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Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Friday, May 2, 2008

vol 31, no 1

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

New director, renewed direction for UW Athletics UW alumnus Bob Copeland takes the helm, page 19

Message to WPIRG-backed Food Not Bombs:

“You are hereby instructed to

Cease and desist free food distribution at Civic Square and not resume such services without appealing to and obtaining permission from City Council.”

Andrew Abela staff reporter

Dylan Cawker

Kitchener Civic Square is where WPIRG action group Food Not Bombs serves free vegetarian meals every Saturday afternoon beside Williams Coffee Pub.

Food Not Bombs — a volunteer action group of a UW organization — has been told to cease and desist giving out free food outside of Kitchener City Hall. Food Not Bombs is an action group of the Waterloo Public Interest Research Group (WPIRG) that seeks to “provide free hot vegetarian meals for those in need while drawing attention to the vast wasted investment of the state in military expenditures and war,” according to their website. On April 12, the group received a cease and desist order from Kitchener city clerk Randy Gosse. The demand was issued due to a complaint made by one or more businesses concerning “the negative impacts of free food distribution in the Civic Square on area business” the letter stated. Complaints of this nature invoke policy I495 which requires the mentioned group to halt food distribution and not continue the service without appealing to and obtaining permission from City Council. Policy I-495 was approved by council back in 1999 — the same year Food Not Bombs was reactivated as a WPIRG action group and began its service in Kitchener. Gosse noted that City Council has never had to invoke this policy before. Food Not Bombs will be appealing the decision to City Council on Monday, May 5. Food Not Bombs volunteer and UW Health Studies and Gerontology professor Kelly Anthony and a few others will be “formally explaining to City Council and everyone present what Food Not Bombs does, what the charge against us appears to be and why we will continue serving despite the request to cease and desist,” Anthony explained.

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Concerning the grounds for complaint, WPIRG representative Evan Coole explained that “they’ve never given us the specific complaint; they’ve referenced some general behaviours such as aggressive panhandling, fighting and blocking of sidewalk, but they can’t reference specific incidents of any of these behaviours and they haven’t given us any dates.” Coole added that “some of these behaviours, like aggressive panhandling and fighting, are against municipal law and there is no record of police visits or police complaints.” Since 1999, Food Not Bombs has served free food and produce every Saturday afternoon to approximately 50 members of the community with the support of volunteer students, professors and others below the roof shared by Williams Coffee Pub in Civic Square. They use ingredients that would have otherwise been thrown away by local businesses such as Central Market. Coole described that “in 1999 there was a complaint by Williams Coffee Pub at City Hall, and after that the municipal council tried to pass a bylaw banning free food distribution. “It sort of came down to more of a matter of not wanting food distribution that would specifically target people who are poor and homeless.” Owner of the Civic Square location of Williams Coffee Pub Lyvia K. disclosed that she didn’t make a complaint this time since “those people who are getting free food [are] not affecting us; they can’t afford to come into the restaurant.” When asked about the frequency of the violations described in the letter, volunteer Anthony recounted that she has “spoken with everyone who has been involved over the past couple of years and no one remembers anything violent.”

Learn more at

See FOOD, page 5

!

www.retailservices.uwaterloo.ca/green


News

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

The new green routine

UW Food Services slated to open Eco-Café Kathryn Gwun-Yeen Lennon reporter

T

his September, when your stomach rumbles for fresh, local, organic food, you will be able to satisfy it on campus. Development for Food Service’s new Eco-Café is underway. It will be housed in the School of Accounting, attached to Hagey Hall. With a focus on a healthy body and a healthy environment, the café will offer up wholesome food produced with seasonably available local ingredients, some organic food, fresh smoothies, soup, fruit, and fair trade products. Rather than bottled water, it will provide a filtered water tap for water bottle refill. The café is an effort by Food Services to move in an environmentally responsible direction, and respond to consumer demand. UW Food Services director Lee Elkas said, “This is a unique and innovative outlet for UW Food Services that offers something different to students, staff and faculty who are looking for products and meals that they feel good about consuming…A large percentage of consumers feel good about purchasing products that are good for environment and good for their bodies.” The goal is to create a space that embodies sustainability. From the

Spoon, a student-run vegetarian restaurant at Trent University, in Peterborough. “I thought we could easily do something that is more friendly to the environment, and which makes a statement to the university that food services is committed to sustainable things.” The Eco-Café may also open up opportunities for further collaboration between Food Services, students, and community members. Food initiatives on campus and in the community include Food Not Bombs, the Community Garden, the Food Issues Group, the Fair-Trade Action Group, UW Vegetarians, the Conviviality Group, and Foodlink. More university and college food services operations across Canada and the United States are making an effort to support local and environmentally responsible food economies. In September 2006, the University of Toronto partnered with Local Food Plus, an awardwinning organization that connects local farmers to purchasers to foster and build sustainable food systems. More fresh Ontario food made it to the tables in university residences and cafeterias. Elkas is aware of the broader food security context. It is important that “if sometime down the road there is

from the Elmira Produce Auction Cooperative. Food Services presented the EcoCafé idea to the building and construction committee for the School of Accountancy and their architect. With their support, Elkas has been working closely with his two assistant directors, Jeff Chalmers and Danny Lee, to develop the unit and concepts. Chalmers will oversee construction while Lee and his chefs will develop the menu and product selections. Roland Lynn is the assistant catering chef developing menus for the new unit.

End of term blazes rock Ezra Avenue Chris Miller staff reporter

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olice and firefighters were called into Ezra Avenue on Saturday night to attend to numerous fires believed to be set by university students celebrating the end of the school year. Along the student-populated street, located minutes away from the Wilfrid Laurier campus, furniture and garbage were set afire in four instances between midnight and 4 a.m. Fire bombs were also reportedly thrown down from balconies in some instances. The damage is estimated to be at least $15,000. Waterloo Regional Police describe the event as a “near-riot” – the worst in 29 years according to the head field officer – and fingered post-exam partiers as the culprits. “We believe university students started the fires,” said Staff Sgt. Rudy Smith. Police forces had difficulty entering the area due to debris, which has eventually taken away by two tractor trailers. Both students and police agreed that this year’s festivities exceeded the typical boundaries. “We normally get called to end of the school year parties which can get out of control but this was unusual,”

“I thought we could easily do something that is more friendly to the environment.” — Lee Elkas, Food Services Director food it serves, to countertops made of reusable, recyclable materials, Elkas said, “we want to make sure that what we introduce is sustainable in ideas and logic, not just a passing fad.” Elkas also sees the café as a place where Food Services will be able to try out new products, which can be introduced across campus if customers like them. Elkas was inspired by the Seasoned

a gas shortage and we can’t bring in food from California, that we have a sustainable food system that will help us meet our basic needs”. Waterloo Region is home to many farms, so fresh, local produce is readily available. Food Services already partners with students to bring the UW Farm Market to campus in the spring and fall. Produce is sourced

Maggie Clark editor-in-chief

Student’s suicide renews debate over medical privacy rights There was no happy outcome for the family of Nadia Kajouji when a month-and-a-half-long hunt for the Carleton University undergrad ended with the discovery of her body in the Rideau River. According to the Ottawa Citizen, Kajouji had been undergoing counselling, struggling in school, and taking anti-depressants prior to her March 9, 2008 disappearance. But due to patient confidentiality laws, her family only learned these details after Kajouji went missing. Her grieving parents went on to blame Carleton University for her loss, saying that the institution should have done more to inform them of her depression. This accusation has since set off a renewed discussion, spanning National Post op-ed pages and an open forum in the Toronto Star, about balancing privacy and protection with regard to the mental health of university students, who are viewed as an especially vulnerable group. Kajouji was 18 — an adult in the eyes of the law, which binds counsellors to privacy with regard to the details of their patients’ cases. Even without the on-going social implications of this incident,

the April 23 identification of Kajouji’s body — and with it, the confirmed loss of someone the Brampton Guardian called an “outgoing, happy, intelligent” first year public affairs and policy management student — leaves a pronounced impact on friends, family, and the university community at large.

14 UofT students, campus community members charged after protesting fee increase If you ask the protestors, they’ll say they were the victims of police brutality on March 20, when the New College Student Council (allied with a group called “AlwaysQuestion”) staged what they term a “peaceful sit-in” in Simcoe Hall, only to have campus police forcefully remove them. But university officials told Maclean’s and the Torontoist a different story — one of “harrassment and provocation,” according to Torontoist writer David Topping — and have since pressed charges on 14 U of T students and staff in relation to the incident. The NCSC was protesting a residence fee increase of, according to their numbers, 20 to 23 per cent. They staged the sit-in hoping to garner the attention of U of T president David Naylor, and to arrange a time and place to express their concerns more formally. But initial news reports expressed confusion as to the focus of this event, with everything from the war in Afghanistan,

said Smith. Graduating Laurier student Vince Avati added, “It gets really loud some times. But it was just insane last night.” On the contrary, however, Ezra Avenue has been the source of ruckus in the past. In 1994, the street known as Waterloo’s “student ghetto” became the site of an infamous party that snowballed into an all-out riot, leading to one student being injured by a chunk of thrown concrete. Yet Ezra has changed substantially in the last decade, with its older homes giving way to apartment buildings over the last two years, though it seems that the recent renovations have done little to quell the boisterous atmosphere. In fact, some have suggested the renovations have worsened the situation, such as resident Dwight Schmidt, who feels that cramming even more students onto one street fuels the problems. Much of the change was the product of landowner Sean French, proprietor of Studenthouses.ca, who oversaw the demolition of older houses and the erection of four new housing complexes. The other major change following the 1994 riot was the creation of an on-campus party beginning in 1996, which continues to operate as an alternative to private parties and is billed as a “controlled and safe way to let off post-examination stress.” This year’s on-campus party was held on Saturday evening, shortly before the fires took place. Laurier’s officials have refused to comment on the incident, but Martin Van Nierop, the University of Waterloo’s director of communications, commented that he was unsure whether any UW students live on Ezra Avenue, which has typically been home to Laurier’s community. As of Sunday, the street bore little evidence of damage, and no one has yet been charged for the fires. cmiller@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

sonia lee

Palestinian solidarity, and the price of Second Cup coffee finding its way into the protestors’ dialogue before university senior officials asked the campus police to remove participants. Readers are encouraged to watch video of the event, titled “Police violence ends student sit-in at University of Toronto” on YouTube, and decide for themselves what happened next.

Criminal charges and academic sanctions were accompanied by strict bail conditions banning the individuals from setting foot on university property, and from associating with one another outside of court and classes. How these students are to attend class was not explained. editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

One year later

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uring UW’s exam season, Virginia Tech College, in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S., marked a year’s passage since the school massacre on April 16, 2007. With 32 students and staff murdered, at least 29 injured, and the gunman, SeungHui Cho, ultimately committing suicide, these tragic circumstances constituted the deadliest shooting rampage by a single gunman in North American history. According to the New York Times, many U.S. states are presently considering legislation to allow students with concealed gun permits to carry firearms on their

campuses. The thinking, shared by over 25,000 members of “Students for Concealed Carry on Campus,” is that having more weapons “in the right hands” will allow future students to protect themselves from another school shooting. Meanwhile, according to the Associated Press, the Virginia state government recently passed a law requiring colleges to inform parents when their dependent students become a danger to themselves and others. The still-recovering campus of Virginia Tech is also working to improve the reach of its counselling services.


