au/disability Phone: 13 QGOV (13 74 68) Email: disability@communities.qld.gov.au National Disability Insurance Agency www.ndis.gov.au Phone: 1800 800 110 Sign up to receive regular email updates at: www.ndis.gov.au/sign-updates


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 13

Management Committee President and Public Officer: ......................................... Michael Collins Vice-President ................................................................. Tania Hornberg Secretary: ....................................................................... Leanne Carmichael Treasurer: ....................................................................... Ross Kingsun Ordinary Members: ......................................................... Richard Cordukes

Staff Chief Executive Officer: .................................................. Deborah Wilson Advocate/NDIS Appeals Officers: ................................. Helen De-Campo Anne Hansen Joanna Mullins Junior Advocate: ............................................................. Jessie Taylor Office Administrator: ...................................................... Beverly Smith


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 14

Nothing about us without us! Organisations like IAT can only survive with the involvement of community. We know there are many people with skills and experience that would be an asset to our organisation. Membership is open to anybody who supports the values, mission, and work of this agency. It is from the membership that we draw our management committee, which is the governing body of our organisation. Therefore, we are especially interested in people who want to become involved, who could contribute by supporting the work we do and the values we hold. In return, IAT offers the opportunity to be involved expand on and develop skills and experience relating to the governance of an organisation, and to be involved with like-minded people in a supportive environment.

Mission Statement “To stand with vulnerable people with a disability through vigorous independent advocacy.”

What We Believe IAT believes all people have the right to:  Be treated with respect and dignity  Be valued as individuals  Participate in the decisions and choices that effect their lives  Be involved in and contribute to their community  Safety and protection from abuse, neglect and exploitation  Live the life they choose

Membership The membership of the Association has no limits on size and consists of Ordinary and Organisation Members. Ordinary - Ordinary membership shall be open to all interested persons in the community who support the mission and objects of the Association who apply for, and accepted for membership of the Association. Organisation - Organisation membership is open to organisations who are allies of the Association and do not have voting privileges.

What Membership Does Not Include:  Automatic or preferential approval for advocacy support – all members, should they require advocacy, would be subject to the same entry criteria and referral process as any other person requesting advocacy support  Automatic approval for membership of the management committee – any person nominating for membership of the management committee must nominate and address a set of selection criteria. This is to ensure that members are able to support the values of the organisation, and assists us to determine how we can assist the management committee members to increase their skills and knowledge in relation to the management of this organisation. If you would like to become a member of IAT, please complete one of the membership application forms at the back of this newsletter and return to the office for processing. If you would like to discuss membership or joining the management committee please call us on (07) 4725 2505 or toll free on 1800 887 688.


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 15

ORGANISATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM I would like to apply for an Organisation Membership of Independent Advocacy in the Tropics Inc. Organisation membership is open to organisations who are allies of the Association and do not have voting privileges. Organisation: Representative: Address:

Email: Office Phone:

Mobile:

Signed:

Date:

On completion, please return to the Secretary. 2/179-181 Ross River Road MUNDINGBURRA QLD 4812 PO Box 3067 HERMIT PARK QLD 4812

Phone: 1800 887 688 07) 4725 2505 Fax: 07) 4725 6106 E-mail: admin@iat.org.au

OFFICIAL USE ONLY Proposed by:

.........................................................

Signed: ...........................................

Seconded by:

.........................................................

Signed: ...........................................

Accepted by Meeting of the Management Committee. Date of Meeting: ......................................................


Christmas Office Closure

12:00pm 22 December 2017 till 8:30am 2 January 2018 Newsletter: December 2017

Page | 16

ORDINARY MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM I would like to apply for Ordinary Membership of Independent Advocacy in the Tropics Inc. Ordinary membership shall be open to all interested persons in the community who support the mission and objects of the Association who apply for, and accepted for membership of the Association.

Name: Address:

Email: Phone:

Date of Birth: ☐ Yes

Do you identify as a person with disability?

Signed:

☐ No

Date:

On completion, please return to the Secretary. 2/179-181 Ross River Road MUNDINGBURRA QLD 4812 PO Box 3067 HERMIT PARK QLD 4812

Phone: 1800 887 688 07) 4725 2505 Fax: 07) 4725 6106 E-mail: admin@iat.org.au

OFFICIAL USE ONLY Proposed by:

....................................................

Signed: ......................................

Seconded by:

....................................................

Signed: ......................................

Accepted by Meeting of the Management Committee. Date of Meeting: ...............................................

Profile for Independent Advocacy in the Tropics Inc.

December 2017 Newsletter  

Independent Advocacy Townsville's December 2017 Newsletter

December 2017 Newsletter  

Independent Advocacy Townsville's December 2017 Newsletter

Advertisement