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University

of Waterloo

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Waterloo, Ontario volume 15, number 32 . frjday, febrq?ry \ 28, ,1975

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Craft culture

came

to the campus

centre

this week

and according

to one observer

“it was

prettyfcnky’fm (I

We regret

In last wed :s art icle in the chevron headed “Feds stage Trot talk” severai issue 5’ we re takbn out of context and thus it ma myhave inferred,a Cr ,iticism of the Anti-lmper, ialist Alliance and the two- individua/s ni jmed. The the\ u-on regrets any misunderstanding and will continue as in the pa sbpport thf : rights’of any progress, ive faculty to be in”‘volved in po!it ical activitic 2s on this-campus.

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Photo by randy hannigan

No? change ini OSAPl.allowances Ontario universitystudents re.ceiving provincial assistance will still have to m,ake ends meet‘on $32 a week, at least for the time being. James Auld, minister of colleges and universities X told Ontario Federation of Students (OFS) offfcials Tuesday that “in view of the prevailing economic climate ,” he doesn’t “see the revenue for increasing student support. levels.“’ However, Auld said that in mid-March there would be a small increment in the weekly allowance given to students under the Ontario Student Assistance Programme @SAP), after he has consulted with the treasue board. OFS is seeking an increase in the grant portion of OSAP from the current $32 a week living allowance to, $45 for students living in Toronto. Auld further advi$ed OFS to submit its OSAP proposals to the interim committee on financial-assistance for students (there are three students on the 10 member committee) .’ In addition, he’ informed OFS that Ontario’s OSAP schgme is the “most generous system in the country”. But Auld was tiuntered b,* OFS chairwoman Barbara Cameron who said “nothing is being done to substantially increase the standard of living of students.” The .provincial govefnment doled $36.9 million ifi financial aid ‘from OSA’P to -90,662 students so far this year, an increase of about 22 per cent over 1973-74. Cameron also stated that in tight of a tighter economic @atiOn more students have to apply for-aid thus contracting the pool of money available. “The minister (Auld),, himself, said that $32 per week was ‘inadequate’,” she added. Cameron then went on to say

that OFS has organized commitexpenses would be to increase the tees on every campus in the prostudent-faculty ratio. vince to press for OSAP changes. Auld warned the OFS delegation “The OSAP proposals are based that the Ontario universities will on the complaints of its memberhave to s&t economizing to avoid ship,” she said. massive deficits in the 1975-76 She also said that OFS advdcates academic year. He said universities free tuition and living stipends for -should not expect “masGve instudents as a means of assuring an creases of support” @ the next four open and freely accessible post- _ or five years. second,ary system. To which Auld In a press release Monday, Auld “don’t hold your quipped said the government wouldn’t_inbreathe’ ’ . crease operating grants beyond the Other OFS representatives ex$568 million already budgeted for pressed concern over the reduced the next academic year.’ Due to level of funding for *h-e postsecondary system in a time of raging inflation and the constricting effectsbn the quality of educa&n.

Shane says

Shane Roberts, from Waterloo, told Auld that the univ’ersity system “is going to suffer or be damaged much more quickly than it was built” because of budget restrictions. He also queried about the future of the institutions and whether this was the “beginning of a trend of deficits”. Roberts glsb affirmed that with the budgetary restraints, * universities are being forced to pay less than competitive wages for both academic and non-academic staff, which would result in-an exodus of‘ the former to industry and a high turnover rate for the latter, Backing Roberts’ claims of a deteriorating situation, Susan Rich, from the University of Toronto, said that the cutbacks would result in larger classes ahd she cited her own courses as exgmples where the class size varies’from 80 to 100 stu/ dents. But Auld said that according to figures sent to him by the univ5 sities, the. average class size is 24 students, and the student-faculty ratio is presently 14 to 1. He also suggested that one way to cut down

higher enrolment, t hataverages out that prediction for seven ye&-s and to .a 7.8 per cent increase per stuthe universities can’t expect to dent. exist in.the manner they have in the -Auld’s stalement contrasted past, he sai,d.. sharply with a recommendation The OFS spo&esmen proposed made by the province’s advisory that more revenue Could be raised Council on University Affairs for education if the corporate in-Monday which called for an addicome tax were increased. The cortional $16.2 million to be distriporate income tax declined from buted to the university system to 11.3 per’ cent in 1966-67 to 9.1 per help offset inflationary pressures. cent in 1974-75. . Universities should not be sur- _ However, Auld said that to‘enact prised that they ~are facing such a measure would drive induseconomic re-straints, Auld said. For try out of tlie province. the government -has been making -john morris

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Gov’t _deceives “The Ontario government is attempting to deceive the public about the finances of the universities,” says Shane Roberts, chairperson of the Federation of Students’ board-of edtlcation, . The provincial Ministry of Colleges and Universities (MCU) is telling the pub& this year’s university spending is being increased by I 17 per cent. However enrolment figufe? have also increased resulting in a cut in spending per student enrolled of 5 per cent. The On&u-i0 Council of University Affairs (OCUA), an official advisory body to the MCU on government policy, has advised against the cutbacks. The OCUA pointed out the budget cutbacks will resvlt in the failure to achieve the established government goals of providing good quality postsecondary education.

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Meanwhile, more fears are being Robert Nixon, leader of the nroexpressed within the academic vin&al liberal party has alre’ady community because of a policy . promised “to increase the access to proposal increasing tuition fees higher educ_atibn”, at a rekent within arts faculties to two or-three meeting with Ryeison Polytechnithousand dollars. The policy as- . cal College students in Tento. serts this area of s&dy is of little However, Roberts told the chew use to soCiety . ran “I don’t trust the liberals be-i The policy further recommends cause they have offered no suggesstudents enrolled- in faculties, of a tions as to what Fxactljr they would technical natui-e such as engineerdo to increase accessAq un&ering who are in greater demand by sity “. the corporate sector should be subWhen asked what he thought of --_ sidized by the government. the NDP Roberts replied “they In response to these proposals, have been rather ambiguous aboutRoberts is asking students and their lwhat priority they give this issue”. faglies to put ,pressure on-opposiTo put pressure ‘on the ruling tion members of the provincial parparty-the Davis conservatives, one liament to defer the budget cuts and student group on campus, the increase student aid by writing letPopular Student Front is circulatters to their MPP’s. Robe’rts ing a petition demanding the inpointed to an upcoming provincial crease of university funding -and electioti for which these parties are .student aid. Roberts hopes this and. still formulatjng their ‘party platfetter writing will’save university forms, and hoped the gublic pres-- education from its present deteriosure may encourage a high priority ration. for student demands. -michael gordon

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Thkday ’ .I. a Stratford Feitivai Ensemble presents c %ederation Flick&: “0, Lucky Man!“‘ ‘<$he_&d DetaGhtient ,of Wome;” _ . , with Malcolm McDowell. AL1 l%! 8pm. Chinese balk bt’ ab&t rqvolu’tion vyith a Saint-Saens Sdnata~‘l2:39pm. Theatre / .: Museum of Games &Arc&e. \ TheBirthday &rty; A play of mystery * : :. : ‘, .dis&ssion afterwards.. 7pm: Worker’s of the Arts. Feds $1. Non,-feds “1.59.. l-$xii. MQS032. \ and horror. Directed by Maurice .Ev&s. i <Centre in Waterloo (by Caky Mozart)., \ . *I 1 .I _ ’ . “Ev&ed”. A sliahtlv unusual- look at . *- Theatre of the Arts. 8 pm. Admission _ k - , Cami XJS entre Pub opens 7pm. .Ad- Everyone:weJcome., “Evolki”. 8pm. Humanities Theatre. the outcome of e&&ion in plan s,, anI: $1,56; students /. .\ _$1. J* ’ Al . mrssron 74 cents. Spott Farm from . _ _- _ . ’ - ma& and man using 8 proj et?tors, 2 _ ‘* Para~ie@ &@tance; Providing free 9-1 am. Waterloo ,Christian F@iowship have movie projectors&@ a stereo s&&dL ixthus Coffee!&-,. IIS&% .Free ‘TV coffee. --..--, ’ non-professional legal advice for stutrack. 8pm: Humanities Theatre; , I their dessert meeting at 5:3Opm in CC i # ’ s@ech and kipfels. Music by Chris Par: Sunday _ .dents. 7-4Opm. CC 106. Call 885-0849 * <131 This week’s discussion isby David - ’ 912pm; CC - coffeeshop. ‘w . so&:’ or ext 3846 ’ t ,, : , K-WSimphonj!. 2:3Opm and 7:3 Wm. ’ ‘<‘The P&tie .in the Co~munity”.a pub’ -Ward on “Experience of Salvation and -, . Sanctification”. , Humanities Theatre. ‘. -_ - Ys. , I -. a. .- .- Ie_,AF-- _ ’ lit fcrum sponsored bv K-W Human , The JazZ Bncl ewes GIUI) isnoralng an RiQhis-Cau&b. ’ ’ “Do wb* &_ -. .- / ------_ -_-_ Gh&&e _...____.-_ Ti.& Mandei to speak- on Feminist . . -* ’ informal-record programme; This week ,Police’ Histo S&iety Labatts trip to London. Advanced lecture for Transcendental _ _2” a discussion ‘on police and PsychoTherapy. 2pm. HUM 161. ., acquwmons -JO tne, \ mdtatok only. 8pm. ENG3 1101. , ~ ‘a preview of new i- - --‘-‘*‘--- I- ” Get your-tickets now. History students , \ . community relations. Everyone wel-a, jazz records. 8pmi library’s collection of -2,. q come.. 8am. Cameron Heights Col-.. $2.50, non-history $3.00 in HH -128. .’ j Crafts ,Fair in - CC Great Ha& Kitchener Public library. ’ ‘\ _ / Cin6ma Soiid&ity’hll ‘present two leaiate Abdiforium. _ _--. -_ _ . __ . __ loam-4pmi Sponsored by CC Board. --a----.i . _, : .-. / i’ i _. The. Gr&ek StudeptS; Association. is films at 7pm in CC.Great Hall. “Work” is Pub opens -* -mm L 12 - noon. holding a, regular,meeting. 7:3Opm in a film with scenes from a,Qetroit <auto Cm &.mpus Centie$ub. opens 12, noon[ I II&V ___-Man!”.-_.__ - NIS Centre .lhdrn+i&~ WYI,“..“.. “Fli&ac . ..w..y. “n- ‘w.“‘, after 6pm. \ BitI McCIO~~ 9-1 ami 50”cents y’ ’ . , Bill McClory 9-l ami 50 cents after 6pmTr; CC., y Lvith Malcolm McDowell. AL1 16: -8pm. factory , . , ~ andc_ _“Finally _ __ il-- -Got the News” l wnicn rocuses on me 14,-A..~eayut: .d VI DA meI- 1 feds $1. Non-feds $1.50. * ‘_ ‘I -*. “A ._ .Wednesdayv Baha’i. Fire$iaes-lnformai discussions. -\ volutjonary Black Workers; I 4.. -, 66Evoived” 1230 & 8pm. Humanities Everyone welcome. Come on to HH 334 / ’ Camp& kentre Pubbpens 12 noon. L Theatre. ‘Free admiss@ ’ from’ 730 to 9:3Opm or phoney Aerial at frfim aftfir * Federati& Fii_cks: “0 Lucky’_Man!” Tuesday \ - --- ----a i , - , .884-0292.; .-\ _ -‘with Malcolm McDowell. AL1 1%: 8pm.. Pabh-leg+l ‘assistan*, Providing free Mtis&of Games and Archiies.‘ Feds $1. Non-feds $1:50, non-professional legal advice for stu- \j-4pm & 6-9pm. MC 6632. / i , The’Navig&or&nviie you to a short dents. 7-.lOpm. CC 106. Call 885-0840 ,. 1, ’ meeting of ‘Christian fellowship& enMoiiday ’ ’ L Saturday ., ,>. or ext. 3846. ‘Social and ethnd dance club meeting -% ’ couragement, 7pm. CC 110. / , , , . . i . Meeting’ -for Association of ItalianK-W Symphpny,. Humanities-The&r a ‘features -!:‘Irish folk &nce” with Pat Canadtin. students. All , ItalianM&eum of G&es & Archives. . 7:3Opm. . Cusack. 8pm, CCi‘lO. , ,.. * “W@jr& th3t from”; -noon drama. 14pm. MC6032. w i Canadian students, staff and -faculty ‘ 12:3Opm in Theatre of the. Arts. .> -and all others are welcome. 8-lbpm CC The Birthday P&y.’ 8pm: fheatre. , ” Campus &tre Pub>pens; 12 n&n. /. ’ r . I’ Chess &b&@ing. 7:3Opm, CC 135. 113. ’ I / , the Arts. Admission $1.50, students $ Bill McCloty 9-m. 5Ocents after 6pm. Pa&egai assistance. Providing free’ _ /’ ‘-_ w d r; L II * Para-leaal &is&we. Providina free ’ non-professional -legal advice for students. 1:30-4:30pm; CC106. Call b 1 ,\2-5pm; CC 106. Call I 8850840,or 885-9840 or ext. 3846. %. ext.:3846: ~.. I’ &pus Centre Pbd opfks 12 n&n. ‘Chaplain Remkes Kboistra’s Di& Bill McClory 9-l am 59 centsafter 6pm. :’ , sion Group.-8pm ENG 3 1101. Speaker -_ - Dr. John VanderKooy M-D.i will talk ‘. ‘, , about his .wot‘k in MIKar Hospital, : -_ Nigeria. /Afterwards there wilt be a dis., cussion on The Christian andCultu~e. --_

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, The~K#fi Ka@ Ra&g Clu@ are d,isplayMature ‘Women. &de&. Meeting.. This weeks guests, Mr. Dick Kni,ght, Dr. ’ ing sevbral racing karts at Faikiew.’ _ ’ , Anyone ‘interested in this exciting sport Ron Eydt and Dr. Jim Leslie will be talk,ing abQut programmes and courses. All can come out and get any information. . \ ~ .’ .interesetedwomen arejnvited toattend. ’ . . . : _ Coffeehouse. Free coffee, 3-4:3Opm. HUM 373,. Faculty Lounge. - ixthus speec.h and kipfel,s. hnusic by local ” Gay Liberati~ncoffee ho&e. 8:$Opr6. - . musician. 9-112pm. CC co’feeshop. Everyone welcome. ,_ ’ - Everyone welco-me. CC 135,,. , *. . I , “Wher& that From” noondrama. DiFede6aqon Flicks: “Touch of Class” with George Segal and ,Glenda *Jackrected by Maurice Evan’s.‘ 12:30pm. Theatre ofthe Arts. Free. 1 son.’ ‘AL!*l6. 8pm. Feds $1, non-feds , . I ,$1.50., . i t%ee Movie4“Bionde \ienus’? with --Marlene .‘Dietrich. 10:15pm. CC Great Campus &tre Rub opens 162noon. Bill McClory 9-l am. 50cents after 6pm. _’ ‘Hall, Sponsored by CC Board.-’ ‘\ _’ 0 I

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ECOL;FRANCAISE’D’ETE duly 2nd-August . jn the largest F,rench-sbeaking = you LEARN FRENCH WHERE tiETHODS: beginners;

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: ’ -N,&v the glorious beer of Copenhagen is brewed right hqre in Canada, -’ -It I comes& you fresh, from tkk- br.e$Fry. 50 Wta$tes evkp ,bctter. than ever,, , I?\ \ :. %. _ 9,And Carlsberg. is sold .aKregulati,pr$es.. ’ % <i _ ’ d :‘- -’ Sd let’s heakit, Carlsberg Jo&s. “One, two,‘&ee . ‘. i ‘Che&s!”

‘1975’ 8th. , -i.miver’ity FRENCH

The iatestaudio-visual advanced students work

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on the contihent IS AT HOME.-, ’- ’

*methods @are used in se.n$nars..

with.’ I ’

, ADVA&lmD &EVEk, Special atte$io@ given to Englishspeaking-teachers.‘o&,French; to students of ,,French liter’ad - turean,d tb people ‘wi$$ing to know.mgre about Quebec. , \ , .,’ I ’ 1 LIVING A&X&.MMODATtO~& Roo’ms are ‘available “‘in 1 I campus resj,deirces-for male .and female students. <I, kTkITIESI~ French-Canadian life dikoveied through folk singing ,evenings, the theatr+,_e>tcursions in@ the typical Quebec, countrysi.de.strolls and,sightseeing through historic i ‘,old Montreal. Sports activities available. \ 4&RSlARIE& IL’l!Jniversit~ de, fvlontreal/ has be& selected’ $s a participating , institution in j the ;J?ederaf-Pr&inciai , bukry progT?m foi, Canadian stF&ts’ who wish: to lesirn French.as a second language. j -‘ , , r* Booklet &n req&t: ” i , - r ’ ’ F ’ ..f 2. I- i

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Jj friday,

february

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the chevron

What is the RAA? There -has been m&h discussion on campus about the ACidemic *Assembly so the chevron invited the members submit an article explaining their organization.