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News

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

Feds, past and future Jamie Damaskinos staff reporter

For those of you who worked co-op jobs, or were otherwise preoccupied, over the winter term the Feds executive and board of directors underwent some crucial changes. ES student Justin Williams will be succeeding Kevin Royal as president of Feds, while Del Pereira is continuing his position as VP administration and finance (VPAF). As neither of them had to put much work into the campaigning front (they were both acclaimed) they have had the opportunity to work on a number of incentives they plan on implementing starting over the Spring ’08 term. Both Pereira and Williams seemed to have a great interest in improving student involvement in and around

we have with them.  Two areas of immediate partnership that I would like to explore are volunteer opportunities and community relations,” said Williams. “This kind of partnership would really help to promote opportunities for students at both institutions.” The past term also saw the election of a new VP education (VPED) and a new VP internal (VPIN). Andres Augustin Fuentes-Martinez took the position of VPED, while VPIN was taken by Andrew Falcao. Falcao has echoed both Williams and Pereira’s enthusiasm to improve student engagement at Waterloo: “Becoming active in our numerous services, clubs and societies in the spring term is the best way to improve student life on this campus. Not only

Falcao is looking to work closely with the Feds Arts commission. Despite the commission’s revitalization last year, Falcao found himself without very much to work with. “I would like to expand the commission to have a much clearer mandate, and would like this to be the main organizing body for many of these events,” said Falcao. Looking to improve the commission’s functionality, “I will be selecting a new Arts commissioner in the upcoming months, and a committee will be formed, so keep your eyes open for this.” The Feds Board of Directors saw the election of new members this past term as well. Sam Andrey and Humberto Vigil-Gutierrez are now sitting on the Science council. Chris Neal has maintained his position as

As of September 2008, CKMS will no longer receive funding from the University to support their station. the campus, however this has yet to be co-ordinated with the remaining members of the Feds executive. “We’ve got some ‘Along the Path’ goals for student engagement, but we obviously need to sit down with the rest of the Feds exec and get everyone on the same page,” Pereira previously told Imprint. “For now, let’s just say there are some really great things in the works.” Williams has also conveyed an interest in working with Wilfrid Laurier University’s student executive in order to promote campus relations. Williams believes that this would help promote volunteer opportunities for students on both campuses. “At present, there has not been a lot of time for the new executive teams from WLU and UW to sit down together, but I look forward to building on the relationship that

do you get to meet new people and forge new contacts, but you learn a lot and get a chance to develop the campus culture. Anyone can come visit me in my office for more information — I love visitors.” Falcao plans to use his time in office to launch some “large personal projects.” He intends to engage the Arts clubs around the campus in order to generate greater student awareness of the events that these clubs throw. Furthermore, as a self-declared “film snob” he intends on having monthly viewings of classic films: “…I would also love to have monthly screenings of the greatest films ever made, so people can finally see the films that us movie geeks are always gushing over — rarely seen classics such as Kurosawa’s Rashomon or Godard’s Breathless.” As former Arts commissioner,

a member of the board representing St. Jerome’s. Sumaiya Tasneem and Bronwen Morris will be sitting on the Math council and the Arts council, respectively, over the next term. So how can you get involved in all of this? Well as Andrey points out: “…the services and 100+ clubs are always looking for new volunteers, particularly in the spring term when many students are gone.” Two referenda also went through last term’s full-time undergraduate student ballot, with landslide results for both. Approximately two-thirds of the students who voted, voted in favor of supporting the inclusion of a $1 dollar refundable student fee used to support the World University Service of Canada’s (WUSC) Student Refugee Program. See FEES, page 5

Cait Davidson staff reporter

Tibet’s troubles with China show no sign of lessening as Summer Olympics approach The countdown for 100 days to Beijing Summer Olympics started Wednesday, April 30, as Chinese officials prepare for the events. As the Olympic flame came to Hong Kong, seven activists were deported to help the parade on May 2 run more smoothly. Almost $40 billion worth of infrastructure has been developed in anticipation of the games, including additions to the airport, and underground railway lines, according to BBC News. The Olympic Flame’s journey has been filled with protest and roadblocks due to the situation in Tibet and China. The highest point the Olympic torch will take on it’s journey is the top of Mount Everest. Opportunities for discussion outside the country still persist, however, as at University of Southern California Chinese students were able to voice their opinions on the subject when a Tibetan monk held a question-and-answer session at the school. However, the session quickly turned hostile, with the New York Times reporting that a water bottle was thrown at the wall beside the Tibetan monk, and shouts of “Stop lying! Stop lying!” overwhelmed the talk. The New York Times further stated that such conversations, varying in tone from “civil to aggressive” are taking place in colleges and universities across the U.S.

Austrian creeper also the father of daughter’s children DNA tests have just proved that the Austrian man, Josef Fritzl, that kept his daughter locked up in a cellar for 24 years was the father of the woman’s seven children. Two of the woman’s children, and the woman are now in psychiatric care. Three of the children had never seen daylight. According to The New York Times the seventh child, a boy, died shortly after birth, and was thrown into the incinerator. Fritzl’s wife, Rosemarie, 68, knew nothing of her husbands activity. Fritzl led a double life, with two families of seven children, one with his wife and one with his daughter.

Zimbabwe election results yield only more delays The long delayed elections results in Zimbabwe were recently leaked according to Reuters. Robert Mugabe’s opposition for President, Morgan Tsvangirai,

won the election 47 to 43 per cent. In Zimbabwe the president requires a 50 per cent plus one to win an election. As Tsvangirai does not have this with his victory, there will be a run-off vote in three weeks time. Zimbabwe currently has the world’s highest inflation rate, at 165, 000 per cent after Mugabe’s 28 year reign in Zimbabwe.

Sign of the times? Starbucks stock drops in North America Starbucks stock is down 28 per cent from the same period last year. The coffee chain reports that it will be opening just over 150 fewer stores this year, than it did last. Blaming the fact that they were facing the worst American economy in history, BBC News, mentions that outside the United State its margins were improving.

Texas polygamy/child-custody case prompts a critical look at Canada’s polygamist sects Earlier this month, a raid on a polygamist ranch in Texas resulted in the removal of over 401 minors, as well as the evacuation of 133 women who “wanted to leave,” according to MSNBC. Evidence of abuse and underage arranged marriages is continually being unearthed as the investigation continues. The massive custody case was sparked by the phone call of an alleged 16-year-old girl from the Yearning for Zion ranch, who reported being abused herself, and who said she knew of girls as young as 14 and 15 being forced to marry men three times their age. The girl from the ranch has yet to be found. The girl allegedly had a child at 15 and was married to a 50 year-old man. This situation in Texas has created questions in Canada, according to The Globe and Mail, as a Canadian is among the 534 people taken from the ranch. As well, there is a sect in Bountiful, British Columbia, a sister commune to the ranch in Texas, which is being brought under scrutiny as the NDP party calls for action in parliament. Vancouver-area New Democratic MP Dawn Black has written to Federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson, asking Ottawa to stop turning its back on the situation in Bountiful, and to enforce Canadian law in the area. While polygamy is illegal in Canada, authorities fear any course of action could be protected under freedom of religion. Black argues that statutory rape charges cannot be defended under freedom of religion. cdavidson@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

— with files from BBC, CNN, GoogleNews, Reuters, New York Times, MSNBC and the Globe and Mail

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News

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

Campus Events Breaking the wall of silence — a working symposium Friday, May 2 through Saturday, May 3 @ Senate & board chambers, WLU Wilfred Laurier University is seeking to collectively discuss how best to address sexual violence on university and college campuses across Canada. With guest speakers Pamela Cross, Jane Doe, and Karen Mann-Bowers. More information at http:// mylaurier.ca/rainbow/ wallofsilence.htm New Student Welcome Monday, May 5 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. @ Multi-Purpose Room SLC If you’re a new student come and check out all the services offered by UW and meet some other new students. The New Face of AntiSemitism: Anti-Israel Obsession and Academic Boycotts St. Monday, May 5 7:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. @ Jerome’s University, C.L. Siegfried Hall room 1030 Dr. Menachem Kellner, Professor of Jewish History at the University of Haifa, Israel will give a public lecture discussing boycotts of Israeli academia. Lecture will be followed reception.

The 3rd annual President David Johnston Run for Health Wednesday, May 7 4:15 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. @ Needles Hall (ring road entrance) Participate in a 5 Km run or 2.5 Km run around ring road to help raise awareness about mental health issues. The race will be followed by a reception. You must register and relay teams are welcome. Register (for free) with Johann Reis at Health Services 123B, ext 35418. The 16th Annual Graduate Student Leisure Research Symposium Friday May 9 @ Lyle Hallman Institute, Clarica Auditorium Room 1621 A celebration of the research in the field of Recreation and Leisure at UW. All students are invited to attend. To register, or for more information contact Jennifer Carson & Linda Robson, Symposium CoChairs at garls@healthy. uwaterloo.ca. Social Entrepreneurship Bootcamp Intensive Monday May 12 – Wednesday May 14 @ St. Paul’s College, University of Waterloo Learn skills knowledge

and abilities needed by a social entrepreneur. Costs for Student: $250, and non-student: $450. For more info visit http:// laurelcentre.ca/bootcamp. html. Networking 101 Monday May 12 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. @TC 1208 Learn useful networking skills and strategies that you can use in your daily life to enhance any potential career opportunities. Mindfulness@University of Waterloo Wednesday May 14 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. @ Great Hall Village 1 This is a six weeklong stress reduction program that starts on May 14th. The program teaches mind and body techniques to help deal with stress. Cost is $15 and this includes all the materials. Professional School Interviews Wednesday May 14 4:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. @ TC 1208 Learn some tips and tricks to help you prepare for a professional school interview. You will learn how to handle most situations as well as what to wear and how to act.

Fees: CKMS out, u-pass co-oped Continued from page 4

Unfortunately for the campus radio-station CKMS, an equal proportion of students voted “yes” for removing the $5.50 per term fee that supports the station. This past month, Board of Governors announced that, as of September 2008, CKMS will no longer receive funding from the university to support their station. Despite all this, CKMS has announced on their website that they are currently working on plans to stay up

and running into the coming fall term: “Plans are afoot to keep CKMS alive. Although our student funding stops on August 31, we are making plans to continue past that date.” For further information, you can visit them at: http://ckmsfm.uwaterloo.ca/. There have been some changes to the U-Pass program that will facilitate the off-term usage by both co-op and regular students. Undergraduate students will pay for the pass on terms in which they are enrolled as a part of their ‘Feds Administered Fees.’ As a result of

the payment students will be permitted unlimited usage of the pass in off-terms and co-op terms. Although the base cost of the pass has increased, it is balanced out by the near elimination of the administration fee. Hence students should see a reduction in the cost of the pass by about $3-4. The change has been approved by the Feds Board of Directors and is the result of an amendment to the original U-Pass agreement between the Feds and GRT. jdamaskinos@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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FOOD: service continued Continued from cover

Nevertheless, Anthony confessed that “it’s a downtown corridor, so there are people engaged in activities on the street who are not affiliated with us or eating our lunch with us who I’m sure are involved in panhandling, aggressive or not, or arguing or fighting… but we don’t know anything about that and haven’t witnessed anything like that.” The Dream Centre and the Waterloo Pentecostal Assembly — which

enforced since. Gosse remarked that “we haven’t been enforcing it.” He assured that “it’s not about ending the program, that’s not what this is about. “We’re not trying to take a heavyhanded approach — we’re just trying to resolve what the complaints are and are trying to come up with a win-win situation: that everyone is happy, the program can continue, and the business or businesses that have felt an effect are satisfied.” Food Not Bombs has circulated

