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Lovell wins major safety award

Lovell has recently been recognised for its contribution to the health and safety of employees. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) Major Award in the Housebuilding & Property Development Sector was presented in May to Lovell’s London Region, in recognition for the company’s work on accident reduction, as well as the quality of its health and safety management systems. RoSPA’s David Rawlins said: ‘Lovell Partnerships Ltd-London Region has shown a commitment to protecting the health and well-being of its employees and others. Entering the RoSPA Awards reinforces the message that good health and safety is good for business, and clearly demonstrates an organisation’s dedication to improving performance in this crucial area.’

TODAY

8 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

1 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust Patronage

Good Returns on Artistic Investment

The Group is pleased to confirm that it has recently become a corporate patron of the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT), which was founded in1946 by the late Sir Peter Scott. We anticipate that our association will offer great opportunities for both the WWT and the Group in future. In addition to providing eight Wetland Visitor Centres around the UK, the WWT offers a consultancy service that we can use to allow the Group to consider incorporating environmentally friendly wetland areas on future developments.

Investing in community art is an effective way of supporting local business, as well as providing a chance to reach out and develop relationships with local community stakeholders; as Morgan Sindall Investments (MSIL) have discovered.

There is also the opportunity for volunteering to help with the upkeep and continued development of the Centres, as well as the use of their conference facilities (in extremely tranquil surroundings) for meetings and seminars. The Group has a limited number of free tickets (initially 250) available for staff and their families to visit any of the WWT sites across the country, that we can distribute on a first come first served basis. Please contact Astu Tilahun: astu.tilahun@morgansindall.co.uk if you would like tickets.

MSIL frequently encourages the local community to create artwork for the division’s public sector developments and funding projects. At Community Solutions Primary Care Centres for example, by making spaces look brighter and more colourful, community art offers an invitation to enter a welcoming and relaxed environment in which to conduct business and engage with local community service providers. As a reflection of local taste, expression and craftsmanship, this type of art is a reminder to local users and residents that the building is there for them. Local art also helps create a sense of belonging and of ownership, which in turn promotes a commitment to care and responsible use over the long-term; adding to a sense of ownership, reducing vandalism and promoting sustainable use.

What Do You Think? We want your views on sustainability and the way sustainable construction is carried out in your division. Let the editorial team at Today have your ideas, comments and criticisms. You can email us at: today@morgansindall.co.uk We are keen to hear about achievements, projects that demonstrate sustainability in action, safety guidance, personnel stories and waste minimisation tips. In fact anything that you feel would be worth passing on to your colleagues; whether they work alongside you on site, or in a completely separate part of the Morgan Sindall Group. Today will also be available online later this summer; look out for details of Morgan Sindall’s new sustainability website.

Today is published by:

This newsletter is printed on Revive Uncoated – a recycled grade containing 100% post consumer waste and manufactured at a mill accredited with ISO 14001 environmental management standard

Morgan Sindall plc. Kent House 14-17 Market Place London W1W 8AJ Tel: 020 7307 9200 www.morgansindall.com email: today@morgansindall.com

MORGAN SINDALL’S POLICIES AND ACTIVITIES WILL NOT COMPROMISE THE NEEDS OF FUTURE GENERATIONS, THE PLANET OR FUTURE PROFITS.

summer 2009

DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

SUSTAINABILITY. WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT? PAUL WHITMORE

Paul Whitmore, Morgan Sindall’s Commercial Director and Head of Sustainability explains what sustainability means to the Morgan Sindall Group. ‘Sustainability’ is increasingly understood as a concept. It is used in an everyday sense to promote all types of products or services, from washing machines to tuna. As a concept and as an objective it is something that I believe we should all take an interest in both at a personal and at a corporate level. I’m pleased to say that it is increasingly becoming part of everyday life right across the Group. For us as a business, it means being able to meet the needs of today without putting future generations’ needs at risk. The actions we take today can influence not only the world we live in, but also the world that will be inherited by our children and our children’s children. We have to use precious natural resources with care. Water, energy and materials are hard won and all too easily wasted. There are three main elements to sustainable development on which we can all have a direct and positive impact; people, profit and planet – the three ‘p’s’. With the conviction

and engagement of all of us as individuals, as employees, as members of the construction industry and as global citizens, we can deliver surprisingly positive benefits in all three. In future editions of Today we will be reporting on things that you are already doing as well as things that we might decide to try, in all three areas. I’m sure that we all recognise and value a community where people can live, work and play, access healthcare, education and leisure facilities, and prosper. But we don’t get these things for nothing. Nature can only do so much. We all have a part to play in creating the environment and community in which we live, and that requires us to take an interest in what is going on around us, and sometimes to take action. Delivering Today for Tomorrow is Morgan Sindall’s new sustainability statement. It sums up, in just four words, the Group’s commitment to a more sustainable future. It embraces the things that characterise us as a Group. We are a diverse business, and diversity is a common theme running through ’Sustainability’. For Morgan Sindall, it is a characteristic that distinguishes us from the

competition. It is better to be a smart business than a big one. There is a natural energy and drive in our businesses that we need to harness and channel into learning more about how to make ‘Sustainability’ smart, so that we can enhance the things we are already good at. I believe that by adopting the principles that underpin Delivering Today for Tomorrow we will create and benefit from an increasingly successful future. I hope you enjoy reading Today. If you have ideas for future articles or would like to comment on any of the features covered in this issue, please contact our editorial team.

