Page 1

From an original

woodcut

by Jan Fischer


bY

r. Jacqueline

Classified ads are accepted between 9 and 5 in the chevron office. See Charlotte. Rates are 50 cents for the first fiftekn words and five cents each per extra word. Deadline is tuesday afternoons by 3 p.m.

Frey

nities Building oom .280 Sponsored by Health Services

LOST

$25. Phone 744-5348

Small black kitten called “Tiki”. Had habit of hanging around Tim Horton doughnuts. Please call 576-5412 because we love her.

4%piece china set. Like new, hardly used. Ca,, 576-5412.

PERSONAL

University of Waterloo in Co-operation wi?h

Mature lady will babysit children. $3 per day. References available. 7421390.

Birth

FOR SALE Beautifully refinished spool tables. All sizes, very solid, very reasonable at

Panasonic ,amplifier, turntable, excellent yours for

F3abysitter wanted. My home. Tuesday and wednesday afternoon 12:306:30pm. 3 children, light housekeeping $1 per hour. Phone 5780414.

or 575-7636.

stereooutfit. Receiverbuilt-in antennae, 3-speed speakers. Only one year old, condition. Originally $320; only $250. Call 576-5412.

HOUSING

WANTED Babysitter wanted every Wednesday afternoon l-5pm and occasionally at other times for b year old girl. 5767668.

AVAILABLE

Bachelor apartment in downtown Kitchener, Conestoga Towers. Kitchenette, swimming pool, recreation room, health room, and sauna. Available October 1 $123; $10 parking. Phone 743-3046 or 576-7490; 576-7490,

BOOK STORE BULLETIN This week on campus is a free column for ?he announcement of meetings, special seminars or speakers, sociai events and other happenings on campus-student, faculty or staff. See the chevron secretary or call extension 3443. Deadline is tuesday afternarsns by 3 p.m.

A recent study made of N.S.F. cheques returned to the Book Store showed that nearly 60 percent were counter cheques. For this reason, it has become necessary to prohibit their use. If purchases are to be paid for by cheque, please use official Bank cheque forms.

FRIDAY Co-ed Slow Pitch Soft Ba II Tournament. Teams will be picked at start. Meet on Columbia field:511 am Free

Also, there will be a $5.00 Service Charge on all cheques returned by the Bank for any reason.

Pub in Campus Center 12-12; Whiplash and Black Ivory from 8 pm. Free until 7 pm. From 7 pm. 25 cents $1 nonfederation members; members. Campus Tour campus center

leaves 3 pm.

from

front

of

Concert with Walrus in the Phys Ed courtyard 3 pm. Sponsored by the Math Society Free. Dance in Campus Center Gaslight. 8:30 pm Free. Movie : “The campus center

with

Married Couple” 12 midnight Free.

Dance in Village Red & *en dining halls with Spott Farm and Rain. 8 pm. 25 cents federation members; $1 nonmembers. Movie : “101 Dalmations” center 12 midnight. Free.

center.

Free 12-8 pm.

Concert with Kit Carson - Jazz and Fats, plus Utah Philips, in campus center. Free. 2 pm. General Meeting of Arts 100 students in Biology 1, Room 271 at 7 pm. This is important since discussion groups, viewing times and seminar rooms will be organized at this meeting.

in

SATURDAY

Pub with Copper Penny in food services. 8 pm. 25 cents federation members.

Capture the mansion on the Westgate Campus, 12 Westgate Walk, Kitchener. Maps available at the information center in the campus center. 2 pm.

Student Services on campus: discussion with people from security, health services, counselling services and intramurals. campus center 8 pm.

Pub with Tightass. Food Services 8 pm. 50 cents federation members; $1 nonmembers.

Movie : “the Bank Dick” with W.C. Fields, in campus center. 12 midnight. Free.

Dance in campus center with Appleton Century. 8:30 pm. Free. TUESDAY Movie: “I’m No Angel” with Mae West in campus center 12 midnight Free. SUNDAY

Been

Gone

Picnic on the Village Moor with Utah Philips; bring a lunch, musical instruments, etc. 12 noon.

Pub in campus

Spontaneous water-fight on the Village Moor. Bring a bucket 2 pm.

Concert with Liberty in the Engineering Lecture outdoor amphitheatre (in the campus center if rain) Free. 12 ;-3 pm.

-

Kitchen &

May Ling’s Gift & Poster Shop The one stop everything store Fungifts for fun folk Private Dining In or ca,rry out

Z

162 the

chevron

Free 12-8 pm.

Concert with Kit Carson, Jo, Delaney and Taylor in campus center, free, 2-5 Pm.

Gords China

428 King N - Waterloo 490 Highland - Kitchener 2685 King E - Kitchener 1209 Victoria N- Kitchener _. _.. in thei,_ A subscription fee included r

General Tour and information on Physical Education Building. Meet at Red North entrance. 9:30, 11 am., 1:30, 3:30 pm. center.

I

George Kerr, Ontario Minister Energy and Resources, speaking Biology 82 353. Free 2 pm.

changes

promptly

to:

the

chevron,

university

center

12-8 pry;.

Free Concert with Kit Carson, Jo, Delaney and Taylor in campus center. 2-5 pm. Free Badminton Night gymnasium. 7 pm.

in phys

ed

Play : “In a Bar in a Tokyo Hotel” by Tennessee Williams. Arts Theatre. Free 8 pm. “Cheap Wine” pub. Food services with Copper Penny. 8 pm. 25 cents federation members; $1 nonmembers. Movie : “Going campus center.

Down the Road” Free 8:30 pm.

in

Movie : “Pierrot Le Fou” (Jean Luc Godard) in campus center. Free 12 midnight.

THURSDAY Pub “Beer Garden” and Band in the campus center. 12-8 pm. 10 cents federation members; 50 cents nonmembers. Concert with Hooker Family in phys ed courtyard (in the campus center if rain) 12-3 pm. Free. Free concert with Cody, Jo, Delaney and Taylor, Jazz and Fatts and Co. in campus center l-5 pm. Robert Nixon, Provincial Liberal Party Leader speaking in the Arts Theatre. Free 3pm. Volley Ball Night nasium. 7:30 pm.

in phys

ed gym-

Play: “In a Bar in a Tokyo Hotel” by Tennessee Williams. Arts theatre. Free. 8 pm. -Pub in Food Serveces with Copper Penny. 25 cents members; $3 nonmembers. 8 pm. Movies: “Thunderball” and “You Only Live Twice’” in arts lecture 116. 50 cents members; $1 non-members 8 pm.

organization meeting of Radio Waterloo. All students interested in Radio Waterloo welcome. Station operated on Grand River Cable thought K-W area 94.1. Come help us.

Gay Liberation Pub in campus center with Whiplash and and Go-Go Boys. 9 pm. 10 cents members; 25 cents nonmembers.

Pub with Copper Penny. Food Services 8 pm. 25 cents federation members: $1 non-members.

Movie: “The Coconuts” with the Marx Brothers, in the campus center. Free. 12 midnight. ’

Non-students: address

of in

Concert with Mason Proffit and Crowbar in the Phys Ed courtyard (if warm and clear) otherwise in the P$ys Ed Bldg. Free 8 pm.

annua Send

Free pub in campus

Concert with Amish in the Humanities Bldg. courtyard (in the campus center if rain). Free 12-3:30 pm.

in campus

MONDAY Pub in campus

WEDNESDAY

&Waterloo,

Waterloo,

Ontario.

$8

annu&ly.


Page

/-fomosexuaIs from the Waterloo universities’ gay liberation front and the Kitchener-Waterloo COMmunity took part last month in a Parliament Hill demonstration calling for an end to discrimination of gays and acceptance of their sexuality. Some club members indicated the constant Ottawa rain a//owed them the treat of the day - a communa! drying-off party after they made their point to closet parliamentarians.

Local activities planned

Gays ‘liberate’ the Hill --.About 15 university of Waterloo homosexuals were among more than 100 members of Ontario’s homophile movement who demonstrated in Ottawa late in the summer. According to local gays, the august 28 march on Parliament Hill was a vital experience for members to admit openly that their homosexuality was not something to be ashamed of. Waterloo universities’ gay liberation movement president John Dunbar said the small turnout probably could be blamed on the constant rain.. Dunbar said r&action to the demonstration was favorable among observers on the Hill though others, notably Dick Smyth, news director of Toronto’s CHUM, reacted with a scathing radio denunciation of the “mental abberation” of and sexual homosexuality . Smyth said the prospect of

Ministers

to speak

A federal cabinet minister and a member of the Ontario cabinet are among seven speakers scheduled as part of the freshman orientation. The series, sponsored by the federation of students, began Thursday night, with an encounter of the three candidates for election in the Waterloo north riding. The candidates include the incumbent Edward Good, liberal MPP, Brian Turnbull, progressive conservative, and Jo Surich, NDP, a former university of Waterloo student-. _ L George Kerr, minister of energy and resources, Ontario’s political pollution-watchdog, will speak at 2 pm Sept. 14 in room B2-353,

Fed

homosexuality was about “as savory as a demonstration for equality and acceptance by militant alcoholics,. lepers or lunatics.” Smyth was forced by CHUM’s owners to allow equal editorial time to pro homosexual spokesmen after the Toronto Gay Action group published its own searing attack on Smyth’s views. Toronto Gay Action is an offshoot of the Community Homophile Association of Toronto which works with services and social agencies to counsel homosexuals and arrange non-private dances and social events. A brief prepared by Gay Action and directed to the federal department of justice was presented by demonstrators at the Parliament Hill event. A major recommendation of the brief calls on the government to amend the Canadian bill of rights to guarantee freedom from

buses

The federation of students announced this week that it will continue its Toronto Express bus service, once again based on the “break-even philosophy” of student services. “We realize that the regular bus companies are also now in this field of transportation,” stated the federation announcment, “and for this reason it is not our intention to compete with them in the market. “Rather, we provide for the student who cannot afford the usual commercial rates a service

biology building. The Ontario liberal party leaaer, Robert Nixon, will present the opposition view at 3 pm Sept. 16 in the theatre of the arts, modern languages building. The national leader of the new democratic party, David Lewis will speak at 8 pm Sept. 17 in the humanities theatre. John Munro, federal minister of health and welfare, is scheduled at 3 pm Oct. 19 in the theatre of the arts, modern languages building. This year’s orientation replaces the traditional university “initiation” and is intended to offer first year students a chance to participate in non-academic university life.

ride

a

subsidized by the federation of students.” The year’s price schedule will be $3.50 round trip and $1.95 one way seated and $1.25 one way standing. Service will be implemented weekly beginning friday september 17 with the buses leaving the campus center. Ticket sales will once again be handled through the creative arts modern language box office, building, on campus. Further information may be obtained from the federation office in the campus center.

repression on the basis of “sexuality ” as well as race, national origin, color, religion or sex. Local gay activity begins with a gay orientation pub on the 16th of September which will feature male go-go dancers from a Toronto gay club. The club here has about 100 members at this university and Waterloo Lutheran and plans a full schedule of activities through the year. Speakers addressing the group will include health services’ director Dan Andrew, federation of students laywer Morley Rosenberg, local NDP member Max Saltzman and doctor Franklin Kameny, founder of the U.S.-based Mattachine Society, fore-runner of today’s gay liberation cells. The club is also organizing empathy and encounter sessions with the aid of couns&ing services. The sessions, open to anyone, are designed “to raise gay people to a realization of their true sexual integrity.” Club members suggest new people may be interested in the film nights, drag balls, camping trips and Christmas fairyland, which the club also intends to sponsor.

