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Sir George students riot, destroy computer center MONTREAL (CUP)-The occupation at Sir George Williams University ended violently tuesday and left in its death throes over a,million dollars worth of damage, a fire and water gutted ninth floor of the school’s Hall building, 96 arrests and numerous injuries to police, students and by-standers.

A fireman directs a stream of water into ninth-floor window of Sir George Williams University in down town Montreal after students set fire in data center yesterday. A blanket of computer cards, tapes, and student records litter the street. by permission,

Library

Montreal Star and Canadian Press

lugs

by Bill Sheldon Chevron staff

A crisis is forming over the situation in the libraries at the University of Waterloo. The main arts library is drastically understocked and has been that way, unchanged, for many years. As far back as 1965, it became obvious that Uniwat’s increase in books was dragging behind the other universities in Canada. To relieve this situation .the EMS and arts library committees have strongly recommended the giving of ten percent off the top of the university operating budget, before it is divided amongst the faculties and administration. Anyone who has not triedover and over to get books from the library only to be told that the books are out or that the . university does ‘not have the book, may well wonder what state the libraries are in at present. The best index is the inter-library loan requests. These are requests for books that the library does not have. There were 221 such requests id the month of january, 1969. This points out the definite lack of books in the libraries. Despite this lack of books, the percentage of the university operating budget given to the library has been decreasing over the years. In 1966-67 the library budget was $1,017,000 or 8.1 percent of that

Monday night, the whole affair seemed calm and approaching satsettlement. Tuesday isfactory morning, it exploded wildly out of control. The spark to explosion, ironically, was a weekend-long round of negotiations between the occupying students and the administration. By sunday afternoon, the negotiators had hammered out a working proposal-and that’s where the confusiori began. The students’ lawyer said he had been told by his administration counterpart that the terms of the agreement-acceptance by the administration of the five demands set by the occupiers in return for an end to the occupations-would be ratified by his superiors. The occupiers sensed victory and arranged a party sunday night. Meanwhile, the administration lawyer took the agreement to principal Douglass Burns Clark for signature. Clark hesitated, and said he wanted to sleep on it,. The next morning, he did not sign but rather called a faculty association meeting to discuss the proposals. Spirits were still high in the two occupation ceI’1tres- the computing center and the faculty clubeveryone waited for final victory. But the faculty, after a stormy seven-hour session, rejected the proposal and replaced it with another one- unacceptable to the students. The faculty was incensed over Clark’s morning suspension of prof Perry Anderson, ostensibly‘ for his own protection. The faculty had also supported

behind

of the whole university. In the following year it was $1,669,000 or 5.9 percent. This year it has again dropped to 5.8 percent, $1,334,193 of the operating budget. This can be compared with other universities such as Queens which allots 8.1 percent. Many universities allot over 10 percent and some go as high as 14. Other figures prove to be equally small. The average library expenditure per student by universities all across Canada in 1967-68 was $197. The Ontario average was $215. The Waterloo expenditure however, was only $157. The 196869 is just as low in comparison ; $208 is the Canadian average, $219 the average for Ontario, while Waterloo gives $161. In comparison to the above percentages of the university’s expenditure on libraries for the 1967-68 year, where Waterloo gave 5.9 pei-cent, Ontario gave 8.2 percent and Canada as a whole gave 8.1 percent. The present system under which the library is given money consists of two areas of expenditure; money given to the library by the budgets committee for operating expenses and facilities, and money that is given by the faculties for the acquisition of books that they feel are needed by their’faculty. The amount spent by each faculty as a percentage of the faculty budget is as follows :

other

the old hearing committee and was not willing to renege on that support. Their refusal to accept the negotiated agreement had tragic consequences. When the faculty rejection was relayed to the students, they greeted it with stunned resentment. Two weeks of frustration and weary occupation sharpened into focus. Some occupiers cried, others hardened and called for a close-down of the school. At that point, the principle of non-destructiveness still held. The occupiers decided to seize the entire building. As a major portion rushed to lock all the entrances, a small group headed out into independent action. They swarmed into the cafeteria, seized chairs and tables and started barricading all the exits and escalators from the fourth floor up to the eleventh. To get into the cafeteria, they took axes to the locks-a move that brought the police in. About 4am, 50 uniformed police marched into the school. As they tried to mount the barricades, they were washed away by powerful streams from fire hoses trained on them by the students. But realizing the weakness of their strategic position, the stu-dents retreated from all areas of the building into the computer center. That was the breaking point. Once they had watered down the police, they were there to win or lose, win or lose big. The police followed them up.

They broke through the barricaded glass doors of the computer centre and were again met by jets of water from within. Two policemen were cut. It is unclear whether they were injured by window glass or flying bottles, but it is probable that both were involved. _ Realizing they hadn’t the strength to get in, the police settled down to a seige. Forty of them stood outside the center in ankle deep water singing “Michael Row the Boat Ashore”. The students then started to smash up the center. They tossed IBM cards, printouts, papers, research documents -anything they could find-out the windows. These were followed ‘by typewriters, portable computers and adding machines. Nine floors down, the city streets, now cordonned off by police, for three blocks, were thick with paper. Bystanders, at least 1000 strong in the early morning, waded through reams of it. The students then announced they would destroy the computers, one by one, until the police left. This was at 8am and Clarke had had enough. He told the police he “wanted them out of there, and I don’t care how you do it”. The police told him they, had to wait for the riot squad, Montreal’s crack team designed for crowd control and riot-busting. The squad arrived at 9: 30, but they didn’t move in until lpm. / Varidus administrators, thinking they could save the computers, wanted to hold off. Meanwhile, a huge mob had gathered in the streets below. The majority jeered the police. Others, about 400, supported. the students. Fist fights erupted continually. At least 5 people were ar*continued