Delivering Today for Tomorrow Morgan Sindall is committed to delivering construction projects of the highest quality that will benefit society and stand the test of time. Our objective is to ensure that our employees, customers, suppliers and subcontractors are treated fairly and that every aspect of our business is conducted sustainably. Our policies and activities will not compromise the needs of future generations; environmentally, economically or socially. Morgan Sindall’s focus on acting today and delivering projects on behalf of its clients on a sustainable basis links it directly to the future well being of tomorrow’s society.


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2 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

IT’S ALL ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY 3

What is carbon anyway?

?

There’s plenty being written in the newspapers about carbon reduction. But what is carbon, why is it important to reduce it and how can that be done?

Carbon - The Big Issue A rise of just a few degrees in global temperatures brought about by climate change will have potentially catastrophic effects on habitats, sea levels and the population. In order to mitigate climate change, carbon emissions need to be cut. Morgan Sindall is committed to reducing carbon. There are two main areas where this can be achieved. First; in the Group’s own operations, including offices, transport and

People, Planet, Profit A popular way of looking at sustainability is to view it as: People, Planet, Profit. Successful projects are always a balance of these three things. Whether it’s a multi-million pound urban redevelopment, or deciding how to manage your own day’s work. People: for example: your fellow workers, clients, the local community Planet: waste, recycling, water and energy saving and the natural environment Profit: for you, your colleagues, the company and shareholders

site plant and second; in the provision of more energy efficient buildings for clients. In terms of low energy building projects, Morgan Sindall’s divisional companies are already contributing significantly to carbon reduction, for instance through the design and construction of BREEAM standard schools and public buildings, as well as low carbon housing. Closer to home, Morgan Sindall’s own activities have recently been extensively analysed to establish the Group’s current carbon footprint. The work, which was carried out by consultants IBM, supported by an internal team, will provide a starting point for reducing energy use and a better understanding of the way the company can manage carbon more effectively.

Graduates Play Key Role Four graduates, employees of Morgan Est, Morgan Ashurst, Lovell and Morgan Sindall discovered first hand how business activities and carbon emissions are linked, as part of their involvement in the Group’s Carbon Foot Print Project. ‘Carbon is connected to everything we do’ explained Astu Tilahun, a graduate at Morgan Sindall who has been gathering data

for the carbon footprint project. ‘This work has made me realise what we can all do to reduce emissions and how small changes in the way we work and use energy can add up to a big difference over a year’.

careful and methodical approach.’ Practical lessons learned in this first year, including easy indexing of utility bills on a site by site basis, will be fed back into the foot printing project.

Finding the data needed to accurately assess emissions was a challenge; according to Morgan Est’s Cleopatra Jones, a graduate in civil engineering. ‘The information is somewhere in the organisation, but finding it and then making sense of it required a

Ben Wolstenholme at Morgan Ashurst summed up the importance of the carbon footprinting work that he and fellow graduates have been undertaking. ‘The good thing about this project is that we have been able to identify where data collection is difficult. These areas will become the focus for attention when data gathering takes place again next year.’

The gas is emitted when fossil fuels such as coal or oil are burned to make energy; for example in a power station or in a car engine. Reducing carbon emissions is going to be crucial if we are to combat climate change. It is estimated that buildings use about 50% of all the energy consumed on the planet, so there’s a lot at stake – and the construction industry has a big part to play in providing both new and refurbished houses, offices and factories, as well as roads and other infrastructure. There are plenty of things we can do; individually and as an organisation, to reduce carbon. But first we need to know where we are today, which is why Morgan Sindall is measuring its carbon footprint.

TOP TIPS SAVE REDUCE IMPROVE

• Compressed air leaking through a small (5mm) hole could cost up to £14,000 per year.

By undertaking this review now, Morgan Sindall will be able to implement improvements well in advance of the forthcoming Carbon Reduction Commitment legislation. A major part of the IBM work involved gathering and analysing data from divisional companies. This important aspect of the project was undertaken by graduates working for each of the divisional businesses; providing them with a valuable opportunity for applied learning. The results of this review will be shared across the Group in early August 2009.

Carbon dioxide is one of many greenhouse gases that contributes to climate change. (Others – some of which are even more harmful than carbon – include methane and Clorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

Q: if 5 people in your workplace use an average of 8.5 polystyrene cups per day, how many tonnes of landfill will it make in 1 year? A: Too many. Take your own mug on-site.

• A 5mm drip from a single tap can cost more than £900 a year in water and wastewater treatment costs. CLEOPATRA JONES, BEN WOLSTENHOLME AND DANIELLE CLAYDON. THREE OF THE GRADUATES WHO ASSISTED IN THE IBM CARBON PROJECT

• For every tonne of household waste we produce; commercial, industrial and construction businesses produce another six tonnes.


IMS Morgan Sindall newsletter artwork:Layout 1 9/07/09 10:50 AM Page 2

2 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

IT’S ALL ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY 3

What is carbon anyway?

?

There’s plenty being written in the newspapers about carbon reduction. But what is carbon, why is it important to reduce it and how can that be done?