You ca A year ago the chevron reported that a Canadian studies program was having trouble getting off the ground, because of apparent stinginess in some parts of the administrative structure. The enthusiasts who were trying to get it started thought they were doing a good job of cheese-paring on their budget, when they asked for an allocation of $20,000 to operate the course. They were cut back to less than $9,000. Money isn’t everything, apparently, because the course did operate successfully in its guineapig year, even though administrative snafus put up a couple of road blocks right at its starting line. Nobody told the computer the course existed, and receptionists in the registrar’s office knew no more about it than the computer did. It should get off to a better start this year, giving an opportunity to

rap

unplugged

Marigolds keep flies away. Really. They really do. Rick Page, university of Waterloo federation president, said so in a radio interview Wednesday night. The live interview in the Chevron office - touted by radio Waterloo as Page’s “state of the campus” address - was neither an address nor did it have much to do with the campus. While fereration on-lookers formed a peanut gallery by munching on peanuts in the Chevron office, Page told anyone who was accidently listening of his discovery in the ecology field. “With marigolds,” he said pointing to the wilted flower pinned to his t-shirt, “you don’t have to use repellent or any of that stuff.” The apparent hidden purpose of the interview - never revealed to those listening - was to acquaint freshmen with the workings of Waterloo politics and the federation. But Page disagreed that it should be an address or serious. Propping his feet on a desk and dangling the microphone in one hand, he beamed at his friends sitting on desks and tables and demanded “ask me questions.” Right. “How’s orientation going?” “Fine. Let me tell you about my trip to England.” Although the session was disrupted occasionally by Larry Burko - past federation president - unplugging the mike cord, Page managed to tell about his summer

New

drop,

Arts faculty students new drop and add which became effective

trip to England and his experiences with skinheads at a stadium there. “But they didn’t knock our teeth in because they thought we were bikers since we weren’t wearing lovebeads,” he assured everyone. Further tales of the foggy isles followed and all were glad that he had a good summer in merry Englari ’ Radio Waterloo took time out from anarchy and paused for a musical break, giving Page time to collect his thoughts or remembrances of England past. Back to the totally live, uncensored multi-media interview pursuing what ever the subject was one more time. Although listening staff and friends offered plenty of subjects for discussion, some of which went on the air, the idea of “federation president meets his constituents” seemed good. Up the stairs to the great hall dragged, mikes, cables, interviewee, interviewer and a multi-media on-looker to the milling crowd half listening, half dancing to the rock concert. Mostly ignored by the freshmen who were too busy looking at each other, Page greeted several friends on the air. But technology fell before the hand of man once more when Burko again disconnected the mike and the “state of the campus” interview mercifully ended. mercifully ended. Welcome to dynamic, politically aware uniwat.

add rules

must follow procedures September

1st.

According to the bulletin issued by W. R. Needham, associate dean, courses may be added or dropped during the first three weeks of the term in which they begin only with the signature of the instructor of the course and the undergraduate officer of the student’s major department. With lectures beginning Monday, this means that the drop and add period ends Friday October 1st at 5 Pm. After this time, courses may be added or dropped only with the permission of the examinations and standings committee acting on the recommendation of the course instructor and the undergraduate officer. The student must also show that such a change will serve his or her academic interest.

Courses offered during the summer sessions may be added or dropped during the first week in which the course begins only with the signature of the instructor and the undergraduate officer. After that time, the course may only be added or dropped with the permission of the examinations and standings committee and after the student follows and the same procedures as for the fall and winter terms. These procedures do not fall under the imaginary term ‘academic freedom.’ The change in regulations, according to Needham, was made because of the concern expressed both by the students and faculty. The arts faculty reviewed the drops and add procedures and made its reommendations for change during the pa?$year. During the winter term, which begins January lst, 1972, the drop and add period wilf end on January 25th.

udy Canada any student to get a Canadian touch to his education in a way that has not been available at any other Canadian university. Oddly enough, there are established Canadian studies programs at nine United States universities, including front-rank institutions like Johns Hopkins, Duke and Rochester; until the uniwat effort began a year ago, there was none in Canada. Carleton at Ottawa has a graduate program in Canadian studies, directed by Dr. Pauline Jewett, but nothing for undergraduates. Simon Fraser and Trent have been studying the Waterloo innovation in detail, with a view to copying it. The program is interdisciplinary. It is recognized by the economics, political science, history and geography departments as fitting into an honors

program in any of those departments. It is intended, for example, that anyone in honors political science who includes a Canadian studies course in each of his second, third and fourth years will earn a degree with a bracketed tag: political science (Canadian studies). The format of the 200-level course is of the scatter-gun type, aimed at the Canadian aspects of many topics. Lecturers come from the faculties of economics, history, earth sciences, geography, planning, biology, sociology, philosophy, english and fine arts. Several guest lecturers are also scheduled : for example, Dr. James Reaney , poet and playwright, of the english faculty at the university of western Ontario. Monday evenings, 7-9, in AL 1240nly at Waterloo can you get it.

friday 10 September 19il

(1213)

163

3


Gas for less

47.9@

chevron

M & M Marine

I

8, AM to 7

Weber

l

Avoid make

the the

(an open letter to you)

needs you !

PM CHARGEX

N. at Columbia

N STUDENTS’ Effective

September

10th

WEEKEND EXPRESS BUSES TO TORONTO UN VIA UNIVERSITY Frl Lv. University

Ave.

(at designated stops & south entrances

*Ar.

Toronto

& Columbia

Ave.

.

Frl

IZ;~VI

.

2:25pm

Lv. Toronto Terminal Ar. University

5:05pm

8:30pm 9:50pm

& 1050

pm

7:OOam

& 12:l

Oam

8:20am

355 . 520 7:20 9:05 lo:45

6:lO am - ext. Sat. & Sun 7:15 am - Sat 7:3O am - ext. Sat & Sun 8:3O am - ext. Sat. & Sun lo:20 am - daily * 12:55 pm - fri serves

pm pm pm pm pm

Fri. Fri. Sun. Fri. - Sun.

uniuersity

SAVE MONEY! BUY ” 10 - TRIP TICKETS I’ 10 tickets

have

$20’~ One Way

For Complete Telephone

$230~~

no expiry

(at & are

No news

Kitchener

Terminal)

of

your

Anyone interested in helping as a volunteer, please contact us at the office, or Janet Merrill at 745-8253. University life offers new f reedom to choose your own style of living, and to search out your own mental and emotional potential, but be responsible for your actions 7 to preserve that freedom. Avoid unwanted pregnancy.

university birth

of Waterloo

control

center

room 206, campus

center

open: IO-5 Mon. to Fri. T-!) pm. Tues. aud Thurs

is good

news?.

looking into the possibility of having insurance companies expand to the campus area. They would not like to see the buildings taken over by people who would not be ‘a source of pride and benefit to the community.’ About 800 professors will lose their jobs and their prospects of regaining employment, especially at this time, are very slim. It will be impossible to obtain jobs in this community which will pay as much as their university salaries for such a correspondingly small

summer

amount

warning

signs.

Since

of work

Rochdale may soon be forced to Unable to meet the mortgage leave its Toronto highrise, they are payments on the large homes, interested in the Waterloo campus, many professors will soon be selling out en masse and ata spokesman said. tempting to get accomodations for Officials at Waterloo city hall themselves and their families at arereported to be concerned about youth hostels. the university, the city’s largest K-W residents who are looking employer. If the university is for new homes would be smart to closed down, even temporarily, the wait for the bargains which will city’s welfare office will, again this soon be available in the formerly year, be swamped with ap- exclusive Beechwood and Westplications from all the newly-mount areas. unemployed In any case, the people of this Although a city council area will be watching developspokesman said they had not heard ments at uniwat very closely since of Rochdale’s interest, they are developments here could indicate concerned about what the campus either a boom or a bust for the buildings will be used for, and are entire community.

transferable

s5*25 Round

Trip

Information 742-4469

By-law changes threaten Wilmot township communes A by-law which seeks to restrict the number of unrelated persons

GRAY COACH LINES

the chevron

medically

termination

Although thousands of students have arrived on the university of Waterloo campus, it is not known now whether classes will begin on Monday. No one as yet has registered for the fall term. This summer many students hinted they would not retrun for the fall term. * The masses of students now on campus is apparently part of a magnificently executed hoax on the administration. Only Rochdale college in Toronto seems to have heeded the

living

4.164

therapeutic,

approved

Mon

COMPLETE EXPRESS SERVICE TO TORONTO FROM KITCHENER BUS TERMINAL

of

arrange

pregnancy. - Consult us any time, or wander into our office and pick up our free literature .

3Zirn

Sun

Books

Health Services saw, last year, between 250 and 300 students for unplanned pregnancy. The university of Waterloo birth control center helps an average of five female students a week during the school year. Most of these girls could have prevented their pregnancy if they had used a little foresight. However, most of them had either been irresponsible in their actions, did not know where to Obtain contraceptive methods without a hassel, or conceived during a spontaneous encounter and were not expecting to have interCOUrSe. The birth control center wishes to stress the importance of contraception, before intercourse occurs. We, at the center will offer information on contraception, sexual hang-ups and venereal disease. If you become pregnant, and are seeking abortion information, we will do all we can to

near north of campus)

Terminal

*

unwanted fat: love, not children

in

one

house

in

Wilmot

township will receive Ontario municipal board hearing at 11 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 4 in the Wilmot township council chambers. The hearing was announced Wednesday in g legal ad posted in the Kitchener daily. The by-law ” will re-define the term “family”, and is evidently aimed at communes and houses shared by young people. The current by-law defines family simply as “one or more persons living together as a single

and non-profit housekeeping unit.” The proposed by-law will change th;t definition to: . . .two or more persons related by blood, adoption or marriage and not more than three (3) persons who need not be related by blood, adoption or marriage, and in addition may include bona fide domestic and agricultual servant’s employed as such on the premises.” So, unless commune members are willing to hire on as servants to each other or adopt each other, they had best prepare to present opposition to the by-law at the hearing in Baden.