Renison of it to -_

The Renison Academic Assembly (RAA) is a student organization which appeared the day John Towler and the Renison board of governors ousted Hugh Miller and’Jeff Forest; and banned Marsha Forest from teaching many months ago. It has become through these months a ’ mature, active, and very organized force. From its inception, because of its visibility, it has been run through the mill of political attacks more than once. Its response has been to become stronger and moreorganized as the objective conditions ’ around it change; and if there was valid or correct criticism-it changed to accommodate (as with the time it attempted to incorporate the conservative elements in Renison in its steering committee). The RAA was established for the purpose of voicing sentiment in’an in active way, ‘active’ meaning to use as many tactics asnecessary order to make Towler, the board of governors, and administration on campus move on the liberal issue of academic freedom. The line of the RAA was that Miller and Forest should be reinstated, and that a democratic environment should b-e created at Renison so-any further repressive acts could not happen. The demands which the RAA made at the ‘beginning of the struggle still remain pertinent, however, the conditions which exl@st now at. Renison are basically centred around the academic procedure of arbitration. The RAA has mobilized for binding arbitration by academics on - academic grounds. The administration has tried to justify themselves on legalistic grounds: they argue that by-the terms of the contract what they did was entirely moral. (There is a difference between morality and legality however,the Tenure Committee Report said “whatever the-legal standards may be, the Committee addressed itself-to the case from the point of view of-proper academic standards”). For a liberal academic institution, Renison’s type of morality is not acceptable. As a result of their refusal to accept the fairness of binding arbitration by academics, they have delayed and stalled. As early as Nov. 14,1974 the faculty involved were asking for arbitration’procedures, but without-acceptance. President Burt Matthews had asked for an answer by. _ Feb. 6, 1975 but none was given, and to this point still none has been given. The excuse at the moment is that the board cannot meetin order to make a decision due to circumstances beyond their control. For a group which could move to fire people with such rapidity, they seem to be moving rather slowly now. RAA is not the only force which is , working for binding arbitration; the Arts Faculty and the Senate of the University of Waterloo both urged the t Renison-board of governors to go to binding arbitration. At this time, &id for the. future, binding arbitration is not the only ground for which the RAA is fighting. Just as their consideration was not only for the reinstatement of Forest and Miller at the beginning of the ‘ ‘Renison Affair”, but for a more democratic Renison as well< the , programme which is being worked through now includes a great many specific issues which include simply by their nature, the -.__-interests of a larger number of people. In the most recent newsletter which RAA put out, emphasis was placed on a number of general but important issues. The question is “what kind of say do we have in the things which are taking basically- place around us “? Obviously, as can be seen from the firings (which students were not questioned on) the attitude of the board of governors is that the board should haveultimate control. This is reflected by the recent addition .af three non-voting members to the’Tri-Partite Committee (an advisory committee set up to determine constitution, etc.) to makesix board members as opposed to only four students (with three votes) and three faculty. _ The questions are, then: why is the Board stalling (perhaps in order to wait until there are no students around); what say have students in the ‘replacement of faculty who left prior to the affair; what say do students have in their own representation; what say do students have in the renewal of faculty contracts; what say do students have in the way the college is going; what say do students have about the economic situation, especiallythecutbacks (residence fees are going up $200 next year; who has investigated this?, why hasn’t -_this been gone into des tail?); etc.. In general, the RAA is “changing with the times”. History has shown that conditions change, andthat as a result people and organizations change as well. The objective conditions, not only at Renison, b”ut on the campus as well, are certainly changing, and this is reflected in--*the broader and more effective nature of the RAA.

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Motor

Coming

Hotel

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Next Week

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Crown

Room

With His Many Hits Including Ain’t That A Shame, & Cord Mae I . Appropriate Coronet Motor

Dress No Jeans’ Hotel 871 Victoria

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today. Johnson will respond to the Johnson will make a speech at talk by making,brief remarks on his ’ 2:00 p.m. lasting about 45 minutes followed by a question-answer agreements and disagreementswith the speech. The audience will - period. Again there will be small group discussions. then be called upon to submit quesThere will then be open discustions. On March 14 at 12’:OO p.-m. prGfessor Johnson will give a sion at 7:OOp.m. where anyone can speech of about 45 minutes in speak for about 15 minutes about the theses provided by Bains and which he will list all of his main points and basic analysis of the deJohnson. This session will be followed by semi-social, semivelopment of capitalism in Canada, political discussions in private followed by response from Bains. The audience will then be called homes. Sunday’s programme will be a upon to submit questions. repetition of the Saturday progl The I week-end. symposium will begin on Saturday, March 15,1975, ramme except that Bains and Johnson will make their final remarks at 9:00 a.Jn., in Engineering Lecbetween 3-5 p.m. ture roomlCl1, for which everyone must register by 9:00 a.m. on / The entire proceedings will be reproduced in the Journal of PolitiSaturday in E.L. 106. Each’registered delegate will then be provided cal Economy which will be made with the speeches and comments available shortly after the noonmade by Bains and Johnson during hour lectures and the symposium. the two noon-hour lecture meetThe AIA hassent letters to all the ings. The delegates could read the universities in Canada, infor_ming speeches and engage in informal l them of the conference and rediscussions amongst themselves. questing that interested academics Bains and Johnson will then answer and students attend. Prof.‘<Marsha any questions or clarifications beForest who is helping to organise’ ginning at 10:00 a.m. Bains will the symposium said that the remake a speech lasting about 45 misponse from other-universities. has nutes at 11:OO a.m. followed by a been very encouraging and that she question-answer period in which he has received favourable replies will expound his .thesis further. from as far--away as Halifax and After this there will be small group Vancouver. . a discussions. -neii docherty -

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Todav is the last day for those who have offices ?n the Environmental Studies building to order I tackboards from the deans office. This situation arises due to the fact that the’ cleaning staff have been given instructions that any items still remaining on the doors by the end of the month are to be removed. This was the-message contained1 in a memorandum sent * by the deans office to all occupants

of the Environmental Studies building on-February 19. The subject of the memorandum was “elimination of visual pollution” and the deansoffice was -advised by -“those on high” that all items afnxed to office doors ~must be removed. ’ According’ to the deans office there has been some opposition to this procedure especially from the man and environment department. Many professors rely on noTices at-

tached to their doors to communicate with their students, and are concerned that this channel -of communication not be lost. There are also those who feel that the “visual pollution” helps humanise the otherwise sterile environment of the building. The question of personal censor has also arisen, since some faculty feel that they should have some control over their office doors. --randy

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Ballot on i. new. -dean for~ESS ’ - 1 Ballots were circulated earlier The purpose of the ballot, acNelson is currently a professor of cording to .Robbie Kieth a member this week to members of the Engeography at the University of vironmental Studies faculty with of the selection committee, isto asWestern Ontario. He has been the name of J. Gordon Nelson as certain whether or not the selection chairman of the .department of sole candidate for the position of committee had interpreted the Geography at University of Calwants of the Faculty ’ correctly. If dean. gary as well as Associate dean of The ballot will ask each faculty there was substantial opposition to Arts and-Sciences dnd assistant to: member whether or not, despite the candidate, tlien. the selection the vice-president academic; also -committee would have to sit down -any feelings towards Ihe other at. the University of Calgary. His and reassess the situation. Some . major scholary interests are land nominations for dean, whether they would be able to work-with faculty members feel that they use history and landscape change should have been’given a choice of Professor Nelson. Nelson had met or historical ecology and resources’ earlier with faculty.and students of candidateson the ballot rather than management. ’ _ . the Environmental Studies Faaccepting or rejecting a single randy hannigan name. 1 culty .

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-Ronny HavykinS In The

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We are suffering from raging inflation and rising unemployment, increasing lay-offs and \ education cutbacks. Traditional economists scratch their heads and come out with little that’s useful to those of us who continually\pay higher food prices, higher rents, higher gas prices etc. etc. The problems have to be discussed. Answers have to be found. A symposium, sponsored by the Anti-Imperialist Alliance (AIA), on xhe political economy of Canada March 13, will be an attempt to provide some of those answers. , The symposium will be centered around a-debate between UW history Prof. Leo Johnson and the chairman of the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) Har_- dial Bains. ’ These two speakers first discussed this topic at the University of British Columbia in Nov: 1973. Following the symposium at UW they . .will meet in Montreal in May and a fourth session is planned for August though the location is yet to be announced.. The format of the meetings will be as follows: Gn March 13 at 12:OO ‘p.m. Bains will-give a speech .of about 45 minutes in which he will list all of his main points and basic analysis of political economy

Please N 744-3511

Police brutality protest. r -On Saturday, February 22, 1974“a demonstration was-held to denounce “Police Brutality”. Residents from New Hamburg, and Kitchener-Waterloo, including members of the Anti-Imperialist I Alliance were present. The charge of police brutalityrises out of testimony given by Randy Starke - and Robert Radunske who were. allegedly beaten. by two regional policemen ,i.

at the-New Hamburg police station -July 5, 1973. Court was told Radunske’s nose’ was brokenPolice claim that they were involved in a scuffle when *attacked by the two handcuffed men and denied they had attacked the men. Police dropped the counter charges of assaulting a police officer when it was revealed that it was plaini elothes officers using an unmarked car who attempted - I “.._the _ __, . - to -1stop

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youths on the street. The question then arises as to how can two youths assault officers when they are handcuffed? In support of the two youths, the AIA ’ r stated that they’ll support the _ struggles of the working class against the monopoly-capitalist ruling class and showed their solidarity by uniting and supporting the demonstration.


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the chevron

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Better

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Pqrsonai ., ’ Gay Lib office CC 217C. Open Mon.i Thurs 7-10 pm & most afternoons f-or counselling and information. Call 8851211 ext. 2372. Pregnant and Distressed? Birth Control Centre 885-l 211, ext. 3446. Doctor referrals, , unplanned and unwanted pregnancy counselling and follow-up birth control information. Complete cbn/: . fidence. Are you pregnant? If you need confidential concerned personal assistance call Birthright 579-3990. Pregnancy tests.

For Sale 1970 Cama&Automatic, power steering, radial tires. Call week days after six. ,Apk for Ken. 634i8529.

Typind

february.28,

1975

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OTTAWA (CUP)-Members of Parliament may soon deal with the sco&-ge of recession and the rigours of governing with increased calm and composure. This “at least was the point of the Feb. 12’ meeting between members from all parties and the Tratiscendental Meditation society of Ottawa. - A letter of invitation was sent to all MP’s signed by MP’s and Senators -from the major p&ties asking them to cqme out and be instructed in the art Room for rent. excellent kitchep and of meditation. laundry facility. Close to Universityinale The initiator of the meeting, MP Jacques Guilbault (L. St. Jacques) tiho only phone 8!4-1381. says he has-been practising.TM “a Fouple of years.” He explained that Sublet May 1 to-September 1, 3 iedMP’s work in a tension filled environ’ment and that TM was a good way of room apartment, 1 112 bathroom’s, carunwinding from those pressures. pet, . unfurnished, close to university. Sudbury NDP member John Rodriguez, who also signed the invitation Rent negotiable. Phone 742-7164. says he .has been practising TM for about two months. He arrives at his_ Apartment’available April to September. office at 8:45 each morning,, settles into his chair, closes his eyes and 2 bedrooms, ideal for 4 people. Fully begins meditating. He refused to identify for reporters his mantra-the furnished, 5 minute walk to campus, behind Westmount Plaza.. Call 742-5014 sound he hums while meditating. anytime. I$odrigne_zf@ds the 20 minutes of meditation leaves him calm, with his Live in a house this summer term! 5 daily prior&es falling into place as he re-enters the world of the living. beflrooms, shared cooking, for singles The’MP’s invol’ved have been tight-lipped about the TM m’eeting. It is or couples, 381’ King St. at Columbia. believed that their reluctance to talk stems.from the last round the Com$60/mo. Claire AdamSon 11 Au&tin Dr. mons had with TM. Tha?t was in 1973 when the minority Liberals were to No. 7, Waterloo. 884-3899. have a TM demonstratidn in c’aucus. Word leaked to the press and the Spacious 2 tqedroom apt. to sublet. May Opposition ridiculed the Liberals, resulting in the ‘TM session being canto Sept. Close. to university and,shopcelled. a ping. Rent $145 per month. Call Sandy Since this most recent session will involve members from all parties, br Marilyn 742-5613. / ridicule will have to be non-partisan. 1 or 2 people wanfed to rent second . So- if your MP responds to your problems in the future with glazediyes floor apt. in old house. $lOlb plus share and a blank stare, it may not be because he is an unconcerned fat cat. He utilities, garden space. Phone 579-5383 _I may be practising TM. after 5 weekdays, weekends anytime.

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Classified ads are accepted between 8 and 4 in the chevron office. See the chevrori secretary. Rates are 50 cents for the first fifteec words and five cents for each additional word. Deadline is noon Tuesdays. ’.

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Student is experienced in cleaning and repairing typewriters. Also rents typewriters. Reasonable. Call Bill at 634-5592 after 5 pm. T a Experienced typist will do typing in own Rome, jresidence within walking distance of University. Please Call 884-6351. Fast, accurate typing. 40 cents a page. IBM Selectric. Located in Lakeshdre Vil-Iage. Call 884-6913 anytime. g Typing at home. 743-3342. WestmounJ , area. Thesis, essays., ReasonaMe rates. Excellent service. No math papers. Would-like;0 do typing. Live in the cotintry but will pick up work. Call Ann anytime at 634-5569 “Ousing Available Lovely convenient three &droom plus Waterloo home June through August or pa,rt thereof. 885-3606 evenings: _ Townhouse’ to Sublet-MaySeptember. Lakeshore Village, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, utilities included. Phone collect 884-5663.

House on tr$ed lot, available MayAugust, excellent for,family, completely furnished, 4 bedrooms, .20 minute walk to cavpus, $250/mo. Call 744-5024.

Corp@rate profits down

OTTAWA (CUP)zAfter-tax corporate profits were down slightly in the last .quarter of 1974 acCording to preliminary business surveys. Things were not too bad for the 102 companies surveyed,b however, as this was their first decline in profit rates since early 1971. The 14.3 per cent profit decline for the companies culminat‘es a trend begun in the first quarter of 1974 which saw profits only increase by 47.8 per cent over the previous year. This figure was down from the 59.4 per cent increase in the last quarter. of 1973. The rate of profit increase continued to decline d&ng 1974 until the last quarter when profits actually yent down largely due to the kffect of the reintroduction of a 10 per cent surtax on corporate profits and the disallowance of tax exemptions on royalties paid by companies to provincial goyemmenfs. Thus, for the whole of 1974. the companies had a profit increase of 24.1 while the average wage increase was 8.6 per cent. .

you am arienginm this ” -,<I ~chaircouldbe@ur% I .”\. ‘. This is where yo’u could find yourself if you become a Maritime Engin&ring Officer in today’5 Canadian ArmedForces. ThewaSter Engineering Control centre of one of our new DDH 280 Destroyer,s. , No boilers. No stokers. No sweat! The pow@- within these beautiful_ships comes from jei turbine engines. The machinery that he’ats, cools, ventilates and provides w’$ter throughout these ships is the latest: I Maritime Engineering Officers on these ships work with some of the most sophisticated equipment in the I world...with expertly trained men w.hqare as proud df their work as they are of their ships. If you’re studlying engineering, think-about !his’Offitier’s job. It’s a very special one. It could take you anywhere in the world!

DiTectorate Box 8989, Please -iri the

of Recruiting & S lection, National Ottawa, Ontario ’ If 1A OK2

send rni Canadian

more information Forces .of Maritipe

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Between the 17-19 Feb. stories American Marxist-Leninists durno longer participate in the confer- were run in the Toronto Star: and ing the-month of November 1972 in ence. We-withdrew from the conthe Globq and Mail as well as on the one of Canada’s main cities as a- ference and asked certain organisaCBC about a ‘man who claimed to representative of his organisation. I tions frorn the U.S. if they would be an FBI agent-provocateur with The meeting was also attended by hold their own conference in the orders to infiltrate Maoist oriented various other groups from Canada U.S. They held this conference in communist Parties in Canada. and the U.S. A number of strange August of 1973 to which we sent a Irkthese. articles Joseph Burton, incidents t%ok place- during that nominal and fraternal delegation. from Florida, claimed that he at- period which cautioned the Party to Finally, Joe Burton participated tended conferences and cell meetundertake serious investigation of .in various activities in such a way ings of the Communist Party of the groups participating in the Conthat it was-extremely difficult for us Canada (Marxist-Leninist). He ference. Our Party also attended to hide the fact that we knew that said that he-was an intimate of the the Conference and hosted the prothey were from a certain-intelligchairman of that party, Hardial ceedings. The claim’that Joe Burence agency from the U.S. Our Bains, and that Bains had “walked ton makes that he infiltrated our Party comrades were always out of the North Korean embassy Party is altogether wrong as he was friendly and sometimes extremely in Paris with $30,000,” with which never invited to participate in the so, such that the two age& did not . he could use in financing his party’s private meetings of the Party. He have any-suspicions. Through this activities. claims that he gathered information method, the Party was able to colThe Star reported 17 Feb. that about the CPC(M-L), but all he lect valuable information regarding Burton was told by the-FBI that the managed to gather was a lot of the operations of -certain intelligI Canadian authorities did not know money from the_ FBI. ence agencies in the U.S. and their of his activities. Two days later the Joe Burton was never invited to . links with the operations of the Globe reported Solicitor-General any private meetings of the Party. RCMP here in Canada. Warren Allmand as saying that a In all the public meetings, the Party chevron: Was Burton an intimate of . Florida man who spied on Maoists _always listed the names of deleHardial Bains? in Canada did it with RCMP ap- gates from other countries and in- CPC(ML): Comrade Bains had no proval. formed the public at large about relations, political; social or otherBurton said that his reason for their presence. Our Party has no wise with Joe Burton. Comrade releasing the news was that the FBI connections whatsoever with anyBains met Joe Burton in the course * had begun to put pressure on him one in East Germany, and no for- 8 of the business of the Preparatory when he’decided to run for Tampa mal delegation has ever visited Committee of the North American City council. . Canada from any organisation in ‘Marxist-Leninists and had no retaBains has spoken several times Sweden. tions otherwise with him. Our at UW and is returning in March to (Burton claims that at party conferParty or any individual associated take part in a symposium on the ences he met members from Swewith the Party had no relations of * PoliticalLeconomy of Canada. den, Britain, East Germany, and any kind .since the ‘end of August The chevron sent a questionnaire other European countries.) 1973 with.Joe Burton. ‘to CPCML”nationa1 spokesman Our. Party became suspicious of Richard Daly and had a telephone ’ him during this Conference. As the interview with .him on Feb. 20. time went on we investigated Voting member? the Below is a transcript of that conissue further. In order to undertake chevron: Was Burton a voting versation and Daly’s written reply. full investigation, we led Joe Burmember of the party? How do you ton into a trap. We asked him in the become a voting member? FBI ‘agent course of various discussions that CPC(ML): Burton was never al; C’hevron: Is it true thatJoseph Burhe should host one of the meetings lowed near any aspect of Party ton, who claims to be an FBI agent, \of the Preparatory Committee of -work. Our dealings with him were infiltrated the Communist Party of the North’ American Marxistsimply as a representative of Leninists in his hometown in another Canada (Marxist-Leninist)? organisation attending. Florida to which he agreed. We conferences open to/all serious left CPC(M_L): No Joseph Burton attended a meeting organised by the sent two delegates to this c*dnfergroups. Secondly, the process of Preparatory Committee for Conence and categorically decided becoming 1“a voting member” of vening the Conference of the North after the meeting that our Party will the Party is based on the

Federation of &dents University of Waterloo / No&

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~of -the Federation- of Students, University of Waterloo, a corporation under the laws of the Province of Ontario, to be held on Monday,. March IO, -!I?5 at 8:00- p.m. in Needles Hall, ’ -Room 300-6. The directors of the Federation will be appointed at. this meeting, in accordance with section 3 of by-law no. ‘1 l - \ The agenda for this meeting. is restricted tothis item-of business, for w-hich proper notice ,( has been given. I. 1 I n

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individual’s mance in throwing class and aspirations based on gle.

day to day --perfor/ taking up the task of overthe monopoly capitalist giving up all other basic in the process. It is long and arduous strug( chevron: Did Hardial Bains receive $30,000 from the North Korean embassy in Paris? CPC(ML): To the best of our knowledge the North Koreans do not have an embassy in France.’ Our Party has never received any funds from any country abroad for our political activity and the entire political work of the Party is financed by the Canadian working class and- people. As for the To’ ronto Star statement of “Hardial Bains walked out of the North Korean Embassy in Paris with $30,000.00” ) I have been authorized to state that the Party is consulting its lawyers about this and the Toronto Star will receive our view soon. ’

revolution in the near future. For * the Party and the people the’future is extremely auspicious. ’

Why not CIA?