Carbon - The Big Issue A rise of just a few degrees in global temperatures brought about by climate change will have potentially catastrophic effects on habitats, sea levels and the population. In order to mitigate climate change, carbon emissions need to be cut. Morgan Sindall is committed to reducing carbon. There are two main areas where this can be achieved. First; in the Group’s own operations, including offices, transport and

People, Planet, Profit A popular way of looking at sustainability is to view it as: People, Planet, Profit. Successful projects are always a balance of these three things. Whether it’s a multi-million pound urban redevelopment, or deciding how to manage your own day’s work. People: for example: your fellow workers, clients, the local community Planet: waste, recycling, water and energy saving and the natural environment Profit: for you, your colleagues, the company and shareholders

site plant and second; in the provision of more energy efficient buildings for clients. In terms of low energy building projects, Morgan Sindall’s divisional companies are already contributing significantly to carbon reduction, for instance through the design and construction of BREEAM standard schools and public buildings, as well as low carbon housing. Closer to home, Morgan Sindall’s own activities have recently been extensively analysed to establish the Group’s current carbon footprint. The work, which was carried out by consultants IBM, supported by an internal team, will provide a starting point for reducing energy use and a better understanding of the way the company can manage carbon more effectively.

Graduates Play Key Role Four graduates, employees of Morgan Est, Morgan Ashurst, Lovell and Morgan Sindall discovered first hand how business activities and carbon emissions are linked, as part of their involvement in the Group’s Carbon Foot Print Project. ‘Carbon is connected to everything we do’ explained Astu Tilahun, a graduate at Morgan Sindall who has been gathering data

for the carbon footprint project. ‘This work has made me realise what we can all do to reduce emissions and how small changes in the way we work and use energy can add up to a big difference over a year’.

careful and methodical approach.’ Practical lessons learned in this first year, including easy indexing of utility bills on a site by site basis, will be fed back into the foot printing project.

Finding the data needed to accurately assess emissions was a challenge; according to Morgan Est’s Cleopatra Jones, a graduate in civil engineering. ‘The information is somewhere in the organisation, but finding it and then making sense of it required a

Ben Wolstenholme at Morgan Ashurst summed up the importance of the carbon footprinting work that he and fellow graduates have been undertaking. ‘The good thing about this project is that we have been able to identify where data collection is difficult. These areas will become the focus for attention when data gathering takes place again next year.’

The gas is emitted when fossil fuels such as coal or oil are burned to make energy; for example in a power station or in a car engine. Reducing carbon emissions is going to be crucial if we are to combat climate change. It is estimated that buildings use about 50% of all the energy consumed on the planet, so there’s a lot at stake – and the construction industry has a big part to play in providing both new and refurbished houses, offices and factories, as well as roads and other infrastructure. There are plenty of things we can do; individually and as an organisation, to reduce carbon. But first we need to know where we are today, which is why Morgan Sindall is measuring its carbon footprint.

TOP TIPS SAVE REDUCE IMPROVE

• Compressed air leaking through a small (5mm) hole could cost up to £14,000 per year.

By undertaking this review now, Morgan Sindall will be able to implement improvements well in advance of the forthcoming Carbon Reduction Commitment legislation. A major part of the IBM work involved gathering and analysing data from divisional companies. This important aspect of the project was undertaken by graduates working for each of the divisional businesses; providing them with a valuable opportunity for applied learning. The results of this review will be shared across the Group in early August 2009.

Carbon dioxide is one of many greenhouse gases that contributes to climate change. (Others – some of which are even more harmful than carbon – include methane and Clorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

Q: if 5 people in your workplace use an average of 8.5 polystyrene cups per day, how many tonnes of landfill will it make in 1 year? A: Too many. Take your own mug on-site.

• A 5mm drip from a single tap can cost more than £900 a year in water and wastewater treatment costs. CLEOPATRA JONES, BEN WOLSTENHOLME AND DANIELLE CLAYDON. THREE OF THE GRADUATES WHO ASSISTED IN THE IBM CARBON PROJECT

• For every tonne of household waste we produce; commercial, industrial and construction businesses produce another six tonnes.


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4 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

IT’S ALL ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY 5

‘It’s one thing having a safety policy or system in place. That’s not much use until everyone applies it; which is where the behavioural change work we’re involved in is so important. Across Morgan Sindall’s divisional companies the idea of changing behaviour is really taking hold. We might have different names for the initiative; it’s called Behavioural Based Safety at Morgan Est for example, but fundamentally we’re all working towards the same objective.’ MARTIN WORTHINGTON, SAFETY, HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT DIRECTOR MORGAN ASHURST.

Factory of the Future

Changing behaviour and engaging the workforce helps improve safety MARTIN WORTHINGTON

The construction industry is one of the most important economic sectors in the UK, providing employment through over 250,000 organisations.

Everyone Has a VOICE VOICE: Views of Operatives In the Construction Environment, is a way that all of us can improve health and safety on site. Bring your ideas to the next barbeque, breakfast meeting or site talk held as part of the VOICE scheme. Every suggestion is an important suggestion. We need to work together to reduce accidents and improve safety – at all levels.