One-tier

l

government

The university senate and board of governors voted thursday to rescind their 1969 declaration of faith in “unicameralism” - a one-tier university government. In rejecting this principle, both bodies threw out three years of work by the committee which had been mandated to redraft the existing university of Waterloo act. The committee’s report, finally released last September recommended replacing the existing “senate” and “board” with a single “governing council” composed of 63 members. First indications that the‘ unicameralism report was doomed came before the committee’s final draft had been released with the appointment of Burton Matthews (a former vice-president at the university of Guelph) as the new administration president last july . Although Matthews never publicly admitted the committee’s work was futile he said on several occassions that he, himself, saw no reason why a “revised” form of bicameralism - senate and board of governors - would not work. He also promised not to take any new act proposal to Queen’s Park that lacked the confidence of what he termed a significant portion of the campus. As it stands now, the revised bicameralism plan that will be completed by the old act committee by november may be unacceptable to merely students. It is not known if students constitute a large enough portion of the campus to warrant Matthews’ refusal to offer revised bicameralism to Queen’s Park. Last rites for unicameralism then came this past june when the university senate ended a lengthy discussion of the report by passing a motion stating its approval of a revised form of the traditional senate-board structure. Also early in the summer, the board of governors struck a committee to make a recommendation to the full board in September on the advisability of accepting the unicameral report. Yesterday morning, preceding the joint boardsenate meeting, the board accepted its committee’s suggestion that a revised bicameralism form of government ~8s best for the university at this time. Reasons for senate’s action seem to revolve around a senate wish for more direct control over finances, presently the legally exclusive jurisdiction of the board. Senate seems to have counted on the one-tier concept of bringing previously specialized responsibilities before a broad governing council as justification for turning many board financial responsibilities over to the senate upon rejection of the one-tier plan. The board, on the other hand, would have lost its exclusive financial control if a one-tier governing body had been established.

dead

Because it was also the act committee’s intent to limit “outside” or non-university representation on the governing body to between 33 and 50 percent, the board of governors had good reason to protect itself by refusing the unicameralism proposal. So while the senate and the board spend the next month attempting to influence the committee’s final recommendation - the senate trying to wrest financial control from the board, and the board trying to keep this control - the question of student numbers on either group will be relegated to insignificance. For while at friday’s joint meeting, everyone gave verbal support to the question of student representation on the “revised” bodies, their proportion in relation to faculty, and the narrow restriction suggested by Matthews of leaving on either body at faculty numbers on either body at fixed totals was not questioned other than by student observer George Greene, federation of students vice-president Carl Sulliman and grad student union president Jay Beattie. Senate’s anxiousness to assume more and more board responsibility was reflected in remarks like those of senate member Jack Gray who stressed the nature of “privileges and duties” of the advisory senate with the board be written into the act. In describing senate’s role Gray used the word “oversee” but quickly corrected himself to say “revise” the actions of the board of governors. Acting on the prodding of observer and math professor R.A. Staal, the joint meeting empowered the continuing university act committee to recommend a definitive split in the duties to be eventually handled by the revised senate and board and legislation that would include two-thirds lay representation on the board of governors. Highlights of the discussion which will be considered by the committee include: @a proposal by history professor John New calling for extraordinary joint board-senate meetings when special issues - arise, aa suggestion by chemical engineering professor R.Y.M. Huang that student and faculty membership should be elected at-large and not by particular faculties, and ea charge by a graduate student that the new proposal would be “government by clique.” He said the proposal as referred to the committee placed measures laying out election of students to the governing bodies in the bylaws, where, conceivably, changes could be made to eliminate student representation. The student representation should be guaranteed in the formal act, itself, he said. The matter was left for the committee to deal with for final submission to board and senate by October or november.

PATIO DINING WESTERN STYLE GRUB IN KITCHENER- WATERLOO

SUNDAY Western

Style

Chicken

Platter -Price

79”

Roast Beef Sandwich and French Fries Price

79e

MONDAY Delicious

TUESDAY Fresh Ground

Tasty

l/4

1/4lb.

Western

lb. Cheeseburger Price

49” .

THURSDAY Western

Style

Quarter

Chicken

THIS OFFER EXPIRES SEW 3~7’ VALID WITH UNIWAT OR THIS AD. 2 Locations 2-10 King Waterloo 296 Fairway Kitchener

I.D.

at N

Rd. S.

CAMPUS

CORRAL

friday 10 September 1971 (12:13)

165 5


BERNIES AUTO SERVICE

Jocks

LTD8 King & Young Sts. Waterloo

MaAJOR & Minor - electronic - motor

tune-ups shampoo

- simonizing - service

Repairs

- carburetor

repairs

- batteries

- tires calls:

free

- free glassware

pick

up and delivery

redeemable

with

- Bernie

Riedel

member

of O.A.A.

group

Foreign

izii

n

contests

A first prize of $100 and a second prize of $50 will be awarded the winners. The essay should not exceed 3,000 words and should be typed. It can be submitted to Arum Kumar Palit, India Canada Association, department of chemical engineering, university of Waterloo. Deadline for contest submissions is Sept. 30.

student

center

liked

sored by isa and Conrad Grebel college. Eighty-nine per cent also said they would use the facilities of a magazine and newspaper library if one were set up. Rating last year’s activities 84 per cent of the students said international night was excellent or good and 75 per cent rated the movie series in the same categories. Only 21 students said they would be interested in living with a host family outside the university.

The results of a poll by the international students association seems to indicate that isa students are interested in the establishment of a centre for foreign students. Of the 263 students who returned the questionnaire, 87 per cent said they would like a centre which could include a lounge, cafeteria and other facilities. The students who responded to the questionnaire were also interested in attending discussions about different countries spon-

VEREND’SE for men

holds

An essay contest has been organized by the India Canada Association to promote understanding between the two countries. “democracy and population” and is open to students at the university of Waterloo, Waterloo luthern university and residents of the Kitchener-Waterloo area. Kitchener-Waterloo area.

742-1351

apparel

up

The track season will begin with a 5 pm meeting September 13 at Seagram stadium. The coach is A. Taylor. The team will also require a manager. Basketball, coached by D.McCrae, will have its first meeting Oct. 5, room 1083 in the athletic complex. October 18 at 5: 30 p.m. is the first meeting for the wrestling team coached by K.Boese. R. Graham, coach of the swimming teams, will schedule the first meeting at a later date. Squash, coached by S. Morgan, will also be scheduled later. The first hockey meeting will be 5:30pm October 18 at the athletic complex. Coach is R. McKillop.

our coupons

India Prop.

warming

Prospective participants in ten fall sports are invited to attend the first meetings in September and iearly October. coached by Tony rugger, Parker and Bruce Hadley, has met once last Wednesday. Practices are at Columbia field. The first soccer meeting will be at 5pm September 13, room 1083 in the athletic complex. It is coached by Brian Anable. Tennis coached by G. Buckley, will meet at 5pm September 15 at the Waterloo tennis club. Phone Buckley at extension 3788 before the meeting. The golf meeting will be announced later by coach J. Pearse.

I

and

Get off to a Good This year

JEANS

BE A RAPID

present

Carol Imhof

Playboys Miss

Dee

*

Triple

your

*

Special

*

Small

*

Written

classes

Pick entry

up free forms

at

Overends You could

reading

Rate -

money

Secure

1970

READER

present

Student

Start

& payment

Individual back

a.Seat

rate plan

attention

guarantee Now

for

FREE MINI LESSONS First

escort

week

of fall

semester

(seating

limited)

Write

or Phone

Miss Imhof to dinner LW -19

KING

Open

6

St.

Mon-Sat

166 the

chevron

N.

Waterloo

9-6

Thurs

743-2254 & Fri

til 9

at

the Ali Baba Consultat prizes

ion too

THE RAPID READING CENTRE

576-7880 Suite 24 125 King St. W. Kitchener


swallowedup

by the monolithic corporations from Canada’s that exirac t resources inid-north, the people of MidCanadanotably french-speaking and Indians-have long suffered the Canadian government policy of helping industry, not people. Mid-Canadians, who are a minority in every political jurisdiction and every political party except the Creditistes, are 44 percent french speaking. They are people whose communities begin life as camps and end as ghost-towns; whose wealth is taken for the benefit of people who live somewhere else.Presented in this feature, to be concluded next week, is the adapted transcript from a special hour-long CBC Weekend report on Mid-Canada aired on television in both english and french last march.

THE TOWNS OF MID-CANADA PARTONE THE COMPANY Design:

Alex

Smith

friday

10 September

1971

(12:

13)

167 7


Sudbury Ontario Real estate development is slow because no Falconbridge management can predict the future city of Mid-Canada. In this vital respect, Sudbury town, but Sudbury is none-the-less a producer of base metals, copper, zinc, and especially nickel. been steady and wages have remained high.

Oh,

that means

about

two

miles

from

one but Into or of this, the largest is still a company highly marketable Employment has

T

Bathurst...

HE PROBLEMS OF Mid-Canada are not confined to the poor. It is a regiqn that can make use only of those human potentialities and skills required by the industries that exploit its resources of wood and metaLthe vision of its businessmen, the skills of its women; the potential of its youth are mostly unused.

Yea.

How

much

money

450

dollars.

About

For five

do you

months

earn

a year?

of work?

Yea.

You earn

about

one hundred

dollars

a month.

Yea.

And after those five months: you work somewhere e/se? Not for a while.

0

cutting - -N NEW BRUNSWICK’S north-shore wood for-C&&&dated Bathurst Pulp and Paper company is the only sure cash income the farmer sees. Twenty percent of the population of the province is now on welfare or on unemployment insurance. Here, subsistence farming has existed for 200 years, wood operations are scattered, uneconomic and unorganized. Poorer even than the farmers are the men who are out to cut pulp for the farmers, union organizer Michel Henri blames their plight on the pulp and paper industry. k guy who’s working in the wood is making probably, I don’t know, about 60 cents an hour$1.25 an hour-it’s an impossible life. They have to pay for their own equipment; in the woods and work mostly very poorly organized.

they have by hand.

to walk They’re

What about the faimers they work get more money out of them?

for? Could

Well

money

paper

the farmer

doesn’t

get more

from

they the

mill.