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unwersmes 0

Amount percent LIBRARY of budget spent !$) 6’/1 arts 214 * 1.5’,‘i, 64 eng 3.2% arch 3 3.2% math 70 3.0% sci 78 1.2% phys-ed 3 *the arts faculty also received and spent a Canada Council grant of $48,000 and a grant from the academic vicepresident’s academic development fund of $50,000 bringing the sum to $312,000 or nine percent of the arts faculty oderating budget. Library committees for the past four years have strongly recommended that 7 the library budget be drastically increa-’ sed. The’ proposal by this year’s round of committees to look into the library crisis is that “the University of Waterloo take ten percent off the top of the university operating budget set-it aside as a first priority for the support of the tiniversity library. ” With a present operating budget of $23,613,000 the university would then be giving well over two millon dollars to the library. This is an increase of $660,300, which could buy over 25,000 books Per year. Biology prof Ron Eydt feels that the ten percent “is needed for several years in a row if the University of Waterloo wasn’t to be Canada’s biggest thirdrate university.”

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The university gets its operating money from two sources basically : government grants ($19,036,000) and student fees ($4,413,000). The amount the government gives any university is determined by the Basic Income Unit. The BIU is the amount of money-per student the government gives to the university. In 1967-68 the actual BIU was $1320; 7.9 percent or $104 of which is the library component. For the 1968-69 year the BIU received was $1450, exactly ten percent of which was destined for library expenditure. Only 5.8 percent was spent on the library. The main excuse for this money not having been spent on the library is that the money has been allotted to the advancement of PP&P, audio visual, the computer and , health services. The deans feel this is a technological university and Waterlob should spend more money on its computer than on its libraries. Furthermore the deans feel that the libraries are quite adequate and do not propose any drastic budgetary increases because there is no pressure to increase them. Chemistry prof Reg Firesen, member of the EMS library committee stated, “the deans will not do anything unless pressure is put on them because the money will have to come from some other part of their budget. ”


George

Sir

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International

-

starts

wee&

International Week, starting on monday, february 17, will give you an insight into the problems and revolutionary movements in the third world. The week will begin with White Colonialism in Africa. The situation in Africa is so bad that African students, when asked to speak on the subject, had to refuse because of the fear of endangering their families in Africa. The subject will be presented through multi-media in the Campus Center Great Hall at 4. On tuesday, following the films at 3, Dr. Norman MacKenzie, who had been working in various countries, including China, India, since 1945, will and Nigeria, speak on the topic of World Famine. People who are thinking of going abroad through CUSO or Cross-Roads Africa are encouraged to listen to him in the Great Hall. There will be a starvation supper at 5 in the Pub Area.

Council

gives

it to Hagey

Student council honored retired administration president Gerry Hagey monday night, but didn’t seem very enthusiastic about it. Speaker Sandy McGregor had trouble maintaining quorum near the end of the agenda as the matter came up. Federation president John Bergsma proposed that Hagey be made an honorary member of the federation. The motion passed. An unidentified councillor said

Federation

it was like-making a corporation president an honorary member of the union after his retirement. Bergsma then proposed the federation buy Hagcy a rocking chair as a farewell gift. When McGregor called the vote, no one voted either in favor or opposed. McGregor declared the vote a tie and cast the deciding vote in favor of buying

in film-making

rested throughout the day. And the police, as they moved in to quell the fights, used billies to break up knots of people, injuring several. One police van was set aflame but the -fire was quickly extinquished. By lpm, it was clear the computers were being destroyed. The riot squad was given orders to move in and started breaking down the barricades. At that point, the occupiers smashed the remaining computers and set fire to the barricades. Flames shot out 15 feet and the police drew back. The blaze was visible for three city blocks. Thick black smoke filled the corridors and at least 5 policemen and firemen were overcome with smoke and rushed to hospital. The students, ringed by fire, stayed in a back room near an open window. Out in the corridors, newsmen and other students fled the area to get away from the smoke, unbearable even two floors away. Dozens retched in nausea. The fire began to move in on-the students. The riot squad managed to put out the fire and get the students out before they were all either burned or overcome by smoke. The police seized 96 and kept them lined up against a wall for 2 hours as they put out fires and awaited instructions. Only a few of the occupiers managed to evade arrest. At 6 pm, they were shoved

the rocker.

The proposed referring

loses close one two points. The team said the judges were so biased that the Ottawa team approached them afterwards and offered to supthe port them in challenging ruling as Ottawa also thought the judging was ridiculously prejudiced. However, Waterloo decided to let the ruling go unchallenged.