“... We’re just trying to resolve what the complaints are and trying to come up with a win-win situation... ‘ — Randy Gosse, Kitchener city clerk all serve food in the same area, on different days than Food Not Bombs — also received similar cease and desist letters. Anthony commented that “this might just be an issue of them trying to get all of us off the streets, too, and I’m sure in their minds, tidy things up.” Since receiving the cease and desist order, Food Not Bombs has continued to serve food at the Civic Square. Even though the cease and desist order was issued, it has not been

a letter of support for concerned individuals to submit to City Council through Coole at WPIRG which is available at the Turnkey desk in the SLC. Additionally, anyone is allowed to attend the appeal meeting on Monday, May 5 at 7 p.m. in council chambers at Kitchener City Hall, to speak on behalf of Food Not Bombs about issues of food security or poverty, or simply to support either side through attendance. aabela@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

A turn of the tide Friday, May 2, 2008 Vol. 31, No. 1 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editor-in-chief, Maggie Clark editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, vacant Sales Assisstant, vacant Systems Admin. vacant Distribution, Mitch Sanker, vacant Intern, Dylan Cawker Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Jacqueline McKoy president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Sherif Soliman vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, vacant secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Peter Trinh liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, vacant Head Reporter, vacant Lead Proofreader, vacant Cover Editor, vacant News Editor, vacant News Assistant, vacant Opinion Editor, vacant Opinion Assistant, vacant Features Editor, vacant Features Assistant, vacant Arts & Entertainment Editor, vacant Arts & Entertainment Assistant, vacant Science & Tech Editor, vacant Sports & Living Editor, vacant Photo Editor, vacant Graphics Editor, vacant Web Administrator, vacant Systems Administrator, vacant Production Staff Paul Collier, Brian Gashgarian, Sherif Soliman, Jamie Damaskinos, Chris Miller, Peter Trinh, Cait Davidson, Sonia Lee, Christine Ogley, Dinh Nguyen, Andrew Abela, Monica Harvey, Tom Levesque Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next staff meeting: Monday, May 5 12:30 p.m. Next board of directors meeting: Thursday, May 8 TBA

Viewer complaints challenge media hierarchy

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pril proved an important month for citizen empowerment in North America. No, I’m not talking about Earth Day, but activism of another sort: the lashback, both internal and external, against corrupt, divisive, or simply irresponsible media. While most of you were busy studying for exams, U.S. Democratic hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama faced off in an April 16 debate, the victor of which remains uncertain (with Clinton ultimately sweeping the following Pennsylvanian vote, but Obama quick to pick up new superdelegates after the address). However, average viewers — and there were 10 million of them, the most any primary debate has seen in this election — had no problem electing a loser: ABC News, the media outlet that hosted and moderated the debate. Responses to a follow-up post on ABC’s website reached over 19,000 in a 24-hour period, with the bulk of comments accusing ABC of marginalizing the issues that truly mattered to Americans in favour of “gotcha” or “yellow” journalism. Because the majority of these contentious questions (like “I want to know if you believe in the American flag” and “Do you love America more than Reverend Wright?”) were aimed at Obama, a “Clinton bias” and, in retaliation, a “sore losers” argument also emerged in the course of these comments. But the real focus was the overwhelming public conviction that ABC moderators Charlie Gibson and George Stephanopoulous failed their viewership by sweeping aside serious socio-economic concerns (like soaring gas prices, the mortgage crisis, ending the war in Iraq, and the future job market) in favour of shock-value controversy. The media itself even reported on this overwhelming response, with ABC’s own, brief news piece overshadowed by the Los Angeles Times’ report of a subsequent public protest, and a commentary by Tom Shales of the Washington Post, who wrote that both moderators delivered “shoddy, despicable performances.” The timing is interesting. Frank Rich of the New York Times argues that viewers had already had their fill of media hype surrounding “Bittergate,” an Obama issue that was covered extensively despite a lack of any real-world impact (Rich states that polls didn’t change, and the flow of superdelegates to Obama’s side was unhindered), and that this “overdose” of

sensationalism simply brought the public to a breaking point during the April 16 debate. But can so pronounced, spontaneous, and precise a public attack on the media really just be the result of background dissent? The New York Times on Sunday, April 20 posed an unexpected attack of its own on the media when it ran a story — and on the front page, no less — about the Pentagon’s use of military advisors as propaganda vehicles within mainstream news networks. Here too, readers surfaced to express a strongly-felt communal response to David Barstow’s lengthy report: While the journalism itself was good, its presence in the New York Times pages had come years too late. And where, some asked, was the New York Times’ apology for its own complicity in

Yes, the public regularly exhibits habits of ignorance ... but not without end, and not all on its own. the war propaganda machine years earlier? But a third piece of this empowerment puzzle arose long before these controversies surfaced in the U.S. — in fact, while I was reading through submissions for Imprint’s 30th anniversary media essay contest (with the winning entry, by William Hall, published on March 28). Some of the submissions were driven by a bonus mark incentive by Prof. Augie Fleras, who teaches sociology and communications studies; others came from students of diverse departmental backgrounds. Yet one collective sentiment surpassed faculty barriers in their writing: the almost universal belief in the media’s power to wilfully manipulate and distort “the truth” for political or financial gain. That so many students could both insist upon the isolating power of media monoliths, while at the same time remain unknowingly united in their distrust, was both impressive and thought-provoking. In the 1920s Walter Lippman penned a series of extremely influential works arguing the inevitable socio-political ignorance of the average citizen, the implausibility of journalism as an “organ of democracy,” and the necessity of more elevated news groups being granted

special access to government information, then parsing and deciding on “the truth” in their readers’ staid. It should come as no surprise to continued readers of this column that I vehemently disagree with this perspective, aligning myself far closer to Lippman’s most outspoken opponent of the day, John Dewey, who viewed journalism instead as a process of providing citizens with all the information required to move towards public consensus. And while a belief in the ignorance of the average citizen is exceedingly common among journalists and non-aligned citizens alike (individuals of course counting themselves outside the ignorant masses while they make these critiques), issues like those raised by ABC’s “angry viewers,” as well as responses to the New York Times’ report on media corruption, lead me to suspect that Dewey’s views offer a necessary counterpoint to that perspective. Yes, the public regularly exhibits habits of ignorance — often choosing to accept what it hears and reads at face value; often indulging in sensational stories and responding quicker to immediate controversies than more prolonged, complex issues — but not without end, and not all on its own. Rather, news organizations play a key role in guiding their audiences toward or away from certain ways of thinking (in short bursts, jumping from soundbite to soundbite, or in larger, more complex chunks of information), as well as in prioritizing certain issues above all others; and audiences will accept that guiding hand so long as they feel it provides a useful service and has some sort of self-correcting mechanism in place. But if past audiences have been slow to react when these terms were not met, it might just be because the privileges of our technological age weren’t as readily available then, or as entrenched. Now, though, as American blog aggregate sites like the Talking Points Memo, the Huffington Post, and the Drudge Report demonstrate how easily average readers can hone their capacity for direct response, it’s clear we have a different, more empowered population on our hands. As to whether this population — our population — will use that power as effectively in the future as they have this past month, well, we’ll just have to wait and see. ... Or deliberate some more about it online. You know, whichever you decide works best. editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

How much are you worth?

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hat’s a million dollars between friends, right? The Conservative government wants to clear up just what exactly the RCMP was doing a few weeks ago when they executed a warrant to search and seize at the Conservative Party’s headquarters. The opposition parties have all decried the actions of the Conservative party, while Prime Minister Harper has insisted that these actions are firmly in line with the law. In case you haven’t heard, the allegations are that the Conservatives went beyond the $18.3 million limit imposed on federal parties for election spending. Having reached the limit, the Conservative party transferred between $1 to $1.3 million from their coffers to candidates in individual ridings who had not yet reached their individual spending limits. Those candidates then transferred the money back to the Conservative Party, who used it to purchase more ads for the Federal Conservative Party (albeit with the individual candidates’ names tagged onto the end of the ads). Overall, this suggests that the Conservative

Party overspent by 5.5 to 7.1 per cent in the last election. Considering how close many of the ridings were in the last Federal election — Health Minister Tony Clement defeated his Liberal opponent Andy Mitchell by the slimmest national margin of only 28 votes — is it too much to think that the extra million dollars could have swung enough votes to win the election? Had 11 ridings that chose a Conservative MP chosen a Liberal instead, that would have been the difference. There are defences to all these attacks of course. The ads were not for the federal party — they were for the individual candidates, since they were bought with their funds — even though those funds came from the Conservative Party’s coffers, and even though the ads were identical to national ads, with only the candidates’ names added. The Globe and Mail also reported that Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre raised a previous “judgment” by then Chief Electoral officer Jean-Pierre Kingsley as a defence. He had stated that national advertisement bans on the day before the election were a waste, since individual

candidates could run the same ads with their names on them without issue. I think it comes down to a question of whether or not you feel cheated. Does it feel like cheating that an extra million dollars appears to have been spent over the limit? I would compare that to Ontario’s last tuition freeze, when tuition rates were capped, but institutions were free to add hundreds in extra bills for library and computer use onto student’s bills, which bothered two students enough to launch a class-action lawsuit over the matter. Does it feel wrong that the extra money taxied around is now being claimed by those candidates who received it, looking for taxpayer dollars to reimburse them for a percentage of those costs? Or does all of this make only too much sense? After all, the Conservative Party’s Accountability Act took the conflict-of-interest code for public office holders, and removed the rule that they must “act with honesty.” So even if their actions feel dishonest, and you feel robbed or tricked, at least it was all ‘legal.’ adodds@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

Opinion

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The “It” gay’s guide to protecting yourself in the city

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ugar, you know I would never wish any harm on you, but you’ve got to know these are wild times we live in and untamed streets we walk. I worry about you, and it breaks my heart to read stories in the news about another gay boy getting taken down. But it’s okay, Auntie Trav is here for you, and I’ve got some advice to help you out if you find yourself in a spot of trouble. 1) Walk that tight little ass of yours away, honey! If things get rowdy and you don’t feel safe being your fabulous self, just pretend you are Naomi on the catwalk and strut yourself on away from the problem. I know you’ve got “Supermodel” on that pretty little pink iPod of yours, and it’s not like you weren’t already doing your model walk already. Duck into a nearby store or boot it to a house with their lights on and ask them to use their phone to call a cab. Don’t be a worrywart — an awkward moment at a stranger’s door is better in the long run than chewing on the pavement. 2) Call the police! If you don’t feel safe enough to continue your walk, or if one of those ruffians lays so much as a finger on you: dial up those three little numbers on your hot pre-release iPhone 2. Even if it just works to scare away the trash that was after you, consider it a success! 3) Keep cigarettes on hand. Whoever told you smoking was bad for you never considered how easy it is to identify an attacker in court once you’ve burned a Belmont into his/her face. And if smoking’s not your thing, well, never fear: that’s where a Starbucks decaf venti mocha latte comes in. Use the same rule for your coffee that you do with the men in your life: the hotter, the better. Remember darlings, if he’s giving you trouble, splash that double-double. 4) Sweetie, you know I am not a fan of violence, but if all else fails, then it’s time to throw a punch. Don’t worry about ruining those nails of yours, there will always be other manicures — but you spent $15,000 on that nose and you aren’t about to see it get broken, are you? If you are attacked it is not only your right but your responsibility to defend yourself. If this beast of a human being happens to be bigger than you, remember that you are an Adonis, you are Tom of Finland, and you might as well put those countless hours spent in the gym sculpting the perfect body to a practical use, hm? Now, darlings, it’s story time. I’m going to

tell you about a little gay boy named Lawrence King. Larry, to the gals, was about as fabulous as they come. He knew his fashion and knew how to put the fashionistas to shame on a dime. I can’t think of any other 15-year-old who knew how to accessorize like this darling. Of course, that isn’t all Larry knew a lot about: he knew about what plants you need to have in your yard to get those pretty ol’ butterflies to come, he knew how to crochet a scarf to send to troops in Afghanistan, and he knew who he wanted to be his Valentine. I’m sure the butterflies in his yard must have found their way into his stomach in the days leading up to the 14th of February, lord knows how hard it can be to get a man’s attention. But Larry was strong and confident (think early Whitney) and put all that aside and asked 14-year-old Brandon McInerney to be his Valentine. Of course, like any man you put your heart on the line for, Brandon ended up being an asshole. But Larry had better things in his future. Auntie Trav has a knack for these things, see, and Auntie Trav can see that Larry had big things ahead of him. Someone with that kind of dramatic flair, natural social skills and fashion sense? Well, such a debut hasn’t been seen since Auntie Trav herself! But this story time doesn’t have a happy ending for Larry. Two days before Valentine’s Day, Brandon walked up to Larry and shot him in the head. Turns out Brandon didn’t care too much for a gay boy’s attention. Larry may not have had his Auntie Trav there to protect him from all the hate in this world, but he did have one important thing that was taken away from him: the right to live in this world freely and unhindered; the right to express himself in each and every way that he saw fit; the right to be gay. Sugars, you all have that right, and darling, nobody is allowed to take that away from you. Protect yourself from violence. If you don’t feel safe be sure to stay in well lit areas or streets with lots of traffic. Get a loyal (or vicious) dog. Walk with friends whenever possible. Do whatever you need to do to feel safe. Remember that feeling safe to be yourself isn’t limited to being gay — it’s about being able to jog through the park as a woman without harassment, it’s about being able to ride the bus as a black person without being hassled. It’s about being safe being you.

