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mprint tember 14, 1984; Vol. 7, No. 9; The Student Newspaper; university of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario.

tiddv: moral relativity

1 I

y Patrick Hayes

"The end justlf~esthe means," G. Gordon L ~ d d ysatd about is part In the 1972 Watergate burglary. "I deploy the power 01 my will, a s I would any tool at my sposal, In order t o reach that end." 111 rt,. /'Dtlferentlatlng between the legal Jellnltlons 01 r~rulw~r - m e s deemid morally wrong In a n 01 themsehcs. and I I I U ~ U I I I rohrhrtum, c r m e s deemed wrong by lcg~blat~ce dct. Mr Lldd) lrplamed that legislated laws may be b ~ o k e nlor a "h~gher a n d "'

kicted co-conspirator. Mr. Lldd). spoke betole an 01 approxlmately I.6W at the U n ~ w r s l t )01 W a t e ~loo er I I. He dctuscd the undelcurrent ol anlmowy h~m that had appeared on campua. u ~ t h the ~ n 11rst1c.w of hls openlng. non-apologct~cremark\ spoke 01 the many ~Uuslon\Amerlcanb h e undcr the9ystem hascentlnued t o glow 'would be no money lelt eientuallq and. "An

association." He talked in a n animated fashion. occasionally usinggestures reminiscent of Adolf Hitler. His message was simple. I he strong and powerful uill d o what they must t o survive. Mr. Liddy said he does not see a "wrong" in breaking a legislated law to achiebc that end. Mr: Liddy said hc lully expected t o be arrested and t o go t o prison for his involvement in the burglary. He said he had not been prepared for the reaction of the American people to the 'Watergals affair. M r - ~ l d d vsald he could not understand how narvemrm Piesident Richard M. Nixon wasacriminal. Hesaid Mr. Nixon In hlr lorsign polic) than hls d o m o t i e polic). A quc.rtio~iand anr\rcr period lolloucd Mr. 1.1dd)'r spwch. I.~dd) \ad he c n p ) \ tough qucrtions. and caut~oncdthat the) ma) rccciie tough ansuers. H c reccitcd a luu pointed qucrtion u l ~ l c hhc addrcrrcd killlull). and screral cundcrnnationr lrom those \rho did not appreclatc his bare knuckles stqlc ol ;: Isctu~lng. In a n i n t s r \ ~ u u .M I . I.idd) alllrmed his bc.llcl In the &&&@v:

1

come I r w . r n d belong t o the people 01 the U n ~ t c d In 1986. I'~rrldenth m m ) Carter'rseclet brlcl~ngb w k lound n a d d i k m a l lunds are requ~redb) the gokcrnmcnt. 11s waq t o Ronald Reagan's headquarters, and a s Mr. Lldd) Rcrcnuo S e r c ~ c eIr sent out. w ~ t hthe retram, "Suck bald. "it had not grown legs a n d walked ocer there."'(lt IS part t~tuilco ~ u r p m eU P ~ U ) U I I LI .I I~ Low of) t h e i v..p ~ c a lU.S. practice 01 each majorlt) party mounttngan 7hc Plur/untbcr:\ 111tu11c . . prurrh.r i~>clirclc.d rhr gives. "in thc States. the reason 1 Intensice political intelligence operation against the other party C>ceL during Utiwtirtiur~1 1 4 i .Si~~rilor rh';Ji it/' Moth Soc :\ giguriric pi!& rie U I I the ~ Liclriuppi~tgin a presidential election year." Mr. Liddl said. it is because my fellow ci~i/ensarc licingii\es ol'iliusion." he tirg Soi~prc~sidiwr. G'ord lkwr~!'. ( . $ I t . lA:ll!?l -Mr. 1.idd) said he bclic\cd the characts~ol "1)ccp I 111-oat" LII wrrihurio~~ think it's important that you Watcryatc'co he a compo\ite. or a collection 01 ~ n d i \ ~ d u a l hIru.\ I ~ C P I I wrur.~n*il u.\ hu.\ hiwt r l r c ~ l r i ~ . ~ imprint photo by Richard Clinton down there. because we arc your conncclcd i ~ i s u m cwa) with the go\crnmcnt, I he cornpt)\itc ae n c i ~ h b o u r s and we h a \ e historicall\ a \ e r \ close Ma5 used to co\cr them. be said. -

Inside


-Fri.,

Fed Flicks: U ncon~mon Valour starring Gene Hachman. Arts Lecturt‘ 116, X p.m. f-eds: $1; other>

Sept. 14-

Chinese C hristian Fellowsship is holding a “Setting Goals and Reaching Goals” session. Speakers M,ill be in attendance. 7:X p.m. Room 261, Seminar!, Building, W LU.

-

Sat., Sept. 15 -

Pinter-Beckett: An c\ening of three pIaSh. Directed by Wojtek Ko/linshi. 8:X p.m. Thea:re 01 the ,4rts.

‘I’hc weekly English C‘on~eraat~on Class for lorcign students, their spouws and ~lsiting lacult) begins in the f-orcign Student Otlicc, nccdleh Half 2C;XC;.2 to

Waterloo Christian Fellowship Squaw Dance. C,C C;reat Hall. 8:3C; p.m. ~~ I I:30 p.m. f’rofessionaf callers. E\erqone welcome.

4 p.1n.

1 1:x f’.Ill. CC‘ The Mug Coffeehouse. X:36 p.m. 116. Good load and 1riendlq people. Hot cider.

5:(X

Orgatll/atlonaI SlcetIng & thenpIa>.

Chess C‘lub All Mcl(‘ornc. 7 p.m. C‘C’ 113.

-Tues.,

\ lnegar.

Learn to Impro\ ise! InlpI-o~isational comcd> 1kit;

A 11-w Morhshop 011 at I p.m. in Hag! Hall

Pinter-Beckett: An e\ cning 01 t hrcc pla! 4. L)lrectcd b> &‘c)-itch Ko/linshi. X:(X; p.m. & midnight. I hcatrc 01 the

Auditions t 01 / ~slzi/y. a traglcomed! . ;l:ld 7110Uo.\ of SC~\Y~II Firc~r~s.a children’s pIa!. kcill be held in H H I X(1, J:-j() 6:X p.m. Ao preparation required. Inlo: e\t. 3730.

at the

Schnitzing Bee .Joxph Schneider Haus., I o:oo p.m. Help prepare apples ior: dq ing III the Schnitlhaus. mahlng apple butter. pressing into apple cldcl, nlah~ng apple jell! and cider

AIT\.

-Sun.,

Sept,. 16-

Laurel (‘reek and Seed> Husincs\! a.111. and 2:(X p.m. to look at and Icrns of tall. and learn hoI\ IOI- minter.

the wnle

Hihcs at I I:00 colou~~1~1I berrlcs plants

Health*W’ise through

Sept. 18-

t-ltness

C‘anlpu\

Asws\mcnt\

Health

arc

f’ronlotlotl.

a\allable Include\

a

complete litncss c\aluation and per\onaI health PI olilc. ficcoillmendations for change arc di\cuswd M lth the lltne\s consultant. Studcnts 4 15. Stall and f-acult) 525. f’hone xx496’9 lo1 ;L one-hour appointment. Health & Salct! C‘lub Dal Vi\lt the C‘a~llpu\ C‘ctltlc and tahc III the various dlspla!s in the Great Hall. I alh to them. join them oI.just brctmsc but don’t miss it. I 1% a.m. 3:30

p.m.

prepare

Big Sisters 01 Kltchencr-Watci loo and arca i\ a 5 u&h OI icntatlon sccl\\ion lctr \ oluntccr\ beginning f ucsda!. Scpttmbcr Iti at 7:N; p.m. II JOU are 20 jcars 01 age and oldci. a I ull time K-I+ rcsidcnt. and \\ouId lihc to bcfrlcnd a ~II-I bet\\ccn the ages 014 and 16, call XX&I(N; bclorc Scptmchcr 17. 011~ jcar cornniitnicnt rcquircd.

hold111g

New

Slim~Line

Scientific

,‘Programxhable

HI?J5c

Mennonite Doctrine:A CI itlcal stud> 11-0111 tbc \antagc point ot the Bible and current ccumcnical thought. Article 2: f>i\ 111c f<c\ elation. c’of 1ee and di\cus\ion lollo\~s the scr\icc. Conrad Grcbcl C‘ollcgc

c hapcl.

C‘hristian Worship 011 C‘anlpus. Sundays at Ici:Xi a.1.. H H 2X0. Sponsored bj H III-011 C‘ampus Ministr!. l.\cq one w~l~omc. Chaplain Graham L. Morbe!. Holy ~‘orutnunion !11 Kcltcr Memorial C‘hapcl. \+ith cot Ice hour lollo\~ ing. Spon>orcd b\ Ldutheran C‘anlpus M inlstrb.

-Mon., M aterloo

.Ic\\

III\ itcs \oti meet pcoplc

to

Sept.

ish

Students

17Aswclatlon

tllllcl

OUI bagel br uncIlc\. A great place and llcar \pcahc! \ I I :3c; I :30 p.m.

Bible Study: all In\ itcd. I 177 Albert Street at Scagranl Dri\c. Sponsored b) f .uthcran C‘amp~~s M i nistq .

-Wed., Eng Sot C’hariot Race: OM11 home-made chariot I2 1loo11 C’f’H courtyard. L~ening C‘ollcgc

Prayer

in

Huron f’.“‘.

4:.x;

Progressive ~‘on~cr\att~c C‘a~llf~us C‘lub No. it’s not another \ ICIOI’! ccltbratlon. this I\ ONI lirst 01 \\ haI p~~o1111~cs to bc ;ili csclting lcar. 1.) \\L ~IOOf h I f hCc‘f<OI. 1. I’.c‘. C‘andidatc hcchlng nonl~natlon loi the I’m\ 111c1al f<ldlng M III bc-llcre to \ I\I~ us. C’omc 0111 and 11lcct tlcr. C‘C‘ I IO.

(‘ampus

f.ach and

team

111u\t

ha\c 11-s pla~crs.

consist 01 Iour All mclconlc.

and

C’hapel

to

CC‘ I IO.

Sept. 19-

xrmon.

C‘onrad

(;I-chel

f’.“‘.

M~iiisli! I cllo\\4hip.

~‘0111I110l1 kleal: ILlcc~lllg: uclco~llc.

f-elIo\\ship Collcgc. All

St. U’C\lC! (;lahanl

-1.X 7:(X I)lnlllg f lall. c hapcl, St. 1’;11ll~\ I hlol bq. Campw,

l’;lul’\

C‘haplaln.

c\ent

3:30

Numerical

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Discount

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at

THE UW BQQK STORE SOUTH

CAMPUS

House

01

;LIC’ holding an 1‘0o111 I IO at 5:36. All attend a.4 \ie I\ill bc a pcrmancIlt meeting tinlc. II Lou arc lntcrestcd 111 the club but can’t attend the meeting, call f>a\ c at X86-97 14. t>ipc~xmce and talent arc not

organmtlonal Intcicstcd all-anging

rcq ulrcd. be cfultc

BLYTH

FESTIVAL

Country Tues., 8:00 p.m. Humanities

Sept.

production

$10.50 Theatre

22,

From the talented people who brought you QUIE? ION-THE LAND, THE TOMORROW BOX and dozens of fine productions at the Blyth Summer Festival comes a light-hearted country musical, full of laughs, good-times and foot-stompin’ music. Set in a small-town hotel barroom, COUNTRY HEARTS will have you grinning from ear to ear as a few townsfolk and tourists are snowbound together overnight, along with a travelling country band - Sam Slick and the Slowpokes!

L

%‘c

III Cc‘

bccausc

tllc

tllectlng

u if1

Students 01 ObJcc*tI\ 15m. I aped 111tc1.i ICM fi;Ind. Dr. l.cotia~~d I’clholl ;itlcf excerpts COLIC-\c ‘* I hc l’hllosoph~ 01 Ob~cctn~snl”. 75 nllnutcs. ~I\CLI\\IOII m111 lollo~~. All 7:w

;~ICI loo Hoard ncu ICICI-cc\

I\ rccIlIItIIlg

01 Hahhctball lOI rl1c 19x4 85

\c;l\oIl. l~dlicatloIlal nlcctlng\ are hclcl e\ C1.J hl ondq I I.0111 : 9 p.m. at St. \llchacls ~cl1ool: 64 I,ll~\CI~\lL! A\c. M ., ;IcIo\\ IIon u l-1 f OI mole IIllO~ mat1o11 contact Ian at 579-7370. ( I so 1rll~~I~nlatlon ~lcctlllg. hlldC ~nlall-\calc bu\lnc\\ dc\ clopnlcnt III Larlbla ~crlcl:i’Llllg aI1 I I1COlllC PI oductl\ c cnlpl~~~ illcllt loi comnlunit! 7.30 p.n1. :1dulr M atcl loo. r;s5-

I<cclcatloIl I7 I I c\t.

\taIIlng S,;lIC\.

Kitchener-W’aterloo f<cd c‘ro~ f3lood f)ono~ C‘linic. 2:(X p.m. 8:X p.m. f ii3t L nitcd Church. King 81 U’iIIlani Sts., U ;I~CI loo. Quota 325 L>onot 4.

I\

tt1c

I

111da \,lOl!

I’lcwlltatloIl: I3ot\\\ana a11d solllcc iI lid nlcnlbel 4.

c Cll(lC. IS5 3 I44 101 dCLlll\.

~~r~ll~th\ 01 il

and Illa1‘llcd

I’.“‘.

G.I,.l,.O.l\. u tiICI loo)

HOL’Sf out

IS

(0;1\ \f”“lW’

and lng

I c\b\all 1 ibcratloil 01 II> \\cchl! C‘OI f L-f

bcginnlng at t(:3(i f3.111. III ~‘104ClS ;lI c I or clothes.

C‘inema (;ratis Grca~ llall.

I hc CJoodb>c

-Thurs.,

C’C‘ I I(;. C o:llc

(r11.1. 9:36

Sept. 20-

kll1.g St. b..

dltcctcd b! I\oIl1aI1’s

01 her

I.

Labatt’s

C‘FC’A~105

honlosc\uaII~!. ~pon\o~ccl b\ the c 01111111ss1011. f cdcrat1on ot Studc11ts. all othc1.4 52. 7.3; p.m. Al. 11.3.

The Air Farce Sat., Sept. 8:00 p.m. Humanities

M lth A! II l~onl hl\ I otal t~mc ~\clco1l1c.

f II 1 33-r.

Winners of 7 Actra awards, 1 Juno and others too numerous to mentio,n!

of

($7.00 Stu./Sen.) Reserved Seats

Graham

\houJd

bc pi ompt

tiitchener-I\

olllclal\

.lohn

Hearts 18 to Sat. Sept.

meeting

I’lcasc bl iel.

~calI/ation U’oIllcn’\ t cds: 5

The

f>cbatcs:

\tudcnt\

IJ,I\\/,\,

HALL

(‘111 i\tian f-aith 7.30 p.111. Uc\lc~ 1’;1111’4 Collcgc. I cadcr: Chaplam Mot bq. All uclco~nc.

the St.

p.m.

The

Complex Functions-The and the Imaginary.

Eaploring C‘hapcl.

29 Theatre

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome aboard! You’re in for a fun-filled evening of LIVE Air Farce madness! $11.50 ($10.00 Stu./Sen.) Reserved Seats

/ 885-4280

p.111..

OII

CC


ews,

Imprint,

Friday,

I4illtt~r

Iv I’ Ltwt1,

September

3,,

14, 1984.

Election ‘84

1 bough the Liberals lost a great deal of ground locall!. botll MI-. Myers and Mr. Needham expressed satis\iaction Lzith their respective parties’ shall-e of‘ the lotcs. Myers cited the so-called “1 or) tidal ~a\ e” as minimising his disappointnient. sa> ing that it was \ irtuallb impossible to topple an incumbent with that sort of support behind him. Mr. MJ’crs asserted that no OIIC element 01 the traditional. Grit electoral coalition defected any more than the others. He also saw the Tory landslide as primarily a I ote for change, e\ en change for the sake of change. Mr. Needham, whose party r‘inished about the same as it did in 1986, locall>, and nationall),, seemed content oker uhat he belieLed was an increase in union support for the part) in the riding. Though hc conccdcd that some N DI’ botcs did escape to the ConserLatiLcs b) ua~ of‘ those Manting to “111al\c dtimncd Mr. Sccdham. a prolcssor sure the I2iberals didn’t get clectcd”. 01‘ economics at the Uni\ersitJ 01 Waterloo. asscsscd his support positil cl). Needham listed anti-I.iberal scntimcnt as the reason tor the landslide, though hc made allo~ancc Ior Hrian M Lllronc>‘s strong ~CI-lorn~ancc late III the campaign.

by Jeff’ C‘onwq

fell

linprint

and

staff .1

hc

Central

5 t II d c I1 t

Association (C’SA) at tlic CJni\ crsit? of Guclpli mot tlic Bo\ c\ C‘oninii5sion 11ith ;I pichct I\ hen it came to h~jld Its hearings at that uni\crsit! on Scptcmber IO. Se\ cntccn students participated in ihe one-and-a-hall hour pichct outside the hearings cari-! ing picket signs to c1prcss their 0 p p 0 s i t i 0 n t 0 I 11 I‘ t I1 c I’ education cutbachs. UniLeIsit! of Guclph7 nils the first stop 01 tlic tZo\cJ Commission in its toLli. of

on

tl1c t I111d

\\CI’C

I~cld

da!

01

about

1111lc

that the hearings

cra’y.

the nisi II c;lIl pLI~. Hi-iicc. C’SA \‘.I’. Ac;idcniic. \talcd tl1at she “con\idcrcd the denions~ra-

tl1c

111

:,I\ ;t ci d

0 t I1 c I‘

IlClLldl~

;I

tl1c stall

tlic

stiidcntb.

iacult!

and

sttal‘l.

bLlt

acre\\

the

pi-o\iIlcc

to

\ pea

kc

I1 c

t

l’CpI~C4CIltLtti\

C

. 01

and

a

o\

tl10ugl1t tl1at the

Hrucc and IdC

! ot-II

Il

\\

I11ollcrltLlIl

2x

incial

dcnion\tiation in .I oronto on the last da> 01 the Ho\ e> hearings. She \aid tliat arc

s~ll cIlt:, c\

;t ngl-lcl-

bclorc

Cl‘

t ban

about

tllc

rccci\cd reports and complaints about o~c~ci~o~tding III classes and about the inabllrtj 01 students cLltbach\

and

she

tlmt

Imprint local

campaign.

c~~ntl~ols cdLlcatlol1.