The Uniwat House of Debates emerged from four rounds of debate undefeated in a tournament at the University of New Brunswick last friday. With the highest point total in the tournament, Jo Surich and Rick Powell met U. of Ottawa in the semi-finals. However they were beaten by

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for a year ulty is set up by administration to begin the hearing but ten black students walk out charging the group is not impartial. Jan 27---The university is shut down for secret administrationstudent talks. At the campus 40 students demonstrate against Anderson. Jan 29-The second day of hearings degenerate into a noisy teach-in. 300 militant students take over the computing center. Feb ~---TWO hundred white students seize the faculty lounge on the seventh floor. Feb l&-Students in the computing center try to occupy the entire building after the faculty rejects settlement. Feb

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MONTREAL ( CUP )-Racial problems have errupted at Sir George Williams University. The following are the events leading up to this week’s computer center take over: Spring ‘68-Biology prof Perry Anderson is first labelled racist. Fall ‘68-Since no action was taken black students approach departmental and administration off icials. Dee +-Anderson voluntarily stops teaching. Jan 22-Seven black students invade O’Brien’s office, force him to find the letter with the “violence” phrase and write an apol%YJan4-Administration announces the campus will be shut .down monday to allow student-faculty study groups to discuss the situation. Jan 26--,4 committee of five fac-

2

l At least a million dollars worth of computers. The center itself won’t be functional again until next October. l The whole ninth floor of the Hall building is gutted. Walls are down, floorboards torn up, windows smashed. e Water damage has wrecked at least 5 other floors. l Valuable research projects were destroyed.

ra%

10% STUDENT

Brewing

into 9 paddy wagons and taken away to be processed. The university will press charges against all of them. One official said, “We’ll hit them with every criminal charge possible: ” The students have been charged with conspiracy, arson and public mischief. Arson alone carries a maximum sentence of 14 years and a minimum of seven years. At least 20 of the 96 arrested were women. The group is almost equally matched black and white. The damage :

business

more than standardizcd

l Animals in psychology experiments on the 11 th floor all died. Total damage is estimated at $8,000,000. 96 students now face severe criminal charges and lengthy sentences. The university will be shut down until at least monday and may take months to get back to normal And of course, the Anderson case may never be properly handled. It’s a sad story of frustration, rigidity, weakness, absurdity and betrayal. __ An administration roundly scorned by students for mishandling the affair finally came to grips with the situation and lost out to the faculty. The students, who had taken such delicate care of the computers for two weeks, finally destroyed them and lost any chance they may have had of legitimacy. The f acuity , never militant throughout and at no time leaders in the affair, raised its hackles at the worst possible time. Everybody loses-over a dispute about the composition of a committee.

continued from page 1

IMPORTED CAR CENTRE

He expects to portray some quirks of campus .lifc to show cvcry day activities are “nothing

Student council decided monday to provide a $510 subsidy for the first film to be produced, on campus. .John Par-lane. architecture 1, plans to complete a seven-minute short film study on campus habits for showing by next fall.. Pat-lane spent two years at Western where he worked on a project that produced several short films. One work, Steps for Catherine, ;I study of the life of a school teacher. is now being distributed to theaters. If Pat-lane’s film makes moncy. the federation will get half of the first $1000 and all of anything over that.

Sir George

monday

Dr. Degre. who was in Peru and observed closely the revolutionary movements there, will speak on Revolutions in. Latin America on Wednesday at 4, also in the Great Hall. . Thursday. the focus will be on Canadian Indians. This is the issue which enables us to relate ourselves very closely with the problems in the third world. This event will take place in the Music Lounge at 4. As the climax of the week, there will be a China Teach-In on friday at 1 in the Great Hall. Among the speakers will be Karen Rowling and Ray Wylie, who were both in China. Mr. Wylie spent 1965-1967 teaching English at the Foreign Language Institute, Shanghai, and witnessed the cultural revolution by travelling all over China. International Week is organized by the Student Christian Movement and is sponsored by the Federation of Students.

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Fe W f u ulty turn Out to confront Wernick Andy Wernick’s marxist lecture series‘continued Wednesday with a critique of the social sciences. Special notices were sent to all members of the arts faculty inviting them to attend and engage Wernick in discussion. However, only a half dozen faculty members attended; and with the exception of a lengthy dialog with sociology chairman Gerard de Gre, and a brief shouting match with poli-sci prof John Wilson, the half dozen did not discuss the lecture with Wernick..’ Wernick’s critique centered around the social scientist’s attempt to view society in the role of an objective spectator. This, he feels, is neither practical nor honest when the same social scientist may be engaged in studies for a government. He also stated there was a dangerous tendency toward generalization. “This leads to statements which are blatant propaganda and lies. For instance, the belief that we live in a pluralist democracy with no class conflict. It’s bloody nonsense. ” Further, he criticized the social sciences for treating values as something independent of social reality. “This is a static model. It can only be considered if time is held constant, and it can’t be applied to a real setting,” he explained. “They start seeing things only in terms of roles within a social network and social science becomes social engineering.” Sociology chairman de Gre argued that, any analysis must begin with the given conditions of the system. “Don’t forget it was Marx who

said that the forms of social existence in which man finds himself determine his consciousness, ” he continued. He felt existing power relations were crucial for a progressive or conservative social science orientation because of the complex situation they cause. Wernick replied it was the elite of society which established a cultural dominance over the remainder of people. “This must be challenged,” he said. He wondered again why social scientists attempt to remain neutral and objective. “They’re merely transmitting bourgeois ideas by doing so.” He challenged de Gre to tell him how it was possible for intellectuals to remain neutral but de Gre was unable to provide a direct. answer. Wernick then asked de Gre how many Marxists there were in his department. “Is the only acceptable social scientist a Marxist?” John Wilson boomed suddenly. Wernick paused and said yes. He went into an explanation, indicating it was a question to which a simple yes or no answer couldn’t be given. “Then you’re narrow-minded,” Wilson responded. De Gre said he attempted to run his department in a pluralist manner, with all points of view represented. He felt the resulting confrontation of ideas encourages knowledge. Wernick responded by referring the audience to two printed critics of pluralism and finished his lecture.