Do y’ou have any theories about why the FBI and not the CIA were involved in this? (The FBI is supposed to be an internal_security organization.) CPC(ML): The’ Canadian police forces and agencies have cooperated fully with the -FBI for years,, in all Imatters. If you are arrested in Ontario, your statistics automatically are sent to the FBI. The agencies of the bourgeois state ’ . in &nada willingly co-operate with the imperialist policies of the US ruling class for North America. So, Canadian security, to the U.S. criminal ruling class, is arrogantly considered a form of internal security . chevron: Why do you think this story broke? Is it simply a disillusioned FBI agent breaking cover or is there something more in it? ’ Press under chinese CPC(ML): There is definitely a serious contradiction in the Canarestaurant dian, and U. S. ruling circles as the chevron: The press which Burton economic crisis sharpens. This claims to have seen in Torontostory 7s a manifectation of- this -was it the CPCML press and did struggle. I predict that there will be leaders of the party show it to him? further developments onthis front. CPC(ML): First, the Party does not At the same time, of course, this own any presses. The press preis an attempt to discredit sumably alluded to belonged to a “expose” CPCML and wrap our politics in a bona fide printing company. It was (media image of shady intrigue. common knowledge’ where it was You also ask, in this conjunction, located. As far as the allusion to the if this is an attempt to label Hardial Chinese restaurant is concerned Bains, Party leader, as a foreign this is simply a cheap attempt to agent or a national security risk so drum up mysticism and gossip about foreign conspiracies in as to find an excuse ‘to pack him off to a foreign land-to use your Canada. If you think a minute you Well, the bourgeoisie will recall that every community in phrase. knows that it would have a real’victhis country has at least one ious fight on its hands if it tried Chinese restaurant. I expect that to ‘deport Comrade CPCML will be connected to. all of arbitrarily Bains, so they try, from time to them in sinister plots in lurid stories time, to build up a climate of lurid in the bourgeois press before the slanders with overtones of sinister bourgeoisie is finally overthrown in intrigue. We have full faith that the Canada. . Canadian people are not fools, and chevron: Why do you think the FBI chose the CPCML to infiltrate? they will not buy this story. chevron: How can your party and CPC(ML): First of all, the FBI does -not have a mind .of its own which the left generally protect itself.from this, type of infiltration? would allow it to make independent CPC(ML): Quite simply, all choices on any subject. These criminal agencies of the criminal genuine left organisations have-to stand up to all attempts at inmonopoly capitalist class receive by the monopoly captheir orders from one section or the . timidation , italist class and its agents,.-be other of the monopoly capitalist they professors, leftists of a phony class. T_hus, the question ,should be,-why is the CPCML the target of ,, U. S. type, media-people, or anyone eise in the scientific category of ’ the U.S. and Canadian monopoly running dog of theruling class. We capitalist class? The ans_wer to this are fully confident that by taking question is obvious. CPCML is the party of the proletariat in Canada, our political line boldly to the people and participating in their strugthe only party with a revolutionary programme, analysis and political gles we will wipe out these puny attempts at infiltration’ and diviline for the future of Canada,.for the liberation of the working and opsion. We, in Party circles, are ordinary mortals: workers, immigpressed people of this land, for establishing the dictatorship of the rants, professionals, natives, students and intellectuals who have proletariat over the bourgeoisie, come out of the struggles of the for building a people’s democratic socialist Canada. The monopoly Canadian people. We. are not intimidated by these conspiracy spy capitalist class knows full well that ‘we mean business. Apart from outstories which only illustrate the further criminality of the moribund right slander campaigns the ruling class tries to build opposition to ’ ruling class. The people are the Marxism-Leninism by promoting most precious wealth on the face of phoney left groups to split and dithe earth. We have full faith in the people’s ingenuity and militancy. vert the revolutionary movement in Canada. (See end- of Press _Re- r We will continue to carry out our lease.) In brief,CPCML is the only programme among the people. We party actually organising revolu-will! not “hide in the jungle like tion, the only Party with something some Second World War Japanese to say to the people and something soldier on some Pacific island”. , to build among the people. As the We willwork harder toexpose the economic crisis worsens the criminality of the monopoly monopoly capitalist class is desp- I capitalist class, of US imperialism erately trymg to unload the burden and of Soviet social. imperialism of the crisis onto the working class and we will continue to extol1 the and people, and they know that the irrepressible struggles of the workers, equipped with the spirit of ’ world’s peoples for national liberathe Party, the spirit of Norman tion and revolution. This is the way Bethune, the spirit of daring to to “protect oneself from infiltrastruggle and daring to win, will be- tion”. ignited and fanned into a blaze of -neiI doeherty chevron:

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all in what“$ou make it . . :I ‘*ant to make it gineering students ,or. amaigqmating with ‘. .work!’ Lauridr. I don’t want to see either -possibility 4ois ltptoh happen, A@ can and *iI! hav,e a secure \ \- y’ chvirkmental studies place at Waterlop if interest and concern are , . (regular) ’ . . ~ ’ ’, shown as-to its future. l’n p73-.1974 there was a drop. iti Art‘s en- ’ rollment and <everytime thtit happens Arts concerned. It adds fuel to ’ students must . the arguments T f ,those people tiho would like to ‘see Artgphased out. Theie \i3ds a titie ’ when there were 5 Arts reps or?$he Federation of -Students Council, today there a@ 3, next year ther tiay be 3. I want?o,see 5,Arts reps o? the Council again and next ye& if not sboner. 1. _ ’ .“’ Arts ‘students are n,& in the majority, but they do make up the second largest faculty on campus aqd,&e still -ati imp&ant and an . intrinsic part of our uqiversity’s life. The contribution by ,A@ students to both the K-W’ .* community aqd; the uhiversify community k z immeasurable. Arts students-are what make .a university -a humanistic. environmtint .it? . which to live: W.e are here and must be _ counted. ,l want to make- our presence fel;. ._ VOTE. . ‘,. -alan itessel th\is point and argue for. a pifferent way of X \ \ , -_ allocation df the provit%s resuurces in*order to resolve the conflict between public needs .’ ‘c , a@ private profit. or ose of $u who do not know me, I am If y& feel such a,strategy*-is valid please, . ’ %$econd year Atis student and ‘am running. -- Well it% tim”e for the anriual council elecgive me your vote.! for this position for tw6,reasons. These are; ./ tjons and I’m hoping you will give rhe atiother #_ - -doug ward an interest in student organizatiqn and hdw _. J year on-the fed council. ’ they can.work for the greatest benefit,of the * The past year has presented. many ch_almajaity of students arid & desire to’see that .Iwges the federation has tried to solve and h$ fees ar’e administered in a constryctive work out, especially thk /dwindling provincial . abd appropriate manner. , fund5 for u?i\iersity education, loans and I 1.w&Id like to see more input and coingrants. ’ - mupication from ‘Arts students in’ regards to --The fed?rafion of! stidents must respond ’ their FaculJy, Federation and Society, espe- ’ #and encourage the provincial goverpment to cially in these times of O.S.A.P. problems, fulfiil their tiommittment to post-secondary ‘and future schol&tio-at@ fipanciat’o,$looks, education. Ali@ady -two Orit&io universities, in regards to~ind$idual departments’and the Lakehead and Laure@ian are contemplating - Utiiversit@ a whple. As ‘a rep I mayebe able clo ing th&doors. T_hough ,I cannot imagine to aid cbmmunication via periodic letter5 in L sb $ ething comparable &curing here, how’ the Chevron- and Knot Garden and by re--s 1 ever we -m@t take no chal?ceq4and remind main\ing accessible to in‘ the‘-goverMile!t studerits are !not “tielfare \ v\;iquld also like to e new inovati-ens cases” as the director of the $student loan and ideas in regards to student-Federationadministratiod has often stated. ’ ’ Society rel8tions+nd gctivities (eg. orientaAlso, u’nless we tell the provincial governtion) whi+sometimes seem to get lost in the xment education is a right open to all society ’ shufflb of a bureaucracy: - ‘no matter what &come, bracket you are in, we ’ Wah regards to related backgrourid f; this may be paying-for the whole shot. A recent position,.~Lwas internYART2 rep bn council govbrnment report ,recommended tuition ’ <from SepteMber.74, Arts Society Vice-Pres.’ -In ‘the cipdbfiing ye&r the eqonomic bu’r- - fees cover all the student’s education ex-‘ 74/T? aqd “represent ‘Arts s&dents on the -den. dri the Univ(ersity df Wateiloo and its w penses, a large suin df more tl%n $3,000. ‘” ,Ckmpus Centre Board *7$/76, Uqder=. Students ‘is $oing ]to be greatly increased. I’ve-enjoyed the past yegrof work with the :#%@tiate Affairs Group (U.G.A.‘G.) and the Th’is,will greatly. aff&t the‘ Univer&ty’s--ability ’ federation 6s vice-chairperson of external reMeF Intramurtil,Athletic Coundil. L’ :..f , to m&intait?its present, programs\ and ser- . ’ Iatidns and as a member of the b&d of Vic-, hot to ,m&tion providing new ones or r, , ’ Kt any rate, vote! Proper representation e’dilcatioti tryjng to deal effectitiely with these ensures that your voice is heard. i&pr&ments. With the predicted inflation_ issues:,There is much to be done and for this i -brute rorrison - ary rate of over 14 percent students will not reason I &k you to vote-for me on Wedn,es.find it easy to get ky.‘For these reasons-and day: . , , many’ other& I feel we need a very strong and . -n$chael gordon . . active Fed&atio& One which I would like very m&h to be a part of and feel I could be SoLho ah~ I that you should vote for me to’ beneficial to. This yea! I have Ibeen- active in represent you on the FederationQu’hcil? I fhe Renison Academic Assembly which is a mean, who &es ‘about the Fed>‘Couni=iI stud&t defense organiz-at!-on of Renison CQ!anyway?! They don’t cgre’- about you, doIege. I helped’est’ablish the-fid Hoc/ Committhey! 0 they?. . .Well; to start yvith” last-- tee to form the Popular Student Front to orthings ‘fii:s t;‘. :‘.yes a$ no, if’you c#e abou’t j them: They are what $0, make them, by your _ ganize students priyarily against the education . &backs. As I well,, I ‘am .‘anxlactiye, interest. atid invo\vement, It% disturbing td ~ member of the An,&!mperialist Alliance. I ,see the trend we’re on in terms of our-waning Have been working for the previous two,years concern @out &uder&af.fairs; .Look/at‘ the \ aqd, am. now a se&d yeal” arts students, I . 4 L, ’ \ Anark wills / their >decreasing participation rate! Look at,. . x .L the damages and laissez-faire attitude‘in and 1 ‘\ I w&u)d ve.ty &ch apljreciate yo;r vote),.for about the’Gampus’Centre! Sure says son-& council i-ep. for Arts in the u$omjng council thing abdut ,how much you. care about your elections. . _ 3’ * qwri plight ., . .nbt too much, eh ;. .or maybe Hbpefuliy I coGId ;be- in&ume~~tal in shapyou’re.an unfortunate victim of-the“Iazy socing a strong feder+tiq-which ,gould along iety” sy$rome and. you can’t betbothered “I with the other univer’sify studeht groups in. doing somethJ’ig about it., Sure it, seems fhis provinqe p6t up a m,gre effective front in hopeless at times, but maybe Ihe $forts opposition to the impending Ipost-secondary __ being made aren,‘t pervasive enough. People ; ’ educaJion&l cutbacks. seldom use the. power,of their ,ability ‘to the Tt@ cutbacks are. part of a wider crisis in greatest extent. . . so th_ere’s always room to L-8,”Is Arts sti II vital? Does A.&have a place on the public $ectpr in,.which thetvgt-ious-levels ‘push a little harder!@ No dodbt part o\,@e the UW campus? IsArts receiving its due? -of governmentare becoming Tore and more -problem lies in communicati;on, so in answer Should&t$ Students feel like secong fiddles t 1 hard-pr&sed The.‘ students’ couticil has the power, to to sustain social expenditures _‘:‘to the next question, l’c‘are! I care about the l OQ’ the UW cappus? -. ’ make decisions such adwhether o,r not fhe_re ‘in light of ‘spiralling co&s. Behirid this crisis fact’that this chan$el for con;l!$unication and, The answers are y&s to the fi& tviio queswill be findihg for a student run pub, a stulies a tax system, in which-the brunt of educai participation exists, and that It #must be kepr tions, and no to the secpnd iwp. Arts&, ahd dent newspaper Federation Flicks and so opep to ‘promote student activities and intional and ‘social costs is increasingly being- should confinue to-be, avital and influential hean$.that th& are about ter&ts. .baving \iirorked with our society for. . on; Usually-this ,$hiftedon to the ingividual wage earner tothe , force on tpe UW cambuS. There @&forces j 1’5 people (the numbsthat usually shows up -. Xi/ benefit of thecorpqrate sec9.r. f;No years and with-the Feds for one, there’s ii which would’lrke to see&s either diminished for meetings) tiho can,control ‘a large part of Student groups must continue to stress . one thing that ’became quite clear . . ,.it really is . I ’ to the positiqn of supplying electives -- for &I.’ Y, ) : A *w I \ st .: /

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your cultural life on campus. The council can also approve or disapprove funding for projects that can affect the bare necessities of life such as food and shelter. The “average” student has no say at all in controlling. the actions of student council. -Obviously I don’t feel that this is a democratic process. The main reason that I am running for council is so that I can ensure that the student media, specifically the Chevron and Radio Waterloo and the Board of External Relations ‘and Education will get enough funding to keep operating at least at present standards.. “. -neil dunning environmental studies

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’ The most important role of the councilmember is to act as a conjact person for ’ students who want to make use of Federation servioes or money. When students have problems with bureaucrats, OSAPS, landlords and other household pests they should be going to theircouncil rep. to get help or advice from Federation people who have experience solving! problems. The Federation is also a fairly wealthy service organization and as council member, 1 would encourage and lobby for science students who.want assistance to attend conferences or sponsor projects on campus. On entertainment’, I think we must develop more diversity: The pub;>with all its faults, is a good thing but it is essentially a high energy situation. The Federationshould also be supporting a lower energy situation, say a coffee house, where poets and folk-singers could perform for appreciative audiences. .On education,.this is the area I have personally‘been involved in through serving on the Board and helping to organize the recent Although I can claim no extensive experisymposium on conflict resolution. In a time of ence in student government, I feel that this increasing secularization/of the university will not violate any aspect of my position as when many of the faculty are shirking thejr representative for St: Jerome’s. In fact, I feel responsibility as teachers, it becomes the this freshness, this new awareness, .will be students’ responsibility to innitiate and proan asset.’ mote campus wide dialogue. The Federation At the present time the. Federation is witshould be sponsoring more public debate nessing increasing input from the Societies and symposia on issues and ideas of the day. and the Church Colleges. I intend to maintain Alsp, I anticipate close cooperation withthe and strengthen these ties and to espouse Science Society.-The new sci. sot. president those issues that will be most beneficiatto and I agree on many of the issues facing the the students of St. Jerome’s. In this respect sci. sot. For example, there is- a group ,of there.exists the possibility of obtaining acstudents within the society who want to decess to Federation-funds for St. Jerome’s velop a more relevant system for course educational activities, such as guest lecturcritiques. The Federation should be giving ers. full financial and moral support and lending As a member for St. Jerome’s I would be a technical expertise to projects. such as this. moderating influence on the more left wing f -ralph toqie elements in the Federation. For example, I’ co-op physics *\ view with concern the Davis government’s recent cutbacks (in real terms) to post secondary institutions. However, I cannot agree with the extreme’doctrine being vaunted by theEOntario Federation of Students who advocate, in response, free tuition and living stipends for student. I My primary concern throughout the year will be your views and opinions. On this basis” I ask for your support on March 5. ’ .-brian miatelle I

Engineering

A ,representative’s job is to continually make the views of the council known to his constituents. In the past the problem hasbeen finding a forum to make these views known and the result has been a total breakdown of communication which in turn leads , to apathy; the council carries on its business and nobody knows what the,y’re doing 3nd

A “choice” group of people playing in the removed arena of student politics controls most of the federation. I feel that the student body as a unit should benefit more from the existence of the federation because we all.. pay equal dues. My idea is to have the federation act through the Societies (Engineering, Math, Arts, etc.) rather than through their little read official voice, The Chevron. . . 1 -albert f. sweetnam 3A civil engineering

soon nobody cares. Answer this: Where is your student fee spent? On what? What’ do you get for your student fee? Doyou get your money’s worth? These appear to be the issues that the new council is going to have to address itself to, and so-on. They%e tough questions and they may even lead to questioning the usefulness of the federation as a body. A representative ‘cannot be afraid to confront these question if they are in the best interests of the constituents. Are they? If you care about the answers to some basic questions about your federation and its viability and need and whether or not you are. willing to support it,‘you’ll vote next Wednesday.. ’ -phi1 reil/y

-

.

I wouldn’t run for a position on the Federation Council if I didn’t feel I could do a good job. I feel that the position carries as, much responsibility as one wishes to ac:spt. lntending to be more than a re,n. that just sits on the counci!, ihere are a few ‘non-radical’ realist@ &as I would like to take to the Feds. S!Yne are my own, others were suggested by my collegues and if elected I expect more ideas from those I represent. Included in what I feel are my duties is the aspect of the thorough and immediate reporting back to the students of the goings-on of the Federation. In past terms I don’t believe

that this has been given the attention it should have be~en given. Put simply, if nobody knows what is-going on then it makes for difficulty in getting people involved. This is my first concern as it seems to be that of my fellow students. For those*who don’t know me, and they would be ‘in the majority, I am Eng Sot’s 2nd Vice-President, Eng Sot’s representative to the Campus Centre Board and the initiator of the Rigid Ensemble, that wonderful little band that aids in dreating a little healthy w inter-faculty static. l Come March 5th, make the right choice. I Thank you. -paul j. chown, ---> I 2A system design.