It is also, according to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), one of the most dangerous industries to work in. Bringing about change in the way everyone treats risk and safety is a crucial aspect of all responsible employers’ activities. Nowhere is this more evident than in the work Morgan Sindall undertakes with a long term approach known as; Behavioural Change Worker Engagement. In partnership with the HSE, Morgan Sindall and other construction industry leaders are developing ways to ensure that safety improvements are not only identified but also acted upon by

Trojan Horse is full of good ideas for safety Workers on construction sites around the country are being given safety tips in pictorial format; thanks to a new initiative supported by Morgan Sindall.

and wrong way to go about a task and, because they are on the materials themselves, they act as a reminder immediately before a task is started.

The idea of a Trojan Horse, used by the Greeks to enter and defeat the city of Troy, has historically linked to trickery and deception. However, there is a more modern version of the Trojan Horse. Unlike the original it isn’t full of nasty surprises- but simple, effective safety ideas.

Morgan Sindall is actively promoting the use of these effective reminders of site safety. The Group recently funded the third phase of Trojan Horse, along with the Health and Safety Executive.

Images placed on materials, embedded in products, packaging or equipment are used to explain health and safety guidelines, as part of this Health and Safety Executive initiative. They say a picture tells a thousand words and, in many cases, pictorial images can be far more effective than a description; particularly when a message needs to be communicated quickly, simply and clearly; and often to workers whose first language may not be English. The Trojan Horse idea has been well received. The pictures demonstrate the right

staff and subcontractors at all levels. Ultimately, making health and safety information clear and simple is the key to success; as Martin Worthington says: ‘We’ve done a lot recently to get messages across in a memorable way. Site inductions are now geared to personal responsibility, as much as they are to regulations. Staff and contractors understand the importance of their personal safety. They want to know how they can contribute to make a construction site safer; for themselves and their fellow workers.’ You’ll all recognise this as part of the Work Safe, Home Safe ethos that has been adopted across the Group over the past five years.

MARK TURNER

Adopting the principles of Morgan Sindall’s sustainability commitment – Delivering Today for Tomorrow – design, engineering and project management specialists Morgan Professional Services are involved in one of the UK’s most ambitious industrial sustainability schemes; building the factory of the future. Funding of over £100 million was approved late last year for the development of a major aviation research programme, to be led by Airbus. The Next Generation Composite Wing (NGCW) is widely regarded as the most significant research and technology project of its kind to be undertaken for several decades. Seventeen of the UK’s most forward-thinking organisations, including MPS, have joined together to enable the design, development and manufacture of lightweight, more ecoefficient aircraft. MPS will be playing a big part in the design of the environmentally advanced factory, which will include innovative, low carbon construction methods and incorporate a range of energy efficient heating systems, water recycling and even green walls of live vegetation.

‘ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE MEANS WE MUST LOOK FOR NEW WAYS TO BUILD FACTORIES, SO THAT THEIR INITIAL CARBON FOOTPRINT IS MINIMISED. ONCE IN USE, TOMORROW’S FACTORIES WILL ALSO NEED TO BE ABLE TO DELIVER ENVIRONMENTALLY, SOCIALLY AND ECONOMICALLY.’

TOP TIPS TOP TIPS TO KEEP YOU SAFE; AT WORK AND AT HOME Personal Safety When Alone • Be visible. Wear high visibility jackets, use lights on bicycles and carry a torch if walking in unlit areas. •

Think ahead, consider your activity or journey and have a plan of action ready for any foreseeable problems.

Hide any objects that may be desirable to others – laptops, mobile phones, handbags.

MARK TURNER HEAD OF SUSTAINABILITY AT MPS

The MPS factory of the future will be constructed largely offsite and assembled using prefabricated modules, to minimise transport costs, materials wastage and site time. Once built, the factory’s own thermal mass will be used to help control temperature, while collected rain water will be used to cool the south facing walls during the summer. The innovative design and build techniques being incorporated in the factory of the future will also benefit forthcoming housing and office projects.

Manual Handling • Always use mechanical handling methods if possible. •

Know your capabilities. Get assistance if required.

Plan the lift and ensure the route is clear and well lit.

Don’t guess: where possible, establish the weight of the load before lifting.

These Tips are extracts from the Morgan Sindall Group health and safety guidance; copies available from your Health and Safety Manager.


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IT’S ALL ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY 5

‘It’s one thing having a safety policy or system in place. That’s not much use until everyone applies it; which is where the behavioural change work we’re involved in is so important. Across Morgan Sindall’s divisional companies the idea of changing behaviour is really taking hold. We might have different names for the initiative; it’s called Behavioural Based Safety at Morgan Est for example, but fundamentally we’re all working towards the same objective.’ MARTIN WORTHINGTON, SAFETY, HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT DIRECTOR MORGAN ASHURST.

Factory of the Future

Changing behaviour and engaging the workforce helps improve safety MARTIN WORTHINGTON

The construction industry is one of the most important economic sectors in the UK, providing employment through over 250,000 organisations.

Everyone Has a VOICE VOICE: Views of Operatives In the Construction Environment, is a way that all of us can improve health and safety on site. Bring your ideas to the next barbeque, breakfast meeting or site talk held as part of the VOICE scheme. Every suggestion is an important suggestion. We need to work together to reduce accidents and improve safety – at all levels.