Re@tment reduction heriilds lack of jobs by Al Lukachko Chevron staff ’

A 30 percent drop in placement ads in university newspapers, a 30 percent decrease in recruitment on university-campuses and a good chance students will be out of jobs this summer. In a recent survey of placement ads in the Chevron, it was found the number of pages used by employers seeking students to fill their positions was down 31.7 percent over last year. The placement ads are mainly for graduates, but have a close relation to summer jobs. The companies with substantial decreases include IBM, Bell Canada, Proctor and Gamble, Great-Western Life, Cominco, A.C. Neilsen and General Foods. However, it is interesting to note that the Public Service Commission of the federal government has increased advertising by 600 percent. A look at the number and type of recruiters on campuses is not too encouraging. Major business, notably the pulp and paper and automotive industries, both large employers of summer help, are missing. Is the government, with its large increase in placement advertising, trying to cover up something they have no control over and which oould lead to greater student unrest? Government, itself, must be fairly hypocritical by advertising more and at the same time streamlining their own departments by cutting down on summer employment. The recent move by General Motors to consolidate G.M. Die-

sel, McKinnon Industries and the Oshawa plant under one company, G.M. of Canada is indicative of business centralizing management and research and development. As a result, manpower quotas are reduced and the engineers are the big losers. Students, in the labour context, are simply treated as a commodity by the corporate business world. If business has no need of the commodity, it defers utilizing it until such time as it can employ it to its sole purpose of maximizing profits. Automation is slowly restricting the number of unskilled jobs that students have filled in past summers. The kind of summer jobs that will be available, will increasingly be of a type that requires a training that is not learned in university. If the problem of summer jobs is not solved within the next two months, the government must be prepared to give larger and more student loans in September.

Greek students subjected to stringent *code (LNS)ATHENS, Greece Greece’s military dictatorship has imposed a rigid code of conduct on university students. The code imposes stringent penalties on students who show “disrespect” or participate in strikes or demonstrations. The code also permits action against students” not imbued with the spiritcompatible with the established system. ”

Whopping crane comes to roost on Laurel lake-or how to get a full, unsilted reflection beautiful empty library on a very scenic campus with a large computing center.

Committee

will

answer

Is provost by Bill Brown Chevron staff

In investigating the position of provost the student affairs review committee has been deluged with information from the groups that used to report to provost Bill Scott. The committee of six is chaired by Jack Brown, director of ancillary enterprises, and has two faculty and three student representatives. The faculty members are Leo Johnson (history) and Lynn Watt +&lectrical) engineering). Studentre$!esentatives are Nancy Murphy for the girls, Deiter Haag for the g&is and Al Crawford; a student residence representative. The committee has been seeking ideas concerning reporting relationships and structures from those who were under the provost to come up with a better system. Before the committee begins to draw up a system to recommend to the administration they are going to ask former provost Scott to outline what he thinks would be the best reporting structure. Professor Scott will meet with the committee at 1 pm this afternoon in room 402 in the arts library. This meeting, as all others, is open to anyone who wishes to observe. Thus for the committee has received briefs from and spoken with William Dick of counselling services, Mrs. Edith Beausoleil of housing and foreign student affairs, Dr. Helen Reesor of Health services, Paul Berg and John Koval (Math4) of creative arts, Mrs. Hilda Taylor and Mrs. Heldagard Marsden, dean of women, and Ron Eydt and Cail Vinnicombe of the student Village.

Counselling

of a

services

Bill Dick reviewed the basic policies and plans for future activities. Johnson suggested a closer liaison between counselling and academic departments and Dick agreed that there was a need to fill gaps in that area. Expansion and decen tralization of counselling services was proposed by Dick. He pointed out that there are already counselling offices in the engineering and arts faculties, the Village and healthservices building. New satellites suggested are science, math and phys-ed faculties and the campus center. A consensus was reached that there was a definite need for

a \ necessary iob? more education about counselling services, especially for the frosh during orientation. Along with the idea- was the expression of the desirability of a well-known and easily accessible headquarters for counselling. Dick felt that since many concerns of students bear directly on academic life, counselling should report to the academic vicepresident.

Housing student

and foreign office

Mrs. Beausoleil presented a report on housing. She said that she would not mind reporting to an independent administration such as that in charge of the campus center. What she really wanted, though, was an expression of policy for her department to follow. Beausoleil suggested that the community renting rooms to students would rather deal with the administration than representatives of students. Haag replied, “It is time the people realized that the university is not everything except the student.” In the discussion on foreign students, Mrs. Beausoleil said there is discrimination in Kitchener-Waterloo. She suggested that there is a great need for a special foreign student orientation. Haag informed the committee the Grad Society had just started plans for such a program and that faculty would probably be involved.

Health

Creative

arts

Paul Berg asked for a per capita levy on students to provide a stable budget for the creative arts board. An alternative was budgeting two years ahead so that the bookings could be made on time. There was questioning about the students subsidizing the faculty in creative arts productions. To get around that it was sug- . gested that the funds come from internal university budgeting without the student federation paying directly. John Koval, creative arts board chairman, felt there was a conflict of interest due to the fact that Berg was concerned with both bookings and the creative arts board.