\\CIC

3OIllC

Universal lcdclal

O\CI’

rcscarcl1 01 tl1c

access pa>

traHslcr

and

to

lclt

IlC

IOI

and \\CIC

by J.D. Bonser

uni\crsitics.

mcnts

dc\clopn1cnt

I\SllC\

photo

tighter

pos~-sL’coIl&1I

\

llllclcaI~dls;lI

r11o>st

manlcIlt

plcshllg,

IlCCd.

t3rlIcc

01 t IlC StlldCnth coIIccI I1 abotlt the cutbacks and ICC incix;i:,cs Lindci considciation b! t tic 130\ c! C‘onlnii\sion \\ ii s lrom the ontal’o \ ctci~il;1r~ C‘ollcgc.

I IlC

ha

OllC C.‘ilIllC

IllllldlUl ;Is

01

;t grollp

011 ~LIIIIIIICI‘

t hc

l,

111011~s

Gcncral

Mallagcl.

iCla1-1\

bi-cab.

papc~‘\

Inlplyng

lol~ma~.

tllat

qLIal t~

the

LIIIIOII

llad

rllarhctlrlg

and

110 s;i\

III

hl1..

dll-cction.

Athinbotl’s

cloc~umcnt cntltlcd “/Zdtl1i[11sttrat[\~‘ (‘hangets I'hasc I /Id nlinistration C‘hang~s” 5tatcs that “In 01 dcr to tic up the loose ends hcrc. OLINlirs,t step LS ould bc 10 ha\c the Board 1.c~ciiid Impact’s constitution.” Impact’s 1 ditoi. AIICIICL\ Kolaslnshl. \~as ~I’L‘II 0 da>5 l c)tlcc 01 the lcctlg dccldl~ the late 01 tl1c ncw+apcr’s c~otlstItLitI.oIl bLIt \\a\ unable to attend due to ~IIO~ cc~lll!lcnl~. I IlC dcclsIon to cancC1 tl1c CoIl\tlfLlt1ol1’4

c‘\LLlcicllts

to

s,1ldcllt4’

/\thln\on. \cl 101 111pi~op~~als ad\ ocatlng tllo ci~\solutlon 01 Impact’s 311ucl111’c \\ IIIIC tilt nialorit\ 01 b,tudcnts \\C’IC tllc

tl1c

pr.o\

tl1q

coLII’sc.\

c.umplc

C’otI.,t,t.\luti\‘~)

OLlld

lor

Scpwmbcr

II110

of Purliatttt~ttr (Pt.ogrr.ui\y ut u cutttyr4.s tttet>litlg twt*lit~t- this bIycqt-. !!4tJll ht’r

ga1c

I’5

I 0 I‘ LI Il

assoCl;itIon

picket pl

gcr OIIC

nlcn~bcr.

Ms.

lo

cLlt-b;icA\.

I‘ c 3 s c d

lacult!

baths in the 11III\ crslt) C‘cntrc at noon. .lohn King. t’rcsidcnt ol tl1c C‘SA. l-cad a prcparcd statcn1cnt that the C’SA had Ho\ c\ bubnlittcd to tl1c Commission. (See excerpts 01; page 13.) He stated that the C‘SA “\\ III \\ orb to Linitc all

01

llplc~~~clltatlol~

~LII thcr-

an>

.Ioannc

i I‘0

c 0 ni m u n i t i c s .

Considering

I rLldcall

Ncithcl-con~n~unicatcd slgnilicant interest 111 the bum-patting isstlc. Mr. \ccdlwm itci-atcd the h Df”s dislihe 01 patronage, and claimed the patronage appointments uent through “bccausc the Liberals hnc\\ damned well the\ ucrc coin2 to lose”. t30th candidalcs thought it toi, earl\ To tccil il’thc .I orics \cijl repeat tllc 1)iclcnbakcr prcccdent of’ ending up in opposition al tcl !i\ c I cars. through Mr. Sccdham said all t hc C’onscriati\cs lccd to do to icmain in po\\cris stress the 1nroPrcssi\c side - ol‘the ..” I’.c‘. part\. I{ c noted ’ the dcniihc ot notorious right-n ingcrs John (;anlblc. t’ctcr W’orthingfon. ind I’ctcr I’ockIing:ton. tbougll Sinclair Stc\cn\ and John C‘rosbic rcma~n. as a cast in point. Mr. M\crs Itlmcntcd tbc abscncc OI an> rca~ ISSIIC tram the

oppo\c

c1;1\\cs

OIIC

opcmtion. and the Libct-als ha\c pro~cd thcmscl~cs LI~I+ orth! 01 labour’?, support. Regarding I’rinic Mirilster I L1i.11~1.‘~ blunders. both candldatcs-(xited carl! calling 01 an clcction as his lal.gcst. MI-. M!crs \!cilt lurthci. arguing that patronage appointiiicnts and the lack 01 clxlngc Ill I LII.IICI.‘S cabinet scemcd to “co-opt the

Ho\

C!

C’oninii\sion hcar~ngs to pr~~lr.~s1 ,rgainst the proposed di!rcrcntial lets lorstud~ants III prolcssional programs. I hc C‘SA llils a standing campaign conimittcc rcsponsiblc 10 r organliiiig t IlC caIllpaIg,Il agalrlst t hc Ho\ CJ C’olllniission.

\dIdll!

\\ il s

lcplchclltatl\c

n1atlc 01

Oil

.ILll C

hpact

20

\~llolt

;I

smf.!c

plcxnt.

Imprint

photo

by Richard

Clinton.

EngSoc shines for CF, raises $8,600 by

Salewsk)

Angie

I be

raia

1 nglIlccl~lIlg

Soclct~

tl1a I1

hclci its lirst Sh~ncrania on Saturd+. Scptcmbcr 8th to l‘i

I \c

Il

0 I1 c \

t-lbro\l\ I 60

I or

I csca- I‘C t I O\ll

tog!ctllcl~

to

Il.

stic

Around

cllginccrs

NilSI

s ta t IO I1 s

gLl.\

C‘j

got

Cdl’\

at

ten

t I1 I‘ 0 u g 110 II t

Kitctl~llct.-~I’~itc~ loo. I hc U iii\ crsit! 01 Wcstcrn Ontario pro\ idcd sonic inccnlilc b! challenging the cngincer4. l.asl Jcar tl1q raised

0

\\

II

IldlcIlgc I

lor

$5 .(i(iO

t- i brosis

l1l\C’!‘\l1\

C’Jstic

rcsc;~ 1.~11\\ t I h t 11~1I 5

I1 I II c I it

1\;1\

Il

;I

.

lor

01 W’atcrloo

I IlC

tI1c to

more thq

cl1allcngc

monc!

per

and \!a!, acccptcd. did

.

capita

It

the

appccr5

criynccus

not

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capita c.\cccdcd the anlounl raised b! the I niicrsit! ol W cstcrn Ontario.

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‘I hc cnginccrs Mere I or iAnd Wad \ or.gani/cd b LI s i II c 5 s a t c) : 0 0 ;l . m . At the Sunoco Saturda!. t IlC c0rrIc101 station 0 n C’olumbia and Phillip Street in Waterloo. business \\as going\cr> ncll. Students Ucrc out on the streets bringing in cars to bc \\ashcd oracccpting donations.

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stationed 0 11 Kitchcncr. I’ossibll> tllc beer pro\ ided a little nioti\atiion ltwlf. Shlncrama is ckpcctcd to be rcpcatcd nc.\t scar. but this tlmc. Gord t)cnn~. prcsidcnt 01 the t:nginccring Socict!. L\ ould lihc to get other tncultiCs in\ ol\cd as Ilcll. and

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Imprint,

You should not neglect agitation; each of you should - Ferdinand Lasalle (1825- 1864)

A lion among

oppresses

“Women wish that when the Pope steps off the plane that he would step on the ground and kiss the women.” What was Jeanne Sauve thinking when she greeted the Pope on behalf of our country? More interestingly, what was the Pontiff thinking when he was met by a woman? The Pope’s view on women’s issues has indeed been highlighted in view of the recent. Papal visit. Canadian women (and not simply those of Catholic affiliation) are questioning the Pontiff’s conservative outlook on women working both within and outside of the church. Albeit, nuns certainly are a vital and intrinsic part of the Catholic faith, the Pope shudders at the

September

14, 1984.

-

it his task.

the Christians

To a large crowd of controversy-hungry listeners G. Gordon Liddy gave a masterful performance, easily earning the $4,350 (U.S.) which he was paid to speak. For nearly three hours, Mr. Liddy amused, enraged, and enlightened many. The fifty-two and one half month vetran of American prisons showed his humourous side right away. After a courteous introduction from Federation of Student president, Tom Allison, Mr. Liddy said these welcoming words were better than his former intro: “Will the defendant please rise?” He then proceeded to announce we would play a game of Christians and lions--with Mr. Liddy being the lions. His first major subject area dealt with the isolation that Americans are subject to both by virtue of their geographic location, and because they create such a situation. Due to wealth and satisfaction that America is an invincible fortress, our neighbours to the south lived with illusions about the world. The “an old lady in a bad Carter administration, neighbourhood”, suffered from naivete, Mr. Liddy insited. Military disparity, favouring the U.S.S.R., was catalogued at encyclopedia length. Land-based missile counts show a three to one edge for the Soviets. The air-based B-52 leg of the Triad was as being “older than the pilots”. portrayed Submarines, the only leg of the nuclear Triad in which the Americans have superiority according to Mr. Liddy, are only good for hitting sites which are

Pontiff

make

Friday,

large enough for an inaccurate missile to hit. Mr. Liddy’s attack on the smugness of his compatriots hit home when he mentioned the “fact” that the words purported to be the words of Thomas Jefferson on the memorial in Washington are really a compilation, by some anonymous bureaucrat, of the better phrases, expressions, and paragraphs of the third U.S. president. He continued by attacking the idea of a viable Social Security program, saying that “no one under 35 will receive a cent from it”. The federal deficit is “on auto-pilot”, the former Nixon underling stated. Mr. Liddy went on to a defense of U.S. espionage. He used the Bible as an example of mankind’s reliance on this covert activity. Moses, he noted, sent spies into Canaan. Espionage, Mr. Liddy asserted, prevented war by allowing a nation to remedy situations which it dislikes. The reason for such heavy intelligence gathering concerns at the White House was because of the fissure between the F.B.I. and the C.I.A., a situation blamed partly on J. Edgar Hoover’s immunity from removal from office. Finally, Mr. Liddy warned us that the mixing of theological questions and politics, which he felt was an increasing prominent phenomenon, was dangerous. Saying belief in God and prayer werefine for the Commander-in-Chief; Mr. Liddy cautioned that “when God starts talking back, then you’re in noting the Ayatolluh Khomernr as such a trouble”, dangerous fundamentalist theocrat. ./. ‘I I’(1 c*r’\’

Imprint is the student newspaper at the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA), and a member of Canadian University Press (CUP). receives national advertising from Imprint Campus Plus. Imprint publishes every second Friday during the Spring term and every Friday during the regular terms. Mail should be addressed to “Imprint, Campus Centre Room 140, University of Waterloo, Wa~rloo, Ontario.” Second Class Mail Registration No. 6453. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit, and refuse advertising. Imprint: ISSN 0706-7380

Imprint

Imprint

staff

Events

women thought of priestesses. He abhors the idea of women offering the Host or performing many other traditional ‘priest’ duties. The Pope maintains that women are an important part of the church, but only in definite roles prescribed by the church and perpetuated by the Pope (male) and priests (male). One may be curious as to how the female theologians on campus are handling this suppression as compared to their male counterparts? Is there any doubt that aside from the theological argument that the Catholic Church, completely dominated by a male hierarchy for thousands of years would want to protect that organization? Perhaps, one issue that would directly affect all of the Catholic women on campus is that the Pontiff has graciously said that he doesn’t mind the thought of working women, but those women had better be able to perform their traditional wife and mother roles as well. Considering the Pope’s stance on birth control, it would be very difficult to become a professional woman if one was either pregnant or giving birth 365 days of the year. How can a woman be a Catholic in good conscience if she has to forfeit so much of what she feels is right? Today, men and women all over the world look to the Pope for guidance and spirituality. One may easily agree with uniting the faith of the Catholic Church even uniting the world’s people in search of common bonds. But women are being oppressed by one of the most important and influential leaders of our tlmeUnbe2evably, women are being shut out again t.rrr-r,l I”lr~l~-lrcv~

Friday,

September

2 p.m.

Post-Mortem

3 pm.

Staff

21

meetrng

Positions Available following etitoriai board positions ttJe for the Fall term: ttPY .’ kzlt %;ditor Adver:#tsing Assistant News Editor &? Assistant Arts F:r :. _ H Assistant Sports i&tor &3 Assistant cili XX Manager AsslstaI I!. Rookkeeper l’+it ~to Editor Graphks Ecli tor Typesetters Production Manager Note: Positions are open to all UW students. experience necessary. *’

:

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a~

.-I. 1, i..ic

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1


with name and tetwhons number, and h of letters: 4& words. Anyone wishing ta write longer, e editor-in~chlef~ All material is subject to editing; spetll~~g and

he English 109 Gui to K-W Nightspots TO the editor:

TAPS (Waterloo Hotel): Wilfrid Laurier hangout. Always over-crowded. Great place if you enjoy mingling with over-inspired, under-talented college jocks. Linebacker mentality rules supreme. Much talk of sacked cheerleaders and price reduced steroids. Guys here make more passes than Plunkett and Theisman together, though completion percentage is low; most are Hail Marys. Only IG% of the guys here actually play football and even they don’t know a tight end from a nose tackle. Devestating video screen blitz reduces the art of conversation to Neanderthal gesturing. Nobody misses it. RUBY’s (Waterloo Motor Inn): Travolta meets Newton-John all over again. Lots of flashing lights and plush carpeting. Stuccoed walls exude steaming machismo. Conversation is denigrated to the level of mere solicitation. Emotional masturbation and verbal orgasm are the ruling order of the day. -Hhe joke, “if herpes is a horror story, then AIDS is a fairy talc”, originated here. Penicillin tablets sold at the door. On11 1‘0~1 video screens. THE BEAT ESCAPE (Upstairs at the Kent): The second, and once the only, alternative fashion/dance club in K-W. Someone traded the tacky cracked naugahyde chairs and plastic rainbow chandeliers for church pens and mirrored tiles. The punks beat a hasty retreat. The attack 01‘ the killer cideo screen sent the electro-funk wavers, mods, and rockabillys 1 packing. Now it’s morgue-city. Fabulous interior architecture and an innovative and colourful history is all that remains. Great chicken wings. HUGGY BEAR’s (Grand Hotel): What can you say about a night-club that adopts the name of a sleazy Big Apple pimp from Starsky and Hutch‘? The Grand has been searching for a gimmick for the last ten years. Cave-like interior is now the backdrop for wet T-shirt contests and other feeble-minded conceptions Patrons have a collected I.Q. only slightly higher than that ot the produce at Hi-Waq Market: the staff, even dum her. 7 HE RED BARON (City Hotel): After the time11 demise of The Beat Escape, this, the third alternatite dance club in the area l-wcan~t tll3~’ ;: c,r(-.t1 f(,J- di,p,I;ye d trendier. Though no 1 CiC LOO. i‘ht Bal~j11 wu11 became tht: i-eig1llng orifice for the punk element in K-W. An austere haven for studded-leather peaL,c:(:kk and spiked coiffures, thi\ ersatz punk showcase is the on!; piace in town where The Fclrgottt-rl Rebels are heralded as the Loice of the true Messiah. Near>;, \+r; 1:t the route of the pasbenger pigeon oLe1 rhe summer of ‘84, but promises to be new and improved in the Fall. Watch for the occasional live band ~ usually rockabillJr. 7 HE PIT (Coronet Motor Hotel): Once again, the name sa\s it all. Lots of leather, but not The Red Baron variety. K-W’s most illustrious striptease; biker palace. Enough grease here to lube every Harley in South Western Ontario. The strippers po\\ dc1 t hc1r stretch-marhs and sport more mid-l-11 t roils t haI1 I hc Buns Master. I’atrons li\c and lole bq the music of Dcl Leppard, Iron Maiden, and M otorhead. Anything else is “punk shit”. The original anal sphincter of area night spots. THE BOMBSHELTER (U of Waterloo Pub): It’s only appropriate that the dullest bar in town is the one most

Critiques’ HI

Illilii~lli~I)ilit~~ 01‘ l,crccI) t ioii sccniiil~l~* 1-c i<gns s11pr6ZlI1Ic:, creating a &Ise \\rorl(l 01 I’isc(l iclcas. Is tllis tllc ~lictlio<l l+r \\,liicli tlic ~!‘coc‘cntric \\~orl<l is 1-cusscl-ta1

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Imprint

staff .

Fed insurance not theft-proof frequented by U of W freshmen. Though recently given a costly face lift, The Bombshelter is an architectural nightmare, devoid of atmosphere, without character, and all too indicative of life, or the lack of it, at U of W. A nice place to study. LEVEL 21 (Mayfair Hotel): With the slow deaths of The Flamingo and The Baron this late night dance club now has a firm strangle-hold on the wa\c punh faction 01‘ K-W’s middlecrabs 4 outh. DJ spin5 lot5 ot contemporary 1in) I. steering cleatof the high-tech electro funk a la Flamingo, and isn’t afraid to play material no longer on the CFNY charts. Lots of Siouxsie Sioux, Public Image, Simple Minds, U2, so on and so on. Kill the TV screens and Johnny Ramone may just be the first K-W alternative club proprietor to make a real go of it. So far. so good.