Aim higher. At Ernst & Young, we encourage you to shoot for the sky. You’ll gain invaluable experience helping us deliver quality services to world-class clients, and with each new challenge, you’ll take another step towards a great future. Next stop: the top. Move on up to growth and success. Visit us at ey.com/ca/careers and our Facebook.com group.

ELEVATION: UNLIMITED

tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

How green is my campus? Imprint investigates, starting

Friday, May 16, 2008

Assurance • Tax • Transactions • Advisory © 2008 Ernst & Young

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Opinion

Letters Had a reaction to one of our articles, editorials or columns? Write a letter to the editor at letters@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Re: FEDS executive in review — March 28, 2008 As a Federation of Students Councillor who has worked closely with the executive this past year, I was both surprised and disappointed with the unbalanced executive review in [the March 28] issue. I have observed a competent, dedicated and cohesive team that has succeeded in countless ways to improve the lives of students at the University of Waterloo. The most frustrating review to read was that of VP Administration and Finance Del Pereira. In response to his alleged broken campaign promises, I would argue as a regular customer of Bomber that both the service time and the value for quality food have improved over Del’s term, and that the new wireless debit-credit and ordering systems were creative solutions to assist the servers. Del has lived up to his promise to lobby the university administration to increase Bomber capacity, and I hardly consider the administration’s unwillingness to do so due to safety concerns “evidence

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 of Pereira’s failure.” He also has managed to get a new patio that will fit more people from the university at no cost to Feds. The review gave few of his initiatives even passing mention; however Del’s work this year has been impressive to say the least. He managed to expand coverage of the Health and Dental plan and solved several administrative problems with the plan’s implementation and facilitation. The renovation of Federation Xpress and the Feds office went extremely well and sales at the new convenience store, which includes grocery items (as Del promised in his campaign), are way up over Aussies. He will likely be the first VPAF in years to be able

ager, and Fed Hall manager), which resulted in him filling in for each. Not to mention the fact that he is still the day-to-day chief financial officer of a multi-million dollar corporation. Those who worked with Del this year have nothing but good things to say. Dr. Barbara Schumacher, Director of Health Services provided her insight: “I have found Delto be professional, conscientious, attentive and genuinely concerned. He has a large portfolio, particularly the Student Health and Dental plans. In this context I can tell you that he was instrumental in problem solving the issue of the blackout period in September which posed a major barrier to Health Services

his portfolio and has succeeded in balancing fiscal responsibility within the corporation between our service businesses and our service units.” Director Chris Neal “can easily say that Del’s performance has been nothing short of remarkable, particularly his hard work in completing the renovations and ensuring that the U-PASS was implemented on time and in a manner that was fair to students.” As we move into next year, a number of challenges lay ahead for the VPAF, including the launch of a Halal food outlet in the space vacated by Scoops, the design of the new Bomber patio, the future of the U-PASS flashcard system and co-op opt-in, the implementation of

the referendum-mandated WUSC fee, the development of a plan for the former Aussies space, and the continued renegotiation of the bar and Tim Hortons’ agreements. I can say with full confidence that there is no one on this campus I feel more comfortable leading those initiatives than Del, and I am extremely grateful he will back for another year to continue his amazing work for students.

I would like to thank UW Students for Life for organizing and sponsoring the “Silent No More” presentation at the SLC on April 2. Three women from the campaign (silentnomoreawareness.org) gave powerful personal testimonies on how abortion had a devastating effect on their lives, physically, psychologically and spiritually. Each woman gave a frank account of the circumstances that led to the pregnancy, the decision to abort, the after-effects — on her as well as others close to her — and the impossibility to keep the traumas buried. Very fortunately, each woman was able, thanks to the help of support groups such as SNM, to come to terms with her trauma, eventually shedding a life of dysfunctionality to assume a fulfilling one. And each of the women emphatically concluded her message with the following plea to the audience: If anyone knows someone who is suffering from the trauma of an abortion, please tell them that help is available — that there is no need to remain silent and try to bear the unbearable. By sponsoring this event, UW Students for Life has performed a valuable service to the UW community. Interestingly enough, the SNM presentation took place on the third anniversary of the death of Pope John Paul II, undoubtedly one of the most celebrated advocates of the sanctity of life.

— Sam Andrey 2B biochemistry

— Edward R. Vrscay Department of Applied Mathematics

Those who worked with Del [Pereira] this year have nothing but good things to say. — Sam Andrey, Feds student council to declare Fed Hall as a break-even business, and his accomplishment in turning around a failing business that formerly chewed up students’ money is commendable. He also oversaw the successful negotiation of the bus pass contract and has made significant progress on the renegotiation of the bar directorate and the Tim Horton’s agreement with Food Services. All of these accomplishments were achieved in a year that saw staff turnover at three management positions (campus bar operations manager, Bomber man-

dispensing of birth control pills and preventative vaccines. He took the time and effort to understand the issue, investigated possible solutions, worked with our database, management system and Student Care Networks to put in place a strategy which enabled students to access ourdispensing service without delays. We are grateful to Del for his creativity and leadership in resolving the issue.” Director Jeffrey Aho states that “Del has been a stalwart advocate on the most critical issues under

Campus Bulletin CO-OP/CAREER SERVICES Monday, May 12 – “Networking 101” – 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC1208. Prequisite: work search module from the Career Development eManual. If you have submitted this module in PD1/Coop 101 or Co-op Fundamentals for Engineering, you have satisfied this requirement and may register for the workshop. Wednesday, May 14 – “Professional School Interviews” – 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., TC1208. Tuesday, May 20 – “Exploring Your Personality Type-Part1” – 2 to 3:30 p.m., TC1112. Wednesday, May 21 – “Special Session for International Students” – 2 to 3:30 p.m., TC2218A. Thursday, May 22 – “Basics of Starting a Business” – 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., CBET Outreach Room, second floor of Accelerator Centre (building north of Optometry). Limited to 20. Monday, May 26 – “Basics of Starting a Business” – CBET Outreach Room - second floor of Accelerator Centre

(building just north of Optometry). “Networking 101” – Prequisite: work search module from the Career Development eManual. If you have submitted this module in PD1/Coop 101 or Co-op Fundamentals for Engineering, you have satisfied this requirement and may register for the workshop.. 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC1208.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

“Morning Drive Radio Show” – 6:30 to 9 a.m., www.ckmsfm.ca, click on webcast for the latest news, traffic, school closures, interviews and a great mix of music! To get your important events on the air, e-mail morningdrivel@yahoo.ca. If you have an interesting person that CKMS should interview call 519-884-2567 between 6:30 to 9 a.m....qualify for a prize! The Grand House Student Co-operative is a non-profit housing co-op comprised of architecture students from UW, community members and professionals. Workshops are being organized on environmental techniques, solar power, non-toxic materials and more. For info/registration

Classified HELP WANTED Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. University of Waterloo Student Security Services is looking for outgoing and motivated individuals currently holding a valid Ontario

“G” class licence to become part of RideSafe team. For more information and to apply, e-mail your resume to uwpss@uwaterloo.ca. Support person needed for 14 year old boy with autism. Support for summer camps and weekend outings in the community and supervision within the home during the school year. Must be creative with activity planning, altruistic in your desire to work with a special needs child and must have own vehicle. Laurelwood subdivision. $12-$13/hour depend-

visit the website at www.grandhouse. wacsa.org.

STUDENT AWARDS FINANCIAL AID 2nd floor, Needles Hall, ext 33583. Please refer to safa.uwaterloo.ca to view a full listing of scholarships and awards. PLEASE NOTE: effective May 1, 2008 we can no longer accept the UW Watcard as a form of ID. Acceptable government photo ID includes valid drivers license, passport, immigration card, or citizenship card. All OSAP loans will now be released from Fed Hall from May 5 to 23. All other general inquiries can be dealt with in Needles Hall.

VOLUNTEER

City of Waterloo, 519-888-6488 or volunteer@city.waterloo.on.ca has many volunteer opportunities. Check out the website today.

ing on experience plus .37/km. Call Deborah 519-746-1584.

LOST & FOUND

Found: a bracelet in REN 2102. E-mail description and contact information to wordchick@gmail.com (put “bracelet” in the subject line) and I’ll get it back to you.

HOUSING

Attention Cambridge School of Architecture students! Live conveniently and comfortably right across the street from

Re: Silent No More

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Volunteer Action Centre, 519-7428610 or www.volunteerkw.ca, has many opportunities available – visit the website or call today! The Kitchener Youth Action Council is currently seeking volunteers aged 14-24 who are concerned about issues facing youth and young adults across Kitchener. For more info e-mail youth@kitchener.ca. The tri-Pride Community Association is looking for people to get involved with various projects leading up to Pride Week 2008 which will take place during the month of June. For more info e-mail info@triPride.ca or www.tri-Pride.ca.

SPORTS Attention female slo-pitch players – coed league, Sunday mornings, May 4 to August 24. No long weekends. Kitchener. $65. E-mail evansmatthew@rogers.com. Row for Heart – learn to row: register a crew of five or as an individual. Eight week lessons start the week of June 16. Call 519-571-9600 or www.fitforheart. ca for more information.

school in this beautifully renovated apartment. 4, 8 and 12-month leases available with excellent signing bonuses and rental incentives! Call Darlene or Joanne at 519-746-1411 for more details. Five bedroom house for rent – large rooms, two kitchens, hardwood, parking, laundry, clean. $1,900/month plus utilities. Available immediately. Call 905-398-4909. Room for rent for a quiet individual in a detached house near both universities.

UPCOMING May 2008 Rotunda Gallery, Kitchener City Hall, hosts “Celebrating Youth” for local students between 12 and 24 years old. Open reception Wednesday, May 7 from 5 to 7 p.m. May 24 long weekend May long-weekend – Port Burwell Country Camping – best party camping in Ontario! For more information please visit www.countrycamping.ca or call 1-800863-3735. Saturday, June 21, 2008 Uptown Country Festival – Regina Street, beside City Hall. Check out www. uptowncountrywaterloo.com for all info on the stars, vendors, etc.