Dean

of women

Mrs. Marsden felt that a dean of men was needed as well as a dean of women. She felt an ombudsman for the students might be useful. Mrs. Taylor felt women met special frustrations in our society due to discrimination. Girls are trained to work as professionals in some cases, but are told they can be secretaries. Mrs. Taylor felt student affairs has low priority and vicepresidential authority might get some power. She felt a student, faculty, administration board such as for the campus center would be “tremendous ’

Village

services

Dr. Reesor stated that health services were for students and thus students should have a lot of weight on policy decisions. She pointed out that the health service was forced into being through the efforts of students and particularly Sid Black, former Chevron editor. The idea of setting up a campus mutual fund for health service was brought forward by Johnson and all agreed the idea merited a closer inquiry. Dr. Reesor said the nurses and doctors are underpaid. She further stated, “It is the policy of the university to underpay so as not to take personnel away from local industry because they have to appeal to industry for funds.” Brown, the administration representative denied it, saying the nurses may be paid less but get excellent fringe benefits. friday,

Warden Eydt wanted to have authority over his accounts as do other departments. He feels all his responsibilities come from the students, but he doesn’t have the power to carry things out. Eydt complained about business opefations interfering with the Village, and noted PPandP in particular. PPandP had charged a 20 percent surcharge on village repairs, then switched to $1000 assessment instead. The new as: sessment just replaced the surcharge and the students were told the surcharge was now gone. Eydt sought more power so that he would be able to get things done without interference from other university departments. He also proposed a residence council that would be the warden’s immediate boss. The council would have 21 students out of 21 members. february

?4, 3969 (9:43)

755

a


Depression possible

Marcirs

warns

of money

crisis

by Bill Sheldon

will be common

Chevron staff

Lin Marcus, a consultant economist in New York, warned of an impending economic crisis throughout the world, within the very near future. Marcus spoke to about 100 people monday night in the arts lecture building. This economic crisis will be similar to economic crises on the world market in November 1967 and March 1968 with the devaluation of the pound. he said, and later in the summer of 1968 with the franc. Economic depression he continued, has been staved off by the shifting of monetary reserves during these crises, but this can not be done indefinitely for every crisis. In the very near future either more value must be placed behind the world currencies or else they must be devalued. We are in a period similar to that of 1929 to 1931, the great depression. The U.S. imperialist system is no longer able to support the faltering ecodomies of the world ; it doesn’t have the resourses to put value behind the world economies that it has inflated. Depression is inevitable and we are closer to 1931 than we are to 1929, he warned. Avoiding the more technical aspects of the conomic crisis Marcus explained how inflation comes about, the history of imperialism in the modern world and what can be done to rectify the present trend in events. Capitalism has one real feature, he explained, and that is, if new capital, from prdfits on industry, is invested in new industry, these investments will yield real profits. With a situation such as this the capitalist system could go on indefiriit&ly.There may be coitrii dictions in the system but never an!: crises. The system fails, he he concluded. when it does not produce new profits or value on investments. He illustrated this with a building that is 50 years old and has reached the end of its usefulness as a building. This building is then sold to a speculator for a price higher than the original cost of construction. even in constant dollar terms. Then the speculator sells the structure again for an even higher price. Thus the paper value of the place rises but the real value stays the same. The capital value of the mortgage has risen without a similar rise in the value of the property. This is the actual way the prosperity of world increases. In the U.S. today, Marcus pointed out, .there is over one and a half billion dollars in public and private debt. “But the value of this paper,” said Marcus. “comes from the conviction of people that they can sell this paper for the price they hold it at or better.” So if there is ever instability in a government or other such happening, he continued, the speculators may start to sell their paper money for the value at which they hold it. This precipitates inflation and instability and the demonitization of world currencies. Marcus then outlined the history of imperialist economics. The main factor influencing this history, he explained, was that the capitalist system is an open system. The system depends on the looting and raping of colonies and other developed or underdeveloped countries for its existante. Before 1870 Britain was an opponent of imperialism, but after that period it, along with the other developed countries became exponents of the system.

4

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EVERYONE especially

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WELCOME

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engineering

candidates

“The only viable alternative to depression is a socialist revolution, “said Lin Marcus of the SDS labor committee. By 1913, these developed countries had almost exhausted their colonies, ’ ’ except for the U.S. and Canada, who had their own private looting ground in Latin America ’ ’ , he said. It was clear that some of the competitors had to be removed and thus ensued World War I. “During the 1920’s the U.S. propped up the corpse of Europe, but by 1926 its resourses ran out and in 1929 world trade collapsed and there was a depression.” Every country was ruined by this except the U.S. and these countries were effectively reduced to satropies of the U.S. That. is all except Germany, he pointed out; it went back to tGe imperialist philosophy it held before the war. Therefore the U.S. had to establish complete hegemony over the world whereas Germany had to conquer the entire world.” The two systems have many similarities.” said Mar&s. Imperialism has thus effectively smashed and destroyed the entire world. The underdeveloped countries have been looted so badly they will never recover without outside help and the developed countries are so dependant on the U.S., a country unwilling to reconstruct the world, that they are incapable of helping the world either. Marcus calculates that in order to raise the standard of living in the entire U.S. to that of the average standard of living in Europe, it would require a capital outlab of about 3 trillion dollars. Ta do this for the entire world there would have to be capital outlay of close to 30 trillion dollars. The U.S., Marcus added, is very capable of solving world

problems. Over 60 percent of the U.S. economy is waste. In the last ten years, expansion in the U.S. has been concentrated in two categories, the militaryareospace complex, which does no good for humanity, and the increase in the number of government paper-pushers, who also do no good for humanity. If the money that goes into these areas was concentrated into creating productive jobs and actual goods, the probleins of man could be solved. Marcus concluded with an analysis of what kind of solutions would be put forward by world leaders and what would arise from these solutions. In order to stave off a monetary crisis, the world monetary system must place value behind the paper money to ward off speculation. They could do this by this by taxing themselves but that would decrease their profits so they can not do that. They could develop their old colon’ies so that they become productive once more and can again be exploited, but this cannot be done either, because it means capital outlay. The only thing left to do is decrease the real wages of the working class through taxes and wage guidelines. But even this can not be done to a great extent because the worker needs a fairly high standard of living in order to reproduce himself on a high enough standard of education for modern complex industry. A monetary crisis, Marcus concluded, is going to be hard to avoid and in may or june this year the crisis may be large enough to bring about a world depression.