THE BRESLAU HOTEL: Another striptease, hard-rock combination. A nice place to meet the dirtbali of your dreams. A good place to avoid. Free dental work abailable on request. THE HIGHLIGHT CLUB: The original after-hours dance spot. CalqZpso. reggae, motoun, electro-tunh, and not a punhcr or hcadbangcr I\

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FLAMINGO ((‘harlex Street Plaza): L>ubbed by it> non-reguia1 clientele, the Flaming 0, I ctcl-t

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had all the makings of a clash establ1~hment. No \ idea hcreenb. no pool tables. no foliage. no near: ht~er- signs nc) a1 p\,le sock L no bkinheads, no axle greast, no Kotiaak.~ IIO rugby yhlrrs. Nothing but progressive music and a big dance floor. So what happened? Poor management ~~ jes, but. more bigr:;f1cantly. The Flamingo choked to death on the Lomit of 1ts own solopsistic arrogance. This incestuous den of fashion babies, r 11e chique clique. will soon be sliding on down to the Wildside where they will gi\e new meaning to the term social dwase, LULU’s (Highway 8, Kitchener): Only Gilley’s packs more cattle into one corral. Proprietors turned to Ringling Brothers for marketing advice: Clowns on stilts, packaged Lulu’s confectionaries. hats, t-shirts, mugs, and some moron dressed up as Captain Canuck, selling disco bondage headgear with flashing lights. Hey, don’t laugh -- Lulu’s is a viable concept. Catering almost exclusively to the over thirty mix, Lulu’s makes a bundle showcasing the stars of yesteryear: everybody from James Brown to Donny and Marie. Definitely K-W’s mo$t bizarre and eclectic entertainment facility. Home of the world’s longest stand-up bar. Get there before seven and beat the cover. BALLINGER’s (Cambridge): Quite possibly the largest progressive music bar in North America. Cover starts at a buck on Wednesdays and increases to five bucks on Saturday. All of which means that the Ballinger brothers snort better coke than you and I. DJ, VJ, and LJ (laser jockey) all get together to produce a “fab” sight and sound spectacle ~-- all of your “fav” CFNY hits and MTV videos. Dancing bears and trapeze artists gave way to girls dancing in cages, beach parties, fashion shows, and the occasional live band. Wednesday’s crowd is fashionably en vogue (or so they think); Thursday’s much more eclectic: preppies, greaseballs, cowboys, and wavers all clash on the multi-level dance floor - a most interesting sociological phenomenon. Great fun for people watchers. Big dance floor. Free meal with admission on Saturdays. WILDSIDE (upstairs at the Kent): Difficult to tell how this monster will manifest itself. Clientele wili, in the beginning, consist of displaced Flamingos, all of whom flocked from The Beat Escape when it changed management last year. September 8, therefore, will be a kind of welcome home party for the chique clique and entourage. Time will tell if the Wildside is to live up to its name. As far as The Beat Escape goes...the rotting corpse was beginning to smell anyway; a decent burial was definiteiy in order. THE BACK DOOR (downstairs, Metro Tavern): Although this little hole in the wall has had more face lifts than Phyllis Diller, it was the first alternative bar in town. Sly what? exactly. Nice place for a drink, but it gets a little crowded if you bring more than three 1ricnds along. Club L~tldct-g~~:~~ a 1l;11llc change everytime fickle management senses a bhllt 111popular tastes. In so much as the club is called nou’ what \‘+a\ i,alled six years ago, we may assume this social barometer IS out of‘u hack. I-lie entertainment, occasionally, if jou can beliebe it. Drew C‘ook Department

of’ English

by Nathan Rudyk Imprint staff 1 am writing to warn anyone considering the purchase of the renter’s insurance plan offered through the Federation of Students: if you think it covers theft, you’re wrong. 1 was a member of the Fed Council last year when we agreed to allow an insurance company to offer students a comprehensive coverage that would be transferable from one rcbidcncc to another, and cheaper than the going rate. 11 I didn’t think the plan cokered thelt. I l+ouldn‘t have voted for it, and 1 certainly wouldn’t have bought it. On August 28th, 1 discovered some cash, headphones and a tapedeck missing. I was at a sales conference the night before, but my room-mate was home then and noticed one of our windows open. He didn’t notice the theft, and closed the window. All the doors were locked at the time of the theft - the window in question could only be opened by someone who climbed on our back roof. So Mr. or Ms. Someone got on the roof, pried open the window, and left me $750 worse for the effort. A police report was filed and the insurance company was called (at the time I was glad I had bought the I-cd insurance plan). A nice lad! told me that the theft clause in my policy had been deleted, and a burglary clause inserted. What that means is. if there is no sign of forced entr)! into a duelling, there is no coi’erage. I looked into my edited policy and confirmed this. So it’s all fair and square in fine print, but I’m still out S;75C;.and I suspect most students would be unless they ti\ c in a Lzault. Most apartments, townhouses, and houses hare M indows that can be pried open easillf; I know this is the cast ‘in both SunnJ,dale and BlueLaie tousnhouse developments. Therefore, 1 suspect most students wjould not be covered if they t+ ere c isited bj) a thief, rat her than a burglar. The nice lady told me 1 could have purchased a plan that would have covered me for theft, at a higher cost. I recommend that students looking at the Federation’s insurance Dlan forget it, and buy something that will i’lotcct

tl1c111 tl1cm

MCII.

I al\o

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that

the

1 edct-ation

reconsider their support of the renter’s insurance plan, or at least make students aware of deficiencies in the policy.

sea of galilee atid toiletrv toiletry hi mti’hdw ingram Imprint staff

J

. ..ttic \ca 01 gaiiicc. incan iiicati ar! thing t(’ \ou’! to most. pcrhapb. ItIt illcitlls ~wIlap~. 111cit11s nc\t nc\t to nothing; to nothIng; a;L dim d i ni association associ ation \z ith ii la[-g la[-g,c hod! 01’ \\atcr Mater ~onlcn wnlc~ hci-c her-c in in i<i<I-xl.I-aci. ilil that. that. to to \co~llc. ~omc. tlouc\cr. houc\cr. itit po~\>c>bcs a bit more si,gnilicancc---it ih intiniatcl! iiititnatcl! corincctcd \+itli the lilt ol a nian \sIio has hab allcctcd LLlIcctcd the c0u13c 01 hL1llllill thoug.ht to SLlCh a11 c\tcnt that our \\ hole method 01 placing c\cnts in histor) dates 1I~OIII I.OIII hi> death. 30 I\ hat. 50 b,c)nlc alleged CLcnts aiicgcdl! tooh piacc in that arca a long. Iong time bclorc michacl iach.\on; it bear5 no rclatiorl to the the prcscnt. pt-cscnt. and an> ~a) it’s oni\ a hod\ 01 \\atcr---natural lormations posschs possc3s tlo 110 signilicancc in and 01 thcmscl~cs. this. 01 uoursc. is sinjplj not true. and thcrc arcarc a picntitudc 01 csampleb to pro~c pi-OLL‘ It.

but. enough. M \\ 11~all thl\ noise about the sea 01 galilce’.’ the lact ib. a hod! ol l\atcr \cicntists in tcl a\i\ haic dcciat-cd dccia~-cd the sc;t 01 gaiiicc L~nlsalc to drinh (a scit which pi‘c)\ piu\ ides drInl\iIig natci’ tot- W ( 01 israci’s population). and the rcawn’! reason’! ail unprcccdcntcd number 01‘ tourists ha\c the sea 01 galiicc. and Lfliilc ~fhilc the! ha\c Iia\c been \ isiting tiic bee-11 bc~-tl thcrc. thcx! ha\c been dclccating in it. simplcrs that. i am not. b> atl! nlcan~. nlcan.\. u Ilat could bc cailcd a dc\ out]> out]> rcIigioLI5 rcIigiou5 pcrsotl---I nas \\as raised raised a\a\ aa catholic. catholic. but long ago di\ orccd iii! sell IIIt 0111 oni it5 cl idcnt liniitation~. still, there is ;I

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!or~ JOLI might Inigtlt i~hc i~hc I1or11 Irony t/-114---about nhat thisha!\about mc. \\hat 1t \a!\ about aasht oom tacilities at the sea 01 gai~icc. Itkt sa!s about the \tatc 01 things in the \!or-ld in in gc~icral. gc~icral. ii lotloi- 011~. oiic. ;I111 a111 \h,chcd \tl,chcd and appalled. and


Imprint,

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tive addict A friend of mine is a compulsive abuser of his body. He’s not unlike my cousin Sydney, the registered heroin addict, in this way. But, of course. my friend’s problem is more extreme: he’s a compulsive runner. The danger of compulsive physical activity is that it is selfdestructive. Leacock wrote about a man called Jiggins who threw cannonballs ‘around and dumbbelled himscil‘ to death. This is similar in direction to compulsive running. It requires a measured degree of hypointelligence. One can read about men dying in foot races occasionally, or even just on training runs. They will run until they cannot run an>. more. I’hcy uill limp -LIbile they run. I‘hcy will run without stop for water or beer. True, pure. real runners would not do these things. (Real. pure. true runners would stop for beer:) a certain tj’pe 01‘ character who runs Yes. there’s For want of a better name, such a being may be compulsivcl!,. called the “‘machistoped”. A creature ulth no rational idea 01 M 11~.it \ oluntaril> puts itself‘ through pain. A sick. unthinking. tunnel-minded. se 1f-cc I1 t red . uncontrollable, Lll lapp), unrsa.\onabIc idiot. Usuallq goes t rom running into politicb. C‘abunzio djrbunzo

Rand wronged WITH EVERY PURCHASE

11 II

there is much, much more

To the editor: ‘1 his pasi term I attcndud lcct 0 t the IluI-IlcI-ou~

I

01‘ \ agile S nicdcr’s BLISS gcncralitics denouncing _Obiccti\ibm constitute a Lalid LII‘cs argument against it. nor does ~ponsoI-uci bj the :jtudcnts 01‘ it product a constructi\c L&as Objecti) ism and criticism ot‘ the philosoph!. 1 impressed h> the intcllcctual urge Snicdcr not to conlusc lcalibrc oi‘ its chucuti\c and h i s 1‘c s p 0 I1 s c s . ’ 0 I1 a I1 .guest spcaia-s. -I hc slandcremotional lc\,cl” M ith the ous and blatantly inaccurate piece 01‘ critical -journalism b>’ I‘acts. hope that 1 sinccrcly Gord Snieder that appcarcd Snicder’s article has not in the Sept. 4 edition 01‘ the t urncd aua> those intcrcstcd Imprint prompted mc to write in .A>11 I<and’s pliilosoph~. this letter. and encourage them to SW I‘or Sniedcr’s comments ruf’lect thcmsel~cs u hat Objccti\ ism clearly that hc does not “like” really dot.\ stand for. Objcctibism and as such fill Erika Traub not bother to analyse it Honours Philosophy Neither does objectively.

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LINK

-ACTIVITIES


(KNGqWWERSITY)

LUNCHTIMEb UUENIG


t News

Accounting 14ssociation needs JTOU!

Imprint,

Frida.y,

September

14, 1984.

atience a line-up virtue t-oaci.

! t \\asn’t

StlKietlts

to

LltlcoIlrlotl spL’t1d

iotup

to

fort!

ti\c tiittiiitcs it? one Itnc otil! to ctitcf- another one ininicdiatcI! aitclt~L\al-d. Stniilit situattons could bc lo~tnd at both the banh and the boohstorc. 21

OSl

St

Lldcn~s

c~ptwdd

a

great deal 01 1rus~ratioti \\ hen ashcd about thctr reaction to sccniitiglq ctidltx bait5 in lineLtps, >ct tcci could ol‘totati! suggestion.\ as to ho\+ the situation could bc impt-o\cd.

LISC 01 banhtng tmchincs tc Ittiiit Iltic-Ltph. 1 hct-c ;It’c loit

I’iii~l S~o>tiich. a third jcatSCICI~CCstudctit, assisted Mitll and lccls that t-cgistt.;Itton, tiiotx s~ali I\ 0L1ld result it] g I‘C;I t c I‘ cl I tcictic!. s 0 Il c s~Ltdctlts Iclt tl1a1 a la1gx ;iI‘Cil t I1 a 11 ML!\ \I a s I cqL!tI-cd alailablc III the [‘AC‘ butldtng. hl ost ~Lgt’ccd. ho\~c\cr, that prc-t.cgt5tct.itig and pa> ing LcL’s b> matl hclpcd. them to ill Old c.kt1.a d&i) s. the Canadian Stall at 1nipct-ial Hanh 01 C‘orntiicrcc 011

can1p11s

1uoIl tl ftld

SLICll

mach111cs

011

Ict-mg cltcndcd IIOLII\ ~IwLtghoLtt

ol

can1p11

banhtn the \rcch.

O!ll\

I 11c

dcal~ng \\ it tl I~nc-Lip\. tlioitgle sccn~s to ha\c been p;lt~cncc As the L\CC~ pt.ogt-csxd. Iitic d\\ ~ndlcd ;I[ tllc I’A( butlding,. and banh stall ate’ cotiltdctlt that the siluatto I\ III ltlplo\c ilh the !Cli!. gcr lIt1dcl~

the

na>.

Women to take back night J. George “I ahc Hach the Night!” ha!, bc.cn the 1x11~ing cr> lot- nian~‘ ~li~:rchcs held b) ~~omcn to 1‘1 ,tcst the 1 iolcnw the) iI ICI-

at

the

hands

ot

Il en.

and that slogan \zill again bc hard at U 01 W on Scptcmbct 2(it

h.

.I lie tinatxli is lot. Mornen otil!. .I hc principal txasoti l‘or this is that mown need to cxpet-icncc their ou n poMcr,

their abilit), to walk at night u i t h 0 u t the protectilc custody of‘ mtn. For those

in the Campus Centre Room I I6 at X:W p.m. WC Mill leabc

Il

at

c I1

M

ho

\+tsh

ttr

do

something about \ iolencc against Uorticti, .rhoM J out support bq sta! ing hot-m on Septetnbcr 26th. but ensuring that soul- ~otnen Iricnds do not ha\e to walk alortc on otticr nights. I-or the \\onicti uho uisli to participate. ue uill be rail> ing

the

C’ampus x:30

C‘cnttx and

go.

Grad Club. I-or ~otncn uh cannot mahc ihc ~-all\. po111 JoLt Ltt‘c \$clconic to joitl I

proilptl~ tflI.Ltgll

il!l\

the

campus to Utii\crsit> A\,etiuc. bt-orn thcrc \+c mill tt-a\cl through Waterloo I’arh. up Erb Street to King, damn King to -C‘enttxI and along Albetto Will rid I<aurict Ktii,c,-sit!. WC Mill rcturti 10 Utii\ct-sit> 01 U atct~loo tot- a post-march cclcbt-ation at the

u

hcrc

along

the

the

\\

the

~~edc1~;111011

0111c11’s

~‘01111111ss1011 01

( Stllcicrlts.

I he lit-st time a I akc Bat the Xi&t march M~S hcl under that name ccas in 197

,

Private Room

Personal Video Taping aGailable of “your” sports events. Call for an

Thursday,

’ Oktoberfest l/2 price Student Night Oct. 11 / 7 p.m.

-

aGood Food *Friendly Service @Great Atmosphere @Reasonable prices

1 a.m.

Enjoy

.

Seagram Haus Seagram

Stadium,

Seagram

Canadian

6 Italian

Cuisine

Homemade Lasagna, Spaghetti, Pizza, Canneloni Veal Parmigiana, Chicken, Ribs, Steaks. , . Superb Salad Bar - Espresso Coffee Bar

Dr., Watvdoo

AFTER Dancing & Nightly

rout

Mat-cl1ct.s stlould \\cat‘ ligtl coloured clotl!ing and bt ttlg Ila~liltglit it tlicJ Iia\c 011~. I IIC tiiarcll is ot-ganiicd t:

3 Place To Party


News

3,

L 3r

NQ jab?No- school! \

I

OTTAWA(CUP)Some Canadian students will not have to parents after “starving” on welfare, in’ Vancouver, plans t yorry about frantic registration, overcrowded cl&srooms and continue searching for a job. But he is no Iongcr hopeful anI ldng lineups for textbooks this fall. will not return to school this fall. They won’t have the money to return to school. “There have been students who’ve come in here atid saic They are some of the estimated half a million young people they’d like to go back to school but can’t afford to,” says Pete who were unemployed this summer. They are the people behind Cavers of the Ottawa Unemployment Action Centre. the statistics, .the job-seekers-who ended up empty-handed. No one-can say how many people will not be able to continu According to Statistics Canada, the summer employment their education because they failed to find work this summel rate for those between the ages of 15 and 24 hovered around 17 But many charge that Statistics Canada unemployment figure per cent. Many of those were students. Some early on decided ’ are too low. they would not go back, others vowed,to return and hoped their ‘Government unemployment statistics underestimate by a prospects would lighten. much as a third. It’s a total scam,” says Hugh ‘O’Reilly, .( Ian Weniger, a 2G-year old B.C. resident now -living in member of the Ottawa and District Labour Count Ottawa, is one of these students. Studying second year unemployment committee. economics at the University of B.C., he thought he would find a StatsCan defines employed people as those who did any worl job. But a summer of searching turned up nothing.. at all during the week. This definition means that someone wh( Weniger does not need to read the lastest un&mployment worked one hour or m&-e is considered employed. figures to understand the problem. He knows the rejection from Although students who are unable to return to school will nc employers, the financial insecurity, the loss of self- esteem. be forgotten by unemployed action centres across the countr) “It feels really rotten,” he says. “The ?ne credo of capitalism is O’Reilly says they will soon be ignored by federal politician! ‘York will set you free’ and without work there is no freedom.” O’Reilly says he thinks the issue gain’ed prominence durin( “I’m not, lazy. I refuse to be told I’m out of work because I’m the recent election campaign . lazy. Experieqce is virtually impossible to come by and job I he Canadian Federation of Students agrees. CF! training is almost as hard to get.” researcher Jean Wright says the troubles facing student Even if he could get job training, Weniger doubts it would without jobs will not disqppear in the near future. improve his situation. Training does not create jobs, he says. “It will take a long time to have a major resolution of thf issue,” Wright says. The 20-year old, who moved to Ottawa to live with his

Friday,

Imprint,

.

September

14, i 984.

Library hours

\

and wbrksho’ps Plan on taking one of‘ these guided tours and tcarning more about how to take advantage of‘the many facilities and service’s available for your use in the Library.

ARTS

& EMS (Engineering, Mathematics & Science) LIBRARIES .

\

WEEKDAYS Mon. Fri.: At: IG:3G a.m.; 2:3G p.m.

Sept. 17

EVENllVCiS Mon. -- l‘hurs. At: 7:3G p.m.

Sept. 17 -- 2G.

WEEKENDS Sat. & Sun.

Sept.15--

I

Memorial is one of the growing number of universities acro6 the country to consider limited enrolment as a means of copin with inadequate government funding and increases in first yea applications.

'ORONTO

(CUP)

-- Ontario landlords who force their student :nants to pay 12 months rent in eight months are contravening. he Ontario Landlord Tenants Act, a Waterloo court ruled-last month. Justice Potts of Waterloo County Court said the practice of ro-ratink rent is a torni 01’ sccurit! deposit. k-5hich cannot xcccd thC amount 01’ one month’s rent. Mitch Retterath, vice-presiderit .of univeisity affairs at the lniversity of Waterloo Federation of Students, was’ delighted rith the decision. “This means that any pro-rated lease is not

DEMONSTRATION

Wed.

Oct. 1G

Wed.

Oct.

IG:W

IG .

12:GG noon

Arts Li brat-1

3:3G p.m.

1:3G

EMS Library

Desk in each location \

Sept. 19

Accoqnting

Sept. 21

2:3G p.m. IG:W a.m. 2:3G p.m.

Oct.

2

I:GG p.m.

C’lassics

Sept. 2G

2:30 p.“?.

Economics

Sept. I7 Sept. lb

2:Ri p.m. I G:GG a.m.

I Sept. 24 Sept. 2s

2:3G p.m.

Sept. 20

students.