CHURCH SERVICE St. Bede’s chapel at Renison College offers worship on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Come and walk the labyrinth the second Thursday of each month, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more info contact Megan at 519-884-4404, ext 28604 or www.renison.uwaterloo.ca/ministry-centre.

Parking and all amenities. Please call 519-725-5348. Summer sublet – May to August 08 – $300+negotiable. Call Jason at 613-9895210 or kenkaniff02@hotmail.com.

TRAVEL

May 24 long weekend May long-weekend – Port Burwell Country Camping – best party camping in Ontario! Party animal olympics, live bands, D.J’s and more! For more information please visit www.countrycamping.ca or call 1-800-863-3735.


Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

Crossword Tim Foster Across 1. Resort hotels 5. Foul substances 10. Rugged cliff 14. sinh ÷ cosh 15. Push away 16. Sucker 17. Instinctive motive 18. Visage 20. Buddy 21. Actively saw 22. Smell 24. Sign up again 28. Esteem 31. Male vocal range 32. Chinese fermented tea-leaves 36. Plaything 37. Thoughts 41. Boxer Muhammad 42. Given energy 43. Grinding machines 46. Elitist’s pub (two wds) 50. Anti-electron 54. Grayish brown 55. Pleasure-travellers 58. Matronly title 59. Four beat line 62. Small, double-reed instrument 63. Grand River’s final destination 64. French, ingot 65. Longer forearm bone 66. An eternity 67. Mud-brick 68. Examine Down 1. Marginally conscious state 2. Ceremonial procession 3. English speakers 4. Haggard’s book with villainess Ayesha 5. Wide crustacean 6. Prxy. speakers 7. Part of river near its source

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Jenn: I just got off co-op from Google and I’ve been thinking of you for the last four months (no girls here, I’m afraid). I messed about with the internal programming so that when you Google your name, it brings up kittens. I also took the liberty of resetting your Gmail password to “kisses” because when I see you that’s all I think of. -KL PT: We worked together all semester, and while I know you have a girlfriend, I know

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38. Old Masters’ paintings 39. Camper’s home 40. Principle 41. Elec. current unit 44. Liquid measure 45. Covered Greek walkways 47. Go clumsily 48. Chef’s protective garment 49. Find a better chair 51. Cuban ballroom dance 52. Greek mountain nymph 53. Slang, blasting gel 56. Milosovic nationality 57. Free standing tall plant 59. Steeped-leaves drink 60. CGS unit of energy 61. Neckwear 62. Publicize a hidden characteristic

Tim Foster

“There’s nothing good about it.” Asif Rahman

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I can satisfy your needs better than she. She’s in Alberta, and I’m next door, I’ll be dropping by to borrow some sugar at some point in time. -M CD: I’ve noticed you walking in the SLC; your blonde hair, colourful dresses and dark eyes are so beautiful. The steam from your coffee beckons me to follow you like an aethereal finger I’ve been eyeing you ever since. I can’t even drink coffee now without thinking of your body. “Touch of the Irish” indeed. -BG To the girl with the short brown hair: I watch you on the treadmill at Columbia Lake. I figure once you get down to 150 it’s go time. Meet me in the men’s locker room after you’ve achieved “our goal.” -D

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“The weather.”

Comp Eng Grad

Mar. 28 solutions

8 9 8 2 5 4 1 3 6 1 4 7 8 8 7 1 6 9 5 1 8 4 3 1 4 5 2 NS, you have the hottest Facebook photo I’ve ever seen. I set it as my wallpaper. Originally it was set to Stretch but it made you look fat so I tiled it. Now it’s like there’s a hundred of you staring at me. Hot. Let’s get together so I can play Solitaire on you in person. -Roxy

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“Sunlight after classes.” Maria F. Diaz

4A civil engineering

“You can have your cake and eat it, too.” Kejda Gjermani 4B honours financial economics

Marie: Like a pile of sex, you exploded in my face like a 10,000-megaton bomb of hot. I don’t remember your last name but I remember you were a good kisser. Let’s try it again while sober. -PL To the guy reading a math textbook in front of DP on Tuesday: Your eyes were glued to your book, but man, were mine ever glued to you. I guess you were doing some postexam studying; how about a little elective in human sexuality with me? Hope to see you by the library again — together, we could write some non-fiction you’ll never forget. -AG Missed a connection? Wanna break the ice? Send your missed connections to distractions@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

“Drinking on the patio with your profs.” Karolina Drozd

4B science & business

“Making new friends since all your other friends have left.” Kejda Gjermani 4A electrical engineering


10

Comics & Distractions

POSTSCRIPT

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

BY GRAHAM MOOGK-SOULIS

IMPRESSION, BY JIM & LAN

BY PETER N. TRINH

GUEST COMIC

In need of a caption... E-mail submissions along with your name, your year, and your program, under the title “Caption Contest,” to: distractions@imprint.uwaterloo.ca.

BY SONIA LEE


Photo Feature

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

Philip JAMA

A view from Conrad Grabel of the main university campus and Laurel Creek.

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Jennifer Serec

AFRSA (African Students’ Association) fundraise by braiding hair in the SLC for the Abandoned Babies Orphanage in Swaziland.

Campus Clicks Scott Chonghar

Spring term’s debut of photos by the student body, for the student body.

Jennifer Sequin, Laura Tarrontozi, Julie Goll, Scott Chonghar, and Michel Iskander (left to right) are hard at work in their Chemistry 267 lab.

Rajul Saleh

Math and Computer building surrounded by trees, and flowers just in bloom.

Rocky Choi

The Environmental Information Technology building’s hidden beauties shine though from this vantage point.

Mackenzie Keast

Carrie Zych enjoys her walk past the campus colleges on a misty late winter day.

Send your campus photos, along with the names of any people in them and a description, to photos@imprint.uwaterloo.ca.


Features

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Sound as a symbolic language Andrea Lorentz reporter

Jamie Damaskinos staff reporter

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e mainstream students are well versed in the ways of the video game. You’re also probably familiar with the video game playing environment — you know, the limp sock hanging from the drawer, heaping piles of dirty laundry, sweaty controller in hand. But research right here at UW suggests setting the scene for an intense video game session is more about the sound coming from your speakers than your physical surroundings. Dr. Karen Collins, Canada Research Chair at UW, teaches video game design and has done immense research on interactive audio. Boasting a career in teaching that spans a distance from the University of Liverpool to the University of Waterloo, Dr. Collins has now focused in on the study of sound as a symbolic language, or “the semiotics of sound.” The professor’s attraction to those “harsh mechanical sounds in music” encouraged her to continue in her studies by writing a PhD about industrial music. Soon after, the semiotics of sound came to the forefront of her work. “I’ve always been fascinated by music and sound, but have also always been curious to find out how things work,” Collins said. “It seemed logical to me to study how sound works, how it can take us from being in a bad mood to cheering us up, or how it helps drive the emotion in a movie, for instance.” The study of the semiotics of sound is a relatively new field brimming with possibilities. The appropriate usage of certain sounds can be used to evoke certain reactions and emotions from the listener. Some of these reactions have a bio-acoustic or evolutionary dimension to them. Dr. Collins points out that “… low bass (often used in scary movies) is generally quite universally associated with threat — the sounds in nature that threatened human beings (volcanoes, earthquakes, very large animal growling) all have low bass sounds, and these sounds can physically affect us (usually in the gut region) …” As sound can be used to generate certain reactions within listeners, it can therefore be used as a rhetorical tool to manipulate an audience. “One example I like to use is the political advertisement,” Dr. Collins said, demonstrating the connection between persuasion and sound, “where music (particularly that threatening low bass sound) is used to tell us how to feel about a particular political figure.” Despite certain sounds being of a “universal”

nature, Dr. Collins contends that most reactions to sound have been culturally ingrained into the fabric of society: “… music is not a ‘universal’ language. It’s quite culturally specific, although this is changing with the spread of Western media.” ne of the projects that Dr. Collins is working on is creating a computer program that can, as she puts it, “automatically write transitional segments between phrases of music.” In simpler terms, this means that when a scene in a video game changes, say from a calm scene to a battle scene, the music also has to change. The difficulty with this is that the timing of events is unpredictable. The current method used to transition from scene to scene is to fade the old music out and bring the new music in simultaneously. But as Dr. Collins explains, this type of changeover is really not effective. To deal with this, she intends on developing a system that will progressively adjust the music accordingly, by way of a “transitional phrase.” The transitional phrase will exploit the various emotions associated with certain sounds, key signatures and chord structures. By approaching it in this manner the music will take on an organic nature that flows naturally through the various situational circumstances present in the video game, as opposed to the previous system of crudely fading music in and out. Dr. Collins concedes that this process is not quite as simple as it sounds: “… we can never have a definite ‘every time this means x’, we can develop a more vague ‘often, when this chord sequence appears in this key in this way, it is associated with sadness’…” There are various methods that she is employing in order to categorize and classify music. She is organizing a database of sounds that are classified according to the mood they invoke. Video game users are asked to listen to snippets of music and to then give keywords that they associate it with. Another method she uses to sort sounds is with “neural nets,” where a computer searches for patterns within previously tagged music. Dr. Collins has written many papers on the study of music and video-games, including a study on music in 8-bit video-games entitled “In the Loop: Confinements and Creativity in 8-Bit Video Games Music.” This article deals with how video-game music, and music in general, has evolved through the physical limitations of the 8-bit genre. In the future, Dr. Collins hopes that her research will be used to create more effective audio in the media. She has recently finished writing a book about game audio, and is looking to develop a game audio textbook. To read more about Dr. Karen Collins work in greater detail, visit her website at www.gamessound. com. She has posted some of her research, including articles, as well relevant links to other websites and a tutorial to make your own video game.

sonia lee


Features

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

13

You can take these babies home with you

maggie clark

Photos by christy ogley

Above, some of the almost 1,000 titles included in the Women’s Centre and GLOW — The Queer and Questioning Community’s library re-launch. According to GLOW co-ordinator, Paul Cyr, GLOW has the “largest dedicated library of queer-related books in Waterloo Region.” And, as of this term, students can finally check them out.