It is also, according to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), one of the most dangerous industries to work in. Bringing about change in the way everyone treats risk and safety is a crucial aspect of all responsible employers’ activities. Nowhere is this more evident than in the work Morgan Sindall undertakes with a long term approach known as; Behavioural Change Worker Engagement. In partnership with the HSE, Morgan Sindall and other construction industry leaders are developing ways to ensure that safety improvements are not only identified but also acted upon by

Trojan Horse is full of good ideas for safety Workers on construction sites around the country are being given safety tips in pictorial format; thanks to a new initiative supported by Morgan Sindall.

and wrong way to go about a task and, because they are on the materials themselves, they act as a reminder immediately before a task is started.

The idea of a Trojan Horse, used by the Greeks to enter and defeat the city of Troy, has historically linked to trickery and deception. However, there is a more modern version of the Trojan Horse. Unlike the original it isn’t full of nasty surprises- but simple, effective safety ideas.

Morgan Sindall is actively promoting the use of these effective reminders of site safety. The Group recently funded the third phase of Trojan Horse, along with the Health and Safety Executive.

Images placed on materials, embedded in products, packaging or equipment are used to explain health and safety guidelines, as part of this Health and Safety Executive initiative. They say a picture tells a thousand words and, in many cases, pictorial images can be far more effective than a description; particularly when a message needs to be communicated quickly, simply and clearly; and often to workers whose first language may not be English. The Trojan Horse idea has been well received. The pictures demonstrate the right

staff and subcontractors at all levels. Ultimately, making health and safety information clear and simple is the key to success; as Martin Worthington says: ‘We’ve done a lot recently to get messages across in a memorable way. Site inductions are now geared to personal responsibility, as much as they are to regulations. Staff and contractors understand the importance of their personal safety. They want to know how they can contribute to make a construction site safer; for themselves and their fellow workers.’ You’ll all recognise this as part of the Work Safe, Home Safe ethos that has been adopted across the Group over the past five years.

MARK TURNER

Adopting the principles of Morgan Sindall’s sustainability commitment – Delivering Today for Tomorrow – design, engineering and project management specialists Morgan Professional Services are involved in one of the UK’s most ambitious industrial sustainability schemes; building the factory of the future. Funding of over £100 million was approved late last year for the development of a major aviation research programme, to be led by Airbus. The Next Generation Composite Wing (NGCW) is widely regarded as the most significant research and technology project of its kind to be undertaken for several decades. Seventeen of the UK’s most forward-thinking organisations, including MPS, have joined together to enable the design, development and manufacture of lightweight, more ecoefficient aircraft. MPS will be playing a big part in the design of the environmentally advanced factory, which will include innovative, low carbon construction methods and incorporate a range of energy efficient heating systems, water recycling and even green walls of live vegetation.

‘ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE MEANS WE MUST LOOK FOR NEW WAYS TO BUILD FACTORIES, SO THAT THEIR INITIAL CARBON FOOTPRINT IS MINIMISED. ONCE IN USE, TOMORROW’S FACTORIES WILL ALSO NEED TO BE ABLE TO DELIVER ENVIRONMENTALLY, SOCIALLY AND ECONOMICALLY.’

TOP TIPS TOP TIPS TO KEEP YOU SAFE; AT WORK AND AT HOME Personal Safety When Alone • Be visible. Wear high visibility jackets, use lights on bicycles and carry a torch if walking in unlit areas. •

Think ahead, consider your activity or journey and have a plan of action ready for any foreseeable problems.

Hide any objects that may be desirable to others – laptops, mobile phones, handbags.

MARK TURNER HEAD OF SUSTAINABILITY AT MPS

The MPS factory of the future will be constructed largely offsite and assembled using prefabricated modules, to minimise transport costs, materials wastage and site time. Once built, the factory’s own thermal mass will be used to help control temperature, while collected rain water will be used to cool the south facing walls during the summer. The innovative design and build techniques being incorporated in the factory of the future will also benefit forthcoming housing and office projects.

Manual Handling • Always use mechanical handling methods if possible. •

Know your capabilities. Get assistance if required.

Plan the lift and ensure the route is clear and well lit.

Don’t guess: where possible, establish the weight of the load before lifting.

These Tips are extracts from the Morgan Sindall Group health and safety guidance; copies available from your Health and Safety Manager.


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6 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

IT’S ALL ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY 7

‘THE IDEA IS THAT WE HELP EACH SCHOOL TO BRING ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION INTO THEIR TEACHING; MAKING IT RELEVANT AND EXCITING.’ LEE FERRIDAY MORGAN EST

THIS RECENT OVERBURY PROJECT USED WOOD FROM 100% FSC AND PEFC CERTIFIED SOURCES. CHARLIE WALLIS’ COMMITMENT TO WASTE REDUCTION IS RECOGNISED BY GY WOODSTOCK, A LOCAL SOCIAL ENTERPRISE MIND CHARITY AFFILIATED TO THE NATIONAL COMMUNITY WOOD RECYCLING PROJECT.

Wood’s good for everyone Timber is a natural resource which can be used sustainably, provided it is properly managed. Unfortunately, illegal logging, particularly of hardwoods, is destroying wildlife habitats and robbing the planet of valuable carbon sinks.