,

during

II J ou haic taken a tour and wctuld like to learn hou to make the best possible USCol‘a~ailable library resources. then, plan on attending one of the t‘ollowing uorhshop

students, begging

rent rded illegal

you wish

RESEARCH SHORTCUTS WORKSHOPS

Anthropol&gy

Foreign students at Concordia and MONTREAL (CUP)McGill universities, are lining up , for free groceries toWhen students from outside &e country arrive in Quebel ;upplement their meagre food allowance. they often find themselves living in crowdkd conditions, wit High dif‘t‘crcntial Ices, goi crnrncnt regulations and sometimes six people in a two bedroom flat. Wheeland sai nadcquatc funding from their home countries arc lorcing after paying high differential fees some have little money le orcign students to depend on ha~ldo~~ts t or their dail) bread. over for food. The Loyola chaplaincy I of Concordia University began Without Canadian citizenship, foreign students are nc offering weekly bags- of groceries to needy students last permitted to work and earn wages to supplement the ofte I’hristmas. Hut bccausc the monq sctxa,sidc lor the project soon irregular cheques they receive from their governments. fk+indlcd. the koluntccrs Ncrc lorccd tq turn to Mc(;ill -’ . “If I were a foreign student returning to my country after thi *haplainq t‘or more Isunds. 1 wouldn’t have a very good impression of Quebec,” sai Peter Wheeland, a representative of Quebec’s largest student W heeland. IsSociati-on,. ANEQ, says universities tend to neglect the squalid

h-rated

Desk of the Library

Drop by the Information the times posted.

Byrne said the university has not rejected any student ye because they have already accepted nearly every applicant. “They got caught with their pants down, so to speak.”

faced by many foreign

Hct-t: is an opportunity to see at first hand the kind 01 library research that can be done by computer.

emotional development.” Collins said 3 100 students have applied but no one as yet ha been rejected. The university is counting on a five per cent nc show rate, he said. “We haven’t refused admission to anyone yet.” The university is open to high school graduates with a 60 pe cent average and admission is on a fist-come, first-served basi! Collins said he has no idea if the university will impose stiffe academic standards. e Student union president, Ed Byrne, said the council oppoge lifnited enrolme&. “We’ll do everything $ve can to stop it.”

living conditions

16.

At. 2:S p.m.

WATMARS

For&n

21.

-

Meet at the lnl‘orrnation to tour.

HALIFAX(CUP)A sudden, upsurge in applications for first yeat admission at Memorial University has prompted administrators to co&idcr pegging cnrolmcnt at 3GGO students.’ Ward Neale. Memorial vice-president academic, said no official decisions have btxn made but the unikxrsity could barely accomodate the students enrolled last year. Classrooms will be even more overcrowded if the university accepts the 25 per cent more students who have applied. “We have a frozen budget. We have no more space. Even with 3000 students, standards would deteriorate, faculty would be overyotiked and labs would be overused,” Neale’said. “That number will really stretch us to the limit.” Registrar Glenn Collins said the.universityis experiencing an influx of first year applications because the first class of students from grade 12, which was instituted last year, are now graduating from high school. Until two years .ago, Newfoundland’s high schools ended at grade 11. t‘It seems that an extra year in high school made more students realize what university could do for their social and.

9, _L... - - ..--_-.

Lnglish

/’

I.itcr-aturc

EnI ironmcntal

Goicrnmcnt Health

Studies

Publications

Studies

,

.

\

_ Histor!

valid,” he said. The Federation has been fighting the pro-rated rent battle fc the past four years; losing a similar case in 1980. “We’re nc hesitant to go to cqurt,” Retterath said. The recent round of legal actions has cost the Federatio $4000, in addition to the $2GvG d&ated by other studer societies Around the province. ’ “it’s now a matter of educating students and landlord! North ‘Bay and Ottawa where th especially in Waterloo, practice is most commonplace,” said Retterath.

Oct. ,’ 9

2:W p.m..

Oct.

to

2:3G p.m.

Sept. I6

I:GG p.m.‘

Sept. 25

2%

Oct. Oct.

‘1iHuman

Relations

Arca

Kincsiology

I :(iG p.m.

Oct.

2 3 4

Oct.

4

Oct.

I ii:GG a.m.’ 2:X p.m. 2:3G p.m. I

I-

p.m.

G:GG a.m. 2:3G p.m.

I

Iti

2:3G p.m.

Sept. 26 Sept. 27

2:X; p.m. 2% p.m.

Psychology

Oct. Oct.

2

1:Gti p.m. 2:X p.m.

Public

scpt;

21

lG:G(i a.&

Sept. 17

1:(jG p.m.

Philosoph).

Scpt,

. I

Political

Science

_

I

\ I- i nancc

Rccrca.t ion Religious

Studies

-

I

Sept. 27

1:GO p.m.

I

Sociology Women’s

Oct. Studies r

I

3

1:GG pm.

Sept. 25

lG:GG a.m.


*

Classifieds.

10

Ride Wanted

Wanted

Wanted: Ride to, from Cambridge (Hespeler). 1s! class 9:3C;; last 3:3C;. Willing to share cost ol gas. Call Harjit. 058-5918. af‘tel: 5:OC;p.m.

all si/es, all logos. all can pith them upa on campus. Call Jonathan X80-7772. Buttons,

designs. I

A men’s ten-spucd bicycle in reasonable condition. ’ LightN heels prclerred. Blake.

Call 746-1 I 16.

Semen

1or

donors

inscniinatio1I

LSAT GMAT

Prep. Coursm for

Donor

in

the

0111..

\

I I<

call

2-3

haul-s

pcl-

\\cch. I’Ici.isc \end

brie1 pcr\onal c\pcctcd

dcscl-lptlol

hwrl>

ard ~‘atcrloo Han

Special Student Discount on al I HEWLETT-PACKARD CALCULATORS 20.25%

Models

:~nd I’;ltc

I’hCL’. 1 ‘.I 4 I13

to.

22:

(female) 10

8X4- I Wt( alter

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IOI

0 \\ 11

I~cmLIIiCI.;Itioii iii the prints.

S:(iO ucchda)s.

an! time ucchend.\.

15 years cspcrience: Secrctar) available l’~r~an> kind of tl’ping job. Call Janet 8x6 1604

Edna 1,. in Math and Shaj,la G. i1l Arts. Isn’t school lun’.’ Keep next uwkend lrcc: I’\e got big planh. .Jonathan

Quality

We, the residents 01 5()X(;. mould lihe to v,t‘lwmc the ncu mcmbe~ 01 our honice GLKM. She’\ III traililng and MIII be ~-cad> in the nea1-

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a I’cu bone at the Cambridge race track’! 1 ha\c an extra slot on rn> trailer. SO if‘ intcrcstcd call Jon

houschi)id

170I

sultc

pllot~~gI~apl1~.

able

dear- Robert! Irom CH ti!

Motocrossers! All gassed up bit h no place to ride’!‘! Wh> not break

pia!s stlicilo

to >ou!

on

tl1c

c’ll ha\c a (All

dl~c~lm. c i.ld

accou11tcd

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guaranteed. Multiple orignals 01’ resumes. t hcscs, and u or-k

rcporth.

Data

storage.

Deli\crg arranged. f-ast. accurate WI-\ ice. Gail Diane. 576- 1284.

Student

Word

Resllmcs,

vt0l-h

I’roccssing. r-epo!.ts.

essaqs.

I-ret on campus p1ch-up and deli\ ~1.2 f’rotossIonaI looh. last sc‘r\ ICC. call M1hc or f<ich at 8X620 I 3. Experienced Typist Ii\ ing on campu\ (MSA). Sell correcting ribbon. 75~’ page 01 $7 minimum lo1I-esuIllcs. Call \nn at 8X4042 I. MAGGIF: Can .I \ pe It! t:ssa! s. .I hebl4 & t.ctters per page

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Imprint is read by 12,000 UW students 34 times a year. It is a handy vehicle for getting your message to the student market. Imprint advertising: (519) 885-1660. .Advertising Manager: C. Ricardo Scipo.

Hcst anteed.

Yamaha CP30 Electronic Piano, used in home onl). Good portable altcrnatile to acoustic. E I .(X3. Xt(O-4925. 1979 Fiat X 1 9. black. moonrool. 1I .C;GC;miles, winter-stored. new clutch. Pircllis. quart/ halogen lights, mash included. C‘ertilied. $5,750. X80-4025. Students! Gigantic Garage Salt Household lurnlture. dcxh. cllali. sofa bed, rochcr and lots Il 0 1-e G reut prlccs! Saturda!. ScpZ. 1.5 9 ~.nl. - 5 p.!li. 432 b’csruood DrI\C (SO unit to\\ i~llousc c0i11pIcx) Electric Piano. I-cnd~r- Rhodes good condltlon, ash/q $050.(X, call John x3874. Desks - Steel, L\ood. student, odd chairs 8: table\, chest 01 dt-a\\ e1.s. 4 challset, storage cabtnct,

sl1el\

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C‘omplete stereo \! bteni including turntable, ampl1lier. 2 speahcrs. stcroc) cassette tape dcch,

Typing Plus: u’c do u orb reports.

The powerful Hewlett-Packard family of Series 40 advanced calculators is expandable. Versatile. Reliable. The

$3I .C;Ci

niicrophonc.

earphones

nc\i.

01.

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-- llhc 57%

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qualIt! at

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Monte. Hcncath the Mash. 2nd E.d . A t h I II \ o II . Ath1nsc)n & H@,ard. Intro to 1’4)ch. 570-5 153. Texts:

C.F.

14, 1984.

New Course: Arts 100

1976 l+‘ord C‘apr~ 2.8 G rcat bhape. 4G.C;W on 1rebu1lt. ncn clutch, exhaust. brahe5. ~-ad.alt.. rcccnt paint, Lcill cert. Best ot‘f‘cr, or u11l trade loi strcctbihc. Bart X84-784 I.

to >ou!

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Happy Birthday Happy Birthda Happy Birthda\ Happy Birthday

September

For Sale

rnu>t

caIl bl-lcfgc.

Sept.29 LSAT Oct.20 WA1 !q infofmath

art it icial

p1~og12.iInrnc

bc health! and rc~ponsiblc. I’1.cIcrcncc gi\cn to married candidates. I’lcahc co11tacl 130x. 10. Al 01’ III. h.12. 13I\d.. Aswd. 695 ~‘ol~oIl;1tlol

arca.

Friday,

Personal

weight, 24 inch I‘rame. i inch Wanted: Ride to, from Cambridge. Mon., Wed., Fri. 1st class 9:3(i, last I:3(i. Willing to share gas. Cali Doreen 622-1963.

(416)

Imprint,

Art 1cici A,I B is a completelq neM kind of course at this University; a team-taught university-level introduction to the Humanities, in which basic concepts and genres of all the Humanities disciplines are presented: Classical Studies, the Languages, Art, Drama, History, Music, Philosophy, and Religion. This gives the student the opportunity of compare and contrast, to fill in gaps in his or her previous acquantance with these fields, to develop an appreciation of‘ what tht: many Humanities dcsciplines arc cancer-end with, and to experience a wide variety of‘ selected works of art, music and literature in a historical context. ~1hc cour\c is organijcd around sclccted periods in western history from the point of view of the Humanities (the periods selected Mill \a~-> in dill crcnt 1,~~s). ‘I his autumn. two periods at-c tocussed on: Classical Grcccc and Late Rcnaissancc, Baroque. In the winter, the course shifts to Romanticism and Modernism. In both cases, it is nonrigid: glimpses to relevant carlicr and later periods WC lI~cqucIlt.

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LJW- ed e\ r ati 0 ,,r[ef in full -. The following is the complete text df the Federation tudents response to the Bovey Commission. Imprint Jblishing this response as a public service.

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The “Rationalization” implied in the terms of reference of the )mmission on the Future Development of the Universities of Ontario FDUO) is ‘but another example of a short-term fu<, attempted by the lvernment of Ontario, to a long-term problem. The ideals of ccessibility? to post-secondary education seem to have become buzz)rds for a poorly financed, poorly managed system. These ideals are btbeing attained now and, with the present direction which theMinistry Colleges and Universities has laid out, the ideals will not be met in the ure. The Ministry has, however, in its own way, recognized the need for ‘arm of consultation with groups which have a vested interest in the &-secondary education, in Ontario. The questions to which we have en asked to reply must be viewed with the Commission’s terms of ‘erence as a background. It is with this view that we answer the testions. \ Undergraduate education has become seriously deficient and poses oblems in a number of key areas. Affecting quality of education arethe ated problems of classroom overcrowding and professors with too avy a workload. We have seen the student-faculty ratio increase 2 1: 1 at Waterloo. The livers@ has tried to cope with increasing demand, but has not received fficient funding to hire more faculty or to adequately provide the cessary classroom, laboratory, library, and other student services eded to deal with increasing enrolment. The quality of education is ‘o being eroded by individual universities becoming increasingly ecialized; the government cannot allow selective programs to grow Len this growth will be detrimental to those other programmes cessary to provide ,a truly universal education. _ Many of these ecialized programs have grown to the degree where a student finds rself/himself “locked in”; not able to study in alternate fields because an overly restrictive core requirement. General accessibility to postcondary education is also not being realized because of an insufficient ident aid program in the Province. The program has been found to be equitable and unjust to the extent where there are qualified students IO are simply not able to shoulder the financial burden. ACCESSIBILITY The issue of accessibility to Ontario universities is one which involves : factors of an individual’s academic and financial qualifications aswell the academic qualifications of the institutions and their capacity to comodate students. The latter two factors are influenced by the quality the program at the particular institution preferred and the ‘level of lding it receives. In our discussion of accessibility we will not consider ? factor of the student’s financial eligibility to attend university. This stter will be dealt with in the section on Funding. We will now address many of our concerns on accessibility but will rain from employing the restrictive format of answering athe mmission’s questions. Many of the areas which are of concern to us addle several questions, while other questions raised are not within r scope to provide a significant answer. The policy on the Ministry on Colleges and Universities on accessibility s most recently articulated at an Ontario Federation of Students meting on November 2, 1983 by Dr. Bette Stephenson: The government policy is that no student who is qualified, that means, uld benefit from a university education, should be denied a place in the iversity system. The Minister then went on to qualify this statement by stating that gible students may not be ensured placement in the university or )gram to their first choice. 3ur view on accessibility concurs with the outline presented by Bette tphenson, and we maintain that the level of eligibility which has been antified through secondary school marks is appropriate; that is a 60% : off point. We must make it clear, however, that we support the notion excellence at various institutions and encourage them to strive for ality in these areas. n order to address all these concerns, the Commission should 7sider as a response to questions 11 and 13 the’notion of allowing 1st institutions to determine their own level of selectivity, but ensuring ough some external authoritative body (preferably OCUA but possibly 1Ministry itself) that in all major geographical regions of the province Ire are some programs which allow for accessibility to all eligible dents. This open-door policy would have to be balanced, by in-cotirse eening to ensure that the program does not suffer damage to its edibility and the reputation of the universities offering these programs t be adversely affected. fhis type of approach has many advantages and few disadvantages. e economic expense of a fairly high failure rate would be minimized concentration, freeing up badly needed funds for other institutions. cessibility would be presewed and the phenomena of so-called~‘Iate lomers” would be accomodated; The problem of geographical trictions to accessibility would be alleviated by providing at least one :h program in each major region of the province. In particular erence to question 12 this proposal would ensure that the Colleges of plied Arts and Technology will continue to serve the people for which y were originally intended. Furthermore, universities which wished to more selective in their admission policies for a particular program uld only be restricted by the quality of their graduates and not have to concerned with universal accessibility. The problems with such a scheme include the political resistance of its Dlementation by the governing bodies of the selected institutions, jecially-if a university held in high esteem was forced to broaden its :essibility standards for a particular program. This may be alleviated newhat by the argument that since currently, funding is tied to tuition, n these institutions stand to benefit by the resulting increase in -olment. Other problems include perceived threats on the autonomy :he participating schools and the concern that even if screening-out jcesses are used, that the specific degree granted by that institution y not be respected by prospective employers. n this section of the discussion paper, the Commission also concerns !If with the problem of variations in school standards and its effects on eligibility of students to enter the system at the university and Igram of their choice. Ve have little to offer on the problem of secondary school inequities :ept to say that they do exist and they do have an effect on a student’s libility due to university evaluation of the school from which a titular mark was derived, It seems to us that this problem will always

be with us unless the Ontario government can establish some degree of equity between the quality. of education of its secondary schools. Another concern of ours is the processof application for entrance into the university system. The present’system of priorizing a list of three institutions can lead to perfectly eliglible applicants being denied admission because lack of information or poor advice resulting.in the list not reflecting their qualifications. An ideal situation would be for applicants to be able to apply to all fifteen institutions but the administration of this would be prohibitively expensive. The most suitable solution is for the list to be expanded to allow five institutions to be named. The proposal for developments in distance education to be applied to part-time students and to increase general accessibility are currently being explored at UW ‘with possible application elsewhere in the province. It is important;-however, that this type of instruction be purely voluntary. The implication in the last portion of question 13 is that distance education would be used to deal with academically qualified students who cannot gain admission into any institution in Ontario. This is not acceptable. Accessibility to professional programs must not \be restricted by projected manpower needs. Manpower projections have failed in the Past and given a chance will fail in the future. In this area institutional autonomy has provided the impetus for response to public needs and will continue to do so if adequate funding is available. It is somewhat ironic however, that the Commission suggests establishing reserve funds in universities when the very same government which established the Commission is the primary cause of the current level of underfunding. Adaptability . One of the major roles and one of the prime reasons for the evolution of the university is its,ability to adapt to a changing societal framework. It is often difficult to see which changes which; do the universities directly affect the evolution of society, or is it society which affects change in the university? This situation seems to be for the best. Just as society is not static so should the university not be; if the university is left floundering in ‘the past as society marches into the future, a great deal of problems would arise. One of the tasks of the modern university is to attempt to gauge where~we are going, and to lay out scenarios and the potential traps of such a move. . The ability of a university to adapt depends very strongly on a number ‘of things highly skilled people who have the intelligence and imagination to research and think about the past, present, and future; encouragement by the society’s current framework (i.e. the government); necessary funds to support the university structure. We have the people, we have the support, but the funding has been decreasing steadily. One of the major effects of the decline in funding has been the “brain-drain”, wherein large numbers of our best people have been steadily migrating to other provinces or countries where they can truly exploit their intelligence. The funding level must increase or we run the very real danger of becoming an intellectual wasteland. Balance and Differentiation The idea of accentuating the development of centres of concentration or specialization is one with which we have some problems. An overlyspecialized university cannot adapt to a changing society as can a balanced university. Any type of advance in the direction of specialization should be made in such a way so as not to eliminate the core of arts and science undergraduate programs within each university. The notion that “each university cannot aspire to universality” as put forward by Dr. Stephenson, -is fundamentally wrong. If a university has noticed a strength in a particular, programme then it should have the ability to strengthen that programme as much as possible. This should not, however, be to the detriment of other programmes which are offered. These should be maintained and enhanced so that the university grows as a whole. As to how programme strengths would be recognized, we feel that this should be done by the individual universities which are in the best position to judge the various programmes. Once a certain programme is seen by the university to be singled out for specialization, then that university has to decide how best to develop the programme. They should be able to apply to the government for special grants in order to facilitate this. These applications would go to a restructured and strengthened OCUA which would be able to make a decision (rather than just a recommendation) on whether the grant should be approved. Funding Arrangements forDiierenti&ion/Adaptability . The Commission request that submissions to this question provide guiding principles it should adopt on reviewing the tuition fee level and to discuss the effects of higher tuition on accessibility. This is perhaps the most significant question of the entire discussion paper from an student perspective because it ties in the concern of financial accessibility quite apart from ademic qualifications, and also because the question immediately x2 ens a discussion on the appropriate level of student aid. One of the ‘most basic guidelines on this issue and which must be considered as a backdrop on any discussion on tuition fees is the recognition that the cost to the individual of a university education is a matter of concern to our entire society and cannot be reviewed without an eye on social policy. Social policy has always maintained that a university education should be available to all academically eligible students regardless of their financial status. In 1971, a background report to the Commission on Post-Secondary Education in Ontario (COPSEO) entitled, Financing Post-Secondary Education outlined the generally held view: “Opportunity of a student from a lower socio-economic background to further his education shouid be the same as that of one from a higher socioeconomic background. Qne of the major barriers to equality of opportunity has been the lack of financial avenues and it is this obstacle which society is attempting to eliminate.” (p. 145) , It is impossible to discuss the idea of raising tuition fees without undermining the objectives of this policy. In David Stager’s discussion for the Commission. Accessibility and the Demand for University Education, he argues that “the elasticity of demand (or enrolment) in response to price) change is found to be less that -1 .O, or that a ten percent increase in tuition fees would result in less than a ten percent decrease in enrolment”. (p. 1O).This prompts the immediate question of who the ten percent are that will choose not to enroll? It is our opinion that those groups already under-represented in the university system will