I believe the most important duty of an Engineering Representative is to remain in contact with as many engineering students as possible and present their views to the Federation Council. I enjoy this type of activ-, ity and I am willing to spend the time neces-’ sary for this position. m ‘I will strongly support the views of the en‘gineering student in all aspects of Federation business. -g&ry m. oattes

Through my background in Eng. Sot and the Federation of Students in Germany, I have developed an interest to run for the Federation of Studentshere atthe University of Waterloo. I think that thefederation has, to be’the I believe that the federation should be turned voice of the student, the strong voice of the , into a sandbox, and that ail students be given student. The Federation should try to help free pails and shovels. Free diaper service the student in variobs aspects, i.e. social ac-. showld,be provided as well as free-day care / tivities. . for the-students. This would also help keep The Federation of Studnets should work the faculty busy. ’ ss close together with all other Societies on this In closing I would like to piedge that if elected, campus because in these Societies are the I will serve, and that if by chance I* don’t voices of students whom the Federatio”h repun’derstand something I will vote for it anyI resents. wav. / This is onlythe basic concept I feel that fhe Federation should do, and these are the points I would like to base my electipn plat, form on. klaus-dieter naujok gen. eng. / 884-5688 / My name is Albert F. Sweetnam, I am in 3A Civil Engineering and I am competing for the position of Engineering representative on the, Federation Council. I do not have a platform as such but would like to state a few of my %GQhk here. This is the age of c.hange but I think that ou’i federation has had enough of change. It is now the time for some good, honest hard work to be done towards furthering the changes that have been made’and carrying out the objectives of the counoi!: In the past many excellent ideas have been generated but in actuality only a small percentage of the campus population has benefited because of poor participation and, minimal input at the organizational level.

‘I&-


u

_

the chevron

friday,

february

28, 1975

Address all letters to the Editor, The Chevron, Campus Centre. Please type on a 32 or.64 character line, double: spaced. A pseudonym may be run if we are provided

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AIA responds to Trot story -

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Last fall the Anti-Imperialist Alliance (AIA) a political student organisation was formed. As its motion accelerated on campus other groups came forward to attack the 1’ AIA. Prominent among these was the International Sparticist Tendency, a Trotskyist organisation, its New which parachuted York/Toronto contigent. Their first programme here was a public _ meeting allegedly on “revolutionary Strategy fm Canada” held Feb. 1 i. This forum was attended by a group of Trots currently in Toronto under the lkadership of Tom Reid, a few of their local cohoi-ts and a large number of AIA members and friends. i’ The Feb. 21 kdition of the chevron carried an article entitled “Feds Stage Trot Talk” announced the intention of the Fed&ation of Students to invite the Sparticist back to campus. The article also floats’ lies and distortions about the AIA. The chevron article is-based on --facsist reasoning, on the false premisti that violent and undemocratic actions took place at the meeting. The false premise is used to“promote the idea that the AIA should be disbanded, to threaten the AIA _ the? could “forfeit their right to work on camnus”. What actu&did take place at the meeting to inspire such a response from the chevron? While soin elements of the chevron acL

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What is the AIA? This political cused AIA members of “disruptstu’dent organization stands on its .ing” the meeting, the fact is that record as dtiovemerit composed of-speaker Tom .Reid did finish his activists who have organized. despeech. In the course of the speech monstrations, forums, movi~es and heckling did take place in the form generally wide-ranging programof demands that Reid come down to mes of an anti-imperialist nature. In earth, actually address the question of revolutionary strategy for 6 addition the AIA engages in struggles based on the interests of studCanada and give up his characterisents such as supporting the Popular tically Trotskyist method,of talking about obscure theoretical points. Stud&t Front. tq fight the edycaInstead of talking ,about retional. &backs. volutionary strategy for Canada What are Trqtskyists? They are Reid gave ;1 diatribe against a unpolitical sects who engage in disited front of classes, attacked every cussion and debate on obscure imaginable political grotip includtheoretical point+, who parasitise ing other Trotskyist organizations and split legitimate movements in _ and launched an attack n>n Fedthe left on the basis of some coneration President candidate Barb cocted ideas. Nowhere in the world do Trots- have a mass base. EveA I.nnes’ campaign. He accused her of having run on a “reformist” plattheir international leaders such as Jerry Healy admit that theii- bogus ’ fo_rm and insisted instead that she international central committees j should have fin on the demand for a living wage for all students. He are-full of police agents. then went onto some gtiible about a Not only have Trots nothing in workers militia. common with the AIA; they are inAfter Reid finished his speech, fact part of the problem. The AIA is many questions on revolutionary a practical organization which has nothing to do with the use of intelstrategy for- Canada Came lectualisation to avoid actual social forward-questions related to American imperialism, Soviet sopractice and to paralyse the left. native peoples -The Spartacist Tendency so eloj cial imperialism,’ struggles, e’rc. The speaker refused ’ quently represgnted by Reid is a to answer- the questions as they New York based group who came came up, instead selecting a few at to Canada where they act is im-. c the- _ end of the question per?od perialist agents in attempting to de__ __ stroy organizations on the left. which would provide ‘an excuse to attack -Marxism-Leninism and Those blements in the chevron wh,o support the line carried by the offer __ . critical support for the Soviet Umon. article, who defend Trots against In addition a notion was passed in the AIA, who promote the idea that these organizations -have somethe meeting banning Trots. from thing in common, are acting like campus. The .AIA intends to imTrots theyselves-protecting the plement this motion by exposing Trots before the qasses. bourgeois minority against mass The audience simply attempted democracy. to turn this meeting into a mass Who aie some membe@ of the democratic meeting which would chevron in bloc with? They sit on expose the bankrupt position of the sidelines neverorganising anyTrotskyists on the question of rething amongst the stuc$nts. Objecvolutionary strategy for Canada1 _ tively they assist the’ bourgeoisie ’ By condemning the meeting as with articles such as “Feds St;jge evidence of “political infighting” ‘Trot’ talk”. They fail to recognizk the chevron article creates the false that class struggle is authoritarian. idea that Trots and the AIA have. In words they are Marxists, in somerning in common. deeds they serve the interests of the bourgeois minority. The fact is that the AIA is disrupting the status quo while Trots are not. They assimply attempting to leech off a legitimate student movement. Seems they’ve found an ally in some Chevron elements.

professiotid

accountant

,

_ I

Rumour has it that next week is Arts Week. Art< Week will commence Tuesday; March 4th with a trip to the McMichael Collection at Kleinburg which features the works of Tom Thomson ahd the seven me’mbers aof the group of -,seven. Tickets and information avI , ailable in the arts society office, humanities 369. This excursion‘ is not limited to arts students. There Will be a general meeting of the arts students, Wednesday, .-. March 5 at 2 p.m. in the theatre of the arts. This will be followed by a’. free’ concert at 2:30 featuring the ’ _jazzy rockof Candle with Donald J. % ;Blair, Bernie Carroll and, Arnold Snyder. The afternoon will also be .~ highlighted by the infamous (or famous) Saltspring Rainbow. Band. Thursday evening there’will be a $4.00’ per excursion to the Heidelburg House. An Oktoberfest meal\ will be served at 7:00 p.m. Maps and car pool arrangements to be made* at the arts society office, humanities 369. This is the only function limited to arts society members only’.’


friday,

febiu&v

the chevron

28, 1975

Y

c Cultiwe-vukires J and I cinema 3-\ It has been estimated that more’ people go to cinema in the world in one month than have gone to the theatre in the. whole human history. . Wr.ong kind of people undoubtedly go to cinema-unsophisticated, , vulgar, low class, blue-jeans and , pop-corn. Peasants, essentially, you know, lining up around the block, shivering in the cold,. wet snow. You can’t, you see, easily phone ‘in your reservation to be charged to American Express. This is not after all theatre:,cloak rooms, drinks in the lobby, programmenotes, black-tie, shiny hair-dos; hushed silences, back rows and front rows “I would like you to meet...“. Charming, charming! What a battle it was to get liquor license from our incorruptible L.C.B.O. for the Stratford Film Festival at the Avon theatre. Since they would be watching a film rather than a live theatre, they wouldn’t know how to hold their liquor, them suckers. So the argument ran, more or less. Well, what - can you say. There are more important things to fight about than bureaucratic inanities about a glass of Canadian wine-abominable as it is, which you wouldn’t want to drink anyway nor could you afford, at their prices. In 1898, one daring film pioneer in Canada produced a 73 second long film-silent, of course, entitled The Kiss. Synopsis: a middle‘ aged man, with thick moustache, and a happy face-the kind you see all over Canada-kissing, yes kissing, a matronly, =middle aged woman. A vertical kiss, not a horizontal kiss; a nice ,Canadian kiss, not a French kiss, you know the kind which makes you wish you were living,on the other side of the Atlantic, and I don’t mean England either. No heaving, all four hands clearly in sight. No sound effects. No promises, no build-ups. The film created quite a furor. Queen Victoria and \ her faithful servants in Ottawa frowned on such an assault on public morality. Which meant, as it still does in many parts of the world, that they didn’t think it was moral for the ‘manpn the street’ to indulge in his ‘animal passions,’ for a mere nickel ./ Morality has its price, as we all know, for during the reign of our beloved Victoria, for a pretty penny, you could buy much sanctified and fully illustrated pornography leather bound and scented, with no frowns from the pulpit and without the,fear of hair growing on . the palm of your hands! The people with ‘class’ find cinema vulgar, largely because it is “not ‘exclusive’, because -it is a ‘mass’ medium. It may create ‘stars’ and heroes for our folk‘culture, but in the fossilised minhs of culture-vultures-no where more apparent than the curdled formaldehyde of preservatism of universities-cinema stands for cheap amusement, something to stoop down to, rather than reach out for. For many “classy” academicians, cinema is without any redeeming social or academic values. It has none’of the finesse of theatre or poetry or pottery or painting. And none of the academicity of Leisure Studies or Human Relations or Sociology. For many of them, it seems the flight of cinematic imagination ends in The Sound 8 Music or Airport or I

The Blazing

Inferno.

Let us consider the University of Waterloo,: There are a number of courses on cinema-its history, its its impact etc. language, etc.-being offered on the campus, yet not one decent room, where a film canbe\ viewed properly, without ghastly, muffled sounds accompanying it, without it going in and out of focus, withouttonal values disappearing altogether, without some perpetual blur-redness on every frame, without incorrigible frequent break-downs. There are over 3,000 films-of varying, lengths shown on the campus every year, some of them usedundoubtedly as fillers, when professors start perspiring after speaking for six minutes, but not one acoustically adequate, visually .acceptable, 35 mm theatre where a film can beviewed not only for its content, but also for its form: film as a work of art, in ‘a film-gallery. Statistics are not available, but it may not be far-fetched to suggest that more students go to see films in one month on the campus than have attended the two very elaborate theatres in the university since their creation. Perhaps it will be self-indulgent and extravagent to request for cloak-rooms and ushers with black bow-ties-what will they hang in the cloak-rooms, anyway-but a simple, adequate cine.ma is not too much to ask for, is it? I know that in these days of grass-root democracy, we must be careful in not giving in to cultural populism, and we must preserve our decaying values of obscurity, pomposity and exclusivism. And the theatrehnd theuniversities may be just the right places to do it! When theatre gets mixed in big monumental buildings, ostentatious sets and costumes, it becomes a haven for elitism, and is divorced from truth, from imagination. In the ast few years in Canada, more inn c!iJvative things in theatre have happened in the basement of churches or in bans or in squashcourts than at the O’Keefe .or St. Lawrence Centres. Where you don’t need cloak-rooms or ushers, but enthusiastic and concerned audiences, and imaginative plays and Iplayers. Indisputabiy , many students on the campus are enrolled in filmcourses, where they can perpetually crouch in fetal positions. Of course there are-only a few good films around-as there are,only a few good plays around-because, one reason, there aren’t enough discerning audiences. Because there aren’t places to see good films, because good places like Picture Show don’t fit into our goodbvsiness pattern. Because we1 are too damned lazy and coward19 , allowing ourselves to be shoved around by culture-vultures and big business. . , This weekend, go to see 0 Lucky Man on the campus, and invite your President or your dean or chairman or Vice-President of Finances to the show. You will see-and perhaps ’ they will too -what a great film can be! But be sure to tell them there will be no ushers, no cloak-rooms, they won’t be able to hear much what’s being spoken on the film, nor see it clearly. The colors will be faded, the picture %ill be only occasion. ally in focus. But there will be pl.enty of time for popcorn, a minimum of twentj break-downs is guartanteed! -sami gupta

One of the’mbst popular local gro>ps, Spott farm, is performing-this week at the campus centre pub. As usual‘the pub has been running at full capa@y during the evenings. The pub will shortly be turned over to the federation of students which will assume responsibility for running it, although, the license hti/der will still be Bill Decks.

.

He&e

-

flick

“The Magic Theatre. Entrance not for everyone. For madmen only”. So reads the mysterious sign in Hermann Hesse’s Steppenwolf -and now on theatres’ mar.quees. However, the movie version does not live up to the billing. If you are a Hermann Hesse fan, then you will be disappointed. Those of you who-are not familiar with Steppenwolf may find it only a bore. ’ .

“for

madmen /-

Identification with these struggles of inner conflict and selfrealization account for Hesse’s popularity -among the 18-25 year age group. Hesse, though, warns.of possible misunderstanding of his novel by young people in a note to readers; “ . . .this (misunderstanding) may occur so frequently by reason of the fact that this book was written when I was fifty years old and dealing as it does, with* the problems of that age, often fell into the hands of very young readers.” (p.vii) It is just such a youthful orientation that has ruined the film ‘ ‘ Steppenwolf ’. Fred Haines, as well as directing the film, also wrote the screenplay (he co-scripted James Joyce’s Ulysses with Jos. Strick). His attempts to incorporate ideas and dialogue of today’s youth are, at times, quite ludicrous. Such incongruent phrases as: “Cross my heart and hope to die”, %icks and stones will break my bones . . . : ’ , and “Six

only”

of one,- half a dozen of the other”_ are found‘in the dialogue. The most ‘outlandish was the use of the lines from the Rolling Stones’ song “You can’t always get what you want”. In the scene, Harry has declined to go with a couple of friends because he is tired and wants to sleep. One friend, Pablo the sax.ophonist, offers him some cocaine saying, “You can’t always get what youwant . . .” and so on.

-

The screenplay generally follows the novel. Here, again’, the Hesse fan might be upset with some of the theatric liberties taken by Haines in _ the development of the characters of Haller, Hermine (Dominique Sanda) and Maria (Carla Romanelli). One example worth mentioning is Harry’s procrastination and reversion to the feelings of ~ the “Steppenwolf’ in him before the great masquerade ball. Hesse describes this over several pages ’ finishing with Harry struggling with his scorn as he watches a movie on Moses and the Ten Commandents. ’ This set of events and emotions, which he must overcome to meet Hermine, is left out of the film. 0 Lucky Man lenck-but the “American dream” .Omitted from the ball is the comstill intact. It is not nonviolence -Lindsay Anderson’sgraduate of petition with Hermine, who is If . . .goes into the ‘real’ world to that audiences are screaming for dressed as a man. They try to win discover some mind-blowing but karate-chops. Billy Jack haranthe hearts of the women they dance gues the big business and the politithings. Ifyou haven’t seen it, go see with. This competition raises quescians about the honesty, love etc. it this weekend in AL1 16, Federations of- sexuality for Harry. As tion Flicks, or if you have seen it, etc. trying to change the spots of well, it is here that Harry’s personthe leopard and hoping to push the see it again. It is cinema at its and mood changes. “I was best-surrealistic, expressionistic, camel through the eye of the nee- ality myself no longer. My personality dle. neorealistic., with a witty t$uch of was dissolved in the intoxication of’ absurdity-corporate masks inAnyhow, it sure -beats John , the festivity like salt in water.” s.idiously mutilating individual Wayne, and “give peace a chance” Haller also says: “Ah, thought I, . identity, making us suffer ever is a better slogan than “the only meanwhile, let &me to me what more in our bloated privations. good Indian is a dead Indian”. may, for once at least; I, too, have -. After you have seen it, dear stu- i. been happy, radiant; released from dents, think about it, talk about it, The Night Porter * myself, a brother of Pablo’s, a alloiv yourselves to come off,your It is not a porno film, if that is child”. (p. 194, ~Steppenwolf) It- is ‘perceptual seams, to stop wallowwhat some sweet part of your this change that prepares, and aling in some dumb inarticulateness. anatomy desires. A complex work, lows, Harry to enter the Magic cruel and tender, shocking and lyrTheatre, yet Haines neglects it. ical, decadent and very, very, very \ Lenny beautiful. Inspite of Haines’ attempt to ‘j Lenny Bruce was not a comeThis film is not everybody’s cup thoroughly ruin the film, several ’ dian, he was a fool, a wise fool, who of tea-many ‘people walk out of scenes are very effective. Two in , . was tormented by the lack of the theatre. It is an unusual tale of particular, are worthy of note: humour and reason in the palace, love-but not without credibility. *First, thedinner scene with the old and he provoked the wrath of the It haunts some as an exquisite‘work colleague portrays well the buildup king often. Legends-are not an easy of art. (Reviewed at length in Chevof pressure, intolerance j of the thing to recreate, least of all in ron, February 7). smug, stuffy middle class that films, where showmanship rather Harry experiences. The other in-. than integrity is the most cherished Cinema Solidarity volves the dance-, scenes. Dancing ingredient. Dustin Hoffman’s Every Sunday evening at 7:00 is important in Steppenwolf. “Lenny” is a foul-mouthed smartp.m., there is one or more free Through dancing Haller’s stiffness aleck , junky. One would like to political movies at the Campus is broken down and he learns to believe that ‘chat is not all that Centre, followed by discussions. live, enjoy life. He, also, becomes legends are made of. a This is 1an attempt to raise some\ involved with the music; the music A scattered work, at times tire-political’ consciousness, and we’ he considered so low, not on a plane some and self-conscious, with fine sure could do with some raising with Mozart. The dancing in the film performances by Hoffman and around here. So, if you get tired of conveys those ideas well. Albeit Valerie Perrine. s . , . watching TV all day, peep into the Von Sydow and the supporting cast ‘ ‘real’ ’ world. are competent, their performances This Sunday, two films Work are overshadowed by the crassness Thk Trial of Billy Jack’ . (about the experiences of working, of Haines’ cinematic1 skills (espeA potpourrie of counteron’ an assembly line) and Finally cially in the treatise and Magic culture-peace, yoga, karate, freeGoi tlfe News (about the League of Theatre sequences). * , +om dom, inner journey, nonvio-Revolutionary Black workers). bickford Briefly, Steppenwilf presents Harry Haller (played by Max Von Sydow), a forty-eight year old, disciplined intellectual, alienated from the society, struggling with a twentieth century dilemma. That is, he is tom between his idealism, contempt for the bourgeois and the security he finds in the middle class. He decides on suicide, but embarks on a process of selfrealization which culminates in a hallucinatory experience in the Magic -Theatre.

films

aFcWnd town r

r


‘10

the chevron

--

friday,

“y-Y&

february

28, 1975

.