Next time you and your colleagues pick up a complete sheet of plywood, roof truss or joist, think about where it came from. The FSC logo is a guarantee that the timber has been sourced from a responsible supplier. Poor forest management, illegal logging and the use of scarce, slowgrowing hardwoods is a big problem, particularly in parts of Asia. FSC is an independent, non-governmental, not for profit organization established to promote the responsible management of the world’s forests. Morgan Sindall’s timber suppliers are all FSC or similarly accredited.

Schemes such as the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and Programme for Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) exist to ensure that the chain of custody of timber can be verified. Morgan Sindall purchases timber for use in a wide variety of jobs; ranging from high quality interior refurbishments to concrete shuttering. The Group has a big part to play in ensuring that timber is sourced and managed responsibly, which is why the purchasing policy is to obtain materials certified under FSC or PEFC wherever available. It is one of the first organisations in the construction sector to procure timber centrally, with a full chain of custody available on every invoice. Directly purchased timber accounted for 94% of the wood used in 2008. Of course, wood pulp is also used to make paper, where the same standards can be applied to stationery and other printed material. (Just take a look at the logo on the back page of this copy of Today.) Refurbishments, such as those undertaken by the Fit Out division, often require large quantities of timber. These provide an

excellent opportunity to practice sustainable procurement and recycling on the same project. Working in close co-operation with their client, Overbury achieved a 99.5% use of certified timber, when they recently refurbished Deloitte’s New Street Square offices in London. Wood recycling is being actively encouraged by Morgan Ashurst, who are now part of a framework agreement with the National Community Wood Recycling Project; a social enterprise that not only recovers and recycles waste wood, but also creates jobs for vulnerable members of the local community. Elsewhere in Morgan Ashurst, a Site Waste Champion by the name of Charlie Wallis was appointed to help transform the way people viewed scrap wood at the £9.3 million Sewell Park College development. Charlie and his colleagues successfully engaged the site workforce in a number of activities designed to reduce waste and, wherever possible, stream it so that material could be recycled or recovered. Charlie has taken his responsibilities to heart. Not only has he succeeded in getting his colleagues to appreciate the importance, environmentally and economically, of waste streaming; he has also been seen instructing carpenters to de-nail scrap wood before recycling both the wood and the metal nails.

100 Club for tomorrow’s civil engineers A key aspect of sustainable development is the way we treat the planet and resources today, in order to leave it in a fit state for future generations. Wouldn’t it be good to extend this philosophy to the career opportunities for our children and our grandchildren? The construction industry is faced with a talent shortage. Encouraging school leavers and graduates to choose a career in the business is important. It calls for a hands-on approach to raising awareness and interest for the opportunities available. No one is more aware of this need than Lee Ferriday, who chairs the Learning and Development Advisory Panel at Morgan Est’s Rugby office. An ex head-teacher who currently advises local authorities on schools, Lee knows first hand what needs be done to encourage youngsters to choose a career in construction. One example of what can be achieved is a new Morgan Est initiative beginning this summer. The 100 Club is designed to engage 10 schools across the country, each of which will be assigned two engineering graduates to provide curriculum support to teachers. The 100 Club has been designed to provide an ongoing partnership with schools; helping pupils to understand more about civil engineering and giving them the opportunity to sample first-hand what it is like to work in the industry. ‘This isn’t about a school visit once a term. There’s a great deal more to the idea.’ Lee said. During the autumn, each school will be asked to select 10 pupils who

TODAY’S SCHOOL PUPILS CAN BECOME TOMORROW’S APPRENTICES; THANKS TO SCHEMES LIKE MORGAN EST’S 100 CLUB AND LOVELL’S APPRENTICESHIP SCHEME AND SCHOOLS’ INITIATIVE

have shown an aptitude for engineering and could benefit from further training and support. (Ten pupils from 10 schools; hence the 100 Club). These 14 to 19 year-olds will then be offered the chance to take part in a four day residential course, where they will be given the opportunity to sample civil engineering in a ‘hands-on’ way. ‘It’s invaluable experience, and hopefully something that the pupils will remember for years. If we can get some of them thinking about a career in engineering; we’ve achieved our objective.’ concluded Lee.

+3 and the bear gets it. ... a rise of 3 degrees is likely to trigger ‘catastrophic consequences’ including the loss of a third of the world’s species and a sea level rise that will threaten millions of lives. Can you really ignore that?

Every action

YOU take to minimise global warming WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE.


IMS Morgan Sindall newsletter artwork:Layout 1 9/07/09 10:50 AM Page 6

6 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

IT’S ALL ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY 7

‘THE IDEA IS THAT WE HELP EACH SCHOOL TO BRING ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION INTO THEIR TEACHING; MAKING IT RELEVANT AND EXCITING.’ LEE FERRIDAY MORGAN EST

THIS RECENT OVERBURY PROJECT USED WOOD FROM 100% FSC AND PEFC CERTIFIED SOURCES. CHARLIE WALLIS’ COMMITMENT TO WASTE REDUCTION IS RECOGNISED BY GY WOODSTOCK, A LOCAL SOCIAL ENTERPRISE MIND CHARITY AFFILIATED TO THE NATIONAL COMMUNITY WOOD RECYCLING PROJECT.

Wood’s good for everyone Timber is a natural resource which can be used sustainably, provided it is properly managed. Unfortunately, illegal logging, particularly of hardwoods, is destroying wildlife habitats and robbing the planet of valuable carbon sinks.