be the most severely hurt by an increase in tuition fees. Stager himself admits that “students with high ability and from high income families are least responsible to tuition changes” (p. 12) and that studies have shown that “adults (over 24 years) in part-time studies were much more sensitive to fee changes than were younger full-time students”. (p. 1~) Furthermore, in Australia, where tuition fees were abolished in 1974, authors of studies on the social composition of studerrts entering higher education have noted that “groups now under-represented would be most affected by the re-introduction of fees: part-time students, women, older students, country residents and students of lower socioeconomic status”. (p. 30, Stager) ’ It is often argued by individuals supporting higher tuition fees that students ‘are generally representative of the higher socioeconomic bracket and thus should not have their education subsidized by government. Although many uncontrollable factors affect the decision of an individual to pursue higher education,. including parental role models, family income, peer pressure, ethnic&y, and sex, tuition fee levels are a major economic determining factor of that decision and thus should reflect our social policy. In other words, since individuals from a higher income bracket are not as affected by tuition fee hikes, raising tuition levels will only affect the sector of the population which is already disadvantaged. In any discussion of tuition fees and their level, the question arises of what is an appropriate amount of aid? Advocates of higher tuition usually acknowledge that student aid must be revised accordingly, but do not provide any insight into how this might be accomplished. Itis disappointing to find that the Commission’s discussion paper did not address this issue along with its proposals on tuition fees. Stager argues in Accessibility and the Demand for University Education that “the tuition fee is not a significant influence on the postsecondary decision”. He goes on to qualify this by stating that the public seems to recognize this as well, citing a survey in Ontario which found that:, , \ “69% of all respondents feel that current (tuition) fee levels are not a barrier to accessibility..the Ontario Student Assistance Program was considered to be an adequate mechanism for insuring accessibility to those from low income backgrounds”. (p. 30) Since 30% of all students require assistance from Student aid programs it is not inconceivable that 69% of those surveyed also have has no experience with OSAP and are unaware of its shortcomings. At this point, we feel that a discussion of the problems associated with OSAP in its present form would only repeat the view held by the Ontario Federation of Students, and thus we. refer the Commission to their submission for a more thorough discussion of its inadequacies and strengths. We wish to make clear, however, our opposition to an increased loans portion of the student aid programme (due to its detrimental effects on accessiblity). A 1981 study conducted at Washington State University examined the relationship of student aid to accessibility and found that the receipt of student aid was positively related to persistence; that grants were more positive to persistence than loans; and that the larger the assistance received, the less the chance of dropping out. (Jensen, 1981). The “25% solution”, is in our view, an admission of underfunding by the Ontario government and a step backward in the goal of equality of opportunity for residents of Ontario. The proposal for fee differentials larger than those that already exist between general and professional programs can only be viewed as another setback from the goal of universal accessibility. As argued in the previous question, tuition fees have been proved to affect accessibility, and given that student grants are inadequate, differentiations between programmes ‘will only ensure that those who are from low-income backgrounds will be streamed into the lower cost programmes. We feel that the current degree of differentiation provides a suitable balance by reflecting the extra cost of instruction in the professional programmes without significantly limiting accessibility. Those who support fee differentials argue that students should pay for the extra cost of instruction or alternatively, they should pay for the extra I earnings they will expect from enrolment in professional programmes. The problem with the former is that the cost of instruction can vary between universities with the cost not necessarily reflecting the quality of the programme. The rationale that tuition costs should reflect the expected wages of a graduate of that programme suffers from the same problems that plague manpower planning. The salary of a particular profession often fluctuates with current demand and thus it isdifficultto accurately predict the earning potential of a particular degree. The proposal for allowing institutions greater discretion in setting fee levels is not new to students at the University of Waterloo. The administration at Waterloo has supported this idea vigorously because they feel they would be one of the. main beneficiaries of this type of approach. The drsadvantages of such a scheme mainly revolve around the problem of accc?ssibility to quality. Generally speaking, the quality of education would be tied to the cost of tuition at that institution. Those individuals who cannot afford the more expensive school would then be forced to obtain a degree from an institution with a poorer reputation, regardless of their academic qualifications. Inequities of socio-economic status would then be preserved on the basis of ability to pay. Such an “Ivy League” approach to a publicly-funded post-secondary education system goes against the grain of social policy in Ontario. Inter-institutional Planning and CeOrdination The need for an organization to represent the true needs of theuniversities of Ontario to the government dearly exists. The structure which is now in effect does not adequately represent the various sectors of the university community. We are proposing a reformatted and strengthened OCUA which would have decision-making ability. This organization would consist of representatives from the four groups which have the knowledge and will to properly strengthen the university system in Ontario, namely: faculty, administration, staff, and students. These representatives would be selected- from their respective recognized provincial organization (i.e. OCUFA, OFS, etc.). The committee would have equal representation from each group and would work as a democratic organization. Such a committee would see Ontario’s university system as a whole and could effect positive change in the system to return it to the world-reknowned standard it once enjoyed.


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(and’ possibly three) years beginning in October 1985. Selection is made by provincial committees aftei personal interviews and or the basis of the candidate’: record. Some definite qualit) of distinction, whether intellect or character or 2 combination of‘ these is thl essentiai requirement. Value 0 f each scholarship i: approximately ten thousanc pounds (at ieast) per annum Application f‘orms atic particulars ma)’ be obtainer from the Student Award Office in Needles Hall.


respon ds ,to Bovey , strengths and potential when forming institutes; each university has a PREFACE structured in-house process to determine the feasibility of establishing The Government of Ontario and faculty, staff and students of the institutes. There is no demonstrable need to have this process universities of this province are standing at a crossroads in the field of undertaken by government instead as part of some overall structural higher education. On one level we are all facing rationalization of the university system to complement an emergent new technology and a - design. Question 11 general transformation in economic structures. On another level, we are ‘A simultanebus combination of both stated options would be most beset with an assault on traditional, post- 1945 ideological values. appropriate course to pursue. But, it is also important that a more liberal co cerning the nature, course and direction of education. AH discussion, and brbadly based set of criteria should be employed to ensure that the on ‘7‘centres of eticellence”, ” rationalization” and “academic clustering” widest variety of students are represented in our post-secondary flows from these central issues: what should be the role of the university institutions. The purpose of this set of criteria should ensure that in the economy and society, who should determine the nature and shape of that role, and, ultimately, who should’ be able to attend these< students from different economic, racial, ethnic, geographic universities? in society are represerited. Where possible, the backgrounds government should co-operate with uijiversities to ensure that they all stnce _1945, Ontario has approached issues concerning postsecondarv education with a well-defined set of values in mind. The cater to that broad mix. Secondly, once the op‘portunity is given to the student to attend education paradigm was: accessibility for all, within qualitative academic university, a rigorous in-course screening should be applied to ensure limitations, and total freedom to choose subjects of/interest, whkther. that qualified students graduate. specifically career-oriented, or ,of intellectual improvement, or of passing The different screening practices employed by the universities should fancy. Further, it was believed that the Individual should best be left with be clearly enunciated to ensure that potential students still in secondary the responsibility of finding his/her own way from school to work, school are well aware of them. It is of extreme importance that, whichev& that any help in that regard would come mostly’ from industry or the screening process is used, it be clearly spelled out to students entering untverslttes. Any assistance tram the gover;nment was extended in the their last year of secondary school. same vein as its other passive programs; a skries of benefits to be used at Question 16/ the discretion of the individual. The question overstates the universities’ role of manpower training for This paradigm went hand in hand wi$,kany Western governments’ the job market. No university should or can afford to let market forces general devel&pmental approach to the post-war economy. Students create and shape student demand. Students in institutions of higher .were given a large amount of freedom to pick and choose among a wide learning should not be traded on the market as commodities an< the varieb of options; either universities or corporations, would discover industrial demand in dareer areas, and the government would co- bniversity should be wary of limiting the availability of post-secondary education to only those programs ivhich market forces suggest bould operate in bringing the necessary resources to bear in oCder. that the be in demand. While it is necessary for the university to be able to identify demand be satisfied. All of this was accomplished without tampering with the traditional and pubiicize areas of high :student demand for skilled personnel, It concept of the autonomy of the university. Throughout the period, should leave the choice to the individual student. universities chose to develop programs at their own volition, while the . 1ne paramount purpose ~1 a unlverslry snoula pe 10 encourage studentsto think critically and to assist in the further development of the government imposed the barest of regulations. It set absolute maxi,mum store of mankind’s knowledge in all areas. It should never be,relegated to rates of tuition, and tistablished a process to evaluate the need for and a functional role in the economy as a mere job training centre. perfocmance ,of Academic programs. This regulatory regime coupled with the installation of such advisory bodies as the Ontario Co&i1 of Question 2 1 University Affairs (OCUA) demonstrated the government’s commitment The research and development potential is unevenly distributed from to *co-operating with &e academic institutions and respecting their faculty to faculty and from department to department. As a result of assistance from government and private sources (NSERC grants and autonomy. private corporation contracts), .grants and scholarships are more readily Now we seem to be hearing of a new paradigm for post-secondary education, with a different ideological backdrop, and a correspondingly available in certain departments or faculties while limited in others. This has caused dislocations within the overall university community. dltterent university system. Developmental liberalism is to be discarded corrective measures should be used to ensure that sources of funding in the face of the government’s desire to rationalize higher education,’ sre adequate in all faculties. just as industrialists are rationalizing their production processes to meet technological and economic imperatives. The Government of Ontario, Questions 37 and 39 facing what it calls a funding crisis in higher education, is frying to trim down and restructure the university system; and at the sanle time, it wishes to marry this exercise with what it perceives to be new requirements emanating from the latest transformation of the economy. What are the implications of this trend for accessibility to higher education? What will happen to the autonomy bf universities? Will they still be able to develop and structure themselves on terms which qive them some measure of control? What will be the role of the uni&si<visPart of the strength of Wilfrid Laurier University lies in its relatively a-vis the economy? small size, the strengths bf its offerings and its dedication to scholarly research, the university’s response to the Bovey commission says. Si’ATEMENlOF PdINCIPLES The commission, headed by retired business exkcutive Edmund The Graduate Student Association of the University of Waterloo is Bovey, is to report this fall to Education Minister Bette Stephenson with extremely concerned about these questioris. We believe that universal suggestions for the future development of Oritario universities. accessi bit@ subject to reasonable academic restrictions should be In its report to the commission, Wilfrid Laurier University said its maintained as a guiding principle. Now, mQre than ever, u&e&y relative small size, achieved by design, is a positive factor which enriches education is an indispensable vehicle of upward econamic atld social the campus experience for students. It allows close professor-student mobility. The coming techno-industrial society will make an a+quate interaction and wide involvement in campus activities by its students. education an even more indispensable tool in individual achievement. “We believe that diversity in size ought ‘to be an important component In addition to ,tiis first principle, we also submit that in any of the OFtario university system and we caution against attitudes which restructuring of the university system, the autonomy of the university imply that only bigger is better,“.the report says.’ must remain inviolate. We are today in an enviable situation in which our The university does not believe that certain universities should be universities, not having been creatures of government creation, continue assigned to dn inferior status and, consequently, receive relatively less to enjoy an immense measure of freedom r,elative to their counterparts funding because of their size. . in other provinces and other countries. Therefore, any relationship Laurier’s size and its emphasis.on quality in its offerings has resulted, between government and university should continue to be of a co: the report continues, in the university experiencing the highest overall operative nature. ratio of applications to first-year places in the province. Bearing in mind this statement of principles, we wish to respond to The proportion of Onprio schalars (high school graduates with an Questions 6, I 1, 16, 2 1, 37 and 39. average: of 80 percent or more) at Laurier has risen steadily. Laurier now Question 6 stands fifth among 15 Ontario universities in attracting &ch scholars, The University of Waterloo maintains many institutes of specialization behind only Toronto, Queen’s, Wa’terloo and the University of Western srtd they reflect areas of excellence or potential excellence. They have Ontario. :ontincially won high marks for their departments in periodic program One result of the increasing application ratk from high school appraisals. Their existence due to a deliberate choice by the Univ&ty’s graduates has been a raising of the minimum admission standardsto 70. administration and a careful application of resourc& toward them. percent in all areas this faK rhese institutes reflect areas of strengths of graduate students and “The success of WLqs programs, the attractiveness of a WLU ~ulty members in a ‘university and, for that reason, they should’ education, and the high demand for entry have combined to give Laurier \ ontinue to be established within the domain of a university. a significant presence in Ontario,” the report says. We believe that the university community is best able to assess its own “This serves to demonstrate that overall size does not ,determine

ParticipanJs

in recent

commission meeting at WLU. Imprint photo by Patrick

We support retention of government regulation of tuition fees and we are strongly opposed to any increases in tuition above the rate ot inflation. The reasons ‘for our above positions are the following: 1. We believe that deregulation would allow certain universities to increase tuition fees to a very high level, claiming that they are centres of excellence and they can rightfully do this. The result would be an elitist university system, with a. tew top universities where’only students from. higher income families can afford to go, and mediocre universities where everybody else can go. Thus, the result of deregulation would be the further reduction of qualitative accessibility. 2. The basic problem facing post-secondary education is government underfunding and it cannot be solved’ by increasing tuition fees. The government must, in time of fiscal cqnstraint, have the political will to decide on its,, priorities- where $ey concern public services and, adequately, instead’of using a Praod retienchment approach. Peibaps a more progressive income tax system can provide a&e&ibili,ty to ’ , students from lower income families. 3. An argument suggested by university adtiinstrations in ‘favour of higher tuition fees is that OSAP loans and grants to the poorer students could be increased.to lesSen the undesirable redti,ction of accessibility. However, once tuition fees are Increased, there is no guarantee that loans-and grants to poorer students will increase permanently. The only guarantee will probably be that there will be higher tuition fees. Moreover, as can be seen from the example of most European countries such as West Germany, France and Greece, there is nd question of any tuition tee Increases because there are no fees charged at all. . 4. We are empathetic In stating that the use ot differential tees tor visa students at the graduate level is counter-productive. It would result in makiqg. Canadian universities IeSs accessible for qualified foreign graduate students who contribute signiticantly to research. This would further Isolate Canadian unrversities from the International intellectual community and leave us at a disadvantage. 1 his could have negative consequences for the reyut+on of Canadian Institutions abroad and nq decrease our dbillty to establish international economic contacts.

WLU: small is beautiful _

Guelph . CSA: Bovey is ‘a sham. .. ‘.1 The Central Student Association of the University of Guelph. wishes to take this opportunity to express our views on the education cutbacks in Ontario and the role of the Commissjon on the Future Development of ‘the .Universities of Ontario (CFDUO). We at the Unive&ty of Guelph have r-t; illusions that the CFDUO is anything more than ‘a commissidn to work out ‘the details oti the *Ontario gov&nmenfs plan. to reduce the existing university facilities to compensate for’ the inadequate level of funding to the post-secondary education system, that is, to scale down the ‘system to match’ the funding. Furthermore, we are of the opinion that the manner in which the universities are being assessed, as illustrated by the ‘51 leading questions in the CFDUO discussion ’ paper, indicates that the CFDUO is not interested in improving the qua.ity of the university system, as claimed, but only in improving the ability of the universities to meet the needs of’ the industrial sector. It is indicative that the -CFDUO gives such importance to‘ the views of individtials such as Walter F. Light of Northern Telecomm, and th$ other members of the Corporate-

Education Forum, while ignoring the opinions. ot the students and educators whd for over 12 years have been voicing their views on the problems caused by the undertunding ot the p&t-secondary education system. We do not believe that ,CFDUO public hearings will be anything more than an empty showcase ‘to give. the decision process of the CFDUO a veneer of “democratic process” so that the pro’tincial government can claim that “everyane” had the opportunity to influence the decisions of the CFDUO. The real discussions and debate are taking ptace in the board rooms ot the corporate sector.... There are major problems facing students in their pursuit of post-secondary education due to the government*s refusal to fund the education system adequately. There is the question of economic barriers which are not eliminated by the student assiitance program and aggravated by constant tuition increases; the streaming of women ‘into low employment/tow income programs such,as social work and childcare; the unjustifiable and discriminatory difterential fees imposed on international students, up to six times. more than Canadian students.

. Hayes

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quality it is possible for a small university to build towird excellence through careful planning, hard work, art-d a unique vision of its own future.” Research is described as part of the core undertaking of Laurier since “competent university-levei teaching is not possible without faculty involvement in research.” But present financing favours. larger universities with doctoral programs, the report adds, with the result that Laurier must obtain additional funding if it is to maintain its current standard in teaching and research. The university’s selective graduate programs are so well received that quotas have had to. be established, the report says. Laurier looks forward to adding perhaps two’ doctoral programs in areas where it now .offers programs at master’s level. The report says Laurier cannot accept the concept of a system which would arbitrarily prohhibit the addition of doctoral courses at univeisities with’well-established graduate programs where there is ‘student demand. For some graduate students to blossom and to reach intellectual maturity, personal attention and a closely knit academic coinmunity is a must, the. report argues. In ifs conclusion the university stated that Laurier has nodesire to be a “miniature replica” of the province’s larger universities. “Rather, we want to offer a quality alternative to those students who prefer a more intimate and personalized environment And who are interested in ‘that limited range in which we specialize.” - of programs -It’ adds that because of the university’s particulai offerings, it is ’ ineligible for much of the financial support presently availablejo those institutions with more science-oriented programs. Laurier and similar institutions should not be penalized in funding because of their program offerings,’ the reljort argues.

’ .