HOW old are you? Twenty. HOW long have Oh, about-about

you

been

working

5 months.

Five months-but then your Oh, mostly all my life. Where are you from ? St. Ann’s.

Where’s that? just below the

in the woods?

What

We

farm.

work

in the

And

what

Oh,

working

How

tobacco

do you

long

do there

on the

do you

it lasts-july.

do you do there?

in the tobacco

farm?

tobacco.

stay

\

there?

Six weeks.

And how much Oh,

about

do you get for six weeks?

900.

Which means that you get double in six weeks than what you get here in four, five months? That’s

right.

And the rest of the year-because, have six months left, what do you Mostly

nothing;

Are you No. why? We’re

we

then

not

got

nothing

I mean do?

you

stamps.

Well, if you had those stamps, would you then be happy to be on unemployment? Or would you try to search to find some other... Oh yea...but the stamps.

Are

you

I’m

married.

How

long

I prefer

single

to work

you

been

Oh,

going

on

married?

6 months.

not

too

many;

you’re

food

to eat.

earning

you

some.

do you think is the hardest from your work itself, for earning

you

banking

in the

the

chevron

some and

community is that it’s we’re more or less

to

the Spruce Falls pulp across the river there. is good over there, it’s good

In the event of a business situations, then of course town is retarded.

and paper When the in the town.

slow-down the economy

or

strike of the

What about the normal -mortgages for instance. Are they hard to come-by in the north?

for you in life? instance.

They maybe demand the impossible...banks are normally accused of being pretty cautious in this country. Are you less cautious in the north? That’s a leading questior!. We’re ,not less cautious. The policy of the bank is set up for the whole of Canada. However, I think we go out of our way in the north to attract business. We’ll go out and ask for it-more so than in the south.

Thompson is a B-year old mining camp, struggling with some success to become a community. It’s high wage population, now numbering 21 thousand, seems assured of steady work, so long as International Nickel maintains its position as the world’s number s on.e supplier of nickel -and so long as the mine continues to produce. Thompson’s municipal government is now established, but how much can a municipality tax an industry in a one-industry, onecompany town? How independent can a municipal council be when one company determines the very size of the community? And decides when and if expansion will take place. Almost everywhere in Mid-Canada democracy operates under the restraint that few people are economically independent of the company that established the community in the beginning. 168

south

is the difference!

Thompson Manitoba

8

found

Unfortunately in this area the major leaders, such as life insurance companies, don’t seem prepared to enter into the mortgage field.

And do you think with what can afford to have children? Oh yea,

than

or married?

have

about

more

I suppose

Definitely.

married company economy

enough

s a banker

The prime difference in this a one-industry town and

on unemployment?

got

A

differences between banking up here. What

to do.

on that.

why? I haven’t

What Apart airport.

go up until

In july you go to Ontario.

Oh,

life?

We only

what do you do? Do

W

e/l,

rnk

coming to college he where you had mall\ working mother wou employment. I don’ many small industr community that WC ployment for women

Are

there

as many

I would

think

There’s

no sort

No,

There

there’s

jc

no . . .

of ini

no outsid

wouldn’t

be th,

No. Do you think this is a You say one is at t coming back again? No,

Why

I don’t

think

so.

not!

Well, I think she like; us up here are import because it’s our breac from some other plan And she’s now in Ha Niagara Falls and . . .


Brunswick “The

wide-spread

and depressing

levels of poverty,

mental and physical - of squalor, ignorance most communities economic

of northern

brief to a New Brunswick

-

and idleness affecting

New Brunswick

decisions of the forestry

disease

are the result

sector of our economy.”

of

-

A

Royal Commission.

arrived haven’t shared in any of this at all. They still remain 40 miles outside of Thompson, they still live in abject poverty, they still have difficulty hiring on with these companies. Now, of course, every company vice-president sort of thing-you’ve one to prove to the rest of Canada discriminate cerned, this

TI \

M

in experience prior to lyas in southern Ontario nail industiies; where a obtain part or full time ?aily feel that we have or businesses in the provide regu tar em-

OST OF THE JOBS are down there’s any to be had here-because only two architects in Timmins. Dbes the school try to find jobs for you? job...

for

Only one out of six, I think, got a job. Two went back to school, and the other two are just hanging around, I guess...doing anything but architecture.

women

here!

Lry except ldustry jobs,

the at all.

then,

od place university-

for

for

mill? ’ women?

your kids? will she be

jt.hern Ontario. Most of you know, we are here Id butter, blrt we came At least a lot of us did. ton and my home is in

They

do,

but...it’s

south-if there are Does

the

hard.

What do you mean “hard?” the graduates had trouble

Do you mean getting jobs?

last year

Why are you in the course then, seem to be much job future?

if there

doesn’t

I really like the stuff, but if there’s have to do something else.

no job in it, I’d

HE F/RST B/C M/N/NC camp in Mid Canada was CobaIt, Ontario, where silver was discovered at the turn of the century. Ray Clattenberg has four children and owns a home in Cobalt. They just phoned from the south and said to shut everything down, and left us unemployed at 2 o’clock in the afternoon, on november 13th, 1970. NOW, WHO IS “THEY?” Well, truthfully, I don’t really know. I understopd the company was taken over by some other company which decided to close this portion of the holdings that we have. It’s pretty deep. It gives you a feeling of insecurity. There’s no words to explain the sudden impact of just being laid off with no place to obtain money, except maybe welfare or some such thing that would lower your standards and make you feel like a real low-class individual. I don’t think this is necessary at all in this country of ours.

in hiring policy.As is tokenism.

has its indian got to have that you don’t far

as I’m

con-

I have a feeling that general managers or people in personnel departments or even the president of lnco of Canada are more concerned in making the dollar That’s

than quite

they are obvious.

I was very fortunate people at their best; they was at that time-that’s

in

human

develo@ment.

because I met indian n&er knew what welfare 1953.

And in the five years that I lived there, I saw three drunk people. It was sort of a joke; it wasn’t a bad thing, it was sort of a nice thing to see somebody drunk once in a while. But they danced a lot, their sports were terrific. I just met lndian people at their very best, and from that tin&on I’ve seen them go down and down and dow&o that it disturbs me emotionally. Violence is there, you know-they’re beating each other, they’re killing each other, they’rethey have a drag down system where the only violence that they have is against themselves.”

Do you think most of the young people here that you know, some of your friends, want to stay here-or wou/d they like to work elsewhere? Well they would like to work elsewhere for sure, because there’s not much jobs around here, we can’t find jobs to go around-looking for jobs, and we can’t. Have you some friends who are now looking for jobs?

have

quit

school

Some of them are looking for jobs, and the’m are just hanging around and doing

who

some of nothing.

\

W

Next week, PART TWO. THE COLONY. EL!. THE ONE

eyes about northern the people who were

CRY/NC

development here before

SHAME

in my

is the fact that the development

TimminsOntario

To the north, the once thriving gold mining towns of Kirkland Lake and Timmins have been depressed for 20 years. In the last 10 years, 4 mines have closed in Timmins alone. Cold miners make 2 dollars less per hour than base metal miners at Sudbury. Most are without pensions, and they are bitter. No. section of Canada has as high a percentage ot american ownership as Mid-Canada, but the original developers of the northern Ontario gold fields were all Canadian. The total value of gold production in the mines in Timmins to this year is one and a half billion dollars-practically none of it was re-invested in the community. In the past it was* accepted that when a mine ran out the community that depended on it would disappear. Nowadays, it is better politics, better public relations to pretend that this doesn’t happen. But the reality hasn’t changed. friday 10 September 1971 (1213’)

169

9

.


by Reg

Friesen

the chevron

Tonight after an abscence of ten Stratford will once more open a film festival. Labelled the

of Strindberg’s Dance of Death. On Wednesday September 15 at 9 pm, emillio DeAntonio will present

7th Stratford International Film Festival, it will present many new

Millhouse:

years,

-GET

YOUR AND

ONE

CHANCES WE’RE

ENTRY

ARE

GIVING OF

OUR

FORM

GREAT AWAY SUPER

‘4’

FOR

EVERY

-- THIS

DRAW

TRIPS.

COME

SPECIAL

ON

L

$10 YOU

IS FOR

STAR

IN NOW

THESE

“EASY

AND

PURCHASE

CUSTOMERS TAKE

(Across From Waterloo Square) The home of the famous. . .

ONLY

ADVANTAGE

REDBARONSTEAK HOUSE

PIECES”‘.

(Monday

Specials)

Dining

in Qur

JliMmdm3Rom Entertainment weekend

every in our

PUB

l DOWNTOWN 213

KING

OPPOSI

KITCHENER ST.

TE

.DOWNTOWN 10

KING

THEATRE

10

170

the

l DOWNTOWNGALT

W.

11

DUTCH

BOY

FOODS

JUST

WATERLOO ST.N.

chevron

THE

AINSLEE OFF

l DOWNTOWN

BETWEEN AND

THE “LOO”

Corned-y,

and exciting films, including, for !those who wish to wallow in nostalgia, a Mary Pickford Festival. The Mary Pickford festival will begin Saturday September 11 at Children. 7pm. The movie that will be shown At the festival there will be is My Best Girl which was first something for the little monsters released in 1927. There will be nine On Saturday September 11 at of the more than fifty movies made 10:30am Julian Brian will present by this star shown between Sepa series of films in a unique way. tember 11 and 19. One movie , What is different about this nightly will be shown at the Avon presentaion is the fact that the theatre at 7pm. little tykes are actively involved in In the realm of newer films, the what is going on. September 18 at festival opens with the North 10: 30am The Railway Children will American premier of Sir be shown. It is a British film set in the Victorian era. Lawrence Olivier in the production

41 KING N WATERLOO

VISIT OUR FREAK

A White

At llpm on the same evenmg Mike Gray .will present his black panther film: The Murder Of Fred Hampton. To close the festival Stanley Kramer will present his latest film: Bless the Beasts and

139

WYNDHAM

ON

THE

ST.

N.