Next time you and your colleagues pick up a complete sheet of plywood, roof truss or joist, think about where it came from. The FSC logo is a guarantee that the timber has been sourced from a responsible supplier. Poor forest management, illegal logging and the use of scarce, slowgrowing hardwoods is a big problem, particularly in parts of Asia. FSC is an independent, non-governmental, not for profit organization established to promote the responsible management of the world’s forests. Morgan Sindall’s timber suppliers are all FSC or similarly accredited.

Schemes such as the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and Programme for Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) exist to ensure that the chain of custody of timber can be verified. Morgan Sindall purchases timber for use in a wide variety of jobs; ranging from high quality interior refurbishments to concrete shuttering. The Group has a big part to play in ensuring that timber is sourced and managed responsibly, which is why the purchasing policy is to obtain materials certified under FSC or PEFC wherever available. It is one of the first organisations in the construction sector to procure timber centrally, with a full chain of custody available on every invoice. Directly purchased timber accounted for 94% of the wood used in 2008. Of course, wood pulp is also used to make paper, where the same standards can be applied to stationery and other printed material. (Just take a look at the logo on the back page of this copy of Today.) Refurbishments, such as those undertaken by the Fit Out division, often require large quantities of timber. These provide an

excellent opportunity to practice sustainable procurement and recycling on the same project. Working in close co-operation with their client, Overbury achieved a 99.5% use of certified timber, when they recently refurbished Deloitte’s New Street Square offices in London. Wood recycling is being actively encouraged by Morgan Ashurst, who are now part of a framework agreement with the National Community Wood Recycling Project; a social enterprise that not only recovers and recycles waste wood, but also creates jobs for vulnerable members of the local community. Elsewhere in Morgan Ashurst, a Site Waste Champion by the name of Charlie Wallis was appointed to help transform the way people viewed scrap wood at the £9.3 million Sewell Park College development. Charlie and his colleagues successfully engaged the site workforce in a number of activities designed to reduce waste and, wherever possible, stream it so that material could be recycled or recovered. Charlie has taken his responsibilities to heart. Not only has he succeeded in getting his colleagues to appreciate the importance, environmentally and economically, of waste streaming; he has also been seen instructing carpenters to de-nail scrap wood before recycling both the wood and the metal nails.

100 Club for tomorrow’s civil engineers A key aspect of sustainable development is the way we treat the planet and resources today, in order to leave it in a fit state for future generations. Wouldn’t it be good to extend this philosophy to the career opportunities for our children and our grandchildren? The construction industry is faced with a talent shortage. Encouraging school leavers and graduates to choose a career in the business is important. It calls for a hands-on approach to raising awareness and interest for the opportunities available. No one is more aware of this need than Lee Ferriday, who chairs the Learning and Development Advisory Panel at Morgan Est’s Rugby office. An ex head-teacher who currently advises local authorities on schools, Lee knows first hand what needs be done to encourage youngsters to choose a career in construction. One example of what can be achieved is a new Morgan Est initiative beginning this summer. The 100 Club is designed to engage 10 schools across the country, each of which will be assigned two engineering graduates to provide curriculum support to teachers. The 100 Club has been designed to provide an ongoing partnership with schools; helping pupils to understand more about civil engineering and giving them the opportunity to sample first-hand what it is like to work in the industry. ‘This isn’t about a school visit once a term. There’s a great deal more to the idea.’ Lee said. During the autumn, each school will be asked to select 10 pupils who

TODAY’S SCHOOL PUPILS CAN BECOME TOMORROW’S APPRENTICES; THANKS TO SCHEMES LIKE MORGAN EST’S 100 CLUB AND LOVELL’S APPRENTICESHIP SCHEME AND SCHOOLS’ INITIATIVE

have shown an aptitude for engineering and could benefit from further training and support. (Ten pupils from 10 schools; hence the 100 Club). These 14 to 19 year-olds will then be offered the chance to take part in a four day residential course, where they will be given the opportunity to sample civil engineering in a ‘hands-on’ way. ‘It’s invaluable experience, and hopefully something that the pupils will remember for years. If we can get some of them thinking about a career in engineering; we’ve achieved our objective.’ concluded Lee.

+3 and the bear gets it. ... a rise of 3 degrees is likely to trigger ‘catastrophic consequences’ including the loss of a third of the world’s species and a sea level rise that will threaten millions of lives. Can you really ignore that?

Every action

YOU take to minimise global warming WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE.


IMS Morgan Sindall newsletter artwork:Layout 1 9/07/09 10:50 AM Page 1

Lovell wins major safety award

Lovell has recently been recognised for its contribution to the health and safety of employees. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) Major Award in the Housebuilding & Property Development Sector was presented in May to Lovell’s London Region, in recognition for the company’s work on accident reduction, as well as the quality of its health and safety management systems. RoSPA’s David Rawlins said: ‘Lovell Partnerships Ltd-London Region has shown a commitment to protecting the health and well-being of its employees and others. Entering the RoSPA Awards reinforces the message that good health and safety is good for business, and clearly demonstrates an organisation’s dedication to improving performance in this crucial area.’