Then,treat yourself to a chat with Dr. Howard Petch,Vice President (Academic) Mondays,4-6p.m. Campus Centre (Pub Area)

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Saskatoon campus principal praises student activism SASKATOON (INDEED)-Student activism was praised last week by R. W. Begg. principal of the IJniversity of Saskatchewan campus here. But Begg made it clear he disof violence, student approves power, open decision-making, and political democracy in achieving new goals for the university. “In a way,” he told a service “I’m more conclub meeting. cerned about those who don’t give a damn than I am about the radicals. The radicals are concerned about type of education they’re getting while the majority of students are prepared to go along with whatever happens to them. ” He said he didn’t know of any violently active students on cam-

Pus but he “made it my business to find out.” “But I’m not naive enough to think in 10,000 students there wouldn’t be a few.” Begg said the main cause of student unrest is the teaching situation. Large classes in large colleges, where students have little contact with the teachers, fail to create a sense of identity. And, he said, campus turmoi! today does not mean the modern student generation is any worse than it ever was. “Students today are brighter, better-dressed and better-behaved than they were in my day.” The campus principal said he favored more student participation in setting university policy on a lessthan-equal basis with the faculty. He said the university should not be a political democracy because it was not set up that way.

SALE Buy one dress and get one free. Bring a friend! Remember too We still have our clearance sale prices so come on down and save on the latest fashions.

iP0 P I,outi q ue, “Offering

the Unusual”

FRED,ERICK STREET KITCHENER, ONTA


Sir George:

ruc~sm and destruction

by Elly Alboim

MONTREAL

(CUP)Reporter: “Why didn’t you students’ demands seriously?” Faculty Association executive ber: “YOU know these West

pugnant and easier

take

the mem-

Indian students-they exaggerate, they’re expansive and they use obscenity, but we’ve come to overlook that. They think differently.” If it wasn’t exaggeration, it was unpredictablity, a term the administration at Sir George Williams University substituted for communication as its key crisis phrase. And it was precisely that state of mind that precipitated the conflict and its tragic consequences. Of course, there were immediate triggers. After two weeks of occupation, the students were betrayed in the last moments. They expected victory, were told their demands would be met and then, in the midst of victor euphoria, were let down dramatically Tly a moribund faculty suddenly up with a snarl. The pent-up frustration could not be contained-though it might have been had the police not been called. And the computers, so carefully guarded from harm by the students for 14 days, were smashed beyond repair by their meticulous guardians. They would have done their ca,se better to withdraw quietly, losers in a wearying, struggle. They had the support of the student body and might have seen their demands met after a while. But they responded to power with the only power they could muster, destruction. The anatomy of response is an intriguing problem but not very relevant. Not much more relevant are the eight months of administrative waffling on the charges against Perry Anderson. The weakness and hesitancy lead naturally to escalation, demands and finally occupation. That is a straight-forward process. The substantive charges against Anderson-which now may never’ be explicitly defined-may or may not be valid. Racism is a difficult attitude to expose on the subtle individual level. Nuances of speech, treatment of individuals, deliberate color-blindness may all be indicators. It is not so much individual attitudes per se but the social institutions that create them that are important. Pragmatically, in order to satisfactorily illustrate institutional racism, an educator would take an individual and show how he had been molded by and was implicitly involved in, a greater social process, That is the dramatic technique. Whether it is ethically justifiable is questionable. A judgment would involve balancing the relative weights of the consequences to the individual model against the possible value of an increase in sensitivity to *an awareness of social racism. It is at best doubtful whether, in the final analysis, people were sensitized to racism. There is no doubt that a significant number of white students were -they joined the occupations and talked out racism for days. They, however, would have arrived at that sensitivity on their own with little help. An enormous number of people never looked beyond militancy and destruction. Black leaders may have been satisfied with the outcome, at least to a certain extent. They did manage to create a solid, militant core of blacks. Though they had little feeling for property rights, they did not want, the destruction that resulted. They knew the strategical implications of damage and knew their case would be washed away in the swirl of shrill outcry. They simply lost control. There is no doubt the blacks were extremely sensitive to racism. They . may have reacted too quickly, sized up situations too readily. They were of course influenced by the black movement in America and the emerging one in Halifax. But all of this would not have been sufficient cause for the eruption. It

Broken furniture, destroyed computer equipment, broken glass and tered records block the entrance to the computer center at Sir George liams. Ninety-six students were arrestea L rd charged with arson. CP Wirephoto,

was more white reaction that convinced them of racism than anything else. When people are told they’re different, they become different. White radicals were one of the culpable groups. Their obsequience, hesi-tancy to question and debate with blacks convinced the blacks of their control. Decisions in the computing center were almost invariably made by blacks; debate on strategy involved blacks. Whites did not participate until- they proved their worth by an independent occupation of the faculty club. Administrators were also implicated. Their continual hesitancy to act because of the “unpredictability” of blacks was disastrous. They could have handled white protest-dialog and compromise are legitimate tactics with whites. But they made it clear from the beginning they didn’t know what to expect from the blacks and acted accordingly. The stilted politeness, retreat to downtown hotels, lack of communication all hinged on their evaulation of blacks as something Different, to be handled Differently. And they made no claim to expertise. An administration that has handled students cooly in the past, suddenly lost its firm hand when dealing with black students. And the implications of that were not lost on the blacks. The faculty also played its hand badperhaps in the best lY* Teachers, situation to sense the mood of the school, failed utterly. They were more concerned with Anderson’s suspension and its implications to teaching security than evaluating the political situation and making the best of it. And spokesmen kept making unfortunate evaluations of black students to the media. And of course there were hundreds of: “I don’t care whether he’s black, white, green or pink, I want the facts.” The media played the affair as a black-white confrontation though in, reality it had been turned into a complex student power, revolutionary action. The blacks sensed the news value in