University of Waterloo: Poker capital north? Lu Jiang reporter

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p here in Canada there is a tiny city which has become, for many poker players today, almost legendary in stature: Waterloo. Or rather, the University of Waterloo. Mike McDonald, Steve Paul-Ambrose, Will Ma, Matt “Choppy” Kay, Nenad Medic, and Steve Black. They are just a few of the people who can claim UW as their alma mater. To see how their story started, we have to look back five years. 2003 was marked by many great events: the SARS outbreak, the disintegration of the space shuttle Columbia upon re-entry, and even the trial of Michael Jackson. But underneath all the headlines, unnoticed by the world, there was a quiet meeting of a rather spectacular group of people. Steve Black was in his second year of university when he met Nenad Medic in an online poker game. When they discovered that they both attended the same university, a friendship was born. They both started at the bottom of the internet poker food chain – in games with stakes as low as $0.25/$0.50 No Limit – but they battled their way up until they reached stakes as high as $50/$100 No Limit. By 2004, they found themselves on the beautiful island of Aruba playing in a live tournament for nearly $1 million. The next year, it was also in Aruba that Nenad Medic made it to the final table and cashed in sixth place for a hefty $113,000. Then, Black met and befriended other poker fans on-campus including Latif Nanji, Abbas Ali, Anton Polski, Chris Fanaberia, and Steve Paul-Ambrose. Soon after, UW poker icons Steve PaulAmbrose, Aaron Coulthard, Latif Nanji, Steve Black and Nenad Medic all found themselves playing in the 2006 PokerStars Carribean Adventure. Although Ambrose had already achieved immense success in online poker, he proved that he was king-of-the-hill in live tourneys as well when he fought to the top of a pile of

over 600 players and took home the coveted World Poker Tour (WPT) bracelet and a very shiny $1.3 million. His sparkling success caught the attention of the up-and-coming Mike McDonald, formerly an avid chess player. With a natural talent for the sport, McDonald soon established himself as one of the most outstanding online players. Just one week after Ambrose’s score in the Bahamas, Nenad Medic made the final table in the Aussie Millions Tournament and came home with over $275,000. After his strong finish, he launched himself into the biggest games in Las Vegas and cashed in on numerous circuit events. He captured his first WPT at Foxwoods in November 2006 for $1.7 million and found himself repeating the performance at the Foxwoods’ final table in 2007, winning $486,000. Fast forwarding to the present, if you happen to be in Las Vegas, you might see Nenad Medic; he can often be found playing high stakes poker at the Bellagio. If you’re cruising the online poker scene, watch out for Matt “Choppy” Kay; he is well known for crushing the online tournament scene and was ranked second on cardplayer.com’s leader board for 2007. If you happen to be in the poker capital of Canada, you might walk past fellow student Mike McDonald; he recently captured the European Poker Tour in Dortmund for $1.3 million and stands at the top of the leader board on cardplayer.com for 2008. You could also see his sparring partner, Will Ma, who captured the 2007 Grand Prix de Paris for $575,000. You can also find Abbas, Anton, Chris, Latif, and Steve Black here in Waterloo’s very own Accelerator Centre. They have founded their own rapidly growing company, Suited Media, the parent of PokerSpace. As a newbie poker addict, it’s honestly pretty awe-inspiring to be in the same office as them. Here’s to hoping that I get half as good. Full disclosure: Lu Jiang is also treasurer for Imprint’s board of directors.

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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

DOING DRAMA: PART 1 OF 3

Acting the part

The audition process, and other swash-buckling tales of getting involved with campus theatre Brian Gashgarian special to imprint

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he rapiers hiss as the blades slide along one another, a sound that fills the whole room.  Our blades crash together twice more, and I raise my sword above my head — there is a pause. A confused smile crosses my opponent’s face and is mirrored on my own. We have both completely forgotten the choreography.  “Attack her head, Brian,” our lead choreographer, Nick Oddson calls from the front of the room, where he is recording this exchange on his digital camera for later review on Youtube. We are in rehearsals for Willis Hall’s adaptation of “The Three Musketeers”, and about two weeks into fighting rehearsals. However, getting to this point was far from easy. It all began when I started my very amateur foray into amateur theatre with FASS 2008: Global Warming. The focus of this satirical production was to have fun; everyone who auditioned got a role, from a Starcraft-based battlecruiser commander (that was me) to a stoned enviromental studies student. It was a good first experience. Through that, I got to know the stage manager, Anita Kilgour, who as it turns out was running a production of Three Musketeers, which she was directing, to start in April and show in July. My first thought was “SWORDS=AWESOME” so myself and my friend Patrick pestered Anita with emails and facebook messages

on when the auditions would be held. The audition process is a rather interesting one. For FASS, it merely consisted of reading a bit from the script, singing a song of our choice, and learning a short dance routine. This wasn’t that much different; we had to fill out the requisite mountain of forms; “I release director etc., from responsibility of death due to over-acting”; “I am human, I release director etc., from all responsibility regarding my humanity”; “I am free on this and this dates, this is my previous experience etc etc etc.” The next step was choosing whether to do a monologue which we could pick from a stack of random, unrelated monologues or doing

one which we had previously prepared, which we would then read to the director and stage manager, Nadia Ursacki.  I had wanted to prepare a monologue beforehand, but, alas, school and social life and laziness intervened. I picked the most ridiculous one I could find on a marital argument which culminated in the wife throwing a lamb chop at her husband. After this, the next person went in, read their monologue, at which point we were given a short dialogue from the play to read and about five or six minutes to put it together. It was a dialogue between Richelieu and Rochefort; the two main villains in the play. I read the role of Rochefort, Richelieu’s

lackey, with a servile, Igor-like character in mind. After reading it through once, Anita looked at us and gave us a interesting twist: “do it backwards; Richelieu, you be the servile one, and Rochefort, you be all high and mighty”. So we did, and it strangely worked. I walked out feeling pretty good about the audition, but not before picking everything I had done apart mentally. Up next was the fighting audition; I walked into the room to behold four full-sized rapiers with beautiful ornate hilts and guards; this is also known as the moment I knew I HAD to be in this show. Neither of us had had previous stage fighting experience, and I lacked any sword fighting experience at all, so Nick ran us through the basic attacks and parries at first, then taught us a basic choreographed piece.  A few days or so passed after the auditions while Anita and Nadia worked out scheduling and went through who would best fit which role; I was nervous; had I done a good audition? Yes, I knew Anita, but I also knew that she didn’t pick people because she knew them, she picked them based on their suitability for the role. So when I answered my cell and Anita asked “Brian, would you like to play Aramis for me?”  there was a moment of GPS(gaping-mouth-syndrome), then a definite yes. After all, SWORDS=AWESOME. To be continued on June 13 Part 2 of 3: Rehearsals, rehearsals, rehearsals

sonia lee

Theatre programming at UW Maggie Clark editor-in-chief

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here is no “down time” for drama at UW. As students generally set off for co-op placements and summer jobs, or settle into the routine of spring term classes, various theatre projects — both on and off campus — continue to progress at different paces and magnitudes. The next batch of drama theses projects, for instance, won’t see the light of any stage until February 2009, when drama students Joe Recchia and Monty Montgomery are set to complete their respective, full credit Drama 490 assignments. According to Robin Atchison, Recchia’s project is structured around Bent, the Martin Sherman production that first successfully united a gay discourse with that of the Holocaust in a theatre setting. Montgomery,

meanwhile, is at work on High Life, the earlier work by playwright Lee MacDougall that wrings dark humour out of four morphine addicts coming together to attempt a bank heist. But it doesn’t take a thesis project to bind drama students to such time-consuming productions: UW student Derek Lindman is travelling with Prof. Andy Houston to Ponteix, Saskatchewan this summer to research, write, and stage a site-specific production with Knowhere Theatre. Though the executive cast, including UW alumni Melanie Bennett, is still deliberating over which story to tell in Wind Blown, they ultimately expect to be inspired by the nature of Ponteix itself (a small, rural, French-from-France settled town celebrating its centennial this year) and reach a consensus soon after. First, however, Lindman must complete his role as stage manager for the second

run of Differ/End, a community-acclaimed production grappling with the issues surrounding the conflict in Caledonia, and which arose from the background research, in-person interviews, and writing of UW drama students throughout the 2007/2008 school year. This second run of Differ/End is not being staged on campus, but as a part of the Tapestry Multicultural Festival. In practical terms, this means that the June 11 to 14 productions will be held in the Rotunda of Kitchener City Hall, a move which will necessarily change the dynamics of each performance. “We’re going from a small, intimate setting to a five-storey building with political importance,” said Lindman. “So I think the location offers radical potential, which will be discovered in the process.” This June will also feature a series of one-act plays produced by other UW drama

students, with Amy O’Grady co-ordinating the four rigorous productions. “Marriage Proposal,” by Anton Chekhov, and “No Exit,” by Jean-Paul Sartre, will both be stage managed by Brenda Pilateke, with Julie Kern and Marc Rowley respectively directing. Meanwhile “Widows and Children First!”, by Harvey Fierstein, and “The Siren Song of Stephen Jay Gould,” by Benjamin Bettenbender, are in the stage managing hands of Kate Teddiman, with Joe Recchia and Sukhpreet Sangha taking the respective directorial reins. Prof. Jennifer Roberts-Smith also offers an open-ended challenge to UW drama students by working towards staging a production of Julius Caesar in Fall 2008. At present the process is “pre-audition,” with more developments still to be announced. editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

cd review

movie review

The Forbidden Kingdom Rob Minkoff Casey Silver Productions

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his is it, folks: the movie that all kung fu film fanatics have been waiting for. It’s the film world’s response to the big question, “Who would win in a fight? Jackie Chan or Jet Li?” Rob Minkoff has approached this question with elegant grace, making this film (starring both Chan and Li) for me an action classic, although at first I was worried. The film’s premise initially has the same vibe from film synopses such as Warriors of Virtue and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3: Turtles in Time, so it sounded like the once-dubbed “J&J Project” would be an instant failure. The story revolves around Jason — played by Michael Angarano from the Disney film Sky High — a teenager from Boston with a huge fascination for kung fu films. He stumbles upon a

staff belonging to the Monkey King, an ancient Chinese immortal who was cast and imprisoned in stone by an evil warlord. It brings Jason back in time, where he meets up with a group of people searching for the same staff Jason has to free the Monkey King. While the premise may seem like a horrible idea, it’s executed really well. For one, Minkoff doesn’t shy away from the violence at all. As a PG-13 film, it has the best of Yuen WooPing’s martial-arts direction, complete with smooth movements and brutal kills. Unless they’re already into big martial arts films, you might want to keep the kids away from this one. The story itself plays very well, although it’s your typical “epic quest.” The characters make up the meat of the film, however. Jackie Chan plays a master of the Drunken Arts, Jet Li plays both the travelling monk and the Monkey King, and new-to-America actress Yifei Liu plays Golden Sparrow, a musician with throwing knives and a habit of referring to herself in the third person. Add Jason, who unlike Ralph Macchio from The Karate Kid, actually learns how to fight against hundreds of soldiers, and you’ve got yourself a hardcore list of fighters. As well, the atmosphere is captured beautifully with great wide-angle shots, CGI-rendered landscapes, and well-orchestrated music and sound effects that just bleed with classic kung fu film quality. For fans of great action scenes and classic references to “Tiger Stance” kung fu, I definitely recommend giving this film a shot. — Peter Trinh

Book Review

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas John Boyne David Fickling Books

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ooks about the Holocaust are never easy to read. Some are down right terrifying and some make the reader nauseous, this book however approaches this period in history from a new and interesting angle and tells a tale of what might have happened, and in doing so open’s up these stories to a whole new generation of readers. The book was originally marketed as a children’s book, and then remarketed as adult fiction because of the content. The author claims it is just a book, and soon it will be a major motion picture due out in the fall of 2008. This is the story of two boys who lose everything they hold dear, yet the reality of their loss is completely different. Bruno’s life is changed when

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his father is given a new job and they move from their five storey home in Berlin to a new home in the country that is only three stories tall. He has lost his three best friends for life, and his home with the banister and the attic window that looks out over all of Berlin. His new bedroom window looks over small huts in a fenced in area where everyone wears stripped pajamas. One day while being rebellious and doing what he should never do, he walks along the fence and meets a boy whom he shares a birthday with. Shmuel and Bruno meet most days and sit on the opposite sides of the fence and talk. As their friendship grows Bruno’s youthful innocence is challenged. The novel is told in the third person narrative, but told from a nine-year-old’s perspective. Though the reader knows that the story takes place at Auschwitz, Bruno cannot pronounce it, and misunderstands the name from the beginning. Yet in not naming the place the author leaves the story as a much broader tale. This book is extremely well written, it takes the reader to a place and time we should never forget, and it reminds us of the human element in all stories. John Boyne has written a book that could become required reading for all school children, and maybe all adults should read it also, lest we forget. So pick it up and walk with Bruno and Shmeul as they develop a growing friendship just sitting and talking through a barbed wire-topped, chain-linked fence. — Steven R. McEvoy