MAIN

GUELPH ST. SQUARE


WENER Adrian Pecknold’s Canadian Mime Theatre performed at Stratford’s Third Stage august 24th through to august 29th. The programme consisted of a series of sketches put on by the five members of the troupe, ranging in contest from slap-stick humour to moving and profound portrayals of man. A bare stage, scanty use of props, and effective lighting were all conducive to a relaxed and unpretentious atmosphere in the theatre, so rare in the fields of professionalism, as were the pillows scattered on the floor for those who dared to brave pins and needles and aching backs. The involvement demanded by this performance escalated as the audience began to realise that a slight aversion of the eyes meant minimal, if any comprehension of the incidents dipic ted. The implications of a technique such as mime could be astounding

ihe chevron

to an embracing audience, the reactions unpredictable. What we witness is the portrayal of man in his day to day activity unhampered by the binding parameters of words, but laboring nonetheless under the burden of social norms and customs, often atrocities, which could only appear as absurd without verbal rationalization. Stripped of the tool of words, we see him childlike, awed by the beauty of simplicity-afloating balloon, a flower - being denied the occasion of distancing himself from his experience with words. As illustrated by the mime, only occasionally does man’s behavior transcend the strictures of specific cultures, becoming a more humanly(i.e. universally) understandable expression which is basically emotive, barring nitpicking societal codes of ethics. It is here that emotional strain and or drain is experienced, mime

drawing heavily on empathizing and identifying rather than verbal intercourse. The most effective performance of this type was ‘man and woman’, where Adrian Pecknold and Margaret Lamarre sped us through time, discreetly enacting for us the cycle of birth, love, child-birth, old age, and death, a timeless universal process. utilizing incidental BY phenomena which constitute our culture, the troupe held to us a looking glass in which we saw ourselves and laughed, were horrified, or shamed-their interpretation of audiences, shot-gun weddings, and the daily, suburban happy hour being only a few. Only through intense study and training of the body and facial expression on the part of the troupe were we able to share that evening of pleasure, with them and for that we are grateful.

“Pledge your troth Not your bankbook” 8 King Street East

D’ya dig the blues? You’ll get your chance to glut yourself on talent next Saturday, September 18. Appearing in the physed building, at 8 : 30pm, will be Buddy Guy (above) and Junior Wells; both are second generation negro bluesmen, rated by the all-time great B. B. King as the best in the field, the “men who are gonna have to carry on.’ Wells is a specialist on the blues harp having learned his trade from the immortal Sonny Boy Williamson; Guy is a master of the blues guitar,

noted for the sheer speed of his directly and sharing it with others. runs and complexity of melody. Still not convinced? Perhaps If thats not enough to pack the you’ll be satisfied by the music of house you could tantalize yourself Waters and John Lee with the thought of ‘Mississippi’ Muddy Hooker; both Waters and Hooker Fred McDowell, a country blues strove for many years to get their artist who’ll bring a wholly new blues recorded and put before style of talnet to Waterloo. Mclarge audiences, working long Dowell’s experience grew out of hours at demanding jobs and the agonies of the sharecropper’s writing and playing on the side. life; his blues don’t depend on a Both men take their place with the formal message but move directly cream of modern blues talent. on an emotional level. McDowell’s The concert is presented by the understanding of blues sees it as a federation of students as part of cathartic act,-a way of overcoming *personal pain by confronting it the orientaion program.

friday 10 September 1971 (12: 13) 171 1 1


CHARBROILED

feedbac

STEAKS

Sea Food Italian Food Pigstails Business Men’s Luncheons 77 KING ST, N., WATERLOO,

ONT.

Residents

578-9640

l

Let Us

RENT

at as little

3.50

a week

as (min.

8 wks.)

B New 1971 models C Giant 19” screens

Turn

On To

Closed

Mondays

744-3528

OPEN

‘Til 6 daily

Thurs.

& Fri. til 9.

295 Lancaster W. Lancaster Plaza

claim

hump

We, the residents of Minota Hagey, wish to bring to your attention a matter which has been discussed here during this past year and even before, but which has never been given sufficient attention by those in authority. The matter is that of the dangerous section of the ring road which lies just at the end of our driveway. This section consists of a rather sharp curve, which, due to the bank by the new psychology building now under construction, is blind in both directions. The situation is complicated by the fact that our driveway, and also an exit to University avenue, lead directly onto the curve, creating an additional hazard for oncoming traffic in both directions. We are aware that there is a well-posted speed limit of 20 m.p.h. on the ring road, but we are also aware that this limit is not enforced, particularly at night. These factors, together with gravel on the road, no sidewalk on one side, and the fact the curve is not banked, make driving, bicycle riding and walking on that section of road perilous, to say the least. There have been many nearaccidents on that curve, several minor accidents, and a few major ones. Fortunately, as of yet there have been no fatal ones. But the occurrence of fatal accidents, under these conditions, is only a

will cause accidents matter of time. Some day or night, some pedestrian, bicyclist , or motorist is going to die on that curve. We would like to see something done before it is too late. With all the construction now taking place on campus, particularly that of the new psychology building in this area, could not something be done to remove that hump which obstructs vision on the curve? Could the curve be banked? Could the speed limit be enforced? Could the sidewalk which ends so abruptly just past the humanities building be extended around the. curve, so that pedestrians are not forced to cross over to the parking lot to walk further, hoping meanwhile that a car they cannot see will not round the curve and hit them, the cross-walk notwithstanding? Surely something can be done to make this dangerous section of road safer for all users. Ruth Dickinson M.M. Cox Caroline Baycroft Margaret MacBeath Barbara Ann King Barbara Pewkis Lorain Lightfoot June Lester Philip English M.R. Debson and others, Minota Hagey residence

PIZZA 744-4447 Campus residence deilvery is always FREE Pizza Palace 347 Weber

street

north,

at

Columbia

Getting Organized? Giveus a call at 742-1582 We have new and used rentals -typewriters -desks -adding machines -calculator -file cabinets ...etc...

Lockhart delivery at no extra chrarge * OPEN: Mon thru Sat. -9am-9pm Sun - lZam-9pm 1 2

172

the

chevron

578-29 IO

par;<dale mall albert & hazel POST OFFICE Mon. - Sat. 9 am - 6pm

Office 659 King St. W. Open ‘tit 8 P.M. . free delivery.


edbac

Address letters to feedback, the chevron, U of W. Be concise. The chevron reserves the right to shorten letters. Letters must be typed on a 32 charac ter line. For legal reasons, letters must be signed with course year and phone number. A pseudonym will be printed if you have a good reason.

Now buildine in

BEECHW-bOD AREA Criticism

by cliche

runs amuck

Dear Sir: Pardon me if my slip is showing. Perhaps I should have started as dear madam. Regardless, the following are a few comments from the-other side of the fence. Reasons being, I have offspring attending three Waterloo. They think for themselves and I must admit I enjoy that fact. They stand on their own two feet and do what they think is right. Nobody tells them what they should or should not do. Neither do they blame someone else for their mistakes. I nearly used the word failures. They have no failures or mistakes they cannot correct with their own decisions. Perhaps ‘you get my point. Chevron has made mistakes and are proving themselves as failures by the fact of attempting to blame someone else. So our P.E.T. is not to everybody’s satisfaction. He couldn’t care less. He has a job to do and when he is satisfied, I am quite sure he will be only too glad to step down and hand over the reins to someone less qualified. You would say employment positive or negative is his fault. You will know his finances are exorbitant and he is spending in such a way that people are receiving without the feeling of ’ receiving a handout, then again perhaps this is what is wanted. Something for nothing. Nobody gives anybody anything for nothing. Unemployment is the result of people who are not primarily interested in work but how much will you give me. Particularly when you have nothing to offer in return. Not even loyalty to the ‘person who would

Indian

leaders

give. Work there is in abundance. Much has to be done. Priorities are being decided as to which item of work should be completed first. Why should there not be a necessity for priorities? Why can’t all the items of toil be done at once? Why is there such an abundance of unemployed when there is so much to do? People will not work unless they are paid. The last word is the most important word ever uttered. The people who control the purse-strings are the very people who want to get work and get paid. They would like to put in one pocket out of the other pocket. Senseless. I fully believe the editor of the Chevron is a very dedicated and clever person male or female but until he or she will undertake to perform a service and not expect someone else to pick up the tab, then and only then will unemploy men t cease. Capitalistic or imperialistic systems, whatever they are, may not be the answer to all problems but any system will satisfy some of the people some of the time, but it will not satisfy all of the people all of the time. We of the older generation are now dependent on the wisdom of the younger generation. Our experiences are being passed on to you whatever they are for, whatever use they can be and we see the same mistakes being performed before our eyes. You in turn will attempt to pass on your knowledge and see mistakes being performed before your eyes with all the knowledge you have gleaned over the years of your life. One and one are basically two. But

will not accept

The political issue that caused the turmoil in East Pakistan was nothing less than the question whether a handful of extremist politicians had any right to break one country into two without a clear mandate for such a course from the people whom they represented in East Pakistan. The people of East Pakistan voted for provincial autonomy and not for disintegration of the country. The movement which was suppressed in East Pakistan was that of secession, not autonomy, and none should pretend that secession was treason at home, it self-determination could be abroad. In no country of the world is it held a reasonable aspiration for people belonging to one part of the state to separate and claim independence themselves. There could be neither sense nor stability in international life and international relations if any such right or custom was upheld. For any power to support such moves or to condone them is a negation of the United Nations charter as well as the Bandung Principles. The open and unashamed interference by India in this situation in Pakistan had only one objective, i.e. to inflame the situation further by encouraging and materially assisting a handful of people to create disturbances. India abruptly stopped the flow of canal water to Pakistan’s parched lands. She seized Junagarh on the ground that its population was Hindu and Kashmir on the ground that its ruler was Hindu. In 1965, she struck at Pakistan with outright invasion of the western wing

. . . “we will play our hand to the end”

fact of Pakistan

across the international frontier. In 1962, when India invaded Portugese Gova, India was strangely silent on this matter. The late ambassador of USA, Adlai Stevenson, raised the matter at the UN, and Indian ambassador 8. K. Nehru blandly replied that Gova was a part of India anyway, and therefore no body was being invaded. And on Feb. 5, 1964 when Pakistan called for UN action to carry out a promised plebscite in Kashmir, India’s ambassador Chagla replied that what happened in Kashmir was India’s own business and that the principle of gelf-deter-mination could not be applied to bring about the fragmentation of a country. The root cause of the IndiaPakistan trouble is that India has never really accepted the fact of Pakistan. Even its responsible topranking leaders like Vallabhai Pate1 are on the record as desiring the reunification of Bharat, the “Hindu Motherland”. In a bid to fulfil this desire India is sparing no stone unaltered. India’s designs were eloquently articulated the other day by Mr. Subramaniam, director of Indian institute of defence studies, in an address to the institute of international affairs, when he said:“what India must realize is the fact that the break-up of Pakistan is in our interest, an opportunity the like of which will never come again”. The recent Indian-Russian military pact is another step to strengthen her expansionist movements in that part of the world. Javaid I. Khan Chem. Eng.