The Commission is not addressing the real problem in the university system which ic; underfunding therefore, iri response to the 51 questions, only one: Why should we believe that the provincial government, through the CfDUO, is any more’ interested at this time in listening arid responding to our views than“it has been over the past I3 years? Our time will be wasted in preparing a lengthy submission examining the educational system, we suggest that if you are interested in hearing the views of students, you look to the many, many petitions, submissions, demonstrations, rallies, class boycotts, occupations, etc. that have been organized by students in the past. There you &ill hear the voice of students dehanding an end to the education cutbacks, an end to tuition increases, overcrowded classes and labs, outdated equipment, inadequate libraries..., and end to the obstacles which block the youth from acquiring further education, and demanding ’ an environment in which they can pursue their interests and develop their talents in order to contribute’ to human * progress.


Hyde, :3g Brother advocate, and family entertainment king: by Carl Davies Imprint staff Dr. JeQll and Mr. Hyde paid a visit to the Waterloo campus on Tuesday, September 1 lth. Onstage, G. Gordon Liddy is a Mr. Moriarity, one of the great villains of our modern day North America. Offstage, Mr. Liddy is amicable, personable, and softspoken. Offstage, he makes it easy to forget that he once roasted a dead rat and then proceeded to eat it; this was how George Gordon Battle Liddy conqueredhis fear of the dreaded rodent. Onstage Mr. Liddy plays the heavy. He lambastes the American public for their naivete, predicts the collapse of the social security system, and ridicules the western people for their “soft” attitude towards the Soviet Union.

The consumate pop star of Republican America croons the virtues of espionage and willpower to an entranced UW audience. Imprint photo by Patrick Hayes

Saturday, feds $11

others

The question and answer period is the highlight of the G. Gordon Liddy show. Mr. Liddy begs people not to be polite, and tells people to ask what they want. No doubt many people were intimidated by the king of clandestine (a term Mr. Liddy seemed quite fond of, something he mentioned proudly and repeatedly). Many questions approached the topic of Mr. Liddy’s morality, or, to be more precise, asked if, in fact, there is a G. Gordon Liddy morality. Mr. Liddy explained that, yes, there is a G. Gordon Liddy morality. He stressed that people should develop their own morality and not be tied to anyone else’s. The audience did not seem extremely desirous to follow the morality of someone who clearly stated he felt no guilt whatsoever about the Watergate break-ins, or the ransacking of Daniel Ellesberg’s psychiatrist’s office. There was some token outrage in the questions presented to Liddy, although politeness seemed the order of the day for the UVV audience. The most notable outbursts by the audience came when one young gentleman said that he was appalled that Liddy was

September RecordSTOP

turning a personal embarrassment (Watergate) int monetary gain (it cost the Federation of Students : and a half thousand dollars for Mr. Liddy’s three-h show). The questioner (whose comment was not uri one recently made by a comic strip penguin) recei polite applause, as did an ex-resident Chile pi challenged Liddy’s claim that U.S. involvement in toppling of the Allende government was not as great i generally believed. Education is one of our most powerful tools, says Liddy. He told the story of his admission to jail and reaction he got when asked to recite the extent of education (Mr. Lid@ holds a law degree from Fordl College). After Liddy had regurgitated his educatic experiences he said there was “fear in the face of guards, and awe in the face of the prisoners.” The respect that Liddy commanded while behind’ allowed him to conduct “the most effective clandez operation I have every commanded”. He told how he his troops placedwire taps in the warden’s office, wh resulted in the removal of the warden from his posi Activities such as these forced the authorities to sent Liddy to nine seperate prisons during his four year in jail. “I kept getting expelled from prison” said Liddy, and laughter proliferated throughout the with the exception of a few shocked looks. The law background of Mr. Liddy showed throw the presentation. Mr. Liddy was the lawyer, preset his case to the jury, the audience, telling us the Ellen ‘break-in could be justified as a matter of nat security, and that Watergate was no different tha: events surrounding any U.S. Presidential election Liddy was trying to portray himself as a victim screwed up justice system. Judge John J. Sirica, the judge who presided eve

29 8pm fioAo

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Liddy’s Watergate trial, bore the brunt of Mr. Liddy’s attack on the justice system. Mr. Liddy said that “Time’s Man of the Year” (Mr. Liddy’s sardonic reference to the judge) possessed nothing more than a “room temperature IQ” and proceeded to tell the story of the Watergate jury selection. Apparently, ,Mr. Sirica was having a terrible time tm $0 find jurors who hadn’t been affected by the vast press coverage of the Watergate affair. Frustrated, Mr. Sirica finally asked the group of urors to raise their hands if they felt they were unable to make a fair and unbiased decision on the trial. It was not until later that Mr; Sirica discovered that one of his jurors was fluent in Spanish, but alas, could barely speak a word of English, according to Mr. Liddy. Onstage Mr. Liddy is all fire and brimstone, but at the dinner reception held beforehand Mr. Liddy came across as a man capable of almost human-like affection. He laughed and joked throughout dinner, telling one humourous little anecdote after another. The topic of torture was raised onlv once during the entire meal. This topic was the now famous hand-over-the-burning-

conquered,

_

if not

amused:

the -audience

at Tuesday’s

most

candle incident, which Mr. Liddy said occurred during him attempt to recruit someone. He explained that it wasn’t as bad as we may think, that once the flame had burned out the nerves, the only pain experiencedwas a dull, periphary one. On a more pleasant vein, Mr. Liddy discussed his relationship with acid guru Timothy Leary. Mr. Liddy arrested Dr. Leary twice in the pre-Watergate years, and in recent years has participated in a number’of public debates with Dr. Leary. He talked affectionately of Dr. Leary’s “Elfin Irish wit” and talked of their debates. “He would accuse me ofbeing alinear thinker, and sae he was a tangential one, and then he would be off’. Mr. Liddy also discussed 5:. Howard Hunt,-introducing him as “someone you may have heard of.” Mr. Hunt was Mr. Liddy’s partner in crime in the Watergate affair, and has also written over 50 novels, mostly spy novels. He talked of E. Howard Hunt the accomplished musician, and of Hunt’s penchant for older women, telling the story of Hunt’s attempt to seduce a friend’s mother. He also talked of Hunt’s sensitivity, and explained how deeply ‘affected Hunt was by the death of his wife, Dorothy, who

“controversial”

event

of Orientation.

died in a plane crash shortly before the beginning of the Watergate trial. It was strange to later hear Mr. Liddy talk of the evils of emotion and the great merits of reason. Mr. Liddy spoke fondly of his family, and life on the shore of the Potomac River. He told how he had quit his father’s law firm after a conflict of interest because “notu is worth offending my father”. He spoke of how Lyndon B. Johnson had extorted funds to clean up the Potomac River, because his wife, Ladybird, was appalled at how polluted it had become in the late sixties. Although you may have gone to see G. Gordon Liddy fully prepared to loathe him and all he stood for, he makes it very hard to leave his show without holding a certain amount of begrudging respect for the man. He has the chilling ability to make people laugh at some very frightening facts. His self-confidence, his will, is , overwhelming. At the dimmer reception for Mr. Liddy, there was a choice of two entrees, rock cornish hen or a vegetable plate. Out of fourteen people, thirteen chose the rock corn&h hen. It seems that Mr. G. Gordon Liddy isn’t scared of little chickens anymore.

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1 THE PEERS CENTRE

The ‘PEERS Centre is a listening, infor.mation, and referral service 6rganized and staffed by student volunteers.

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Sept. 15

Sept. 14

RICK SANTERS

September the entire Available

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Rock. Concert Passes jiw month only $5.00 at Coronet br Imprint oj’fice

‘Age of Majority’ ‘Bands

Sept. 21

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to change

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up to 9:30’

Sept. 29

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TRESHOMBRES

---CENTRE

‘Good notice’

Sept. 20

Sept. 22

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Coming Soon * Friday Sept. 21 Saturday Sept. 22 Friday Sept. 28 Saturday Sept. 29 Friday

Oct.

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Lee Aaron - Tres Hombres FM - Goddo David

Wilcox


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Fin&, because White has been charitable for so’long he Instead, the steady voice sounds inhuman. White feels sorry for him and tries to reason with him, giving - begins to feel that he owes Bartleby h% life. This is the reversal of the Christian idea of charity through guilt. White feels guilty him money, and friendship, even offering to let Bartleby stay at because he is being charitable. He realizes that Bartleby needs his home. When all the attempts jail, White continues to wrestie with the kind of guidance that .White can never give. f,Wl~ite feels that Bartleby is finally at peace when the young his better judgment, to give Bartleby the benefit of the doubt. m&n’s glazed eyes close for the last time, signifying his sleep But in the case of Bartleby, where one does not know whether “with kings and counsellors”. to pity~ him or ignore him, there can be no strict “Christign” guidelines. Ned Dickens chose to adapt this story to drama.to make Eventually, White assuties that it is his destiny to meet and _ Melville more “accessible” to audiences. Being careful in his ’ _ Mr. Dickens tries to stay close to the original take care of the solemn, young, man. This is the 0111; interpretation, source but found it necessary to do niassive editing to produce ‘Christian” response possible. a captivating play. The play is introspective and provocative. Christianity, in the form of guilt-turned-to-charity is examined thorou&ly.Melville He chose the play because he felt akin to Clarence White, ’ cllt bough he adnits that he wouldn’t be as generous in the same tries to show that charity does not solve complex emotional situatioil. problems. White comes to the conclusion that the you!g man is a When asked what idea appealed to him most in the story, he “victim of innate and incurable disorder”. He ‘longs to pity replied, “native innocence (in Bartleby) against drganlzea tilnd (in Clarence).” Bartleby but Bartleby ignores all form of help.

Wcdkinij mild on the- Wik! Side bd Dave Sider everywhere, ai;d tables appeared to have been distributed at Imprint staff random. I took a walk on the Wild Side last Satur-day. The Wild Sid: is The decor of the club could best be described as being a low the latest club to hit the Twin Cities. Located above the Kent budget decorating job. Black and white paint adorned the walls, Hotel, which has been undergqing renovations, this new club is’ with several pieces of kindergarten art thrown in for good Waterloo’s answer to Kitchener’s Level 21. _’ measure. A large video screen was displayed at one end of the Posters which had been freely distributed around town, room, but wasn’t used. A small dance floor seemed out of place described Wild Side as a place featuring the sounds of punk in ;;1club which was advertised as a place to dance. At the back rock, funk rock, and dance rock. Deciding that I needed d walk of the building, there were a pinball machine and a pool table. on the wild side, I visited this new nightspot accompanied by a Musicaljy, the place was pretty blase. I heard nothing which few friends. could be called punk rock. The DJ selections all sounded like Picking our way through the construction zone in front of the percussion sound tracks. Kent, it wds hard to tell where the construction stopped and Nevertheless, the Wild Side should prove to be- a mild where the Wild Side began. After climbing a set of dirty wooden success due to the fact that there are very few places in .t*own stairs, we entered a long narrow room with a balcony along the which cater to the punks and wavers. left hand side. Since the main floor was crowded, we looked for I would be disappointed if one would assume that the Unfortunately, the seating arrangements a table upstairs. negative tone of this review was the result of a prejudiced found on the tipper level were a bit on the wild side. Wooden attitude towards ‘new wave’ clubs. Personally speaking, I enjoy benches, too large fO‘r one and too small for two, were the atmosphere and sound of Level of 21. ,

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hands

I!

by Hitkka McCatlum >Bartleby is a very passive resistor. He stand by his window that faces a brick wall as if he were the last pillar “of some deserted temnle”. Bartleby, the Scriuener: A Story of Wall Street is a short story written by Herman Melville in 1857, The play Bartleby, presented in the Humanities Theatre is the ‘adaptation of the long-winded story into a fascinatiqg, introspective play. The story was adapted by Jan Swicky and Ned Dickens, who plays the narrator in this one-man shoti. Mr. Dickens’ monologue tells the story of a young man, Bartleby, who is temporarily employed as a scrivener to the narrator, a lawyer. Clarence White, the lawyer, qmploys Bartleby because his soothing and reassuring presence gives , White peace of mind. But there is one hitch: Bartleby refuses to do his job. As a copywriter he is steadfast and competent, but he won’t run errands or check his writing over. Eventually, Bartleby refuses even to write. White is put in a state of consternation. Even though Bartleby never reveals his character, he arouses White’s compassion. At first, White puts up with Bartleby’slack oflwritingbui then he requests that Bartleby leave, because of pressure from attorney friends. When Bart]eby refuses to do so, White relocates his office. ’ Weeks later &r&by is still in the old offices withering away as he stares out his window, desolately. The new renter of the offices demands that White persuade the young man to leave. White fails, as he had failed earlier in talking reason with Bartleby The next time we see Bartleby he is in jail. He is allowed to wander the gardens because he is only there on a charge of vagrancy. White ‘visits Bartleby once but gets a blank reception. The next time White visits, he finds Bartleby lying in the garden with his head on a.rbck looking nowhere with glazed eyes. Bartleby is dead. The play focuses on the reactions of Clarence White to Bartleby. All the time that White knows Bartleby he is plagued by the concept of Christian charity. When Bartleby refuses requestssin a monotone voice saying “I would prefer not to”, White is th rown into a dilemma because the phrase is never said with malice or anger.

.

1hhilsrm

@ Sty e)tbs roll around a wrner %@ hotdt~ mwting nothing yet for thta hotwful squirming of Ihew met , fi and Lips M hi<*ti nt’\cr

hr;rt if

Wall

.

.

The Red Bricbk walls cross with my eye sight auci the sky tht- Btue of Lhc &illte jumper hwomt~s a rig angle for as long as 1 sit here thinking

1,

>I? hanti aches to gt@ somcthirig N’hthre art’ you? r . ‘I‘he shoutclw aches as 1 lean on the pillow wmtcmt~tating the warmth of this hwl and tighl sWt~amin(r in Itrc windull Pasl ttjtb p,lanLs play N,ilh .Ihc lrccs upon 2i the wall 1 Hish it w:outd rain ,t’ou toVt~ct to tita in twd and tislen to rain

Ektkby:

. The Red Br,ick

I ,


,

1 \ /

\-Iu /.

T7.

/ \

/

Math Sot presents...

‘84

-.n

I 1,~

v ). fri. October

at \ the ANNEX!! 5th

\

Sept.15,

1984 7:30 p.m. War Memorial Hall U of Guelph (on Gordon at College) Tickets Available at: The Box Office, University Centre. C.S.A.FR,oom 224, U oj Guelph;

.

y

School of China Dance e University of Guelph

K-W Art Gallery

$4.00/person

_ ,

./

Miss Y uk-Lam Fu, a truly gifted, skillful and dedicated artist, will be performing as the principle dancer in this program. Miss Fu has studies Chinese dancing with numerous world-reknowned instructors at a wide range of dance institutes in China and Hong Kong since childhood.

on sale in the Math Sot

office MC 3038 ,’ I % zp

,-

The Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery will be presenting an exhibition of illustrations by James Tughan, 6-30 September 1984, Tughan, a free lance illustrator in Tok-:)nto, has enjoyed a recent renaissance of c,tylistic diversity and published exposure in tree lance illustration with commissions ‘by Canadiai-t and American magazines and designers. His chalk pastel drawings are best described as ‘cartpgraphic realism.’ Essentially a marriage of mapping, abstract realism and natural iconography, this blend of influences results in a form of landscape art with a unique sense of overview whether Y applied to intimate tabletop studies or to aerial views.

i

\

\

6:00 p.m.

Tickets

1%

I

:i Oktoberfest

\

A Chinese Dance Gala Performance will be held in Guelph on September 15th. The program is this performance will be somewhat distinct in comparison to other dance performances of Chinese dancing in that an emphasis will be placed on depicting the image of women as reflected in classical danced from China. In the context of China’s over two thoysand years of cultural history and traditional thinking, the dances in this program will present the calm,. delicate, gentle,‘honest as well as resolute, capable, and perseverent characteristics of Chinese women ,. These enduring images of the Chinese women have sustained ,a major part in the Chinese culture.

exhibits.

Durer, Gurnewd!s, and Gustave Moreau. As Sheldon Williams has noted, “Fuci,s...stands for a kind of imagery that is a mixture of sex, medievalism, mysticism and modernism that is -har=d to parallel in the work of any other artist.” The present exhibition is drawn from a limited . edition book, a recent gallery donation, depicting the story of Samson from the Old Testament. It comprises twenty etchings. and illustrations completed by the artist between 1960 and 1964; the book itself was published in 196-i’. William Blair Bruce: 1859 - 1906: The exhibit& of. - fifty-three “paintings and drawings by the Victorian Canadian painter, Willima Blair B lute, opens at the KitchenerWaterloo Art Gallery,.6 September 1984 and continues until 21 October 1984. Organized ‘-

Ernst Fuchs: Samson Suite: The Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery exhibits the work of Ernst Fu< :hs, iC I September-4 November. and circ’ulated by the Robert McLaughlin Ernst Fuchs was born in Vienna, and Gallery ;)f Oshawa, the William Blair Bruce studied in Vienna ant j Paris; he has lived and show will provide t h< basis for interesting _ . worked since 1960 in Vier Ina. Fuchs is a member of the Vienn ese Set lool of Fantastic . comparisqns with Pictures for ihe Parlour: ?b!annerist -like Realism. His mys ,titial, The English Reproductive Print 1775.nort rauals of biblical scenes are Inspired by 1900, which optins at the same time.

K-W

Chamber

Music

Society

presents UNIVERSITY , JEWISH

WJSA annual

OF WATE,RLOO.

STUDENTS ASSOCIATfON !. HILLEL

invite& you to our thir.d wine-and-cheese party

Where:~‘TheUniversity Club ’ . When: Thursday, September 20th 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. Cost:*Members - no qharge ; non-members Y- $3.00

. a;

Re-mindert Anyone interesteQ in accompanying Shaii or Jonathan to the Network Conference September 20-23 please call either of us. You. will be subsidized at least half of the cost.

CORNER of QUEEN & CHARLES Downtown Kitchener,744-8081

Questions, Queries, Cbmments,: I Criticisms, Suggestions? Call Jonathan Koven 886-7772or Shari. Segall 886-0293 . \ j .

Vvlma Ho: Sept. 16., Singles $8,6. .Veteran violinist Ko is joined by Chris Sharpe, cello, Carmichael, and Dorion, piano, in a delightful program: Haydn, Trio in e; Mozart, Violin Sonata in Bb, K.454; Schubert, Trio Op. 99 in Bb.

Alard:

Sept.

21 &‘Sept.

23,

singles $12/8 each. A major American quartet. Fr: Mozart, Schumann, Shostakovitch. Su: Womencomposers;.Early Amercians, W. Diane Gold,. flute. ’!