Moby Last Night Moby

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oby’s newest CD, “Last Night,” reflects the rawness and allure of New York night life, emphasizing the femininity of electronica in addition to his famous unique sensual sound. All 14 tracks of “Last Night” celebrate the strangeness and sex appeal of nighttime. The order

of the songs symbolizes the unfolding of events in a night, with the changing of clubs and changing of emotions. The enticing, almost haunting sound that Moby is known for peaks in his singles, “Alice” and “Hyenas” (tracks six and seven), where the abrasive sexuality of nightlife is at it’s juiciest. The last seven tracks on the C.D are especially beautiful. “I’m in Love,” the eighth song, most resembles Moby’s other singles, and depicts a transition, as though he is musically changing settings. The first song, “Ooh yeah” is naturally a strong beginning track, throwing the listener into an uplifted state of mind. In each piece, the art of introducing new creations of sound one by one eventually leads to a climax of musical drama and feeling. The club chaos is in full swing by the second track, called “I love to move in here.” The titles of Moby’s songs are a preview for the experiences his music captures. A deeper electronic sound is accompanied by more vocals on this album, and the usual feminine

sensuality takes on a rougher sound. The female vocalist has edge and emotion, especially in the track “Disco Lies,” which follows the song “I’m in Love,” showing the contrasts in emotion that often happen at a night club. There is evidently a cooling-off during the last three tracks, as the music aims to elicit more of a meditative response. “Sweet Apocalypse” and “Mothers of the Night” reflect experiences of disorientation followed by softer sounds of re-connection and comfort for the listener. The final track, entitled “Last Night” has a slow, almost hypnotic sound as the vocalist observes and reflects the night that has unfolded before her. At times his sound could make one feel small and vulnerable, but also beautiful. The genre essentially promotes the art of getting lost in music, and the C.D “Last Night” is one of the best reflections of Moby’s love for electronica and New York. — Britta Hallberg

How to lose quality in a comic

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’ve recently gotten into the heart of what I talk about by starting a webcomic. Mind you, I’m not going to use this time to promote the actual work, but rather I’d like to explain to you why I’ve never had a webcomic up before, save for projects that didn’t last over four pages of work. I’ve never had the guts to continue my webcomic projects before because I doubted my work as a comic artist (i.e. drawing, writing, presentation). After working on Impression

you don’t expect much anymore from the work — which would explain why Ctrl+Alt+Del (Tim Buckley; www. cad-comic.com) has been criticized by a number of webcomics for its “cut-and-paste” style of artwork. But there are times where this concept works. Greg Dean’s Real Life (www. reallifecomics.com) has been doing this for the comic’s entirety, while keeping intact a lively spirit in the comic—no pun intended. What has saved Real Life from

To me, webcomics can be compared to Japanese anime; there are so many out there, but a lot of their themes are either overdone or they’re not very good at all. and actually getting both positive and negative feedback, I thought I’d give it another shot. I once talked about things that a prospective comicist should look at when it comes to making a comic. However, I forgot to mention about some of the DON’Ts you should consider keeping away from your skill set as well. There are some comics out there that I’ll admit are really bad, but that doesn’t mean that someone can’t still read these comics. For example, there are still some webcomics I continue reading to this day without really knowing why. Maybe I still read them so I know never to do what they’ve done, or I could possibly be very picky on what I consider a “good comic.” But knowing me, for those who have been reading my writing since Day One, you should understand that I’m very accepting of a wide variety of comics already. To say that I love every comic in the world is about as true as the release date for Duke Nukem: Forever. The reason why a good amount of webcomics don’t do very well in my eyes is because they almost always miss the ball on certain aspects that would make them amazing. One of these examples is the use of cut-and-pasted figures and characters. For the most part, it’s a really redundant look, usually to the point where

failing is the writing and the creativity of his project. That seems to be the reason why Dean still enjoys doing these comics: he writes well and he changes it up every once in a while. One important thing a comicist should consider is the material he is writing. It’s true that the best stuff one writes is usually stuff that he or she knows. I for the life of me can’t write a consistently good video game webcomic, mostly because I’m not that kind of gamer. (Trust me on this; I’ve had enough experience to learn this.) I tend to write things that I know about: common life humour, friendship, and the occasional geek joke. If it’s comedy you’re writing, know how to include jokes and references, rather than going all willy-nilly with LOLcat jokes without a care. Also, make sure your jokes are original enough to be both funny and significantly yours. Buckley has fallen victim to this a couple of times already: his reference to the new Iron Man film mimics the joke used in Least I Could Do (Sohmer & Desouza; www.leasticoulddo.com), and Scott Ramsoomair (VG Cats; www.vgcats.com) called him on a joke on April Fool’s Day involving a familiar game character humping his victims while dragging them away. To me, webcomics can be compared to Japanese anime; there are

so many out there, but a lot of their themes are either overdone or they’re not very good at all. However, webcomics have more of a chance of being good due to the amount of room that the artists and writers have to improve. But in order to write and draw something great, a comicist must know where his or her skill level really is. Only then can you try to develop your talents into something greater. And I don’t mean to pick on Mr. Buckley. He’s got a good fanbase, his work has extended greatly and he’s even trying new things with his comic. It’s just— ...well, it’s kind of easy to pick on his stuff when you write about good webcomics for a while. Oh! And on a slightly related note, this Saturday, May 3 is both Free Comic Book Day and Free Comics for Kids Day. I’d recommend going to your local comic shop (such as Carry On Comics) and picking up a free — and hopefully good — comic for you, a younger relative, or your children! ptrinh@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Science & Technology Bored? There’s a condom for that!

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h, at last — the snow is gone, and with the arrival of warm weather comes the relentless urge for summer romance. Now that exams are off your mind, it is the perfect time to spice up your sex habits with a bit of variety. On that note, if you have been committed to the plain old lubricated condom, it may be time to expand the limits of this long-term, exclusive relationship.The best thing about contemporary condom choices is the diversity available to the public. Thankfully, the condom industry is no longer driven by a universal standard of size or shape, but a desire to suit the many demands of a diverse population. And this, by all means, is something worth taking advantage of. With condoms, the slightest amount of change can make a big difference for you and your partner, or sometimes none at all, so the best way to discover all the possibilities condoms have to offer is through trial and error. Don’t be afraid to try something new and never think twice to stop something that you aren’t comfortable with, or anything that hurts. As such, if you are intimidated by the idea of avant-garde condoms, it is worth taking the baby step to trying reduced thickness condoms to experiment with sensation. Thinner condoms up the sensation while still maintaining the contraceptive quality of male condoms. If you are convinced that reductions in thickness translate to reductions in condom effectiveness, you can take the route of trying nonlatex condoms, such as polyurethane which are thinner yet stronger than latex. The two advantages of polyurethane condoms are that they facilitate better heat transmission and have a thinner design, both of which mean increased sensation to the user. Experimenting with scents and colours is also a simple solution

for new sensations without being radical. If you have already tried these options and are looking for a more noticeable change, it may be time to join the ‘male condom revolution.’ The newest condom on the market is specifically designed for males and based on the notion that past condoms constrict the head of the penis too much, which limits sensation during sex. This condom features an expanded or sometimes twisted reservoir at the top, to allow for more friction where the greatest bundle of nerve endings is located — at the head of the penis. Now, for something both partners can enjoy. Studded and ribbed condoms have long since entered the mainstream, and are sold everywhere from convenience to grocery stores to pharmacies, indicating that taking an interest in actively enhancing your love life is no longer taboo in our society. These condoms can do some serious spicing up for the love life. Both the ribbed and studded condoms (and sometimes a combination of both) are designed to enhance sensation during sex. They are undoubtedly worth trying for those suffering from a lack of sensation during sex. No matter your choice of condom, don’t forget to include foreplay and lubricant as necessary to max out the pleasure. A word of warning about ribbed and studded condoms, though: just as with any sex tool, their preference depends on the individual, and some users have found them to be too rough for enjoyment — small-bodied women, in particular. Congratulations! You have now taken the first steps towards experimentation. May you find many pleasures on your journeys in this foreign land. And who knows, maybe handcuffs aren’t that far behind. alomako@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

55

Maria Karpenko reporter

Babies’ gender may be linked to moms’ breakfast

According to Scientific America, biologist Fiona Mathews of the University of Exeter in England and her colleagues surveyed 740 first-time mothers on their pre-pregnancy eating habits and found that 56 per cent of those on high-calorie diets had sons, compared with 45 per cent of those on diets with lower calories. The amount of calories was not the only factor. Specific foods also played a role. “Prior to pregnancy, breakfast cereal, but no other item, was strongly associated with infant sex,” the researchers wrote in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. “Women producing male infants consumed more breakfast cereal than those with female infants.” The reason is unclear, but Mathews thinks that glucose may be key. Glucose is the by-product of carbohydrate breakdown. Carbohydrate consumption in the form of cereals leads to high levels of glucose. Some studies have shown that glucose enhances the growth of male fetuses in vitro. Scientists have found that cows, deer and horses produce more male offspring when they have generous diets. It has also been found that human female fetuses require less energy to develop. Matthews notes that low glucose levels may signal the body that food is scarce and that it would be more rational to produce a female fetus. The finding may explain the drop in the ratio of male to female births in well-fed industrialized nations, a fact that Mathews credits to the decline

Taylor Helferty staff reporter

Microsoft to release Windows XP Service Pack 3

Microsoft is planning to release the long-anticipated Service Pack 3 for Windows XP after a last-minute delay. Service packs fix bugs and security issues in an operating system. In Service Pack 3, there are 1,073 fixes for XP including four features that were previously exclusive to Vista. These features from Vista are mostly background security features that improve safety when accessing networks, but one of them also allows you to install XP without providing the product key (although activation will still eventually be required). If you are a Windows XP user, the service pack will be available for free on the Windows Update website (www.windowsupdate. microsoft.com) when officially released and is scheduled as an Automatic Update for June 10th. Xerox makes disappearing ink

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in the proportion of women eating breakfast. She notes that the number of adolescent girls eating breakfast in the U.S. declined from 85 to 65 percent between 1965 and 1991. Such an interesting result will need to be replicated in other populations, such as those in developing nations that are chronically underfed, before any definitive conclusions are made. Extreme diets may redu ce lifespan

Researchers at the University of Glasgow’s faculty of biomedical and life sciences conducted a study that showed that fish given a “binge then diet” food regime had a reduced lifespan of up to 25 per cent. “The fish on the fluctuating diet put just as much effort into breeding – the males became brightly colored as usual and the females produced the normal number of eggs. However, on average their lifespan was threequarters that of animals eating a constant amount every day,” Prof. Neil Metcalfe told BBC News. The research found that the difference in lifespan was not a consequence of more rapid aging but an increase in the risk of sudden death. “It seems that uneven growth, due to the fluctuation in the amount eaten per day is responsible for the increase in the risk of sudden death. This is possibly because the body tissues are more likely to have imperfections due to growth spurts,” added Metcalfe. These findings could be applied to humans who follow extreme patterns of dieting, and especially could be seen in teenagers and children who are still growing. “But it would be for extreme switches in

run it through the printer again, which will automatically erase what was on the paper. This way you won’t have to throw out and buy new paper for all those scrap notes and printouts you make for an hour or two of use. The printer also saves energy consumption. It takes 204,000 joules to make a piece of paper (about as much energy as running a 60-watt light bulb for an hour), and another 114,000 to recycle it. The printer uses 1000 joules to print and erase paper, and only 100 joules to print it if you let it fade naturally. The printer and paper are expected to hit the market in a few years. IBM measures force taken to move an atom

