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Modern Family

ON THE JOURNEY FROM KIDS TO TEENS My husband and I, obviously as journalists, are into the news, and now our kids quite often watch the news with us and we’ll have discussions as a family. The discussions have changed as they got older and we have much more broad-ranging, grown-up conversations now. When the whole Ghomeshi thing broke, we had a lot of conversations about sexual violence, and it was interesting to hear the different perspectives from our 13-year-old and 19-year-old girls, and then our 16-year-old boy. ON HOW TO STAY CLOSE When they were little, it was easy

10 inbetween

trying to raise polite children in a fairly rude culture is also a challenge. the division between adult world and kid world that existed when I was growing up just isn’t there. to say, “Hey, let’s go for a walk and get ice cream.” But now, to spend time with them, I’m competing with jobs, plus school, plus social lives and they’ve always got their devices out. It becomes a matter of finding things that we like to do together — for us, that includes watching The Walking Dead. ON CONSEQUENCES My youngest is crazy for sleepovers all the time, and I get really tired of the noise that tends to come along with teenage girls in the basement. “I’ll say something like, “It needs to be quiet now,” or “Make sure you clean up when it’s all done,” and if those things don’t happen to my satisfaction, then there (logically) won’t be sleepovers for another month. If you don’t get home on time, you’re grounded. Or, if I couldn’t reach them and they have a cellphone, maybe they don’t need a cellphone!

I try to match the consequences to the crime. ON THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BOYS AND GIRLS Both my daughters were sort of lower maintenance in the early years whereas my son was very active. He wasn’t a bad kid; he was just very energetic and busy so I found it more of a physical challenge looking after him, whereas the girls could do quieter things. In that regard, they were different. But in terms of emotional and psychological needs, they’re all the same. They all need to be told that they’re loved and valuable and they all need their cuddles. You sometimes forget, especially when they get older, that you still need to hug them every day. ON CHALLENGES None of them is what you’d call a shrinking violet, I’ll tell you

photography by agnes wywrot; agnes.wywrot@gmail.com

The Walsh/Kovacs family lives in Aurora, Ont. Patrick is the editor-in-chief of Outdoor Canada magazine and Jackie is a freelance journalist and contributing editor of INBETWEEN. Hayley, their oldest child, is in her second year studying journalism at Ryerson University. Riley is in Grade 11 and works part time at a local restaurant, and Molly is in Grade 8.

Profile for INBETWEEN Magazine

INBETWEEN Dec/Jan 2014-2015  

Our holiday issue is packed with fun stories crafted for every parent of a teen! Featuring stunning gift guides and getting glowing skin to...

INBETWEEN Dec/Jan 2014-2015  

Our holiday issue is packed with fun stories crafted for every parent of a teen! Featuring stunning gift guides and getting glowing skin to...