TODAY

8 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

1 DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust Patronage

Good Returns on Artistic Investment

The Group is pleased to confirm that it has recently become a corporate patron of the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT), which was founded in1946 by the late Sir Peter Scott. We anticipate that our association will offer great opportunities for both the WWT and the Group in future. In addition to providing eight Wetland Visitor Centres around the UK, the WWT offers a consultancy service that we can use to allow the Group to consider incorporating environmentally friendly wetland areas on future developments.

Investing in community art is an effective way of supporting local business, as well as providing a chance to reach out and develop relationships with local community stakeholders; as Morgan Sindall Investments (MSIL) have discovered.

There is also the opportunity for volunteering to help with the upkeep and continued development of the Centres, as well as the use of their conference facilities (in extremely tranquil surroundings) for meetings and seminars. The Group has a limited number of free tickets (initially 250) available for staff and their families to visit any of the WWT sites across the country, that we can distribute on a first come first served basis. Please contact Astu Tilahun: astu.tilahun@morgansindall.co.uk if you would like tickets.

MSIL frequently encourages the local community to create artwork for the division’s public sector developments and funding projects. At Community Solutions Primary Care Centres for example, by making spaces look brighter and more colourful, community art offers an invitation to enter a welcoming and relaxed environment in which to conduct business and engage with local community service providers. As a reflection of local taste, expression and craftsmanship, this type of art is a reminder to local users and residents that the building is there for them. Local art also helps create a sense of belonging and of ownership, which in turn promotes a commitment to care and responsible use over the long-term; adding to a sense of ownership, reducing vandalism and promoting sustainable use.

What Do You Think? We want your views on sustainability and the way sustainable construction is carried out in your division. Let the editorial team at Today have your ideas, comments and criticisms. You can email us at: today@morgansindall.co.uk We are keen to hear about achievements, projects that demonstrate sustainability in action, safety guidance, personnel stories and waste minimisation tips. In fact anything that you feel would be worth passing on to your colleagues; whether they work alongside you on site, or in a completely separate part of the Morgan Sindall Group. Today will also be available online later this summer; look out for details of Morgan Sindall’s new sustainability website.

Today is published by:

This newsletter is printed on Revive Uncoated – a recycled grade containing 100% post consumer waste and manufactured at a mill accredited with ISO 14001 environmental management standard

Morgan Sindall plc. Kent House 14-17 Market Place London W1W 8AJ Tel: 020 7307 9200 www.morgansindall.com email: today@morgansindall.com

MORGAN SINDALL’S POLICIES AND ACTIVITIES WILL NOT COMPROMISE THE NEEDS OF FUTURE GENERATIONS, THE PLANET OR FUTURE PROFITS.

summer 2009

DELIVERING TODAY FOR TOMORROW

SUSTAINABILITY. WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT? PAUL WHITMORE

Paul Whitmore, Morgan Sindall’s Commercial Director and Head of Sustainability explains what sustainability means to the Morgan Sindall Group. ‘Sustainability’ is increasingly understood as a concept. It is used in an everyday sense to promote all types of products or services, from washing machines to tuna. As a concept and as an objective it is something that I believe we should all take an interest in both at a personal and at a corporate level. I’m pleased to say that it is increasingly becoming part of everyday life right across the Group. For us as a business, it means being able to meet the needs of today without putting future generations’ needs at risk. The actions we take today can influence not only the world we live in, but also the world that will be inherited by our children and our children’s children. We have to use precious natural resources with care. Water, energy and materials are hard won and all too easily wasted. There are three main elements to sustainable development on which we can all have a direct and positive impact; people, profit and planet – the three ‘p’s’. With the conviction

and engagement of all of us as individuals, as employees, as members of the construction industry and as global citizens, we can deliver surprisingly positive benefits in all three. In future editions of Today we will be reporting on things that you are already doing as well as things that we might decide to try, in all three areas. I’m sure that we all recognise and value a community where people can live, work and play, access healthcare, education and leisure facilities, and prosper. But we don’t get these things for nothing. Nature can only do so much. We all have a part to play in creating the environment and community in which we live, and that requires us to take an interest in what is going on around us, and sometimes to take action. Delivering Today for Tomorrow is Morgan Sindall’s new sustainability statement. It sums up, in just four words, the Group’s commitment to a more sustainable future. It embraces the things that characterise us as a Group. We are a diverse business, and diversity is a common theme running through ’Sustainability’. For Morgan Sindall, it is a characteristic that distinguishes us from the

competition. It is better to be a smart business than a big one. There is a natural energy and drive in our businesses that we need to harness and channel into learning more about how to make ‘Sustainability’ smart, so that we can enhance the things we are already good at. I believe that by adopting the principles that underpin Delivering Today for Tomorrow we will create and benefit from an increasingly successful future. I hope you enjoy reading Today. If you have ideas for future articles or would like to comment on any of the features covered in this issue, please contact our editorial team.

Delivering Today for Tomorrow Morgan Sindall is committed to delivering construction projects of the highest quality that will benefit society and stand the test of time. Our objective is to ensure that our employees, customers, suppliers and subcontractors are treated fairly and that every aspect of our business is conducted sustainably. Our policies and activities will not compromise the needs of future generations; environmentally, economically or socially. Morgan Sindall’s focus on acting today and delivering projects on behalf of its clients on a sustainable basis links it directly to the future well being of tomorrow’s society.


Issue 1 - Today - Summer 2009