.-

Abdication’

starring Peter Finch- aid >-Liv Ullmann Show Time. 7:00 L;m an,d 9:00 pm

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We need the markets and the natural resources of Latin America a great deal. ” Meanwhile, Kissinger began to visualize the possibility of Latin AmeAca becoming autonomous and being influenced by the oil “reso he substituted his indifvolt”, ference and hardness for a diplomacy of persuasion. “The Latin Americans will number TOO million in the year 2000, representing a gigantic consumer market and furthermore Latin America has always been a source of raw materials for the U.S., which fully shows the need .for a change of attitude as proposed by Kissinger,” said Jeremiah O’Leary, a specialist on Latin America, whose information is culled from sources in the state department, the Pentagon and the CIA. Also backing Kissinger’s new foreign policy, Orville Freeman, president of Business Interfiational, declaimed: “The Latin American market (34 per cent of Latin American imports come from the U. S .) is far too attractive to be ignored.” So without fanfare, nearly a year and half ago, Kissinger announced the “new hemisphere dialogue” and worked thereafter to set into motion the conditions for it. But one must bear inmind that the U.S. still prepares special military units for intervention. According to a study entitled The Future World Context, Latin America is counted as a possible location for “anticipated intervention programmed for the last quarter of the century”. “The reason for intervention is the ‘growing U.S. dependence on foreign sources’ of raw materials,” stated the New York Times. Projections indicate that by the turn of the century, the U.S. will depend on foreign sources to satiate its appetite for 12 of the 13 raw materials needed for industry (phosphate . bekng the sole exception)‘:

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tion of principles with Panama that paved I way for a new agreement over the canal, were‘ quickly arranged so that Kissinger would -have-a few trumps in dhand for a meeting in Tlateloco, Mexico, February 1974, with Latin._ American foreign ministers.

he fol!owing article traces rather sketchily . Henry Kissinger’s sudden reversal in foreign

relations with, Latin America. Background was culled from Le Monde (Hebdomadaire), Le Monde Dipiomatique, Prensa Latina and Opiniao(Ricdejaneiro, Brazil) by )ohn Morris.

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More or less’ grounded after Nixon’s rear ignation, Henry Kissinger sought to revive his magic touch by initiating a “ne‘% hemisphere dialogue” with Latin American nations. But the mercurial U.S. state secretary was shot down Jan. 27 by Argentine foreign .-. minister Alfred0 Vignes who cancelled an Organization of American States (OAS) conference,slated for March in Buenos Aires, in protest of a recently enacted U. S. foreign trade bill. The meeting was crucial for Kissinger as he had planned to introduce his new foreign policy vis-a-vis South America. ‘In addition, he had promised to visit Venezuela, Peru and Chile, to propagate the U.S.’ foreign policy just before the, March OAS conference. However, with Vignes’ rebuff, the “ir$er-American” tour has been postponed indefinitely by the Americans and presently both sides are trying to iron out differences before setting new dates for the OAS meeting. The’ differences between the tw,o Americas stem from many causes, the most recent being the, passing of the aforementioned American Trade Act by the U.S. congress last December and signed Jan.’ 3 by a reluctant president Gerald Ford. The new law rules out granting most-favoured-nation status to any state belonging to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) or _ any other “restrictive cartel’ ’ of ‘commodity producers:’ Venezuela figured on the list, which the White House was prepared . to submit to congress, of countries not entitled to perferential tariffs. Yet neither Venezuela nor Ecuador (any more than Nigeria, Indonesia, or Iran) had I applied to the U.S. the oil embargo decided on in Kuwait, in October 1973. In their view, along with those of other Latin American nations, the act’s provisions, apparently .drawn up without even a thought of consulting the countries directly affected, are even more damaging to their ‘honour than to their interests. Therefore, since the act’s adoption, Venezuela and Ecuador have been lobbying to spike the Buenos Aires conference, which in any case they have decided to boycott. The act also came under fire Jan. 23 when LatinAmerican and Carribean countries in the permanent council of OAS endorsed a resolution condemning the bill’s “discriminatory and coercive clauses. ” ,But despite their differences, the two’ \ Americas are forced by geography to put up with each other. ‘So it was hardly surprising when Kissinger first coined the phrase which was later to become the new U.S. foreign policy toward South America, in late September United States will initiate a 1973: “The new dialogue with Latin America”. At the time, he was addressing a group of Latin American ambassadors who reacted with utmost disbelief, for since 1969, with _ almost total control over the U.S.’ foreign affairs, Kissinger always looked upon Latin America with indifference. An indifference which turned to hardI) ness in January 1972 when, according to Prensa Latina (the Cuban news agency), Kissinger was the instigator behind the veto power exercised by the U.S. over the granting of loans by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to counter unilateral takeovers of American concerns in South America.- Peru and Chile were the main victims of this newly acquired American weapon by being the first to be denied IDB loans, which prompted them to censure economic as well as military aggression; a move subsequently followed by the rest of Latin America. In April 22, 1974;-when- the “new hemishad survived a meeting phere dialogue” between thetwo Americas, a statement by William Colby, director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), in the U.S. congress, showed that Kissinger’s hardline didn’t restrict itself to IDB politicking for he :had authorized sabotage (“destabiliza? tion’:) against the Chilean government, a fact oniy made public Sept. 8. / (Acc.ordi’ng to Colby, the U.S. put up $11

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“Inter-American relations must base themselves on equal status between na- ’ tions, on the renunciation of economic and ’ military coercion and on the respect for the right of nations to choose their own economic, political and social systems,” stated the declaration of Tleteloco which was signed by all the foreign ministers. It also was decided that further study would be done on the-activities of multinational corporations in Latin America. Moreover, new faces and documents sprouted to back the “new hemisphere dialogue”. A former adviser to presidential candidate iGeorge McGovern, the lawyer William D. Rodgers, considered a “radi’ cal” by conservatives in Washington and ‘a . vehement critic of the Nixon-Kissinger Latin American foreign policy, was brought in by Ford-Kissinger. He was appointed assistant to the state secretary for Latin America, and soon after he surprised Latin American ambassadors in Washington by making them listen to CIA chief William Colby say that there aren’t any “covert operations’ ’ , being-conducted in ’ their countries. This unprecedented state- a ’ ment was prompted by misgivings uttered by Peru, Venezuela,, Colombia and Argentina over CIA operations in their ‘territories; and Colby’s assertion greatly enhaneed Rodgers credibility whenever he condemned CIA manoeuvrings. Furthermore,‘a document given to president /Ford- in October 1974, the so called / Linowitz Report, prepared by 23 “experts” + w selected by the New. Ybrk Center of Inter-American Relations, was dug up three months later and adopted by the U.S. t state department in an attempt to “soften” the outcry caused by revelations involving the CIA and Kissinger. The report recom, mends a ‘ ‘new focus” for U.S. foreign relations with Latin America and, proffers 33 recommendations. Some of them, such as asking for the “end to covert operations of / the US. in the internal affairs of Latin American nations” and the elimination of U.S. veto power in the IDB over the granting of loans, implicitly reprimand Kissinger for actions taken against Peru and Chile. So with the endorsement of the Linowitz Report, Kissinger will have to make use of his considerable tact to manage advisors and studies mobilized around the “new hemispheredialogue”. But will it be enough to overcome mistrust among Latin Americans? Kissinger tries hard to bridge the chasm by continually reiterating the ,importance today of a continent which just a few years ago was, at best, worthy of a ‘ ‘requiem ’ . To understand this turnabout, one need ’ only examine Kissinger’s most ambitious project: the detente with the Soviet Union. It all boils down to common sense: (1) the arms race reached epidemic proportions 5 with the elimination of war as a means of conquest due to the’unlikelihood of there ’ being a winner in a nuclear conflict; (2) the U.S. and the Soviet Union would agree to stay out of each other’s “spheres of influence”; (3) diplomatic efforts would be reserved for explosive areas and of “high strategic importance” such as the Middle East; (4) the U.S., would tky to solidify its alliance with Europe, hence strengthening I its ‘ ‘conquered,ypositions’ ’. ; r However, Kissinger’s formula left Latin America unaccounted for, which was rationalized by the platitude thatthe continent was incapable of being a cause for conflict. But,- “ the accords reached in Moscow have not eliminated the possibility of conflicts in key areas of the ‘Third World’ ;” said a former undersecretary of state John Irwin, in July 1972, thus countering Kissinger’s smug optimism. The unity of OPEC and the pressures of other producers of raw materials lend credence to Irwin’s remark: a challenge to the industrial west based on the creation of groups of nations to fight for better prices in exchange for vital natural resources. Irwin’s warning was’ picked up, in January 1974, by Kenneth Rusk, at the time Kissinger’s main adviser and now a member of the White House staff; who informed a conference -of American businessmen that: “‘Latin America is a very important source of raw materials. i l

million to try to bring down the Popular Unity government of Salvador. Allende Gossens. The money was used during Allende’s 1964 and 1970 presidential campaigns and to “destabilize”~ his govemment after he won in 1970. Throughout the summer of 1973; when the Allende administration was contending with raging inflation and growing civil unrest, a $1 ‘million programme was set up “for further ’ political Pestabilization activities.” After the bloody military coup Sept. 13, the prog- ramme was discontinued). . Therefore the disbelief on the part of Latin Americans over the announced . “new hemisphere dialogue” was caused by a sometimes hard and indifferent past. But to comprehend better the reasonfor this sur’prise‘over Kissinger’s sudden turnabout, one. must dwell on the outcome of a meeting held in 1969,, in Vina’del Mar, Chile, involving foreign ministers from all over Latin America. At the @al plenary, the ministers passed a series of “consens sus” positions which were to be sent to the U.S. for consideration. The package of recommendations included the recognition. of the “emerging Latin American nationalism” and the point that “the- interests of Latin America are not the same -as the U.S.“. The ministers then commissioned Chilean foreign minister Gabriel Valdez to present the conference’s positions to Nixon, but Valdez was well aware that the reception would be a cool one for only/after much insistence did he convince the president to even’ see him. Valdez was to be denied, for not only did Nixon express little interest in Latin America but Kissinger, also present at the session, affirmed that

“the course of history bypasses Latin Ame-rica. ” A little while later, New York Times reporter Joseph Novitski (now Chilean correspondent for the Washington Post) got hold of a study outli ing the priorities of strategically importa $ t areas to the U.S.: i Latin America was placed last, behind Af-’ iica. Meanwhile, professor Joseph Plank, one of the authors of the Alliance for Progress + (a Kennedy era project designed to obliterate “backwardness” in, South America by means of “peace. corps”-groups of American university student@, stated that “Kissinger is convinced that nothing would happen if Latin America sank in the sea”, in a document prepared in 1971 for the Council of Foreign Relations (a mouthpiece for the North American diplomatic establishment /formed by university professors, lawyers of multinational corporations and representatives from the big’New York banks). In the Plank report, the continent is treated as “strategically solitary” and which might be worth, at best, “a requiem, but no massive economic, political or military assistance. : “Even the welfare of American firms doesn’t change /the low strategic value of Latin America,“’ said Piank, _thus summarizing the establishment’s opinion which considers Kissinger to be of its most renown stars. Then why the Sudden change of Kissinger’s attitude and the embracing of the “new hemisphere dialogue”? To answer the question, one must-first examine Kissinger’s actions which set in motion the new/approach. An atcord with Peru that permitted the country access to IDB loans and a declara-

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C&OS Castaneda and his kooks have become something of a ,cu& in recent years. His philosophy is studied in three faculties at\ UW and his bo@s continue to be among the best sellers at the bookstore. His popularity is reason enough to exiunine his philosophy and chevron writer.Brian Amos in the following article reviews Castaneda’s books and his philosophy.

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by Brian Amos People of the western culture have been rebuked time and again by mystics regarding their inability to open the mind to new patterns of thought; that is, for indulging in a “one-sided consciousness”. They fear it has resulted in a significant lack of meaningful introspection and has ‘removed people from- a sense of personal awareness and conscience. c Due to the society in which they live, people are .obliged toadopt routines and habits which encourage them to enter into a state of passive acceptance. _~ ,This sub’mission i-s fostered. by the media through conscious manipulation of the audience. Such manipulation involves alienation to-an even greater ex/ tent by what the viewer must contend w-ith in the and so on, i form of radio, television, advertising Some people, however, find that the image of the world which the media projects does not conform with the world they experience. Their lives are anything but “a tremendous and beautiful feast of interests and passions.” - .Perhaps in reaction to this, people are turning to ancient philosophies and practices which they had formerly ridiculed, in an effort to find fulfilment and give their lives meaning. We find almost daily mention of yoga, meditation, gurus and acupuncture in the west today. One of the mystic followings that ,emerged is centred around Carlos Castaneda. and his nowlegendary apprenticeship to the Yaqui brujo,-Don -Juan. The “cult of Castaneda” has definitely caught .- on, evidenced by the cover of Time (March 1973), and an army of eager followers combing Mexico in an-effort to discover the whereabouts .of the sorcerer.

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sonal life make&t difficult to believe that this fellow bubble is our perception. We live inside that bubble with the white shirt and grey suit could -be a all of our lives. And what we witness on its round sorcerer’s apprentice; especially considering he walls is our own reflection. - ‘-‘The teacher’s task is to rearrange the view, to does not smoke, drink, use marijuana or hard drugs, and rarely touches coffee. _ prepare the luminous being for the time when the One must almost concede then, however much it v benefactor opens the bubble from the outside. hurts to admit it, that Castaeda’s account is either “The bubble is opened in order to allow the embellished fact or total fiction. Whether it is or not luminous being a view of his totality.” is quite unimportant, for the essence of the four The first step was to make Castaneda’doubt. the books is the philosophy presented, not the tale redescription he believed to be true by allowing.him lated. glimpses of the sorcerer’s view through the agency Castaneda has written four books outlining i&de-__ It isin the fourth and final book of the series, Tales of power plants. “They opened you up by stopping tail hisexperiences while an apprentice to become a of Power (October 1974), that Castaneda receives your view of the world.” “man of knowledge”. The first book, published in the knowledge for which he had so long apprenticed. Castaneda must be_persuaded that reality is only 1968, is entitled The Teachings of Don Juan-A It marks the culmination of the philosophy which “the habit of- having the world always conform to. Yaqui Way of Knowledge, and was acceptable for a started somewhat vaguely with the ingestion ofvariour thoughts.. . .things are real only after one.has Master’s degree in anthropology. His third book, ous psychotropic plants in 196*. learned to agree on their realness.” We do not exJourney to Ixtlan, was successfully submitted for his In Tales of Power Don Juan mentions the perience reality directly; the description of the world Doctorate in 1972. sorcerer’s explanation, which is the view of the ’ stands between the world and us. Our experience of Although his senior colleagues at the University world which Castaneda will hold upon successful the world is !only a recollection of direct experience;‘. of California are convinced of the authenticity of completion of his apprenticeship. This philosophy reality. then, is not an absolute, but is -culturally Castaneda’s experiences, some who read his-work points out that: determined by the description of the world which are more skeptical. Their reluctance to believe is cc . . .we are luminous beings. We are perceivers. We our reason has been conditioned to accept since probably determined by the antics of Don Juan and I are an awareness; we are not objects; we have no birth. Don. Genaro, - Castaneda s teacher and benefactor To understand and accept this philosophy, Cas+ respectively. Castaneda claims to witness awesome _ solidity. We are boundless. The world of objects and solidity is a way of making our passage on earth taneda must first be aware of the totality of oneself, ,feats of magiG and displays of power which no “raconvenient. It is only a description that was created .or to realize his full potential as a luminous being. - tional” mind could accept performed by these two to help us. We, or rather our reason, forget that the . That is, he must be conscious of the eight points with . sorcerers. description is only a description and thus we entrap - which all human beings enter the world: There are, however,’ several other affairs which the totality of ourselves in a vicious circle from “We must say that every one of us brings to the render the books somewhat unbelievable as well. A \ which we rarely emerge in our lifetime.” world eight points. Two of them, reason and talking, most implausible situation is the seeming naivety,% . Don Juan assures Castaneda that this message will are known by everyone. Feeling is always vague but and even thick-headedness of Castaneda. It is quesmean little to him until he has accumulated sufficient somehow familiar. But only in the world of sorcerers tionable whether a highly educated man such as personal power to discover his true nature as a does one get fully acquainted with d&uning, seeing Castaneda , would ask an .unending stream of inluminous being. . \ and will. And finally, at the outer edge of that world quiries to which the answers seem self-evident to one.encounters the other two: The eight points make any reader. This stereotyped relationship of simple the totality of oneself.” student to wise teacher lends a doubtful flavour, and -0n’occasion is extremely frustrating as well. Don Juan’s task is tohelp Castaneda throw off the The constant reference to Castaneda’s notedescription of the world’which binds him to his partaking and the handy recapitulation conveniently ticular view-of reality. Castaneda’s cognition of the These eight points are drawn around two rings of summarizing the philosophy near the end of the final I world is: power, one of which is reason and the other, will. I book are also highly suspect, but when Don Genaro “ . . . a bubble into which we are placed at the moThe vast majority of people are aware of the world actually pulls a car out of his hat the faith of even the ment of our birth. At first the bubble is open, but through the ring of reason, which is directly conmost frantic Castaneda devotee isshaken. _ The-character exhibited by Castaneda in his per-” -then it begins to close until it has-sealed us in. That nected only to talking, Reason and talking concoct

Feats of Magic

Human bubble

’ Reason alnd’will

and maintain the world. reason iSSubject to inter1 scription of reality. A sorcerer, on the otl world through the more p ‘more engulfing than reas netted to the five other requires no interpretatio cerer a direct experience dreaming, seeing and feeli one able to receive a kn nagual, the final two pain at the totality of oneself. “The tonal is the organ shoulders rests the task ( world in order.. . every1 men is the ‘work of the to the rules by which it a There is a personal tonal there is a collective one i reason is to, protect the ( developed. . “The nag@ is the part description: no words, r knowledge. . . At the t nagual... Then the- tona becomes so utterly imps shine of the nagual . . . It d ness and forces us to obli of the other part of the tn . tonal begins at-birth and er never ends. The nagual, / delving into the nagual power to perform incred and Don Genaro. A wa: follow a “fibre” to get to one first place the wti at