scatWil-

by permission

blackness (“black students and white sympathizers”-Montreal Star). Reporters called white students by their first names and collared them informally-they spoke to Mr. Black and asked politely for interviews. The blacks then became blacksDifferent from anyone else. And in doing so, they were fully aware they had been forced to. They acknowledged that individuals were not conscious racists, but saw clearly that the social ethic had forced individuals to treat them differently from all others. Given that institutional racism had become an objective reality and was transmitted to them by various groups and individuals, they were unwilling to differentiate in any relative sense. Had they acknowledged that various individuals were blind to the manifestations of their unconscious racism but nevertheless were objectively less re-

Preamble

to the pplice

attack:

to deal with than the deliberately constructed racist institutions or conscious racists themselves, they might have been able to work the dispute out. At that point, they could have forced many people to re-evaluate themselves and understand the conflict with the blacks. They were able to work with white radicals ; they may have been able to work-though less effectivelywith white liberals. AS the Differences piled up and the division sharpened, the blacks, though never talking about it, began to despair. Perhaps they thought the racist aspect of the situation could be explained away, that it was only surface dirt. AS the occupation dragged on and they read signs calling them niggers, warning them to get back into their place, they lost hope. The overt racism coupled with the not-so-subtle covert racism convinced them they would not win. When the confrontation came, they had little to lose-as human beings. The destruction was a last stutter of impotent rage. The whites involved were split. Some were radical people who tried all the while to put the affair into political perspective. The blacks insisted they weren’t interested in the “Isms”Capitalism, socialism, marxism. They ejected one maoist who was too vociferous. Gradually they began to create that revolutionary analysis. Some of them left before the police came, knowing they could do no good in jail. Others stayed to fight imperialism on the barricades. But many were white liberals genuinely interested in attaining justice in creating a new hearing committee. They were driven to destruction because they were betrayed by people they believed would finally be reasonable-liberal administra tors and faculty. In the final analysis, it was the attitude of difference that killed Sir George. Had this revolt been treated like any others, the tragedy would not have happened. The demands made by the occupiers were the mildest made to date in the history of serious student revolt. The students simply wanted a new hearing committee, agreeable to both sides, a demand they likened to any trial where prosecution and defense select the jury. . Administrative and faculty rigidity came not from the unreasonableness of the demands (though, of course, a fair number opposed in principle giving in to students in any way) but rather from evaluation of the people they were dealing with. And they were incapable of dealing with blacks. Perhaps the blacks in the long run did has prove their case. But everybody paid an enormous price for that lesson.

computer

cards

rain

frida y, february

down

on the street.

14, 1969 (9:43)

757

5

-


Whckor

protest

-

follows firing WINDSOR (CUP)-Some 55 university of Windsor students seized the school’s theology department early tuesday morning in a protest against non-renewal of a professor’s contract. The students are also demanding a voice in faculty hiring processes. Student discontent with the hiring policies sharpened two weeks ago when the theology department refused to renew the contract of Dr. W.D. Kelly. A demand by students for the reasons behind the move elicited a statment from his department head that university regulations prohibited revealing cause in such circumstances. Kelly says he, was rejected for causing dissension in the departmental ideas”. His department head, Rev. ‘E. R. Malley has admitted Kelly’s offences were non-academic. Student leaders said it was the refusal to renew Kelly’s contract, despite two petitions by students in his classes, that provided the initial impetus for the sit-in and made the theology department the target for takeover. They marched in with sleeping bags, food and cameras and chained the doors behind them. They said they would remain there until the following demands are met: * equal student faculty representation at the department level. * open meetings at all levels of university government. ’ * amnesty for the occupiers.

re-instatement of Kelly if he wishes it. The administration responded by charging “widespread misunderstanding and misrepresentation with respect to the facts.” The student council voted 14-2 to support the occupation, though most of the school’s 4200 students have remained uninterested in the affair. The Windsor police, when contacted; said they would not intervene unless asked to by the administration. By late afternoon the administration had not decided on any action. They did issue a news release on university hiring and firing policy, reasons that these decisions remain confidential and courses open for appeal of decisions. Minor incidents occurred during the day when a small group of students threatened to forecefully end the occupation and student council decided to hire watchmen to keep order outside of occupied areas after rumors that engineers may attempt to disrupt. A faculty member broke several windows in an attempt to enter the student held territory, but the belligerent students and the destructive faculty men were unsuccessful. Kelly says he has not pursued lines of appeal open to him, and outlined in an administration news release, because he is not sure he wants to come back to work at Windsor anyway. l

may

OTTAWA (CUP)-The executive of the Canadian Association of University Teachers has proposed that the organization censure the University of New Brunswick because of its mishandling of the Strax affair. In a press release issued Monday, the CAUT executive said it will convene a full council meeting of CAUT on March 15 to discuss the ‘censure. The statement says CAUT has “repeatedly protested against the action of the university president (or UNB) and board in suspending professor (Norman) Strax without any charges or any prevision for an adjudicative hearing” CAUT has asked the UNB board of governors for an adjudicative hearing and the board has not complied. The censure, should it be imposted. will be the second such action taken in the 19-year history of the teachers’ association. The ’ first was imposed on Simon Fraser