,


Recordings

-1

,

Hope / lies in, k&s

In Commie

,

wouldn’t

YOU

have

chance.

the

by Rob Clifton Imprint staff

Russia,

I-Iere at the Imprint David Sylvian Brilliclnt TWOS Virgin Records

mind. forth

After a small break from the music scene David Sylvian has approached the public to give us his first post-Japan solo album, Brilliant Trees. The 1.~. is a definite, but qot drastic, change in musical direction from his previous albums with Japan which led up to their critically acclaimed Tin Drum 1.~. However, this must partly be due to the lack of Mick Kar’n’s exotic fretless bass playing which probably will noticeably be missed by most hardcore Japan fanatics. A glimmer of hope lies in the fact, though, that both Steve Jansen and> Richard Barbieri are on the album. (They also, incidentally, appeared on Mr. Karn’s solo album in 1982.) Ruichi Sakamoto, of Yellow Magic Orchestra, and Steve Nye, producer of Tin Drum, are also contributing artists. Despite the loss of innovative bass lines and the odd solo from Mr. Karn’s sax, Brilliant Trees still comes across as an album worth seriously considering, relying more, instead, on brass instruments and piano solos to round out the subtly synthesized themes. In contrast to Tin Drun~‘s pronounced Far Eastern influences,Trees pursues more strains redolent of Erik Satie, a French avante-garde composer and father of “musique% d’ameublement”, out. of whic’h Sylvian obviously draws some of his musical influences. The album opens with “Pulling Punches”; basically the only danceable number that appears. Mr. Sylvian’s voice is breathy and full on this cut and throughout the album almost leading one to believe he was born td sing within this style of music. (Apparently he -feels his voice is an instrument in itself.) The ba?s is punchy;although admittedly hardly replaces Mr. Kdt-n’s uniqueness: “The Ink in the Well” is a tune capttiring the Age of Reason in a romantic tone and leading into “Nostalgia” one of the representative cuts from the albu’m. It endeavours to cross a romantic sultry mood with exotic percussion (reminiscent of: *Tiii’“D;ru,77’S “Ghosts”). “Red tune Guitar” fin’ IS h e,s dff the first side with a celebratory extoh~ i’ Mi. Sylvi,an’s raison d’etre for his own musical actIvit!es.

Write,

shoot

your

own

Y ‘*or the 1. Frankie The second side will probably be the most appealing to % Japan’s recent followi&. Mr. Jansen and Mr. Barbieri, unlike much of today’s new music rhythmists, feel their way through moody strains and extravagent melodies rather than crank or slap out notes and beats. Mr. Barbieri himself has remarked: “I am more interested in sound than music. Eventually I won’t play anything musical at all I think, it will just be sound.“. “Weathered Wall” does some soul-searching with lines like “Workillg at all hours, Never facing the fear+ here in my heart.” Exotic influences are amplified through muffled high pitched voices which act as instruments in much the same way as they did on Tin Drum. The concluding cuts complete the dejected melancholy mood of the album, as Sylvian confesses, “A reason to believe, Divorces itself from me, Every hope I hold lies in my arms.” Personally, 1 can’t agree with those lyrical sentiments, although the title cut does conclude with, unique multi-layered percussion, a musical direction the listener will be glad Mr. Sylvian pursued. The bottom I~ne’?An album worth buying for Its unique value ds an ~II~OVZI[IV~ artlorm. Certainly the potential is there for this album to grow on on&elf. At ter all, those type of &urns a~e the best kind. I

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TOP TEN ALBU3S week ending .September Go& To Hollywood

8,_1984

-

Two

Tribes

(E.P.) 2. Prince 3. Flock

Heart 4. Fixx

- Purple Rain of Seagulls -

-

The

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of a Young

Phantoms

5. Herbie Hancock - Sound System 6. Art of Noise - Who’s Afraid Of? 7. Villains - Go Crazy 8. Tina Turner - Private Dancer 9. Spoons - Tell No Lies (E.P.) 10. Public Image - This Is What You

Want

Just Arrived - New Releases Tables - The Ruins (E.P.) : 1. Broken - Strength In Numbers ! ‘2. Manteca is Blue Piano

St. John. the Baptist a

p1easan.tstirprise’ by Tim

hprint

Perlich staff

This “Blue Aano” ~ Saint John thf> Baptist Waste island

A new independent release is the Saint John the Baptist EP from the Anglo-Montreal group This “Blue Piano”. It is without a d’oubl the groovie3t come record Montreal since-The Haunted

--

Stephen Lament who emigrated to Canada in 1978 from Belfast, Northern Ireland (yes, the accent is Authentic). Waste Island Records entrepreneur Ken Ashdown at age 22 p,lays bass and sings backing vocals while 22 year old Colin Cahill plays drums. Together, they’ve managed, to capture musically C-Ill

yeneralization is not sufficient to desc!ibe the subtleties of sl?ade in This “Blue Piano”‘s palette. For example, consider the emotional rollercoaster Gde with its of “Summertime” constantly changing mood. At one moment dragging its feet t hrouyh the sludge of sad Idment to runniilg and lumping with 3 nothing-ccln-

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One of the most recent Candd~dn II tdependent releases is the Wet id of EP by Ottawa’s S-1 e‘~nIly ?‘omor row Bamboo. Ovel- the two ~e~11-sthat the yroup has been together they’ve developed a loyal cult following through their charged live shows in the Ottawa clrt’d. The EP is C~compilat Ion of four sonys drawn from their large, almost tzxclus~vely O~I~IIM~ repetoire. All composed by gultal-ist BI-I~II Maule, the music bears a ciistlnct Screaming Bamboo sound that comes as a result of the of IlVcr constant trial and re11nement performances. “World of Tomorrow”, the title song, opens the first side with throbbing drum pounds and “futuristic” synthesizer howls. TensIon is built quickly with Br-mn‘s gritty guitar stabs while Colleen Imparts the space-aye lyrics with enough bombshelter paranoia to effcc tlvcriy

Relationships Saturday to Thursday

R. Van imprint

Ekeren Staff Meissner

Dangerous Games A&M Recot-ds

Expires September 29th

danceable.

“Llfellke”,

the record’s

What scats World of 7‘0171otrow apart front nws t Illdependent t eleases IS 1t s except ionally clea11, tuil sound. Cymbals crash, the snare crunches, the bass rumbles, guitars buLz; and keyboards shriek without a word lost.

gone sour P

Stan

ttwrouqhly

This is a very frightening album. Every song speaks of relationships gone sour, of infatuation and love aone mad. There is no

love between equals here, only triumphs vengeance and triumphs of users.

Everything that this album is trying io say is summarized in the final cut. “Walking in the dark” is the sound of a soul screaming “alone...searching for a love that’s real”. The sense of being lost is underlined by harsh lyrics, monotonous instrumentals, and weak

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a student funded organization, is seeking people to be on its BOARD OF DIRECTORS Interested candi~dates are encouraged to come to the WPIRG office, CC 217, to pick up their nomination forms before Friday, September 21, 1984. Elections will be held Thursday, October 4th.


Literature Dr. Selldev Kumar, at-t Environmental Stucl~es professor at UW 1 has published two books. Dr. Kumar did his PhD in the psychology of visual perceptton and communication and has tnade several films. He has long been interested in the history of philosophy and ideas, with particular focus on science and myths. His two book s are: The Lotus in the Stone and The Vision of Kabir. The Lotus in the Stone deals with dreams and consciousness, from the point of view of transpersonal It draws from spiritual tradition of different psychology. cultures; thus it is closer to the work of Carl Jung than Freud. Though Dr. Kumar feels dreams are essential for our emotional and intellectual well-being--“they l-iave a healing function”--he primarily explores visionary dreams, and does so in an allegorical style. “I feel closer to the spirit of Blake, Plotinus and Goethe than to modern psychologists”, he says. “So I cite great sages and

Imprint,

thinkers for all cultural traditions, to explore dreams, visions and higher levels of consciousness”‘. The book includes 117 illustrattons and 95 verses, dating back 3,500 years. “It is fascinating to note the same themes that appeared in the Work of Egyptian artists, 1,500 years before Christ, reappear in the paintings of Rousseau and Chagall and some modern-day Canadian artists”, he says. “Dr. Kutnar feels our interest in dreams, visions and other levels of consciousness beyond ordinary wakefulness are part of rich historical tradition to be found in all cultures, and at the core of all spiritual knowledge. “Such questions have also inspired the work of great scientists like Pythagoras, Kepler, Newton, Mendel, Bohr and Einstein”, he says. “They also challenge the 19th century view of what was hailed as the triumph of materialism. For now, matter is a more intriguing concept than was ever imagined in our ordinary states of consciousness”.

Dr.

Friday,

September

14, 1984.

21

.

Kumar

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to

Ontario

Medical

The problem with -poetry by George Elliott Clarke Imprint staff The apparent “inward turn” of contemporary Canadian poetry may perhaps be best accounted for by its relative lack of an audience. For this reason, our poetry market is minimal, our best voices are left to cry in the wilderness, and our poetics is squandered in defensive politics. Bereft of ai audience of our compatriots, we are reduced to a sullen and lonely dialogue with our literary colleagues __ our fellow writers, and’ critics. And scholars, since literature tends to reflect the concerns of its perceived audience, ours has focused on language and the creative process -the common concerns of language arttsts. Wtth the loss of a general audience, we, the poets, have come to fear that poetry is threatened by pop&r culture. Our response to thi, Ieat- has been two-fold. First, we have attempted to assimilate the worst features (for example, TV shock-effect imagery) of a decadent, materialist culture int6 our poetry. And second,

considering ourselves to be the Last Da.y bearers of Virgil’s flame, we have drawn our wagons into a circle against Arnold’s massed Phtlistines, shot bullets of sensattonalism (sensatton above sense) at Ihe hoi poll01, and have abandoned the unlettered. These defensive maneouvres have, however, merely perpetuated the loss of audience and have ensured that we will have only each other to which to speak. Our fear that poetry will be displaced by popular culture has arisen from our disbelief, our lack of faith, that literature can serve a deeper purpose than them mere narration of events or presentation of arrangements of words pleasing to the senses. Because weharbour these grave doubts anxieties and ovel what should be .the correct content -- or .purpose -- of our poetry, we highlight its form. We engage in “verbal and formal trickery” because we ‘are uncertain of the immanent and transcendant rneamng of work our poetic d*o;;;g act is 0 . Even worse, it is rank capttulation before the libetal-

technological forces against mlilich we claim to be defending poetry. is a retreat tnto nonsense at a time when all the intellectual resoutces at 0 u rdisposal are required to restore common sense to out- world. Tt-tcket-y 15 no defence of poetry; tt is suictde. It ts betrayal. This retreat or defeat of poets and of poetry ts probably most evident in the reversal of the roles of “aut horitat tve writer and general reader“. The poet no longer believes he has anything tq. tell or teach the reader, while the reader believes he should expect nothing from the poet. This is the reason for our loss of audience and for the precarious position of contemporary poetry. But why is that we believe t h cl t we have nothing worthwhile to sing about or speak of? The answer may be found in the collapse of faith in our time. It is interesting to note that as Nietzsche proclaimed the death of God, Barthes proclaims the death of the Author! Technology ts supposed to SdVt! humanity and verbal a n d lot-ma1 : I-i c k s a r e

supy,!sed :.v edify rea d,er ,N(~nsetlse!

the

Th e gr3test poetry has always been writ ten out of a deep sense of faith -- ot s 0 m e all-encompasstng philosophy -- that made sense of the cosmos. Virgil, Dante, Milton, and Goethe wrote e 11cl u r i n g w o r- k s because they possessed a coherent wet-Id-vtew, a viston woven out of the textures and threads of the commonly-held beliefs -- the myths -- of their times. Invested wtth ihe authority that knowledge of these generally-accepted beliefs gave them, they wet-e able to addt-ess dnd instruct t hetr respective audiences in what was insttnctively known to be true. They were bards. They spoke t 1.u t 11, and the people ltstened. If we at-e to truly defend and pt-eset ve poett y, we mtght begin by writ tny poems that speak truth boldly, and in such a way that those who ‘seek :o understand wrll be able to. Them that have eat-s, le: them heat-.

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.

Warner’s

Lovers

in a dangerous

fall releases

time, torn by faith and age. From

the forthcoming

-

motion

picture

Cal.

This fall Warner Bros. bring’s to the screen a rich harvest of facing fife’s buffetings as together as adulthood allows. But their dreams are fading; reality is taking on a relentless quality. It is new motion pictures that ranies from comedic battles between time for a stand: to revive some of the old dreams and make Heaven and Hell...and right here on Earth, to dramatic conflicts set in Cambodia and the Middle East. Major talent in the fall them happen -- or write off romance, adventure, friendship and hope as mere illusions. line-up includes George Burns, Diane Keaton, Ryan O’Neal, CBS Theatrical Films presents Windy City, starring John Shelley Long, Jobeth Willigms, Tom Conti and Kate Capshaw. McMann, an English playboy, and Cicincarlo Giannini as a Academy-Award winning production designer Stuart Craig (“Gandhi”) co-produces with David Put tnam Cal, the story of a French politician caught up in the adventure. Directed by Rick Rosenthal (Bad Boys) and produced by Doug Chapin with young man who is caught up in the turmoil that exists-in Barry .Krost serving as executive producer, the film’s Northern Ireland over which he has little or no control. Cal, screenplay is by Jim Kouf & David Greenwalt with a story by newcomer John Lynch, comes to portrayed by screen understand what it means to be young and Catholic in Ann Biderman. Original music is by Lewis Furey. Diane Keaton stars in the screen adaptation of The Little Protestant-ruled Ulster. Can his love for an older woman Girl, based on John Le Carre’s critically-acclaimed flourish among the ruins of a city torn by secular violence? Is Drummer bestseller. Caught up in a world of intrigue and internatronal there any hope for his sad and bitter land -- or its people? politics, Keaton portrays an aspiring actress who unwittingly Critically-acclaimed novelist, Bernard MacLaverty adapts his becomes a pawn in a game of international espionage. novel Cal to the screen, with Helen Mirren starring as the Brought vividly to the screen by distinguished filmmaker beautiful, enigmatic widow Marcella, in a performance that won her the Best Actress Award at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival. - George Roy Hill, with a screenplay adapted by Loring Mandel, the picture stars Diane Keaton, Klaus Kinski and Yorgo Cal is produced by David Puttnam. An Enigma Production for Voyagis. Filmed on location in West Germany, England, Goldcrest Films, it is directed by Pat O’Connor-. Greece, Israel, The Little Drummer Girl was produced by Hill, K’indy City is writer-director Armyan Bernstein’s with Patrick Kelley and Robert Crawford serving as executive - affectionate, empathetic and comedic look at a group of friends producers. who have grown up together in Chicago and who are now

1 -Thursday, September No Cover For Nerds Prizes

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RLavens c .oud’ Warriors -,% by Mike Upmalis Imprint staff Waterloo’s football Warriors, in their i*irst pre-season match of 1984, were shut out b>, the Carleton Ravens. The game, played under the bright, blue skies ofottawa, saw Carleton roll up a 33 to nothing victor). over the boys in black and gold. l-he final score was not representative 01‘ the el‘l‘or’t on Waterloo’s part, with a good effort on the part of‘ both the ol‘lensi\e and delensi\,c teams. Waterloo’made l‘cb mistakes but all that theq’ made cost dear)).. 7 uo of‘the three turnovers in thegame bclongcd to Waterloo. but M hilt Waterloo intercepted the ball on their own lourtecn. one 01 the tbo Carleton fumble rcco\cries placed them on Waterloo’s tuo yard line. 7 he three majors rachcd bj Carleton ucrc primariI scored bq the det‘ense( if‘>ou include the lumblc rcco\cq on Waterloo’s t\+o) .M ith Waterlco‘s dcl‘cnse doing an excellent job lor the most part on holding C‘arlcton ol‘tcnsc. Waterloo’s dcl‘cnse was ranhed third in the countq last J’earand ten 01 the tucl~e ha\c returned to the lineup this J’ear.

Carleton 33, Waterloo 0 I‘hc ueak part ol‘ Waterloo’s dcfcnse u’as the dcl‘cnsiic swondarq that *alloucd Carleton to tircak through for the big gain occasionall>,. Some ot thcsc problems ucrc rookie deepbacks blho riced a bit more time to read the ollensc. Waterloo used this game to put into practice their ncu “sprint” ol‘l‘ensc that. uhen it gells. M,ill pro\ idc a l‘eu problems for Waterloo’s opponents this >.car. I his 90”; passing ol‘t’cnsc rcquircs a great deal ol‘co-operation between the rccci\crs and quarterback and many 01‘ the incomplcw passes .wc‘rc due to rccci\crs being out 01’ sJ,nch or slouing up just as the ball arrived. Waterloo disp1aj.s strength and depth in their starting and backup quarterbacks. Drtx Zchr has mo\xd from backup QH last >‘car to the starting position this jcar. tic probably mill lace strong competition I’m the role front his backup-1 on>. lantorno. M ir. lant.omo. a l’rcshntan l’rom I oronto. displaJ*cd incrcdiblc quickness and poise on Saturday. In one play hc turned H hat was surely a f’il’ttxn yard loss into a six yard gain. Mr. Zchr sho~cd that his arm was not rust): with some crisplv cxccutcd passes that came short ol’thc mark M hen recci\crs didn’t run out their patterns. letting up ci,hcn the ball uas about to get to them. Waterloo’s kicking dcpartnwnt. Dario I’retto in both roles. is probably the Mcak link in U’atcrloo’s ol’lcnsc. l’rcsscd into hiching alter sc\cral ‘cars auab lrom it. his tcchniquc is bcttct dcscribcd as erratic. N’hilc ~U.O punts l\crt o\cr lilt_\ >.ards the

Imprint

i mawic)rit> 01 his kick3 ?a 8 1 tucntj or thirly>ardsand ant’ ?$crczround quibbcd punt put tlic I<;I\cII’~ into prime position. N’atcrioo’s coaching stall mcrc upset about sot-w ol’thc crror~ displa!cd but lelt that the g:amc prot idcd a grmd shaking out 01’ t hc

tcan1.

Getting the spccialr). teams straight \iill allou ~‘atcrloo to balance the attach and take some 01‘ the’ prcssurc 011 the 01 lcnsi\ c and dclcnsi\ c lines. \I alcrloo’s lirst game ot the season M ill be against the hapless U’Iwlsor 1.anccr.s Gn Saaurda! in U’indsor. b*Tndsor. pcrcnniaI

photo

by Mike

Upmalis

Et cetera, et cetera f *

-1 hcrc ha\,c bwn a number 01‘ changes in the coaching ranks lor the 19X4 scason as no Ic*ss than hall’ol’thc schools ha~c I& head coaches. John Mwselnian tahes c)\cr from -1 onI i~iniitrll al the UniLcrsilJ 01 Guelph uhilc I-rank C’oscntino rcassumcs control 01 the York Ycomcn. -1 NC) assistant coaches ha\c been clc\atcd to the had jobs LL~ l.auricr and Wcstcrn. I.ong time assistant Rich \CU hrough takes 01 CI- 1mm “- I ul’l’!,” Knight at l.auricr Uhilc IAI r! tta~ lor takes olcr from DarLcin Scmotiuk at U’cslcrn. . As usual. each 01 t tic 01; AA [cams u ill m&t the olhcr SC\cn schools once during regular season M ith the top tour teams OI /\/I ad\ ancing to the league pla\ -0l‘ls. I hc c\cntual champion u iii host the W 1t- 1.(I4’cstcrn I ntcrcoilcgiatc leootball l.caguc) in a semi-linal ball game L+ith the Ninncr adlancIng lo the Vanicr (‘up.