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would stir them, and they would join and emerge onto an area where all of them had to be pooled in one clump, the “me” I know”. Next morning, Don Juan explains for Castaneda what he had gone through the night before: “Last night your bubble of perception opened and its wings unfolded : . . the wings of your perception were made to touch your totality. - “This is the sorcerer’s explanation. The nag4 is the unspeakable. All the possible feelings and beings and selves float in it like barges, peaceful, unaltered,, forever. Then the glue of life binds some of them,! together. When the glue’of life binds those feelings’ together a being is created, a being that loses the sense of its true nature. . . I said to you once that the’ . tonal begins at birth and ends at death; I said thatbecause I know that as soon as the force of life leaves’ the body all those single awarenesses disintegrate and go back’again to where they came from, the

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efforts, the ultimate use of the nagual,” states when relating his experiences of The apprentice is first confronted by real situa-, dreaming. It involves a persistent effort to attempt to fix one’s attention. while dreaming. Don Juan intions with which his reason cannot cope. :‘Oncc the warrior is confronted with his incapacity to reason structs him to try to focus his attentioi on his hands, everything out, he will go out of his way to bolster I and to try to examine them carefully in his dreams. Castaneda is finally able to do this, and gradually and defend his defeated reason, and to that effect he will rally everything he’s got around it. The teacher manages to control the-actions of his hands. Eventually his dreamt double becomes capable of 1111inhut going through sees to that by hammering him mercilessly until all etation; or, is only a dehis view of the world is on one half of the bubble. acting for itself, and he is able to look at himself lying asleep on the floor. His actions in his dreams can be *\ The other half of the bubble, the one that has been as consciously controlled as are his actions while r hand,. experiences the cleared, can then be claimed by something sorcerers awake. Since this dreamt double is free of the bounds tent ring of will, which is call will. L since it is directly-con“The benefactor’s task then is to o&n the bubbleof time and space, it is able to accomplish incredible on the side that has been cleaned. . . the warrior has tasks which would be impossible in the normal state lints. Input through will of wakefulness. thus enabling the sorthen the command of his totality. Half of the bubble And then comes the day when Castaneda finally is Tf the world by means of is the ultimate centre of reason, the tonal. The other -able to experience the totality of himself, and comes ,,, Only through the will is half is the ultimate centre of will, ‘the nagual.” to understand the sorcerer% explanation. Don Gewledge of the tonal and To activate the will, a warrior must increase his naro,Xnding the time for Castaneda to attain such oae must know to arrive personal power, and reorder the tonal to escape knowledge to be right, whirls him in the air and flings from the view of the world by which he is bound. :er of the world . . . on its him into the void. Castaneda describes his sensa“The sorcerer’s explanation says that the island of tions during the experience: setting the chaos of the the tonal-is made by our perception, which has been “ . . .all that was left of “me” was a square centimeing we know and do as trained to focus on certain elements;_each of those ter, a nugget, a tiny-pebblelike residue. All my feelrl . . the tonal makes up elements and all of them together form our view of prehends the world . . . . ing was concentrated there; then the nugget seemed the world. . . My task has been to disarrange your. to burst and I was a thousand pieces. I knew, or or every bne of us, and ordinary view, not to destroy it, but to force it to .. something somewhere knew, that I was aware of the rall of us.” The task of rally on the side of reason.‘? thousand pieces at orice. I was the awareness itself. der which I’OW tonal has The most important step in attaining personal “Then I exploded. I disintegrated. Something in power is stopping internal @alogue, which is the me gave out; it released something I had kept locked f us for which there is no running commentary inside our head which rem-. up all my life. I was thoroughly aware then that my nQ.mes, no feelings, no forces the tonal’s view of the world. To stop the ne of birth we are all secret reservoir had been tapped and that it poured internal dialogue, two techniques are practised: erasout unrestrainedly. There -was no-longer the sweet starts to develop and it ing personal history and dreaming. The problem of unity I call “me”. tant that it opaques the erasing personal history is undertaken by losing There was nothing and yet that zzles us with its cunningnothing was filled . . . the “me” of my familiar world )self-importance, assuming responsibility and using was a colony, a conglomerate of separate and inde:rate the slightest inkling death as an advisor. The technique of dreaming can : nair, the nagual . . . The be achieved through disrupting routines; not-doing, pendent feelings that had an unbending solid,arity tota at death, but the nagual one another. The unbending solidarity of my count_ which is focusing attention on those parts of the 1s no limits. ” It is while world normally overlooked (shadows); and practisless awarenesses, the allegiance that those parts had iat a sorcerer gains the for one another was mylife force. -’ ing the .gait of power, by which a sorcerer travels le feats, as do Don Juan “A way of describing that unified sensation would across the desert quickly at night with complete i%Jr must use his will to be to say that those nuggets of awareness were scatconfidence. The power plants were also used to stop tered; each of them was aware of itself and none was e ‘nagual. But how does the internal dialogue by-flooding it with information. .XG‘Sdisposal? _ “‘Dreaming, of course, is the crown of the more predominant than the other. Then something

Reason can’t cope.. ,

sorcerer’s Castaneda

“The sorcerer’s explanation says that. each of us has a centre from which the nag@ can be witnessed, the will. Thus, a warrior can venture into the nagual and let his cluster arrange and rearrange itself in any way possible. A sorcerer who is in possession of the totality of himself can direct the parts of his cluster to join in any conceivable way. The force of life is what makes all that shuffling possible. Once the force of life is exhausted there is no way to reassemble that cluster.” . Carlos finds that the world is-not *t’other”, not something outside himself, but rather is an integral .part of him; it is himself. One cannot help but feel only love and respect for the earth if one truly subscribes to this philosophy.

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“Only if one loves this earth with unbending pas-‘ sion can one release one’s sadness,” Don Juan said. “-A warrior is always joyful because his love is unalterable and his beloved, the earth, embraces him and bestows upon -him inconceivable gifts., The sadness belorrgs only to those who hate the very thing that x gives shelter to their beings. ” Don‘Juan again caressed the ground with tenderness. “This lovely being, which is alive to its last recesi ses and understands every feeling, soothed me, it cured me of my pains, and finally when I had fully understood my love for it, it taught me freedom.” The revelations which Don Juan makes are compatible with those of most mystics-There is a de% nite lesson for modern man embodied in his philosophy. Whether the events themselves actually _ took place or not is of minor importance. The books reveal an inseparable interrelation of all fife., which leads to an awed respect for the earthitherefore,, the rape to which our planet is currently subject would seem absurd. I The idea thatone’s conception of reality has been - . culturally determined is initself a. good reason for e examining all cultures and allowing them to retain their independence, regardless of their “primitiveness”. Presently, different cultures are studied ethnocentrically. And how will one ever be able to diagnose insanity again, and justify locking those afflicted with-. this “social disease” into institutions? The most important point of instruction, however, revolves around the need for love of earth and life. “Only ‘the love for this splendorous being can give freedom to a warrior’s spirit; and freedom is joy, efficiency and abandon in-the face of.any odds. That is the last lesson. It is always left for the very last moment, for the moment of ultimate solitude when a man faces his death and his aloneness. Only then’does it make sense.” .

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~‘*E~ERATION OFSTUDENTS, I-STUDENTS ‘COIJNklLf’ ’ . ELECTIONS\ .a o I - y I _ . will take place . . ‘WEDN-ESDAY, \ i/lAR& 5 I * I

Polls will be open’from 9:36 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. anb will be located in the main foyers . C. of the following buildings: ’ 1,’ Arts: - . , Arts Lecture Environmental Studies, . + f - Env. Studies regular only: Engineering: * Eng. IV Lounge Science, \ . ’ - , ’ /Chem:-Biology Link co-op only: -. St. Jerome’s St. Jerome’s College _’ \ The following, seats .have been declared’ acclaimed:‘ Integrated Studies; Math regular & co-op; HKLS regular and co-op; Renison. Vacancies remain in the following constituencies for which byelections will be held later in the year: Environmental Studies, co-op; / ‘. 1 Science, reg.; Graduate.

YOU MUST PRESENT YOUR I.D. ~0 VOTE. . \ \ \

Election Committee Federation of Students

Note: Engineering, Math and HKLS-.spring term co-operative ’ students will elect their representatives in June. , i

* , Applicat)o.ns’Are

Now Open 1 ’

for the<following positions on- the Executive, Board of the Federation of Stud,ents for the Ja academic year 19751976: Vice-President (must be a voting member . - of Students’ Council) Treasurer. . *Chairperson, Creative Arts Board ’ .. Chai-rperson, Board -of Communications Chairperson, Board of Education ’ ’ h Chairp,erson, Board Ofkternal Relations ’ -I Chairperson, Board of Publications I I Chairperson,’ Board of Entertainment Chairperson, Committee of Co-op Servi,ces i , SpeakerI of Council

Writ& ,applicati6ns stating qualifications ‘must be submitted to the-undersigned ‘ho later than 4:30 p..m. Friday; March 7. \ John* M. Shortail, President-Elect I

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Federation of Students

note: These positiOns ire open to any member of the Federation of Students. *

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In beautiful Downtown Conestoga (Est. 1830)

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CONESTOGA, ONTARIO Presents

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12 Moon to Midnight

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’ Monday to Thuhclay Dancing 9 to I * Thursday - %JNGRY FOUR” (Swing) o Friday - “GEIGERS COMBO” l Saturday - “BRASS ‘N’ BLUE” (Big Band i / Sound) Fully Lic&ed Monday to Saturday Sat. Nite Only

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Tonight ‘and Tomorrow FEB. 28 & MAR. 1 - 8PM Harold Pinter’s

THE BIRTHDAY PARTY

directed by Maurice Evans Theatre of the Arts *Admission $150;students $1 .OO ’ Central Box Office ext. 2126 ’ Creative Arts Board, Federation of Students

TUES., MAR. 4-l

Stratford

2:30 p.m. ’

Festival Ensemble

Theatre of the Arts Free Admission Creative Arts Board, Federation- of Students , 1 I *

MAR. 4 - 8 p.m., /MAR. 5 - 12:30 p:m. & 8 p.m. MAR. I 6 _ 8 p.m.

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A slightly unusual look at the outcome of evolution in plants, animals & man using 8 projectors, ,2 movie projectors and a stereo soundtrack. a ’ \ Humanities Theatre Free Admission . % Sponsored by the Faculty of Science, ‘Dept. of Biology, and the ’ Creative Arts -Board, Federation of Students. I ’ , 9

MAR. 5, 6 & j-12130

WHERE’S

p.m.

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-noon drama I Backyard Theatre - a light hearted romp through scenes and variations. directed byMaurice Evans . Theatre of the Arts \ . Free Admission Creative. Arts Board, Federation of Students -.


friday,

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28,

1975

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The Waterloo Warriors basketball team advanced to the finals in, the Western Division of the OUAA (Ontario Universities Athletic Association) by virtue of their win over the M,cMaster Marauders last Saturday night. The score, 95-56, was indicative-of the regular season domination by the Warriors. Waterloo played a sound defensive game throughout in keeping McMaster to only 56 points’, well below their average. In the first half the Warriors had a bit of trouble adjusting to the McMaster defense’, . but their own defense helped them open up a 42-26 lead. Coach Bill Fowler of McMaster tried a different kind of defense by combining a zone defense and a man-to-man defense. Art White, Bill Robinson and Trevor Briggs were played man-to-man while Phil Schlote and Charlie Chambers were defenced against- with a zone. The. Warriors were disorganized at first but they adjusted well in the second half. They were able to work the ball around to enable Chambers and Schldte to take advantage of the situation. Charlie Chambers was a sparkplug in the first half with his tenacious defense. He showed that there’s more to playing good basphotg by rob burb*k ketball than putting the ball in the hoop. Chambers was the prime instigator in many of the Marauder Basketball -turnovers. When playing man-toWith regular season play over man Chambers would often leave league Al ended with a 3 way-tie for his man for a second while his dartfirst, with Kin coming out on top ing hands would squirt the ball due to greater point spread. Penaway from another player. tagon was second with‘the Summer At halftime it was announced Rats close third. Optpmetry grabthat Mike Moserwas voted by his bed the final playoff spot. teammates the MVPfor the 1974-75 St. Jeromes A took top honours season. Phil Schlote, captain and in league A2 followed by the Tiny Toddlers, ESS and‘? the Math ’ close friend of Mike’s accepted the award to give to Mike’ parents. Mucks. The second half was all Waterloo Ice Hockey as .a11players got into the act and With the season drawing to a they more than doubled their first close, the 6 playoff spots in A are half lead. assured. St. Jeromes ends the seaArtWhite displayed his powerful son in first-followed by Math A, the phsyical strength throughout the Gay- Blades, ESS, West Alumni game. His 6’6”.frame often intimiand Kin A. ’ dated the opposing team. He Playoff draws will be included in blocked shots and cleared the next weeks writeup.. boards repeatedly. White finished with 18 points, 14 ofthem.coming in the first half. Bill-Robinson’s footwork and head fakes garnered him leading scorer honours with. 20 points. Charlie Chambers and Phil Schlote both sank 1 l.- Briggs rounded out the starting five with 10 points. Center Indrek Kongats Last Thursday February 20 +was best for the Marauders with 16 -McMaster University held a giant points. Captain, Herwig Baldauf slalom race at Georgian Peaks, Colscored 11. lingwood. Conditions were icy, the This weekend the PAC will be sun was hiding somewhere and Ski the site of the OUAA playoffs. Toteam budgets are running low all night at 6:30 the Ottawa Gee-Gees r over, but the majority of the Southwill be facing their perennial rivals, em Ontario Universities were repthe Laurentian Voyaguers. Winner resented at the race. of this game is the champion ‘of the Queens’ University dominated Eastern Division of the 0UA.A. *the team events, taking first place The victor will also be granted a in bo h the men’s and women’s. Water s oo Women placed second on the basis of finishes by Rike Wedding, Sandy Cook and Carallyn Bowes, to consolidate that position in the. series -standings, bumping Western down into third spot.’ Waterloo Men’s Team had some difficulty getting six racers together, but managed to place 7th in . the team event. Individual winners were: ‘-

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The Warriors head for Toronto this weekend and the OWAA semifinals after having eliminated theMcMaster Marlins 9-6 in quarterfinal action last Friday night. ~ Although this was a close con&t after two periods of play, the Warriors cheered on by faithful fans, proved that the third period often makes the game, scoring four quick markers in the span of four ‘minutes.’ McMaster held a two goal lead _by the five minute mark of the first period on goals by Brian Toll and Mark McMurray, the first-a powerplay goal while Warrior defenceman Randy Stubel was serving time for an infraction. The Warriors retaliated with two identical goals when both Mike Guimond and Eric Brubacher scored right from the face off, catching goalie Tom -, Wunne by surprise. Brian Toll tallied at the 16:19 mark giving the Marlins a go ahead goal. However Warrior Ralph‘ Biamonte profited from a penalty assessed to the McMaster team to end the period in .a three all tie. In second period play both teams accounted for-two goals apiece to end this frame in a five all tie. Eric Brubacher scored his second marker, of’ the- game when he poped out of nowhere to tip-in Mike Zettel’s slapshot from the point. Brubacher completed his hat-trick when he netted the Warriors only other marker of-this period. M&aster took the lead early in the third ,when Brian Toll netted his third marker-f the game. Up-to this point the Marlins had -exercised some control over the Warrior offence while misjudgements on the part of the Warrior defence had cost U of W a few goals. But this was the game to win or else the Warriors could hang up their skates for the season. From the 2: 16 mark of the period the Warriors took over sole control of the game and after four quick goals I eliminated the Marlins from-further action. Waterloo marksmen in this period were Harry’Robock with two and Dave McCosh and Mike Zettel with singles. Dave McCosh who at one point complained’of sparse ice duty

’ is now playing in the position vacated by injured Ron Hawkshaw and was loudly cheered by fans when his slapshot’from the blue line was acclaimed as the winner. ThexOUAA semi-finals start at ,630 tonight at Varsity Arena in Toronto when the Warriors meet the by a 9:00 encounter . Blues-followed between York Yeomen~ and the Western Mustangs. The winners of these two games advance to the OUAA finals to be played Staurday night at 8 pm also at the Varisty Arena. The OUAA announced their allstar teams last week in which the Warriors placed six -men. Mike Guimond, Ron Hawkshaw, Frank Staubitz, and Mike Zettel were chosen for the first all-star team while Randy Stubel and Bob Hnatyk were chosen for the second all-star team: liskris

Fryer. and s T-ownson Points

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This terms Fryer and Townson points race is another batt.le down to the wire. St. Jer’omes, the perennial leaders; once again are leading the Fryer race but are holding down _ second spotin the Townson points -standing I Kinesiology leads the Townson Participation points race with a total of 525 followed closely by St. Jeromes with 488. Upper Engineering, last terms winners for the first time, are a distant third with 384 points. St. Jeromes heads up the pack for Fryer competitive points with 129 points followed by Kin with 79 points; Regular Math losely follows Kin with 70 points. With 7 events remaining, anything could and probably- will hap’ pen.

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berth in the CIAU tournament next weekend. The two teams split their two game series during the year and this game on a neutral court, could ,go either way. Ottawa was awarded first place during the regular season because Laurentian was upset by the University of Toronto Blues in one game. i Ottawa features big centre, Merv Sabey , a definite candidate for the 1974-75 all-Canadian team. Sabey owns all-time scoring and rebounding records at the University of Ottawa and was the top rebounder in Canada last year. Laurentian’s lineup includes the Eastern ‘Division’s leading’ scorer, Mike Visser.. A strong rebounder and centre for the Laurentian club is 6’5”. Ken Olynyk. He should -have his hands full with Sabey. At 8:30 the Windsor .Lancers will do battle for the third time this sea- ’ son with the Waterloo Warriors The first two times the Warriors have come out victors rather hand_ ily but-this is the “big one” and both teams should be ready for it. This game will decide the champion for the Western Division of the OUAA. The winner of the game will also be assured of a berth in the CIAU tournament. The Warriors -will once again need strong rebounding and consistent shooting to topple the Lancers. ~The Lancers have a wealth of big’ men and if they could Pse this to their advantage it could spell trouble for the Warriors: The Lancers have 6’9”) shot-blocking Charlie Pearsall and 6’ 8’ ’ Mike Frisby leading the charge. Bill Lozynsky is in . the backcourt to perform quarterbacking duties for the Lancer offense, Lozynsky was the hero of the Windsor-Guelph playoff game last weekend when he calmly dropped in two free throws with 2 seconds left to give the Lancers an 82-80 victory. Former Warrior, Ed Dragan scored 20 points in the game. He has had trouble against his former teammates thus far but may break open in this game. On Saturday at 6:30 the loser of _ the Ottawa-Laurentian game will _ play the loser of the WindsorWaterloo game. At 8: 30 the Ontario champion will be decided in a game between the winners of the two games the night before. These games should be a preview to-some of the great basketball coming up next weekend in the CI-AU ICanadian Intercollegiate Atheletic Union) tournament on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. No teams are assured of berths in the national tournament as of yet and this weekend’s playoff games across the country will spell the end for many hopefuls. Eight teams will be- picked across Canada for the tournament and these teams will be announced sometime next week. -ken dick

MlWt’C

1. Phil Golin (Carleton) 2. Jamie Neilson (Queen’s) 3. Doug Carter (Toronto) -Women 1; Valerie Watson (U. of Ottawa) 2. Ginny Honneyman (Queen’s) 3. Rike Wedding CWaterloo) 5. Sandy Cook (Waterloo) This Friday the last race of the Molson’s University Ski Series will be hosted by Queen’s University at Camp Fortune, outside Ottawa.