IBM has discovered that it takes 210 piconewtons to move a cobalt atom across a smooth platinum surface. A piconewton is a trillionth of a newton, which is the amount of force required to accelerate a kilogram one metre per second squared. As a comparison, it takes 30 billion piconewtons to lift a penny. So what is the importance of this? Why was a computer company the one to figure it out? Moving atoms may not seem necessary to computers, but this is a big leap in figuring out how to make processors or memory devices consisting of strands of molecules or a few atoms. This would allow the storage of exabytes of data – an exabyte is a billion gigabytes (and you thought those new two terabyte hard drives were mas-

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

diet. Just skipping lunches would not have any effect, but if they had several weeks of one diet followed by several weeks of the extreme opposite, then there could be an effect,” said Metcalfe. Mental workout good for the brain

According to BBC News, a U.S.-Swiss team of researchers says that computer-based exercises that challenge an individual according to ability may be more effective than crosswords. In the study, 35 participants were given daily exercises lasting about 25 minutes, while another 35 participants were left as control. The exercises were repeated daily for up to three weeks. After that period, individuals who had been subjected to the exercises performed significantly better on problems unrelated to the computer exercises than their counterparts. “The difference was most pronounced in those who had been slower to start with, but the mental ability of everyone who had taken part improved,” BBC learned from Prof. Walter Perrig of the University of Bern, who carried out the study with colleagues from the University of Michigan. Few scientific studies have been conducted to test the efficacy of computer-based brain exercises. MindFit is one example of the systems available. “There is evidence that such stimulation prompts brain cells to start branching out and form new connections with other cells,” Baroness Susan Greenfield, one of Britain’s bestknown scientists, told the BBC.

sive). It would also allow the ability to go through all this data very rapidly. In other words, that 100GB music library you’re so proud of is about to get a hell of a lot bigger. Ubuntu 8.04 “Hardy Heron” released

Last week, the full release – or the “Long Term Support” version – of Ubuntu Linux’s newest operating system was made available to the public. This release includes more support, more programs, and a better look for the most popular Linux distribution out there. Ubuntu is a free operating system centered on community input and involvement in creating better and free software. The Kubuntu – a version of Ubuntu using the KDE interface instead of the usual Gnome interface – comes with a whole new makeover that looks sort of like a mix between Vista and OS X. It includes transparency, slicker windows and toolbar, and a dashboard similar to that of the Mac. For the Ubuntu users out there, I’d recommend upgrading if you haven’t already for the added support and features available. For those of you who don’t know Linux well, take a look at www.ubuntu.com to get an idea and see if it’s a change you want before starting the next year. It is available for free download at www.ubuntu.com or from the Computer Science Club in the Math and Computer Science Building Room 3036/3037.


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Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008 sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Here comes a Warrior UW alumnus Bob Copeland returns to tackle top athletics role; Judy McCrae aims for new game Dylan Cawker intern

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fter 14 years in the position of Athletic Director and an amazing 37 years at Waterloo, Judy McCrae decided it was time for a change of scenery. “It was time for retirement and a good time for the department to make the change. I am looking forward to another 20 years of a different lifestyle for myself,” said McCrae, adding that she “would like to do some volunteering in another field or two.” Over the 14 years McCrae has been head of the Athletics department she has tackled many issues, but the accomplishment she is most proud of is the service the athletic department now provides to all students. “We believe in the students and their special time at Waterloo. We work to make sure that we do as much as possible to have their needs met as they are growing with the Waterloo experience.” There’s no doubt that during McCrae’s tenure one of her main goals was to reach out more to the students of

to lead the department of athletics and recreational services has been an aspiration. “It’s a once-in-a-career opportunity, as evidenced by the fact that UW has had only three athletic directors in the past 50 years,” said Copeland. When asked why Copeland made such an excellent candidate for the position, McCrae said: “Bob is committed to Waterloo. He is committed to the ‘whole person’ concept of athletic development. He knows what support the teams need, and he also understands the marketing part of sport.” As a former UW student and athlete, Copeland does acknowledge that this experience will definitely help him in the position; however, he does not feel this gives him any sort of an advantage over past directors. “I don’t think this provides me with any ‘edge’ over past athletic directors,” he said, “each of whom had long and distinguished track records with UW through coaching, teaching, as well as their own experience as elite athletes from other schools and contexts.”

“We need to increase our resources to support one of the most diverse and accessible programs in Canada, and to remain competitive with our peers.” — Bob Copeland, incoming athletics director

Waterloo and not just the varsity athletes. This is why she feels that students’ awareness of the Athletic Department and daily physical activity is the thing that has changed the most since she started here. “Students know that physical activity should be part of their regime as a student. We are plugged into the wider campus life.” Now say hello to Bob Copeland, a former University of Waterloo student himself and the first Athletic Director in Waterloo’s history to have attended this school. While Copeland was a student at Waterloo he earned himself both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in recreation and leisure studies, all while playing on the varsity football squad. Copeland will be making his debut as athletic director on Canada Day, where his duties will include watching over 600 student athletes on 31 teams. Noting how much of a large role sports plays in Copeland’s everyday life, it’s not surprising at all that it has always been a goal of his to someday return to UW Athletics. “…The opportunity

He also couldn’t say enough good things about McCrae: “Waterloo has been fortunate to have had exceptional leadership from Judy McCrae.” When Copeland steps into his new position July 1 there are a few issues he already has in mind that he would like to dive right into. “We are facing a turning point in athletics in Ontario with the primary issues involving athletic awards (scholarships) and a renaissance of facility development to improve outdated infrastructure and meet growing activity demands. We need to increase our resources to support one of the most diverse and accessible programs in Canada, and to remain competitive with our peers. This means being competitive in recruiting the most accomplished student athletes consistent with our educational mission, and providing the facilities and leadership to meet the activity needs of our diverse student population, which is anticipated to grow to 31,000 by 2017.” dcawker@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

dylan cawker

UW alumnus and incoming athletics director Bob Copeland in his South Campus Hall office, favouring a photo of UW President David Johnston (right) holding up a hockey jersey with then-outgoing UW President James Downey, in recognition of Johnston’s Harvard hockey years. “There’s a lot of athletic spirit at this university,” said Copeland. “It just shows itself in a lot of unexpected ways.”


20

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, May 2, 2008

A Medley of record-setting UW student and swimmer Keith Beavers part of team headed to Beijing Summer Olympics Dylan Cawker

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intern

t’s not very often in life that we get the chance to meet world class athletes, let alone anyone who is one of the best in the world at what they do. Well, there is at least one more of those select few here at the University of Waterloo. His name is Keith Beavers and he has qualified for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. Born in London, Ontario, Beavers began taking swimming lessons at the age of six after being encouraged by his parents to do so. Seems like it was a good decision now on his parents’ part and an even better decision on his part to follow through with it. Beavers emerged as one of Canada’s bright young stars at the age of 19 in 2002 after taking home a bronze medal at the Pan Pacific Championships in Yokohama, Japan in the 200-metre backstroke event. Not only did he earn third place in the race but he also set a new Canadian

record in the process. That record didn’t stand too long, though, because Beavers broke it again in 2003 at the U.S. Nationals. Then, in 2006 at the Pan Pacific Trials in Montreal Keith reset the record for a third time clocking in at a time of 1:58.97, a time that earned him a spot on the 2006 Pan Pacific Team. A year later at the Pan

part of the race you can do any stroke other than the three used before; the majority of swimmers choose to use front crawl. Beavers’s first crack at the Olympics came in 2004 in Athens, Greece as he raced in the 200-metre backstroke with a time of 1:59.98, placing him 12th, and also competed in the 400-metre

Lenny Krayzelburg right in front of Krayzelburg’s home crowd, a careerchanging milestone for sure. Oleg Chernukhin, the University of Waterloo’s swimming star, represents the Region of Waterloo Swim Team with Beavers and also had the chance to take part in the Olympic qualifiers this year alongside him.

His performances at the trials were inspiring and I am looking forward to seeing him do even better in Beijing. — Oleg Chernukhin, Male Athlete of the Year American Games, Beavers received a bronze medal for his efforts in the 400-metre individual medley (IM) and posted a personal best time in the 200-metre IM. A medley is a race in which there are four different types of strokes involved: the butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and freestyle. Each stroke is used for a quarter of the race in that order. For the freestyle

                          

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IM with a time of 4:21.47, placing him 16th. Not horrible considering he was going up against the best in the world — but this year Beavers is back as he hopes to build on the experience from Athens. There is no question that the fourth year kinesiology student is capable of pulling off some major upsets; at the U.S. open Beavers defeated twotime Olympic backstroke champion

Unfortunately Oleg didn’t qualify for the Olympic team but he couldn’t say enough good things about Beavers and his never-give-up work ethic. “Keith is an exceptionally talented and hard-working athlete and he truly deserved his place on the team. His performances at the trials were inspiring and I am looking forward to seeing him do even better in Beijing.�

The newly crowned Male Athlete of the Year went on to say: “I think we should all take pride in the fact that there is an Olympian walking among us on campus, especially since there has been quite a bit of negative publicity about UW and athletics.� Coming into Olympic qualifiers this year, the pressure was on. Unlike in 2004 when Beavers had already pre-qualified for the Olympics, this year he had to go big or go home. And he went big, finishing the 400metre individual medley in the top spot with a time of four minutes and 16.98 seconds — a personal best, in fact. Beavers, who resides in Orangeville when not attending the University of Waterloo, now enters a rigorous training program so he can be as prepared as possible for the race of a lifetime in Beijing at the 2008 Summer Olympics. dcawker@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Top Athletes’ Awards banquet Dylan Cawker intern

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t was a big night for athletes, coaches and administrators on March 28 as the Department of Athletics hosted the 48th annual Athletic Awards Banquet. Awards were handed out to those that especially stood out during another successful year in University of Waterloo Athletics. Some of the award winners included Dorothy Lui of the Waterloo badminton team who was awarded the Federation of Students Female Rookie of the Year while Athar Zia of the men’s rugby team was awarded the Federation of Students Male Rookie of the Year. Zia also had the honour of being named OUA Rugby Rookie of the Year in a very impressive and successful first season on the pitch for the Warrior squad. Adrian Lui of men’s rugby, Dave Steiner of men’s volleyball, women’s golf coach Carla Munch-Miranda, Diane Kelly of Warrior women’s rugby and Laura Sardone of Warrior track and field/cross country were also winners of their respective awards. The biggest winners of the night

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were two of Waterloo’s finest athletes, Gaby Lesniak of Women’s volleyball and Oleg Chernukhin of the Warrior swim team. Lesniak, a fourth year kinesiol-

Athlete of the Year and was awarded 2008 Totzke Trophy for his efforts in the pool. The third year mechatronics engineer student who calls Fredericton, New Brunswick home had this to

This award was probably the greatest accomplishment I have ever had in my life. — Gaby Lesniak, Female Athlete of the Year ogy student hailing from Hamilton, Ontario, received the 2008 Marsden Trophy, the trophy awarded to the Female Athlete of the Year. “This award was probably the greatest accomplishment I have ever had in my life. It’s really nice to be recognized for all your hard work throughout my four years here,� she said after winning the award. Lesniak got her start in the sport at the age of 12 after giving a hand at tennis; she made the switch after she grew tired of her brother beating her in it. The award capped off a very successful year for Lesniak and her Warrior teammates after making it to the final four in the OUA playdowns. Chernukhin was named Male

say about winning the award. “Winning Athlete of the yYar award was a great honour. UW Athletics has a great history and I feel proud to be a part of it. With Chernukhin taking home four gold medals from the OUA championships and a bronze from the CIS championships; he also competed in the Olympics trials last month in Montreal. Oleg failed to crack the final squad but still enjoyed the experience, “I think I placed somewhat lower than I expected. But, I would say I’m still happy to have participated at Olympic trials, since you only get this opportunity so many times in your life.� dcawker@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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