Pre-Season All-Hosers School McMastcr St. l-ran. ?ia\ ier British C‘oiumbia /2CiLdta C‘i.l1-ltoi-I Sa\hatchcksan t~isllop’s CAgLi~~. .41bc~l-ta C.‘l.i lCOled

ia

V$ ilI rid Laurier C‘o ncordia 1’ ) I‘0 I1 t 0 British C’olumbia 1‘orh St Francis MaI icr Acad ia Calgq . _ Guclph

St. I- ran. Xa\ icr \II ill rid I.auricr i ‘0 ncord ia Acad ia c.‘arlcton

Imprint

photo

by Mike

Lpmalis

(i

uelph


The Book Tuesday,

Lucky

September

Store

Draw

18th

Grizzly Beer Night \

The U of W Bookstore, South Campus Hall, will be having a Calculator Draw..

a Beer

$1.10

2-for 1

With

every purchase of $1.00 or more you get.a chance on a

HP-7

1 from

Hewlett-Packard

TEAM ’ SPORTS’ &‘TROPHlES

I c3 ,.

Everything

at the , Chicopee Ski Club

l II

_.__ . --.

. __. -__ _ - -.-.

.. .---.

5 ’ -_.

Berg Jodler Haus

Sweaters

-.. -

ivREE ENTRY I’ ! on Friday, October for students

you require

i ; I

allother

dates

$4.00 entry fee October

for ticket

6, 12. 13

reservations;

886-l 660 84 King St. N. Waterloo, Ont.

ca!i:

742=5a4 \

BESIDE HARMONY

LUNCH


0

Rugby Wafr 1 ors .lose Rugby -Vhrric rs alumni , Sandy Townsend imprint staff Last Sunday,, Septembef 9, the, Warriors opened their season on a poor n*otc.by losing a tough, hard fought. match 26-- 12 to the Warrior Alumni team. Many of the Warrior rookies received a rough baptism to unicxrsitb rugby and the returning Warrior veterans were surprised by tht youthful enthusiasm of‘ the rapidly aging alumni team. Despite the loss, Warrior coach, Mark Harper, was pleased with the effort of the entire team. “Our aim was to get hi mgny of our piayers int\) the gamc,,and to xc how they would react under pressure. UnfortunateI_\ the alumni put us under mot-c prcssui-c than we would ha1.c liked”. The alumni squad was led b>,’ a pair 01’ agclcss stars, Phil White and Dcrck Humphries (who wcrc the Warrior coach& last year), and by the “big guq*” himself. L)a\x H untcr. ‘I‘his blend of‘ expcricncc and toughness plus a determination to show their peers that they Could still play was too much l’or the Warrior squad to’handlc. I’he alumni jumped into an car11 14 (i lead on tries bb’ “Whip“ Watson. John Hall and Rent l-leming. W hitc was\)nly able to con\ crt one ol‘thohc tries elcn though the ki’cks u&c l’rom \cry easy positions. I hc qarrji>rs‘kcpt lighting back and soon the alumni uxrt‘ reeling from the constant pressure. An

Warriors

’ ’

interception 01’ an. cl-rant pass gave the Warriors their first try. It was outside centre Dare L-urn Kong who scoopt’d up fhc \saJ,ward ball and galloped 55m to score the points. It was bq’ no means a classic try. but it scr\ed the purpose of getting the ball over the lint. I‘hc,try-was coni’crtcd bJ* Peter Kier. and so t,h,c ssorc stood 14 6 for the alumni. II;: half’-tir& cI histle ga~x the alumni a \.ery wxqicomc brca k and a chance to I-c-group. I hq found a hiddc’tl rcser\c ot’ cncrgy and yuickll, ran over tuo more tries before tiring. Last j,Car’s outstanding l‘l~~-half: Jim Al’tcn. was rcsponsiblc 101.&u of‘thc cl’fi~rts with the other try bqing crcditcd to Bruce “Flash” H ooq.. f’hil Whites’ kicking impro\*cd trcniendoust>. in the second hall’ and. hc kiaa!, able to con~crt both tries. The Warriors scored a final try af‘tcr a brilliant run b)’ John Motherwell. Gfen Harper got the.bali,f’rom a tiring Motherwell and scooted the last 2Cim to put the ball down _ under the posts. Dan lngoldsby bounced the conversion attempt off the arms of‘ Mike Peccxr and through the uprights for the two points. I hat lclt the Warriors (\ti the M rang end ol’a 26 12 score as thq rains cifmc and the game ~~1s calicd. ‘I hc Warriors open their uni\crsity sca3on toniorroM uit h an “aclaJ.” game at Lauricr. .I hc game v+ill be pla~cd at C’olumbia t-‘icld and the ki<h-<A’t uill .bc at 2 o’cloch.

Rugby

i WEIGHT NEWLY

FITNESS CENTRE ’ MEN & WOMEN

only bat,. b‘~t.. hilt.. Wed., Sat..

bcpt. 3,cpt. fScpt. ‘ht. Oct.

I5 22 29 3 13

12:3(i,2:(i(i p.m. W.L.U. 12:X, 2:Oci p.m. Wcstcrn 12:3C; 2:W p.m. Brock h:3(i X:(i(i p.m. at ciuclph 12:3(i 2:c;Ci p.111. W.L.U. sat., No\,. 4

Sat., Wt.

p.m. at Western ( Homecoming) Sat., Oct. 27 12:.X 2:(X; p,m. at McMastcr \IVcd.. Oct. 3 I ScmiA. W’cst I I at East ! I inals B. l&t I I at b’cst 1 I . N’inncr A at Winner 13 26

lci:Xi

AND AEROBICS FA(XJTIES

TRAINING RENOVATED :September

84 until March 30

.

COKE

\

(Erb Centre Plaza) 8844330

.

OTFA certified, class A event 10 km (6.22 mile) Run from Conestoga Mall to Kitchener Auditorium l Participation certificates to all finishers l Prizes to first 200 finishers l Pledge prizes to sponsored runners 0 Free T-Shirt to first 200 registrants l l

Registration Entry Fee: l $6.00 before September 28th. l $8.00 September 29th. to Race day l Sponsored runners reimbursed for entry fee.

home of the “folded over pizza”

P~ICtGUP, EAT-IN OR HOME DELIVERY

. I

9% delivery charge on campus

-- / .

Entry forms av@ble from: Athlete’s Foot Stores or Kitchene,r-Waterloo Hospital 742-3611, ext. 2448 4

.“I

88+274C) \

Sat.

4 p.m.-2

. a.m.

Fri. 11:30-2

Tues.:Thurs. 11:30-l 2:00 Sun.

4 p.m.-10

p:m.

.t

x ‘&

x

x

.x .

fR .

rx .

rx .

invites you to Run for Kitchhner-Waterloo Hospital Sunday 7th, October 1984,9 a.m.

Proceeds used to purchase vital kidney dialysis equipment.

p.m.

‘85

$9900

55 Erb St. E. Waterloo

/-

with each panzerotti delivered‘.on cmptis

Mon. 4 p.m.-12

WITH

t2:W

1 I

FREE

FOR

a.m.

An Official Oktoberfest Event

-. rRL

1 Ix .

Jl

.x .Rc

.R.

.R.


Sports Commentary: Fall, football, and losing by Sandy

‘I’o\\llscllcl Warriors

Ah, fall. What a glorious time of year. Those crisp, clear mornings, the brilliant red, orange and gold colours of the autumn leaves, the chilly nights and the wonderful sounds of people running into each other. What? Yes, it’s football time again. Despite the fact that the Yanks play the game all year round’ and even though the CFL starts in mid-summer, football is meant to be played only in the fall. You all remember football, don’t you? It is a game that our close neighbour, Laurier, play so well and one that we at Waterloo just can’t quite seem to get a handle on. Our football team has built itself a wonderful reputation for mediocrity, nay, ineptitude. Last Saturday’s loss to Carleton, 33-0, did nothing to change that hard-won reputation. In the past two seasons, our wonderfully dedicated, but slightly misguided, crew, has won a grand total of three league games while losing ten and tieing one. Contrary to popular belief, last year’s tie against Western was exactly that, a tie, and not a victory. Gone from last year’s Warriors team are the second, third and fourth all-time Warrior receivers plus the club’s top-ranked

i4

Score

passer. These stalwarts have been replaced by recruits from that hotbed of high school football. Kitchener-Waterloo. This team, is going places. Unfortunateiy, the only place they are going is down. 41-1interesting s,.& stic wh:cb I find sums tip our team. is that -:.i; !ezding ali.tlme passer threu 3n [rc :irtlplete pass more than 50% of the lime. ih:s incredibiy ac<L !;l’re passer still threw enough times to give his receivers a chance to crack the Warriors top 5 all-time pass-catching list. In my book. that makes for a terrible pass attack and implies an even more inept running game. Now, to be fair, you should attend at least one Warrior home game (they are free), to decide for yourself just how poor this team really is. There you can be entertained by that wonderfully obnoxious group of people who have the gall to call themselves the Warrior Band and whose only musical talents are few and far between. But I digress. On Sept. 22 come and cheer for Bob, his staff and all his players, as they struggle in their home opener against York. I li~lo\\~ that they can use all the help that they can get.

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 : 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 i) 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Accommodation

I

Waterloo Co-op operates three small residences within walking distance from the UW and the WLU campuses. Each. resident is reauired to do three hours of buties each week. The duties vary from serving dinner to washing floors, from taking minutes at a meeting to making minor repairs. Working together & sharing responsibility for the operation of the residence contributes to the strong sense of community, characteristic of the Co-op residences. Summer

Accommodation

Co-op offers you substantial financiai- benefits if you’re willing to accept this responsibiity. Waterloo Co-operative Residence is studentowned and operates independently of the Universities. You do not have to study under the Co-op system to live at the Co-op residences; the word “Co-operative” here means that the residences are owned and controlled democratically by the students who live there.

I

Accommodation . . . ,. 1 or Winter I’!%

Available

Waterloo Co-operative Residence Inc. 280 PHILLIP STREET WATERLOO, ONTARIO N2L 3X1 (519) 884-3670


sports

Campus Recreation Clubs Interested

in joining

a Campus

the organizational meeting Meetings are scheduled as Archery Club Monday, PAC.

Recreation

for the club follows: Sept. 17th,

Curling club - Tuesday, Sept. Gymnastics Club - Wednesday, Area, PAC. Table Tennis Club - Sunday, Area, PAC. Sailing Club - Monday, Sept. Fencing Club Martial Arts Club PAC. Equestrian Club Outers’ Club UW Ski Club Weight Training Sky Diving Club

1 hursday, - Thursday, -

Club?

Sept.

Sept.

p.m.,

16th,

2:00

4:30

p.m.,

up for

you

most.

Activity

Activity

p.m.,

Activity

Blue

6:00 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,

Printed for your Team, club fmt, class floor gr house student discount P-s

I 13. CC Red

p.m.,

1 I3 Activity

CC

Lorne Merkur & Sister Inc. Custom Silkscreen-Designs 1801 Avenue Rd. Toronto (416) 781-6155 Call Collect

Area,

135.

Thursday, Sept. 13th, 4:30 p.m., CC 1 13. Wednesday, Sept. 26th, 7:00 p.m., CC 1 13. Club - Thursday, Sept. 13th, 7:00 p.m., CC - Tuesday, Sept. I I th, 6:00 p.m., CC 1 13.

SPORT SHIRTS TURTLE NECKS HOCKSY SHIRTS

Cu$tom

Area,

CC 135. p.m., Blue

CC

I I th, 4:30

show to

Red

4:30 p.m., I9th, 5:30

Sept. l3th, Sept. l3th,

Tuesday,

appeals

8:30

25th, Sept.

I lth,

If so, just

which

HATS RUGGER SHIRTS FOOTBALL SHIRTS

1 13.

Slo-Pitch Tournaments League Organizational Meetings If you’re interested in being on a league team meeting dates to organize the groups: Monday Sept. 17 Men’s Flag Football, Women’s Flag Football, 4:30 p.m., CC 135; Co-Ret cc

135. Tuesday

Soccer, Wed. Women’s Thurs.

Sept.

18

-

Women’s

Soccer,

this

fall

here

4:30 p.m., Volleyball,

4:30

p.m.

CC

are

CC 5:30

the 1 12 p.m.

I 13; Men’s

4:30 p.m., CC 135. Sept. 19 Co-Ret Inner-tube Waterpolo, 4:30 p.m., CC 135; Basketball, 5:30 p.m. Cc 135. Sept. 20 Men’s Basketball, 4:30 p.m., CC 1 13; Co-Ret

Broomball, Women’s

4:30 p.m., Ret Hockey,

CC 7:00

135; p.m.,

Men’s Hockey, CC 1 13.

5:45

p.m.,

CC

135;

Official Meetings

?Ic~ri’~ Slo-i)ircli ‘l‘or~rti~r~iiciil Friday, Saturday and Sunday (Sept. 2 1, 22, and 23). Get a team together now! The final entry date is Monday, Sept. 17th at 4:30 p.m. Entry forms can be picked up and handed in to the PAC, room 2040. One representative from each team must attend the rules meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 19th at 6:00 p.m. in in the draw. This is a regulation slo-pitch PAC, room 100 1, to be included tournament ,\lisc*tl

with lob Slo-f)i(c*lr

pitches and ten players on the field. ‘l‘orr~-r~;rrrrc~~r Friday, Saturday

and

Sunday.

(Sept. 28, 29 and 30) All teams are guaranteed 2 games. There must be five women per team. The pitcher pitches to his/her own team and everyone hits each inning. It’s a great weekend, so have your entries in by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 24th in the PAC, room 2040. One represerrtative from each team must be present at the rules meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 26th at 4:45 p.m. in room 100 1, PAC. ?lisc*tl 2 -11:rfl (;oltl ‘I‘(,~II.I~~~III~.II( - Sunday, Sept. 23rd from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Pick up your entry forms and return them to the PAC, room 100 I , bu 4:45 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 20th. The rain date is set for Sept. 30th. Each team must consist of one male and one female. Everyone hits off the tee, then alternates with the best ball. There will be some must the

novelty attend PAC,

holes. Remember the rules meeting

room

that one representative from each tearn on Thursday, Sept. 20th, at 4:45 p.m. In

100 I.

Competitive League Entry Dates Competitive league action will be starting very unable to participate if you miss the entry deadline. and make sure that your team won‘t be left out. \\‘c)I~Ic*~~‘s ( ‘oIii1)cI ir i\ c ‘I’c;r~ii I.c;rgr~c,s

Tournaments Interested

in participating

In a Men’s

Slo-Pitch

tournament?

Get

your

entry in by Mon. Sept. 17 at 4:30 p.m. to PAC 2040 and then attend the organizational meeting on Wed. Sept. 19 at 6:00 p.m in PAC 100 I. If golf is more your style there is the gold tournament. Final entry and the organizational meeting is on Thurs. Sept. 20 at 4:45 in PAC 100 1.

Final Entry Dates The

final

entry

dates

for

recreational

leagues

are

as

-Co-Ret -Bdli

Floor

Hockey

l4th,

4:30

p.m.,

PAC,

room

PAC

PAC

4:30 p.m.. PAC 30 tedm list. 17th, 4:30 p.m..

IO players/ tear-n, maximum: Monday, Sept. l7th, 4:30 p.m., IO players/team, maximum: Floor Hockey: Monday, Sept.

room PAC

2040.

room

room

I5 I5

A G B

2040.

2040.

2040. roorn

2040. 2040.

IO

Mlnrrnurn

A & B levies. 2040.

A, B & C

60 teams. PAC room 2040. A & B 30 teams. 17th. 4:30 p.m., EnySoc

Otfice. A & B levels, minimum IO players/ team. Entry tee determrned by EngSoc. Maximurn: I6 teams. Hockey: Monday, Sept. I7th, 4:30 p.m., PAC room 2040. A & B contact levels, B non-contact. mlnlmum 15 players to enter. Maximum: 40 teams.

Basketball, s Basketball, Inner-tube Waterpolo,

-Engineers

Basketball: Monday, Sept. 17th, 4:30 p.m., levels, IO players/team, maximum: 16 teams. Volleyball: Friday, Nov. 2nd, 4:30 p.m., players/‘team, 3 games and playoffs. ?lc~~i’s ( oriif)c~IiIi\c~ Is~:I~QII~~s

levels, minimum Ball hockey: levels, minimum Engineering

Broomball, Hockey, Ret Hockey, Hockey,

-Men’s -Women -Co-Ret

Sept. 14th, 4:30 p.m., PAC, room 16 teams. 14th, 4:30 p.m., PAC. room 8 teams.

Flag football: Friday, Sept. 15 players, 60 team list. Soccer: Friday, Sept. l4th, minimum 15 players/team, Basketball: Monday. Sept.

follows:

Fn. Sept. I4 at 4:30 in PAC 2040: -Women-s Flag Football, -Men-s Flag Football, -Men’s Soccer, -Co-Ret Volleyball; Mon. Sept. 17 at 4:30 in PAC 2040

-Women’s -Men’s

Flag Football: Friday, players/ team. maximum: Soccer: Friday, Sept. players/team, maximum:

soon. You could be Note the dates below

(please

register

at

EngSocj.

Campus Ret Staff Needs Getting Involved in the Campus Recreation 15 a great way to strmulate those otherwrse dormant muscles. What a lot of people don’t know IS that there are tons ot money-earning positrons with Campus Ret as well. If you d like to make some sss, gain vafudbfe leadership experience and have a lot of fun, apply for a job with Campus Rec. Positions still available this term include: I<c.I> II‘<*% 1; 11‘ Flag tootbdff, soccer, ballhockey, sottball dt Id slo-pitch; 1 ‘o( )I b1:tl7 - Llteyuards and Instructors; 11151 III(*I It dll!.

( )I% ut

-

Fitrless.

ttiebc

squash.

~MtlOl s

SlJlt

tennis. )oUr

tdilC).

basketball,

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move up to Higher Ground Tuesday Night at the Cinema

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skdtrng. lust1

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tc

the

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KK

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The Original Pilot Episode

SEMINARS

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University Text Book Store Used

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Half

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Sold

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Physics:

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Psychology:

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Textbooks sold for the following faculties: Accounting, Management Science, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Science, Mathematics, Physics and Psychology

for

Life

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Geography students Save $10.00 on Diem: Western Europe

Free Beer (beverage) at Morty’s with every Textbook

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http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca/mambo/pdfarchive/1984-85_v07,n09_Imprint