Driced from $38.000

Hnmes

the square root of one will always be less. We the older generation see no answers to our mistakes and it is now too late to solve the question by us. Conversely we do not see the younger generation providing the answer. Their questions are the imitation of our ques%& With such potentiaT, why should any person be without employment? Someone has to produce an i&a whereby this potential of natural wealth be explored and made productive and what better someone than the present generation with the wealth of knowledge it possesses. But to sit and say, “give us this and give us that” and offer nothing in return is surely foolishness. Who is going to give you what? What are you asking for? A statement of fact. For example, should it be that I have something, obviously this something is not what you want, but you would want to change it into something you want. Fair? Not so. I am enjoying what I have made. You now make something you can enjoy and do not tamper with my life. If you do not have the means to make them;acquire the means. But not by down-grading someone else in the process. What you accept as the facts of life and what you would consider to be your due you have not earned by the sweat of your brow. The respect of your fellowman is the same fashion. The rat-race of present day world has no place for the untrustworthy.

s’fjoee’boppes’

But anything they make themselves is an item of glorious excellence because it was made by the only person interested. Your news media has powers beyond imagination, though it is unfortunate these powers are being used in a reverse direction. The thoughts of your generation can be improved with ideas. Not assistance. Even your readers do not want you to think for them. Offer constructive as opposed to destructive criticisms. Dreams are the basics of all real production. Give nothing but encouragement. A pat on the back is worth more than all the money in this universe. You have the power to do this thing. Use it wisely and often and well. The youth of today can be trustedin knowledge and experience. Physically and mentally they are excellent. I w.ould suggest to you that the will to win is somewhere lost in the shuffle. A hand has been dealt and they are at a loss as to how to play the hand. Five card stud and what are the percentages of a pot. Or do we just throw in the hand and say give me another chance. Ability to decide. Willingness to throw in the towel at the first chance. Quit before you start, because the opposition looks like too much. Where is the hand played on a bluff? Has everything got to be a sure thing? We the older generation have been dealt a hand in this poker game and we still have cards in our hand, nothing wild. But we have a heavy stake on the green baize. The youth of our country. We are not going to throw in our hand just because the grass in another field looks greener. We will play our hand to the bitter end. Will you do likewise?

Jump out of bed ahd into your tie-ups. Ieathers,

Brown, Black Tan- Navy & Rust Suede.

By Brayco.

oniy $17.99

Handbag in leather or Suedes. All colors o~bN7.99 Open Thursday and Friday nita! C.O.D. orders accepted:’ Credit -and Chargex dards fionored.

196 KING W. KITCHENER *“Design

J. Keill

and world trademarks in Canada ot the Village Shoe ShoDpes Ltd.“.

friday

10 September

1971 (1213)

173

13


“...Steal two lobsters?”

!The Yippie cop-out of Rubin, Hoffman, Et Al. 1

A’ 1

fter

reading

Dotson

Rader’s

recent review of “Steal This Book” in the Times, I regret more than ever that I did not perform “inventory shrinkage” on Abbie Hoffman’s latest piece of verbal theater. Abbie’s fantasy manual is an elitist shuck, containing more deceptive advertising per page than Standard Oil has employed since Rockefeller Sr. plowed the proles under to create his empire. Abbie is no gentle mother, rather a fraud dangerous to hisown brood. He is no cultural revolutionary of “the people,” rather a self-serving, uppermiddle-class huckster who has been into put-on politics for so long now that he’s been taken in by his own delusions. Partly for that reason one sorely suspects that the very method of production and distribution of the book is an act of theater. The publishing industry is arcane, inconsistent, and corrupt enough, but I cannot, in all honesty, believe the quoted rationales of 30 publishers for not taking the book, rationales which Hoffman and Associates themselves (guerrilla capitalists as they are at heart) use to hype sales by advertising “This Book Will End Free Speech.” That threat is one Abbie constantly has to parade because he couldn’t survive otherwise (which, too, is why sometimes friend Jerry Rubin votes for Ronnie Reagan and urges his sympathizers to follow suit). Of course, Abbie has always claimed that free speech means the right to yell “Fire!” in a crowded theatre; and, although strict constructionalism will pass on that right, it’s about time somebody advised Abbie’s brood that they are the theatre goers, and are sorely being used, co-opted, rippedphrase from the hip off - or whatever dictibnary you want. Abbie has had more access to “channels of communication designed to reach the entire population” than most of us will s&e ‘in a lifetime, and to complain that this third season re-run of Hoffmania is being “suppressed” (however seemingly accurate the charges may be) is a ludicrous cover-up for still another put-on. For “Steal This Book” is essentially a padding out of Hoffman’s earlier freestore pamphlet, “Fuck the a pamphlet which Abbie also System”, for the Hell,of appended to “Revolution It” in 1968, photo offset on half-page size. In case you missed it, along with the redundant politic, the first two times around (and on the second occasion because you couldn’t read it), Abbie now rehashes it all in a new and convenient “anthology.” “Steal This Book” does wrap together some half-bits of hard information hitherto available only in Mobil Tratiel Guides, hip cook books, and various doit-yourself kits (Abbie is really a product of Middle American culture, however much he may try to hide the fact), to which is added a decent descriptive bibliography and a number of lists for the essential counter-culture man: undergroud newspapers, free universities, communes, draft counseling services, and “community switchboards.” I suppose this anthology might be of use to some pimply 12-year-old who has

14 . 9.74

the

chevron

never heard of venereal disease, and is leaving his neat suburban block for the first time in his life. But he shouldn’t follow mother Abbie’s advice too assiduously. He might wind up sorely disillusioned, or even hurt. Of course such results are essential to the puppet theatre of a man who has deceptively claimed that he’d rather ride in the back of the bus. In point of fact, he’s driving, and will count on the kids to blame everyone else in “Amerikkka” when the bus crashes. Just to engage the sympathies of the audience, he adds a pile of com,ic visions to the program. Now who could be angry with Harpo Marx, even from jail? But the jail, too, is an essential set for this Artaud mass pantomime. Abbie is out to build an antination of “outlaws,” and in order for the non-politics of that nation to have any hope of sustaining itself, its citizens must first do some time in Amerikkka. %Abbie will think of any way he can to lure his children to prison. Burglary, larceny, and fraud thus become “political crimes” by his usual self-serving definition. “Steal This Book,” then, is a streetcorner hustler’s gag. It comes on with a tone of “Psst! Hey! You wanna buy some dirty pictures?” Better still, “You wanna buy a great, bridge?” I add that oldie-butgoodie because essentially, much of the book consists of “information” any eightyear-old already possesses, or available to the common sense of any teenager. But two possible theories are lurking here: either the audience is composed wholly of functional morons, a very frightening possibility, indeed, or Abbie has such contempt for his chicks that he assumes them all to have such minimal experience and oi intelligence that they have to be told that fire burns. How far a throw from that warning is Hoffman’s advice to his counter-culture “thieves” to carry doggybags into all-you-can-eat smorgasbord restaurants as a way of copping aa few extra meals? Or to write companies complaining that their last box of cereal was half-full (thereby “copping” a free box of cereal)? Or to go to the Salvation Army for cheap clothes? Or to build bookcases out of bricks and boards, use cable spools for tables, or construct couches from cinder blocks, old doors, and foam rubber?

ust

how simplistic this Dickand-Jane stuff for 18-year-olds I .,becomes is more than amply illustrated in Hoffman’s chapter on free travel. Here’s a big hip momma Abbie on riding boxcars: “If you’re traveling at night, be sure to dress warmly. You can freeze your ass off....You’ll get dirty on the trains so wear old clothes.” Look ma, there goes a cow! And in case you missed it on the telly, the cheapest way to get somewhere for nothing is to (gasp!) hitch-hike - except that you might be asked by a cool driver who also read “Steal This Book” to pay for gas. And

when Abbie adds in another condescension, “When you hit the road you should have a good idea of how to get’ where you are going. You can pick up a free map at any gas station,” we begin to consider the very serious proposition that what Charlie Reich described was a new Neanderthal age. Hoffman’s own Dick-and-Jane mentality, however, reveals itself when he comes to deal with the heavier, more complicated, and more intriguing forms of rip-off, such as connecting one’s own phone lines into the general trunk system, tapping cable tv lines, and income taxes. Basically, of course, Abbie cops out into vagueries on such items. On the last, for example, this J. K. Lasser of the underground counsels: “Read all the fine print for Tax Form 1040 and discover all the deductible loopholes available to you. You should wind up paying no taxes at all or having all the taxes that were deducted from your pay reimbursed.” That’s it for taxes, folks, and presumably for the same people that have to be told that it’s cold at night in moving boxcars or that “farm land is measured in acreage; an acre being slightly more than 43560 square feet.” Can you conceive of Abbie’s assumed group of functional illiterates doing their taxes, or going to the library to look “at any basic text in criminology” in order to gain “an understanding of how pigs act in the street”? John Simon of Random House, for example, a man who holds a reputation for turning down manuscripts on the grounds that they’re “not radical enough,” is undoubtedly discriminating enough to recognize a poor counterculture shuck when he reads one. The name “Abbie Hoffman” might in itself sell books, but a piece that has the audacity to provide, as one of its seven “cheap chow” recipes, instructions not merely for preparing boiled lobster (boil lobster, melt butter), but also for how to eat it (“and dip the lobster pieces in it” the butter - “as you eat”), is more than worthy of any publisher’s rejection slip. The lobster business (in Abbie’s clever collection of recipe titles, “Hedonist’s Deluxe,” which staggeringly complicated recipe depends wholly on the initial direction, “Steal two lobsters” - period!) should obviously uncover one of the major self-contradictions of “Steal This Book.” It turns out that much of the first and last thirds of the book comprise not a manual for mere survival (as Hoffman bills it, and Rader shills it), but for survival in the manner to which the audience has been accustomed. That manner follows the life-style of the Upper East Side, or, better still, of a wealthy suburban brat who attended Worcester Academy and Brandeis.

hat is, “steal” is a euph_emism, for all too many of Abbie’s i”survival” projects require a good deal of venture capital. The only conceivable audience for those projects consists of those who have already read about them in New York magazine: the crowd that can “invest in a freezer” for those “monthly trips to the wholesale markets,” the crowd that can shell out “$8000” for land for a commune. If these projects are meant for the kids hanging dround free stores, they’re just teasing fantasies. The most elaborate of these fantasies thoroughly convinces me that Hoffman cannot really be distinguished from that nauseating breed of young New Politics man who addresses both the poor and the working class in a language that only Upper West Side Reform Democrats with M. As in Romance Languages can even get their mouths around, let alone understand. This particular project concerns what Abbie enticingly terms “food conspiracies,” pretending that the name alone will give his followers the chance to become white niggers. “Food conspiracies” form by bringing together “20 communes, collectives, or community organizations” that you happen to find lying around in nearly every city, and forming a good buying cooperative (a novel idea, oh boy). This cooperative initially raises about $2000 from its members, a sum which Abbie thinks will cover the following: “a storefront or garage, a cheap truck” (registration, insurance, etc., presumably to be handled later?), “some scales, freezers” (note the plural), “bags, shelving, chopping blocks, slicer, and whatever else you need” (maybe some lobster traps and a boat?). Abbie is not talking aboirt establishing a cooperative supermarket after the Berkeley or Hyde Park Co-ops here. It’s important to keep that fact in perspective for a number of reasons, not the least of which is Abbie’s outlaw elitism. The mark of the upper-middle-class life-style informs other Hoffman schemes. Stealing a ride on an airplane? As long as you’re at it, steal the headphones so that the next time you fly, you can treat yourself to a free in-flight movie. Or how about a free vacation for two to Las Vegas for a mere $23? All the comforts of home. Self-revelation is the most telling form of self-mockery, and only a social elitist playing revolutionary could dream up the ruse for obtaining a free meal by attending a bon-voyage party on a soon-to-be-departing ship. If you forget to debark, why you may th& add a free cruise - and one back from the first port after you’re discovered. I suppose that if one is locked in a permanent state of suburban adolescence there’s nothing better to do in America than to cruise to Bermuda or For Abbie himself, no Southampton. doubt, it wouldn’t be a first.