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The Athenas played their final series of games lof the year, at Queen’s, last weekend. If the purpose of a team is clepicted by winChampning the title, “OWIAA ions” (Ontario Women’s Intercollegiate Athletic Association), then the Athenas did not fulfil their duty, but if the purpose lays in doing the utmost best in‘ illustrating skill, poise and talent, the Athenas, were then, a success. For the last time this year I will use the cliche, ‘ ‘the invincible Western team,” and I wish it would become a discontinued line. The invincibl,e Western -team captured the OWIAA trophy which has been their possessive prize for the last three years. It is a, prize welldeserved by this team. They ifidubitably display the best performance of volleyball in Ontario. The gre?% “female Warrior” ehsemble departed for Kingstbn at 1:35 on Thursday of last week. The long.trek was not as tedious as one might anticipate a bus trip to be. The day was beautifully sunny and ,/with the collective efforts of four Athenas and their guitars, entertainment was provided free of charg‘e. At 6:30, our amicable bus driver drove into Kingston, and along the main drag, called Princess Street, mur abode-theGlen Manor- Motel. That night we saw &me of Kingston’s historical sites-the women’s penitentiary and the Queen’s camFlls, which is primarily composed of large, an-* tideluvian buildings of: grey, limestone rock. An 014 British cl&ktower stands proudly in the ce&re ,--till of reminiscence; thih %rea was Upper Canada’s largest urban-community, some two centuries ago. Today, the city has ’ maintained a’versatile setting of the old intermingled with the riew. -On Friday ; in the afternooi, the opening ceremony commenced in the Queen’s gymnasium. A parade of six teams was led b(y a bag-piper,, dressed in appropriate attire. Twelve proud Athenas stood adjacent to the McM8ster and Western teams, who represented the west-

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em divis’ion. The eastemsontario division tias composed of York, Ogawa and Queen’s. Before the -first match,the coach, Pat Davis gave a pep-talk to her optomistic team. She stressed that to succeed, the Athenas “would have to find‘ the crack in their adversaries’ play, and hit that crack. Even Western, who look un-ified externally, can succumb to defetit -if proficient strategy is utilized.” To succeed, the Athenas would have. to play their hardest, Bnd make their noblest efforts in block& hittiw, setting and spiking. “Put it all together,” Pat con&tided and “go eat’m up!” Match number one was against the Ottawa team. The first game expired quickly when Sindy Matiovik knocked down the adversaries with six consecutive serves and finished off the game for Water- = loo at 15- 1. In the second game, Ottawa’s resistance strengthened, but not enough to overcotie-the score was 15-12 for the Athenas. The< second m&h was-against .the ‘host team, Queen’s. The -Masovik ‘twins executed th&r usuai, precisioned spike9 and serves.’ Maria De Costa, partime acrobat on court, performed an unanticipated ‘fake’. This occurs when the opposing team suspects the second touch will be a set, and all of a sudden, when they’re husiling to block, the ball lobs over the . riet and lands in a ‘hole’ on the court. Ina Van Spronson and Maura Purdon blocked and hit *well. The first ,game resulted in a 15-9 victory for the ‘good guys’. The second game was a display of poor play in the backcouti and induced\ a reciprocal score of 9-15 for the Athenas. . _ . In the third game, Maura played consistently well, whether it be blocking or spiking. Her outstanding efforts saved the team‘from doom and they finally concluded -the game with a two point differ&ce, 15-13, in their favour. *In the following ‘match, the women made history, when the first game the score tallied to a

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photo by helen witruk

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then Western in the se mi-finals, faced W aterloo in the finals. The __ Athenas were t he- -victors of this tournament: they defeated Queen’s in the finals after eliminating York in their semis. . To hake matters -ev& further iron& Ottawa was second fromthe . bottom on the list with two points. These two points were achieved by the victory against Western. Yes, Ottawa defeated Western. I must , confess though, that, the We’stemteam coach played her second string, in the match against Ottawa. This loss for Western vquld nbt have altered the stagdings -Western, 8 points, Waterlod, 8 points; York, 6 points and McMaster with- 4 -points. The semi-finals were scheduled for 2:30, that aftembon. Western eliminated McMaster in an easy battle and ‘Yqrk finally defeated Wat&rloo in what resembled a war. I Just earlier that same morning, the Athenas had disposed of kork, and in the afternoon, York reciprocated the same performance--8-15, 15-6 and 9-15. A disap’jointed team, silently left the court, to allow the show to go on. York was ‘on the ball’ and played an aggressive game against Western in the finals, but two straigh.t victories by Western showed that York was still not chal- ’ lenging epo?igh. Before departing for home, the great “female Warrior” ensemble had supper at ‘an elegant-looking, Venetian restaurant, to conclude a successful and good-time Sinc(y Macovik spiking in game again3 Queens. photo by helen a_n-qewitruk weekend. Much to our surprise, the York team walked in and in good 15-12 victory over *Western. Much girls!” &e:e proclaimed, York defun a inutual hissing began. excitement a’rose in the small feated the Athenas 15-13 in,the first For many, this was the last time crowd of Waterloo fans, and outround. they would sit ‘together as a team. crys of “Let’s go, gig Black!” Waterloo then pulled their s-ocks Maria De Costa, Robbie Awde and (Athenas wear black unifo,rms), up to win t&games straight, both Sue MacTavish are all graduating. steered the team on. Sindy, Sandy, at 15-6. Mary Rafferty and’ Maura atid the twins are going to blueMaura and Murt Bryans had found -played well it the net. Ina and the grass Kentucky to resume- their ‘the crack’, aimed and hit hard. twin”s executed some super spikes. f;ivourite sport-tqnnis. Each year Maria and Ina, hustled on court and Robbie Awde and Judy ‘Rash presents a new -Ghallenge for .the made so”me excellent recoveries. played well defensively. coach, but we’re la11confident that Thus, with the colle‘ctivesfforts The last dual was with McMasP;lt Davis will figurk something out. of these six >women, the acme of ter. Sindy played _all-round excelA new’ problem arose foi the team players. Nobody could find a volleyball performatice was at- -lent ball. Thescores were 15-13 and tained. ; 15-9 for. Waterloo. _ suitable alternative to fill in for the The second game displayed an With two points a?loted per win, two ‘hour practice time that they ardent comeback by Western. .,the Athenas tied with Western for 8 had devoted, daily Znd for six Spik;es were coming down consisp@ts out of a possible 10, ,but months. tently hard. Inaand Maura blocked Western. was named number one, By 7:30 we were on the I’oad and well, at the net, but those balls that because they had defeated Water*five hours later we were all back in weren’t blocked, also weren’t re- loo during the tournament. good, old Waterloo. A new day had coveTed,Fy the backcourt. This inQueen’s did not win one match begun. duced a 15-6 and 15-3 victory for and was at the bottom of the list I’d like to extend my appreciathe Western team, otherwise with a big zero. tion to the Chevron staff, Pat, the kno_wn as a ‘kill’. It seems that volleyball is-really team, Fuzz, and Thomie, Lynne, Friday evening feattired a banunpredictable. At the Challenge Gord, Tom, Bob and John, for quet for all the participants at the Cup 1 tou’mament in Guelph, last making it all possible. Thank-you. OWIAA Championship tournaterm,- the Queen’s team defeated -helen anne witruk ment. Each tYeam prepared‘ skits and, dr songs, which- were presentkd after supper. Never 7;jVould one conceive that women could be -_so stentoriari. Thq Athenas s_tarted the show rolling witli the ‘Athena song’ with the accompaniment of guitars. Then the Athenas paid tri; bute to all the six coaches, by-giving them ‘each an appropriate award. For example, Waterloo coach,. Pat Davis, was presented with the P.R. award,‘which stood for “Paity Recruiter”. -The only male cG,ach in the league, from Ottawa, was presented with an alar@ clock to be worn around his neck, SO that he could mak_e his‘routi‘ne bed-checks after curfew. After an evening of fun and laughs, everyone seemed pretty exhausted and retired to their rooms at the motel. The Athen% had two morning matches to play on Saturday. The first match -wBs against York. Pat Davis couldn’t under; _-stand why the team was playing so Waterloo Athena?, Western and York to the left at openingxeremonies‘ at poorly after a gobd night’s ,rest... OWiAA finds -Constant -shouts of “Wake-up, photo by helen@anne witruk ’ . c

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friday,

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february

28, 1975

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I -O*ntario St,ud)etits Action, \Conference -\ March _7,8,9 ,

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Organized by the Block UniversitySteering Committee March (Friday) e\ieninb .thr&gh to Sunday‘ afternoon. . . ,

on Post-Secondary

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to discuss studen,t aid, housing, university and provincial politics, financing post\ - / secondary education. . q ’ Free overnight lodging will be provided but there,will be a $2.00 registration fee and a $5.90 fee for five ieals. If you are interested in attending, please contact the Federation of Students (Shane Roberts or Franz Klingender) at 885-0370 or university extension 3426 as sbon as possible. We are trying to m.ake travel arrdngements but need to know how matiy wqnt % go. Approximate departure time: 6:00 p.m. Friday, March 7.

” AH Students, Faculty and Staff Are Invited. , D ,-

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We’re proud to announce our referrals for early pregnancy are now being sent to Metropol&$n Detroit’s finest birth control center It IS’ a brand new facility de’signed becific&ly for the complete medical and emotional needs of women undertaking a pregnancy,termInation Constructed according to the standards and guldelines set font-i by the Mlchrgan Department of Public HeBlth, over 4000 square feet is devoted to patient comfort . Operating physictans are chrtified surgeons and OBJ~YN’S With over 15 years in’ private piactice, _ . they are specialists in all phases of pregnancy Interruption Patients are welcomed in an atmosphere of music and sheer eleganct by a carefully selected. skilled and sympathetic $taff All information IS confldentlal There are no building signs. ’ We’re. especially prpud of the St-up recovery room Being a patient’s last stop, she will be served soft drinks and a snack at cafe-style tables Sh’e’ll have a large mirrored vanity area with a marble make-up counter for last mtnute touch-up, feminine toiletries. telephone service for a call home, and a private exit foyer to meet.her escort Procedure fees are low Pregnancy tests are free. We invite you to call

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John Greenwood left UW in 1973 themselves up in a vacant studio. as a B .E. S. 1Architecture graduate John then told a nearby producer and will be returning on March 6 as that they were ready for their audia folksinger, with a concert in tion. The confused producer heard Theatre of the Arts. them and they got a booking. _ John and his brother Hugh (also a All the pushing go’t Greenwood’s graduate of UW-Science) played when Vinthe pubs part time until they tired of ‘. talents due recognition tage records decided that his work “the hassle” and-decided to go full was good enough to warrant cutting time. . 21,000 copies of his first LP. a The way to make that change successfully, says Greenwood, is Greenwood says that he has been to “knock on a lot of doors.” The treated well by the music industry doors belong to record companies, \ so far. ‘~You get a break if you are radio stations and television netCanadian,” he said referring to the works and are knocked on in the 30% Canadian content law, which hope that someone of import will forces I AM radio stations to play listen to a demo tape, or offer an 30% worth of Canadian records audition. during their peak broadcasting ’ Sometimes you can’t ‘afford to . hours: A record is considered wait for an invitation. Hugh reCanadian if two of the following counted a time when he and John four categories are Canadian: arrived at a CBC station -with all Music, Artist, Label and Publisher. their equipment, told the guard that All are Canadian on Greenwoods they were delivering it, 2nd set record.

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Greenwood is a folksinger because he wants to communicate. “Simpley and softly I want to say something that is posilive and humanitarian.“’ But that is not all there is to his work. @is writing is witty and he makes good use of sa,tire. In the drafting office where he ‘worked after he finished at university, he said, “you weren’t even ’ allowed to talk.” And, while playing the pubs helped he and his . brother tighten! their music-“it’s difficult to communicate when you have a guy throwing-up in front of you”. Thus Greenwood prefers concerts and is especially looking forward to playing in the atmos-’ phere of the Theatre of the Arts. His lyrics are clever, his music has strong rhythmn and his personality is pleasant. The combination should provide a fine evening’s entertainment .’ -neil

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Just a Boy Leo Sayer 1 Warner Brothers

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This is the second album from the man who wrote the songs for I_the solo album of Roger Da&y (of the Who). The album is different-than his. excellent “Silverbird” album in that he is now going through a. transitional period. Sayer is t ying to rid himself of his now fa lL ous elown image and no longer appears _ on stage garbed as -the melancholy clown,. To mirror this change, the new album’s songs are more individualistic, they tend to stand alone. They are also slightly longer and have more variety than on “Silverbird”. “Just a Boy” contains several sad songs, one or two rockers and a couple of bluesy numbers, all which h.ighlight Sayer’s excellent voice. . The first cut, “Telepath”, makes good use of Dave Courtney’s piano. Courtney is the man who writes all the music for Sayer’s lyrics. “One Man Band”, is the first cut to feature Jimmy Litherland, the former lead guitarist for Colesseum. This song shares the same sort of personal _ experience he sang about in “The Show Must Go On”. “Long Tall Glasses” is a good time sort of song which rocks well. It is receiving rather extensive airplay on F .M. radio as a single and is really one-of the weaker song$ on the album. The final song is called “Giving It ’ All Away”, and+isthe song Daltrey made into a huge success. But Sayer, does an excellentjob, with Dave Courtney again on piano, thus making this the strongest cut on the album. If you liked “Silverbird”, you’ll really appreciate this 1 album. ’ fred Wilson

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fridai,

february

28, 197.5

the chevron

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AIA vs. As a member of’the Board of Education of the Federation of Students, I take exception‘to John Morris’s article on the Trotskyists in the last chevron. He stated that the board voted unanimously for giving the Trots $22. This is technically correct but I was not at that particular meeting and recorded my vote with the Chairman the following day. It was most emphatically in the negative for the following reasons. The name or names of theipeople asking for the the board. The .‘money was witheld-from slander .conceming the previous meeting was not substantiated by any person at the meeting. The meeting slandered was a non-democratic forum to begin with and - the Anti-Imperialist Alliance (AIA) went to the meeting to make it democratic. The format of the meeting was as follows. Tom Reid, Trotskyist leader, was to speak for 45 minutes, followed by 15 minutes for, any opposition statements, followed by submission of questions from’ which Tom Reid was to pick and choose the questions he wished toanswer; it could, have been none. The AIA declined the use of the i5 minutes in order to ask questions. About half-way through Reid’s speech, members ‘of the AIA began to heckle and laugh at some, of the comments of-the speaker. Th&pea,ker claimed to be speaking on “A Revolutionary Strategy for Canada’ ’ . The heckling was directed towards the fact, that the speaker spoke almost exclusively about the Russian Revolution, and about the USA. At the very end of his speech, he spent five minutes talking about Canada and his strategy. The main point seemed to be that we should form “armed workers militias” and “armed student militias” and that armed struggle should begin right now in Canada against the , Canadian bourgeoisie. When we began to. ask questions and demand immediate answers the Trotskyist chairman began to scream and yell at us and we at him. The ,( democratic decorum he wished us to maintain was more like Trotskyist dictatorship. At the end, the speaker got up and screamed a bit longer saying nothing. Concerning the issue of -physical violence. It may be interesting to note that Stafford was moving to the defense of a fellow member of the. AIA that the chairman was attacking at the front of thr room, This was the pomt at which one of the MA members decided to take -the 15 minutes allottey to the opposition to speak. The chairman tried to stop him after.5 minutes, I possibly because the spokgsperson was making some telling po,ints. The Spartacistsare the group that-is to be brought back to campus. This group is financed in the USA and is an offshoot of the American ‘Trotskyist group. This group has consistently suggested that imperialism is not the main contradiction in Canada and the world,and has even suggested that the North Vietnamese should not *have signed the peace treaty because it was a sellout to the Americans (logic that I miss somehow). If Morris wants to continue being a “trot lover” he will certainly earn the everlasting enmity of all progressive and democratic people on this campus.

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Rick

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It is not often’that a letter in the feedback column of ‘the chevron offers so much amusement as, the letter authored by Patricia Gilbert concerning FASS ‘75 in the --Feb. 14 chevion. We would like- to thank her, however, for the compliment in that %st paragraph stating that, “It (FASS) was

, ’ writers,

I’ Pity

T

DeGryss

’ Sexist?

blatantly ’ sexist intellectually bankrupt-with a multitude of cliches, : . . “. We did not realise we were that good! ’ The purpose of FASS-and we quote ,.from one of our posters-is “a satirical, dramatic and comic review of Waterloo life”. Any. serious meaning in the play was unintentional and accidental. FASS is meant to be,a farce! FASS is for the sole amusement ofthe audience and a means to get about -60 people together to have a good time. FASS is a cut-up-only in fun for laughs-of everything and anything on campus or not. It’s too bad Patricia Gilbert didn’t/understand. Oh yes, and in reference to the, sexist charges-YUP! That’s part of satire; to laugh at the obvious is to laugh at life. And if one doesn’t laugh at life, ,where is the joyin life? Must everything be serious? If that’s the case, we want no part of it. If Gilbert would have reread her programme for scene 8 (that’s the sleazy one), she would have noticed 3 male names as Wicked Wenches. All three fellows were’ quite willing to do the bump and grind, but’ were asked not to do it,onlyone week before the show. The people that requested that change -were predominantly female. Everybody who did the scene had a lot of I fun. None of the women were forced to do the scenhthey chose to. _ In conclusion, we’d like to thank Gilbert for the first and only review of the “play”, and a good plot outline of FASS 1975.aIt was very unfortunate that she took the show so seriously; that certainly wasn’t the intention!