T


meal for Abbie’s ! , er free humble readers comes by investing $5 (the cost of five deceit proletarian meals unless one is accustomed to eating at Max’s Kansas City after bopping into town in the $2000 super-beetle) in business cards stamped with “a good name” form the masthead of a gourmet magazine. These cards are then presented to managers of “fancy restaurants” who will then “insist that the meal be on the house.” ‘This gimmick is strictly for the super-rich, unless Abbie himself is even more naive than appearances. Ever hear of Craig Claiborne identifying himself at a restaurant? Managers know the rules of that game, and those who try to play it Abbie’s way will discover a fine bill left on the table. I’d hate to play at Cote Basque. Want to pick up some foreign coins that will fit subway token turnstiles or candy, toll, laundromat machines, etc.? Once your local coin shop has run out (and for most of the coins recommended in the ingenious Yippie Currency Exchange, that should be immediately), all you have to do is fly to Uruguay, Peru, Denmark, Iceland, Malaysia (I!!) to pick some up. Res ipsa loquitur. Even the well-equipped revolutionary is a $1000 technological monster robot complete with shin guards, heavy gloves, hiking boots, helmets, gas masks, gas antidotes, walkie-talkies, spray cans, slingshots, boomerangs, flashguns, personalized tear gas projection devices, a bullet-proof vest, and even guns (though not for street demonstrations Abbie advises discretion there). One begins to understand quite rapidly the full meaning of Pete Hamill’s phrase, “credit-card revolutionaries.” Deceptive advertising items include the usual caps on “FREE DOPE,” leading into a very humdrum guide to growing your own marijuana, and such fantastic assertions for the new agrarians as “A reasonable rate for recreational farmland 100 miles from a major city with good water and a livable house would be about $50 an acre.” I assume that by “a major city” Mr. Hoffman means Grand I-arks, North Dakota, and by “livable house” he means a chicken coop. He suggests that land hunters pick up the United Farm catalogs. I suggest that he read one, just as I suggest- that he try some of those telephone numbers he lists as “community switchboards.” Abbie’s children may be in for some surprises, not all of them pleasant, and that, for me, is reason enough to pick this sham of a production apart, to try to separate reality from fantasy. The politics of the book are really irrelevant when one

considers the sheer number of frauds Hoffman folds into the gift-wrapping. There are more subtle forms of deceptive advertising in “Steal This Book,” but “deceptive advertising” is really an odd kind of euphemism. Despite handbook chapters on Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco, Abbie is also a provincial elitist, and makes a number of assumptions about his beloved Amerikkka which, when translated into some of his praxis, will disappoint a good many non-New Yorkers. Want to steal some furniture? All you have to rent for this one is a truck and some moving men’s uniforms. Then, presumably, you clean out some apartment house lobb.ies in all those apartment houses (a) outside of the city of New York, (b) which have lobbies, (c) filled with usable furniture. (By the way, for the cost of the truck and uniforms alone, one can do much better at Salvation Army in New York, Goodwill in Chicago Morgan Memorial in Boston, etc.) Then, too, from the cookbook, we have another one of those “survival” ret i pes, this time for “Yippie Yogurt”: “Begin by going to a Turkish or Syrian restaurant and buying some yogurt to go....” There is a small cluster of Syrian restaurants on the west end of Atlantic Avenue in Frooklyn, none of which d0 anything “to go” (revolutionary Abbie has such a great understanding of “third world” cultures that he thinks they, too, operate like McDonald’s stands), and, with the exception of a few scattered singles in L.A. or Montreal, that’s about it for Syrian and Turkish restaurants for Ameri kkka or Kanada.

Speaking of Abbie’s revolutionary postures, one has to be very careful in evaluating his relationship to “oppressed peoples,” for some of his recommendations clearly do not take the unfortunate into account (inevitable, of course, for a lobster man). Want a really cheap airplane ride on a stolen ticket or a not-yet-hot credit card? All you need are “good underworld contacts” (for the man who has everything). Abbie is so taken with the politics of the thief, so into the notion that all crimes are political crimes, that he conveniently forgets that those same “underworld contacts” steal millions of dollars from the black ghettos every day, keep the whole country on hard junk, and bankroll a wad of crooked cops, judges, and politicians who are the agents of repression. When the revolution comes, Abbie had better be ready to play his dues for his insenGti\kity. n&o it goes in a Ken-Keseywith-bombs “politic.” One could analyze literally dozens ot Atm~e s little radical action projects in terms of how many people - including Third World people and other “brothers and sisters” might actually die in indirect by-products of some of these cute games. Of course, Abbie is incapable of dealing with causality at any level deeper and less direct than the sensory thunder-and-lightning, and never bothers to think through any of these propositions to their consequences, even for his own audience. He is the child of McLuhan’s theory, seeking to actualize it in a plastic dome in which there is no language, therefore no concepts, therefore, for example, no causality beyond the simple sensory. The problem with this “politic” is that it turns against itself, and removes its adherents from the world altogether. The kind. of del usion that creates Abbie’s Abbott and Costello scene of the hero cultural revolutionary trying to stuff a hotel tv into a suitcase, or, at a more advanced and less selfish stage, depositing a large dead fish in a safe deposit box rented under an assumed name (and thinking that what one is

doing is an expression of a significant political idea), has its logical extension, for example, in the self-serving political solidarity fantasy of “the entire youth culture...cheer(ing) the Tupemaros on.” I choose the Tupemaros from a Hoffman series because I’ve recentty had indirect dealings with them as an item I used in a depth survey of 4%odd college and college-educated people between the ages of 17 and 32. More than 350 had never even heard of the Tupemaros, and of those who could recognize the item, only six indicated any degree of positive response. So much again for Charlie Reich. In short, there are al I sorts of contradictions and hypocrisies running around a book that should be stolen, if touched at all (and even then, primarily for its addresses, telephone numbers, collected lists, and general bibliography). But isn’t that typical of a political culture which reveals the shallow depth of its commitment by brushing off the task of confronting its own contradictions in the catch-al I, “irrelevant” the classic Yippie cop-out which spills through the pages of Rubin, Hoffman, et al like so much vomit? I sincerely wonder which is rnore frightening: the naive and illiterate children of the of.

by Clifford Originally

Voice

Adelman t,t;orn

The

. Village

(UPS).

member: Canadian university press (CUP) and underground press syndicate (UPS), subscriber: liberation news service (LNS), and chevron international news service (GINS), the chevron is a newsfeature tabloid published offset fifty-two times a year (1971-72) by the federation of students, incorporated, university of Waterloo. Content is the responsibility of the chevron staff, independent of the federation and the university administration. Offices in the campus center; phone (519) 578-7070 or university local 3443; telex 0295-748. rirculation : 13,000 Alex Smith, editor We apoligize for the lack of news in this issue, but neither thei news editor nor the news staff have returned from various stages of vacation, registration, or moving out and in. Same goes for sports. Same goes for photo. Gawd Noze there’s plenty to talk about, but unless people start coming out to the chevron and commence blabbing, there’s not much point in caring. So before you start bitching about what you did or didn’t find today, remember the staff meeting next monday night at 8 pm in the chevron office. production manager: George Kaufman news editor: Bill Sheldon coordinators: David Cubberley (entertainment), Dennis McGann (sports), Rod Hickman & rats (features) And here we all are: Al Lukachko, David Harrington, Mel Rotman, Janet Stoody, Deanna Kaufman, Mary Holmes, Reg Friesen and Barry Brown. Special thanks to the creators and executors of the Molly mock-up supplement: Tim Wynne-Jones and Doug Jamieson. The list must be larger next week. TTFN,

J


If it’s happening, we want to hear Even though the chevron’s oncampus news has increased to almost 70 per-cent of all news coverage over the last year, there is still a limit to what a voluntary staff can do. That’s why we have been delivering Form 30 to every club, faculty and department on campus -- in fact, to aII groups sponsoring any activity likely to catch the imagination of students, faculty and staff at this university. We may not consider your event socially relevant and may even assign a reporter to say this to the whole campus, but we want to know it’s happening. Whether you want only listing of the event in tuesday’s special supplement This week on campus or request complete reporter coverage, we will try our best to pass on the information to the whole campus. Only if we know what’s happening can we collect information. And only by accumulating accurate information can we present precise and informed news analysis and editorial comment. If you read the chevron (and we know that more than 93 percent of you do), then you should think about how you can use Form 30. Call the chevron secretary at extension 3443 for delivery of your Form 30 pad. Or better yet, drop in to the office in the campus center and see us in rson. We’re closer than you think.

evron 18

178

the

chevron


Y


WATER-BEDS

Special Rate To U of W Students Faculty

& Visitors

We welcome you & youz at the

A friendly place” Complementary coffee & morning paper 1051 Victoria St. N , Kitchener 744-8171 44

Old

l l 0 l l l l l l l l l l l l e l l 0 l l e l l 0

KING Cole was a merry old soul, And a great bike rider was he He wore black leather In all kinds of weather And rode a bike from

ichty & Sons

0

4 Bridge You

578 5240

St. East see Bridgeport,

Ont

Waterloo

-

Phone

5 7 9 I 5

“7” da vs without a sub makes

0 0

-s

1---

--------_

----

.