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actck,

Gord Dunbar Pat McGrat h Margo DeWildt Doug Wigle Ron Dragashan dancers, FASSers

If Brian McKay and other opponents of the RAA would readand listen more carefully they would see that the issue at Renison was and is not “academic freedom” in the abstract sense but rather defending the right of professors to teach material not usually.dealt with at this&and most other universities. That i$- c,ontent which analyzes theroots of the problems in our society-monopolycapitalism, imperialism %and its components of racism, exploitation ofwomen; workers, youth and immigrants. The .RAA is defending the interests,of students who want to learn about the struggles of the people of Asia, Africa and Latin America. We are fighting to learn at a deep and not a superficial level-to seek truth from the facts of our society-to ask why there is poverty, racism, oppres- , sion, and exploitation in the world. ‘< Brian McKay says it all in his last sentence-‘ ‘ We don’t really care.” Well the students and faculty who support the RAA do care very deeply for the people of Canada and the world. We also care about fair and just solutions to all workers issues -and workers include professors too. Unions have fought for-years for such things as ‘binding arbitration’ .-Many have died struggling for that right-something McKay ridicules -by a comparison to ExLax. We pity the people-McKay and his supporters will work with when they graduate.-They will truly be the social workers so justly despised by the poor of this country. / It is important to note that ‘McKay and many opponents of the BAA have never’ taken courses with the fired faculty. They speak only from rumour and love to spread gossip and slanders about people they don’t even know. The RAA investigates before it speaks and acts only to defend the‘interests. most I students on this campus would, agree with-the right to participate in decisions which affect our lives.

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Brian McKay, John Towler and the Renison board stand in the way of progress and leamin . They want to fit us into melds where we w7 11stop thinking and examining the facts of the material world around us. They want us to-be willing agents of the ruling class. McKay, Towler and the BQG are reactionary, coercive and stand in the way of progress. They have created an atmosphere at Renison today that says, “suppm the system or g@ out!” Progressive faculty and students have been threatened and ‘safe’ conservative profs have been brought in to save us from the dange’rous ideas to which we were bei’ng. exposed! The RA‘A will continue to‘fight for a college where students ca-n learn about, the world as it is, not as John Towler and the BOG wish it was. We, unlike McKay and his friends, do care and we urge all progressive faculty’and students on this campus to continue to support our struggle.

\.

Christopher Jones Dominic Raso Philip Fernandez

-Heroic . , c-aihpaigrp ( History, a process which quasi-Marxists resolutely struggle to ignore, is full of ironies. On Feb. 4, one week before the “heroic peoples campaign” of the Anti Imperialist Alliance (AIA) against a handful of Spartacists at the UW. (see Chevron: feb. 21, 1975), two pipe bombsexploded in East Los Angeles. One of them exploded at a bookstore of the October League, a Maoist organization, the other one at the East L.A. headquarters of the Socialist Workers Party and the Young Socialist Alliance,the largest Trotskyist organizations in the U.S. Twenty-five people narrowly escaped death at the latter, more serious attack. The attack by the National Socialist Liberation Front, a-fascist group, is only one of a series of attacks too innumerable to list. The irony of this is that Maoist organizations know only too well that the state with its paid and unpaid agents attempt to do a thorough job in attacking Trotskyists. Unfortunately Maoist organizations, whether deliberately or not, often follow suit. Consistent with its disregard of- history ,a& concomitant wallowing in fantasy, the ,AIA’s characterization of Trotskyism is. not merely crass, but sad-the analytical product of a radically lobotomized braintrust. In the AIA’s “socia_l analysis” “Trotskyist” equals “CIA”. Depending upon circumstances, we might also be called “imperialist agents”, “fascists”, etc . . .etc .‘. .ad nauseum. Why the U.S. and other imperialists go to such trouble ’ to suppress their own’ “agents’ ’ is difficult to fathom. The AIA leadership undoubtedly tell their neophytes that it is all a diversion (“Trotskyists are Left in form but Right in essence”). The diversion, however, is being perpetrated by the AIA leadership and their mentors-the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist). Slander is a petty-bourgeois political tactic, not a Marxist one! The AIA leadership’s slander is like the cloud of sepia the scuttleship ejects when dangerous opponents are nearby. The “opponents” in this case are ; not the?Spartacists, who are a small splinter group o/n the periphery of the 4th Intemational, but the ideas of Trotskyism, and the main -Trotskyist movement as such. As in medieval days, the neophytes of Maoism are not to be allowed to hear ideas ‘other than those from selected scriptures. Trotskyists are equated with the deviland his witchcraft., who can cast spells upon cherubic AIAers and snatch them away to be inducted into the serviceof imperialism. Fantastic? Not really! The AIA wants to ban Trotskyists from campus. Mindboggling! The same thing was recently attempted at the U. of Winnipeg bye the administration and the reactionary students council. The Young Socialists on’the Win-

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nipeg campus naturally refused to recognize the “ban” on their organization. Here - at UW a “progressive”, “anti-imperialist” group ‘wants to take over the function usually associated,with reaction’ary administrations.. Furthermore, they want Trotskyists banned from campus without .., so much as a hearing, without even the semblance of a trial. The irony of this under the present circumstances at UW is practi- . tally unspeakable. For my part, and for the part of my comrades on.campus, we demand a hearing-an open hearing-where we can defend ourselves against these I trust, however, that r ‘ludicrouscharges. there will be no hearing, because a hearing is anathema to theleadership of the AIA. If I’m wrong I’ll be the first to volunteer as a “defendant”. In the meantime I will remain on campus; the AIA leadership knows where to find me. ‘ Helmuth Fischer (Young

H-uriay for- AI-A

t

3ocialists)

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Hurmy for the AIA. John Morris’s article in the chevron clearly shows why Trotskyists are hated the world over, In the People’s Republic of China they are illegal. Now we understand why. -John Morris might as well be the-administration. Why does he single out-two peo,ple who fight fq the rights of students on this campus? Why does he put down an organization that .has sponsored more educational forums than any other group? What is John Morris’ purpose in doing this? In whose interests is he acting-Burt Matth&s? The Ontario Government? ’ / Now we know why trots are considered to be police agents. They may not be paid by the police but objectively they do police wc)yk. Everytime,a true progressive group arises the trots, arrive, this time from the USA, to break it up, but we won’t let them \. split AIA. AIA will-continue to unite with all people who want to support its programmes (support for national liberation &-uggles, support for native people, campaign against the racist immigration policy, support for -workers: struggles .and opposition to the two superpowers). ’ 1 donna\ Halley

luxury’

_ Right now electronic calculators are r-e. placing the slide rules as a mean to problem solving. They have found their way into the examination rooms too. It is clear that a student using an electronic calculator has an advantage over a student who still uses a I slide rule. Students in science and engineering are desperately, trying to acquire electronic calculatorsto replace their old slide rules because, they don’t want to be left’irr-3 disadvantageous position and also they car take advantage of their fellow classmate5 who still cannot afford to buy one. The average cost of a so-calledslide rule calculator is around $200. It is .a luxury ant it is also ‘a financial strain to the average student; bearing in mind that the average book-cost per termis only $70. It is almos, , three times the book-cost per term. ’ To allow the use of sophisticated problem-solving aids (in examinations) which are not economically available is tc discriminate against the less affluent students. It is hoped that the university authprity should look into the situation and impose some,rules to restrict the use of sophisticated problem-solving aids during major examinations. H.C. Kam

. ,- ,


22,

friday,

the ch‘evron

od Bloc

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The three week display in the Theatre of the Arts art gallery, of the works of ten woodblock printers, comes, to ‘a close this

weekend. Woodcut prints can be a very simple form of printing or it can lend itself to some very sophisticated designs, some in-, corporating several, colours. Throughout the display one can see examples of- almost every technique applicable to woodcut prints. -photos

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by randy

hannigan

Ptin

february

28, 1975 -


friday,

february P

28, 1975

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the chevron

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strike’

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by doug ward ’ Behind the rash @ public service strikes that have hit parts of Canada in the past two weeks lies more than meets the eye. The apparent intransigence of both sides in ,the dispute is a sjimptom of a growing ,rot in Canada’s public sector; a fiscal crisis of the state which given the present economic situation could bring about a fundamental que$tioning of the structural relationships of Canadian society. The dispute pits in one corner the public worker increasingly alarmed over his diminishing economic position in relation to that of his counterpart in the private sector; and, in the othef corner, the federal government caught oh a fiscal contradiction of social expenditures far outstripping ificoming revenues. ’ The strikes Revolving strikes by federal blue-collar woI’kers entered their twelfth day today and the government seems intent on car*ing out its threat to ,take action against workers who strike illegally. The present strike represents ihe biggest group of civil servants‘yet to face the treasury board this year. According to Lou Muiphy, president of the Toronto local of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers: “The result of this one will show the other groups what they can expect. Treasury Board President *Jean Chretien is’determined to be tough and he will stick to it. The government is trying to set the tone for negotiations later this year with 160,000 other public servants ,i including all three ‘postal unions.” Chretien deserves to be worried. While nearly every industry faces hard bargaining, the federal govkrnment especially fpces a lineup of increasingly militant employ&es. Aside from theipostal workers, are dockyard workers, --airport firefighters, clerks, printers, grginhandlers, and Air Canada machinists and flight attendants. Urban mal&e This year should be equally difficult for provincial and municipal levels ofgovem-

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Tot&l Tax Incidence

For The Tax Structure,

1961 c

Incofie i’

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Total Taxes As A . Percentage Of , Income’

Less than, $2,000 $2,000 - 2,999 . $3,000 - 3,996 ( ---'$4,ooo - 4,999 ' $5,000 -.6,999 ; $7,000 - 9,999 . $10,0&I and up .*

6O.OVo 32.9 32.2 '30.5 32.8 34.2 ?8.4

vincial government. The situatiod demands, according to the Globe, that operating costs be curbed, including staff reductions and inflexibility ever upcoming labour- negotiations. Two major lab&r contracts for about two-thirds of the city’s \ workers which run until 1976 are likely to’ be re-opened due to union <pressure. ,Ex” acerbating the crisis even more are “astroqomically” high police costs which take __j c up 40 % of the budget and welfare costs which have risen drastically from 25.5 n-Mlion in 1972 to 32.8 million-in 1974. The delivery of public .goods and servicks-the infrastructure; then, which supports our economy and society is slowly, but $eadily collapsing and falling apart as a resultbf financial starvation. The victims of this breakdown are the state employees and the clients of the state services, such as welfare recipients and hospital patients. In turn the victims react, try to regain ground whether it be in terms of wages or service; and become, in times of ’ economic crisis, the target of public resentment. The upshot is that the roots of . the problem remain unexamined. , Growth of the .* public sector : The squrce of the fiscal crisis is rooted / deepin the development of the public secCOiPORATEAND INDIVIDUALSHAR.EOf tor. The history of the $ublic sector has ALL PROVINCIALINCOMETAX REVENUE been a history of sbpport and protectidn fpr % Canada’s private sector. “The assertion of 85 1 1962i970 , the State”, writes economic historian H.G. Aitken, “in the form of the federal gov75 ernment was merely acting as the agent. . .of ‘private economic interests -the sale of the Hudson’s Bay Company lands, and the chartering of a Pacific railro&d-could.probably be supported.” The proces”s of state intervention into the econbmy, which Aitken talks of, is today ironically ltibelled by m,any as “socialistic’ ’ . The “&son d’etre’ ’ pf the public sector, however, to the contrary, has been to foster the growth of themprivate sector and. to compensate for the inadequacies of the _ private econotiy. ment where expenditures again are exceed-8uppox-t~ is given through the mainteing their revenues forcing them-to go nance of an infrastructure: railroads, highfurther into debt or raise their rates. This in ways, schools, universities, hydro-electric -- --iurn puts pressure on the federal govempower, hospitals. The state sustained exisment,‘to bail them out through its inter. tence of harbour facilities, highways into government transfer payments. depressed areas, Crown Corporations and It is in, the cities that the fiscal crisis is regional expansion programs acts to di’ ‘most obvious. A vicious circle exists where rectly, stimulate and complement private _ with each new hike in ti?c property tax rate, inve’stment . business and middle class home owners Socialization . ’ flee into the suburbs. In-order to continue of -risk providing municipal seivices with a slug-\ gish tax base, cities must keep pushing the The rapid growth of the rhonopolistic tax rate higher. private sector in the post-war petiod has necessitated an equally swift growth of the A recent article in the Toronto Globe and public ‘sector’s role in the economy. Rick ’ Mail illustrates well the fiscal paralysis city Deaton, research assistant for the “Canatreasuries are experiencing resulting from inflationary cost increases and widespread dian Union of Public, Employees”, writes public demands for a-broader range of serthat the public sector’s expansion w& due vices.. to the private. sector’s detiand for the ---y , The Globe report dealt with indications “ socializatioti of risk’ ’ . 1 from senidr provincial officials that yearly “The government through’ the public increases in transfer payments to Ontario sector”, writes Deaton, “absorbs the somunicipalities’ are about to end. Consecial costs of production by providing, for ’ quently any increased operating costs will pollution clean up,, sanitation services, have to be met with higher property taxes. medicare, unemployment insurance, The Globe went on to note that about C.P.P. The private risks of productidn are one-third of Toronto’s 1974 operating, absorbed socially, at public expense, through govem’ment subsidies, grants, fast budget of $472 million comes from direct or write-off depreciation allowances, “forindirect transfer payments frgm the-prol

',

Percentage Of Population

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20.60/o 1'17 . ' 13:5 r 14.9 22,o ' * 12.1 5.3 \-

dency in mature capitalist economies for the corporate share of tax revenues to-decline.” Furthermore, t the1 tax system for individuals itself is inherently regressive. As the accompanying graph shows, people in ,the lower income brackets pay proportionately more of their income in taxes than do people in the higher income brackets. b The overall ef[ect of the tax structure then places the burden of supplying revenues on the Canadian wage earners. This begs the bbvious question of where will the new revqnues come from to deal tiitk the continued pressure for public goods and services? 1 The dynamics of the fiscal crisis has already brought on a strong I’eaction from business and the general public .to hold back on government spending. A recent editorial in the Globe repeats the common litany: “Unrealistic wage demands cannot be allowed to drive prices up ftirther and so penalize us all. As workers walk out, they

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giveable loans” ’ , the underwriting of consumer credit and corporate research and development. ” The fiscal crisis The public sector is limited by the level of incominrg’revenues which are based on ‘CORPORATE AND INDIVIDUALSHARE the existGnt tax rates and share of income 9 OF FEDERALINCOMETAX REVENiE fax revenues paid by corporations and individuals. There is now a growjcng disparity -8; . 1962~1970 between the tax burden borne by the corporate sector and that borne. by the country’s wage earners. It is this gap and the unlikelihood of its being reconciled due to the current stagflation that will make the fisc~Q bottleneck particularly acute in the near future. The accotipanying graphs describe the corporate and individual share of Federal and Provincial income tax r&source. Between 1962 and 1970 the corporate &are of all Federal income revenue fell by roughly I I I I 38% while the individual share of Federal -20 ’ income tax revenue increased by over 1962 1964 1966 ’ 1968 1970 23%. With Espect to all Provincial income be locked out. A prolonged tax between 1962 and 1970 the corporate . should strike-aimed of course against the public. share fell by over 60% while the individual (sic)-will no doubt show the union quickly share increased by roughly 83%. how much public sympathy it has.” Tax structure Fixing wage limits or banning strikes, Rick Deaton, iq his findings on the Public however, won’t solve a thing. The problem lies in the ability of corporations through’ Sector; emphasizes that “the sharp decline in revenues from corporations in 1966 octhe fiscal and tax structure tcr socialize the Curred two years before profit levels costs of productioh and shift the burden of taxation for the maintenance of the technipeaked in 1968 and therefore is not just, a result of ecogomic slowdown, inflation, or cal infrastructure to workers so that there is a public expenditure and a private bedemographic shifts. Given that the corpo/ n&it. rate share of income tax revenue has, sharply declined in the U.S. and Britain Therein too lies the solution. As the costs of production‘ have become over the past decade, despite some cyclical fluctuation, we may speak of algeneral tens.ocialized so too’ must the #profits. ., .

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Member: Canadian iMver&ity press (CUP). The chevron is typeset by members of the workers ‘unidn of dumont pres? graphix (CNTU) and published by the federation’of students incorporated., yniv*sity of Waterloo. Content is the sole \ responsibility of the chevron editorial staff. Offices are located-in the campus _ centre; (519) 885-l 660, or university rocal 2331. ( I once upon a time there was a-fisherman. from time to time he used to fish by the sea and one day he caught a fish who said ‘thrbw me back into the sea for i am really a noble prince’. the fisherman did so, but the next day he ‘retbrned and called to the fish-prince to grant him a : favour. the prince asked what he want&and when the fisherman replied that he wished to be elected to be on the student government, the fish-prince replied that he was unable tosffect this request, however, he said that he would arrange.for. ‘an apprdpriate alternate gift. the fisherman returned home only to discover that he had just won twenty years of free psychiatric help. how appropriate! . . . :,and believe it or not there a,re more elections coming up and we’re not even going to encourage you to get out and vote because we know you couldn’t give a . . . .about who (ioes what with your hard earned student fee (tot+ two-hundred and fifty thousand dollars) do you know how many bubble gums that is? in An effort to discover your views our man on the street asked this question this week ‘what is science’s greatest contribution to modern societi?’ the answer: the flush toilet,‘adding that it has been responsible for a lot pf movements lately . . . . . .parkers beware!‘the little green men with walkie talkies haven’t used up their towing budg4t for february sb they’ve stepped yq their effort to keep, our roads -free of cars .! . . . .this has been a busy week for our retmng editor randy hannigan, hisassociate john morris and the production manager_ neil docherty, they’ve. had one long string of crises culminating with the grand finale, a runny nose. if you ever wa?t to put an ad in our tabloid terry . ‘ad-man’ harding is the gqy to see, and if he’s not in our office manager, mascot and secretary diane ritza will take care of you. the rest of the mad group of chevrics this week includes, michael gordon, doug ward, shane roberts, kpd, stari gruszka (spqrts editor), helen a. witruk, liskris, rob burbank, &d some angry readerh. and this weeks week’s quote of the week as re-told from chuckles: 1. all men are rational. 2. no women are men. 3. therefore no women are rational. (illustrating the fallacy of equivocation) and if you don’t understaird that you aren’t \, thinking logically. respectively submitted, p.f.j.r.

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University -  

icle in the chevron headed “Feds re takbn out of context and thus it ma Anti-lmper, ialist Alliance and the u-on regrets sbpport thf Howeve...

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