.

-

_

-

-

-

WOIVDA Y SPECIAL ATOMIC free delivery

NUCLEAR

reg 1.05 for 80 7 different meats . . ..at KING & LOUISA

on orders

0

one “weak”

0 ver $3.00

0 oo0ooooooooooooeooooooooooo~oooeo0oo

Don’t call yourself a secret unless you mean to keep it. There are times when we just know it’s wrong to isolate ourselves from people or situqtions to avoid being challenged or hurt. Yet awareness of this fact is not much use until we act to overcome our rigidity or fear, and begin interacting in a self-fulfilling way. When this happens, it is impossible for us to keep ourselves a secret. And this is good, for it means willingness to share human thoughts and emotions fully. Sharing is what the rap room is all about. There are no hard-line professionals who cram people into categories of neurosis...there are no wild-eyed psychology students on pins and needles to play Freud... Instead, there are people---people to talk to, people to listen; people to understand. People to be with while problems (from girlfriends to drugs) are sorted out.

People, however, who can and will-if an individual wishes it-make referrals to coun* selling services or other organizations for further aid. We are all secrets worth sharing. The rap room is staffed by volunteer counsellors from many courses, including history, sociology, snglish, psychology, chemistry, mathematics and engineering, who occasionally meet with counselling services representatives to discuss and evaluate their effectiveness and warmth when being with people. The rap room is a project jointly financed by counselling services and the campus center board and is intended as an absolutely free discussion and referral service to all persons on campus.

In the campus

center

beside

the main

reception

desk.

Open

24 hours

heraproom. 20

180

the

chevron

a day.

l l a

l 0


L

hatashita

A New Rucksack

On Sale

school Waterloo 576-2680

(sp.ecial

Square

Plaza

Student

Outdoor

Rates)

Across from Waterloo

1

Bankof

Montreal

The First Canadian

Bank

Let’s talk. About you. Your hopes. And ,how you plan to reaiize them. You’ll find that we can help - as far as the financial side is concerned. It may be that you’re not sure of how much the Bank of Montreal can do for if you have any questions you. so about money - the best way to save, to pay bills, how to get loans ask us. We’ll answer straight from the shoulder. Because we figure it this way: If we can help you now, while you’re a student, you’ll stay with us after graduation when we can help you even more. Come see us. We want you to fulfil1 all your hopes and dreams. We want you to get your money% worth.

You and the Bankof Montreal: a dialogue.

University & Philip Branch Waterloo, ‘Ontario J. W. ARGUE, manager

22

182 the chevron

Specialists

Sq.- 64 King S. -‘742-0712

I


I-


CREATIVE ARTS BOARD PARTICIPATING

PROGRAM

Music -- Drama -- Dance .

Music Performing Concert

groups Choir

1st rehearsal

(This year’s performance: Handel’s “Messiah”, with

Tues.

7-9 p.m.

Sept. 21

“Beloved Choruses” from Little Symphony Orchestra.

1st rehearsal ext. 2439)

Wed.

Sept. 22

7 : 30-9

p.m.

1st rehearsal

Wed.

sept

5 : 30-7

p.m.

‘Little Symphony Orchestra

1st rehearsal

Thurs.

Stage Band (Popular-jazz)

Organizational meeting

Mon. sept 27

Chamber Choir (By audition only. Concert

Phone

Band

All above Instrumental

Vocal

contact

Soloists:

For practice studios and re,ntal Program Center Office, Modern

Director

Theatre

groups the

instruments, Languages

of Music,

Arts

will meet Director

in the Music

22

Sept. 23

Room,

5 : 30-7 : 30 p.m. 8 p.m.

Arts

.ectue,

room

6.

of Music.

contact the Cultural room 254, phone ext. 2127. Alfred Kunz Lecture, room

6, phone

ext. 2439.

of the Arts Sundays,

September

September

19 & 26 2-5 p.m. Play readings

27 & 28 7:30

Resident

for the Fall-Winter

major

productions.

p.m. Casting for fall production and one-act plays Plays being considered : “The Heiress”, Ruth & Augustus Goetz; “Hobson’s Choice”, Harold Brighouse; “Six Characters in Search of,an Author”, Pirendello; “A Cry of Players”, Wm. Gibson ; “Importance of Being Earnest’,, Oscar Wilde; “Lady Precious Stream”, S. I. Hsiung

Drama

Director,

Maurice Evans Modern Languges,

room

121, phone

ext. 2533.

Dance A.

Studio Classes Ballet (Beginners through advanced levels) Modern dance techniques (Beginners through intermediate levels) Modern dance composition (Beginners through advanced levels)

B.

Performing Groups Ballet club Modern dance club (incl. jazz) University of Waterloo Repertory dance company All above

Director

will meet in the Dance

of Dance, Judy Jarvis,

Studio,

Director,

Theatre

Participating Cultural

24

184

the

chevron

Program

Center

of the Arts, programmes office,

Modern

4: 30-5 : 30 p.m.

Tues.

Sept. 14

4:30-5:30

p.m.

Wed.

Sept. 15

12:30-2:30

p.m.

1st Meeting Mon. Sept. 13 Wed. Sept. 15

7: 30 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Wed. Sept. 15

9 p.m.

Physical

Ruth Priddle Education bldg. room Dance Faculty Jill Officer, Til Thiele, Toronto

Physical

Technical Assistants, Lighting, sound,

Technical

Registration Mon. Sept. 13

Modern

Languages

building.

2060,

phone

Dance

Theatre.

ext. 3147

Theatre of the Arts backstage, etc.

Earl W. Stieler Languages, room

are sponsored

Education

122, phone

by the federation

building,

room

ext. 2128.

of students

254, phone

- creative

ext. 2127.

arts board.


Y *


Canadian Studies This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Canadian Environment. It is planned to integrate much more systematically than last year the lectures, readings, discussions and essays. There will be one lecture and one discussion period each week on the various aspects of the physical, social, and cultural environments. Lecturers come from a wide range of disciplines including Geology, Geography, Planni g, Engineering, Biology, History, Sociology, Political Science, Economics, Englisti and Fine Arts. The two discussion leaders in each group are also drawn from different disciplines. Students are expected from every faculty, Waterloo Lutheran University and from the K-W community. Students will be expected to use their notes from the lectures and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;references for discussions and essays. Students will have an opportunity to have their essays discussed in their discussion groups. Assessment of students will be on the basis of their verbal and written contributions to the group. For further visor

information,

see

your

or J.E. Kersell

S.Sc.336

26

186

the

chevron

departmental

ad-

RAP ROOM Organizational Thursday

Meeting

September

16

6:00 PM Campus *New

Centre

Room

Volunteers

* Returning Please

113

Wanted

Volunteers Attend


Visit

the New,

‘Sexciting,

Strip

Continuous

Tease

I

-non-stop -nothing held back -everything goes YO bu won? f5e disappointed No

one

under

18

.adm’itted LA PETl7-E WfEATRE 30 King oppdsite weekdays

St. S. Waterloo 630-l

CAMPING & HIKING GEAR & THE APPROPRIAT OUTDOOR CLOTHING

S

* WATERLOO

SQUARE

WATERLOO,

TELEPHONE

QUALITY

Sq. 2:30

ONTARIO

744-2781

SHOOTING

SUPPLIES

BUY DIRECT FROM WE FACTORY AND SAVE “TASTE-TEAM” IN CANADA Choose * * + * * * *

from

many flavours include

COLA * GlNGE43ALE * ORANGE * GRAPE * * FRUIT PUNCH * ROOt BEER PLUS MANY OTHER

GREAT

FLAVOURS

PLUS REFUNDABLE

which

LEMON SODA CREAM SODA GRAPEFRUIT LIME TONIC FLAVOURS

- GREAT

buy one case or a hundred for outings, parties, dances, etc. Pop Shoppe of Waterloo leads the soft drink industry in the anti-pollution, anti-litter fight by charging a realistic refundable $1.60 deposit for bottles and cases.

?4 lo-02

SAVERS

12 30-02.

BOTTLES

Choose from 12 giant 30 .24 family size 10 oz. $1.33. You must buy by that way you save even mix or match the flavours u of

OPEN Sat.,

The

DAILY 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sun. and holidays IO a.m. to 6 p.m.

Shoppe Lodge

<we chevron

oz. bottles or bottles only the case but more as you in your case.

w I

28 ta

BOTTLES

St. near Corner

of Weber

North,

Waterloo

E


reen Fee.Players’Webme 18 Hole Golf

Championship

dowse 6,260 yards Rental Clubs & Carts

3 miles VVest of St. Agatha on Et-b St:

50 Westmount Waterloo

9th SUN.

OCT.

Physical

Road

Green Fees :

Annual

Performing

Weekdays Weekends

Arts

$2.00 & Holidays

$4.00

Series

3

Education

Bldg.

PAUL MAURIAT ORCHESTRA “Love is Iblue” SUN. OCT. 31 Humanities *Theatre

PLAY BACH’with EN.. I

NOV..-. 28 I.

Humanities

the JACQUES- LOUSSIER TRIO

-

I heatre

NATIONAL DANCE DE MEXICO:FOLKLORICO FRI. JAN.14

SAT.

Continental Kansas SUN.

JAN.

15

Theatre Company State University

FEB. 20

Theatre

MOODS OF MAN, SUN.

MAR.

folk

FLAMENCO

26

Humanities GUITARIST Theatre

CHITIRI ARPI -

R ussian

harp

of the

run

Arts

duo

12

CARLOS MONTOYA, SUN.. MAR.

song

how they - next

see

adaptation

Theatre

of the

Arts

ensemble

PERFORMANCES - 8 pm ADMISSION

$2.50

STUDENTS

$1 SO

SAVE UP TO 35% SEASON

BUY SERIES COUPON BOOKS,

COUPON

BOOKS STUDENTS

$12.50 $7.00

YOUR GUARANTEE OF TICKETS TO EVERY PERFORMANCE. Pre-Season

Bonus

FRI. SEPT.

THE KNACK - Theatre EACH Tickets

30

190

the

chevron

COUPON available

BOOK

24

5, Kingston

PURCHASER

CAN

BUY

Humanities Admission

ONE

TICKET

at Central Box Office, Cultural Programme Languages Room 254, phone 744-6111, ext.

AT

Theatre - $1 .OO

% PRICE.

Centre 2126

Modern


1


,

4

http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca/mambo/pdfarchive/1971-72_v12,n13_Chevron  

http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca/mambo/pdfarchive/1971-72_v12,n13_Chevron.pdf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you