Salary

raised,

Student council set a policy monday night and immediately made a major departure from it. A committee of councillors Bill Snodgrass. Glenn Berry and Paul Dube submitted amendments to the existing salaries policy which for the first time distinguishes between full-time and part-time federation presidents. Essentially they proposed that a part-time president is one who remains a full-time student or who holds another job while he is president. Part-time presidents would receive a salary of $25 a week with full-time ones getting more. However, Snodgrass, the committee’s chairman, included a section in the report defining current president John Bergsma

6

758 the Chevron

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Strax affair at UNB

. CAM

ENTERTAINMENT

censure

Bar open

Students

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FEBRUARY20 4:00

-

9 I :30

University last spring for ,administrative interference in academic affairs. That censure was lifted this fall. Censure by CAUT means that all members of the association are advised not to accept teaching job appointments at the school and that anyone applying for a job at the school will be advised of the reason for censure. To avoid censure, UNB must set up an arbitration committee to hear the university charges against Strax. It must also lift the ccurt order restraining Strax from entering the UNB campus and must assume all legal fees incurred by Strax in his fight with the administration‘ because those expenses were incurred as a “result of the university’s failure to proceed in the normal academic say”.’ Strax now owes at least $6000 in legal fees and does not have sufficient funds to mount an appeal. ,

The sensational

LANGE SKi This

Renison rep Paul Dube. a committee member. attempted to have this proposal deleted from the report but his motion was defea ted. Dube maintained that Bergsma should not *be paid for a job he isn’t doing, and cited student complaints about Bergsma’s unavailability. Starting March 1, salaries for full-time presidents and Chevron editors go up to $75 a week, from about $60 a week for the past year. However if the president is married he will get $85 a week and if he has a family he will get $90.

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AA

CCORDING TO OUR COMPUTER,” says Robert Allan Jr.,

head of Litton Industries’ Greek “there’s less than 800 project, weeks before the present trend will be irreversible. ‘. . .The need for food and the lack of capacity of technology in . . underdeveloped nations will be overwhelming . . . It’s time that we got to work on it.” To listen to Litton executives and to read their annual reports, one might suppose that Litton was some enormous social welfare agency rather than a multidefense contractor. In billion-dollar reality, it is both of these and more. Litton Industries produces S&H Green Stamps and Stouffer Foods, missile guidance systems and nuclear attack submarines. It runs important programs of the War on Poverty at home. And abroad it recently secured an $800 million contract-to which Mr. Allan’s statement referred-with the Greek military junt? for the economic development of the whole geographical region of Western Peloponnesus and Crete. Litton is the perfect example of the new corporation extending itself beyond the limits that have divided the private oligarchies of business from the realms of responsibility traditionally reserved to government. Among the corporate bearers of this brave new American future, Litton stands out as something of a paradigm and archetype foreshadowing the shape of things to come. It is not just the new corporation, but the Now Corporation. It has gathered about itself the full mystique of modernity: advanced technology, the “systems ‘engineering” approach (a product of military contracting), electronics and space. And the mystique has paid off phenomenally well, with a corporate growth rate which Business Week says may well be the fastest in the history of U.S. business. In 1953, when a group headed by Charles “Tex” Thornton bought Litton, then a small electronics firm, for $1.5 million the company showed $3 million in sales. This year its worth has grown to a fantastic $1.8 billion level, making it the 44th largest industrial corporation in the U.S., ranking ahead of such traditional giants as Alcoa Aluminum, Coca-Cola and Dow Chemical. It is perhaps natural that the guiding forces of American society, frustrated by the nation’s stubborn social ills which appear to be insoluble by traditional means, should turn to the methodology of military-space development as the Way to Get Things Done. Unable to confront the real moral and political dimensions of its economic and social crisis, the American leadership defines the crisis as basically a technical problem and is immensely comforted thereby: the technical problem is large, to be sure, but it is one that can be handled without any serious reassessment of American values and institutions-and without the social upheaval that might be necessary to restructure them.

If engineers employed by private corporations on contract to the government can put men on the moon, it is reasoned, surely they can cure the social and economic crisis at home. -The social engineering approach to race and poverty is merely the logical extension of the pervasive liberal doctrine of pragmatic America and the “end of ideology. ’ ’ As John F. Kennedy, whom many look on as the last national statesman to bear the torch of idealism, affirmed in his famous Yale address in 1962: “What is at stake is not some grand warfare of rival ideologies which will sweep the country with passion, but the practical management of a modern economy. What we need is . . .more basic discussion of the sophisticated and technical issues involved in keeping a great economic machinery moving ahead.” The domestic upheavals in the years following President Kennedy’s address have torn to shreds the mythology of the crisis-free welfare state. But the mythoogy of salvation through the application between government and the private corporations has not only survived, it. has risen to a new intensity of apocalyptic promise.

by David Horowitz and Reese Erlich, Ramparts magazine ITTON FIRST

INDUSTRIES

WAS THE

corporation to take over one of the poverty program’s mul1 timillion-dollar job corps campswhose large urban centers are now run completely by private enterprise-and was an early promoter of the “military approach for other areas of systems” national policy.

IL

As the idea has caught on, proposals have proliferated. General Bernard Adolph Schriever, special Administration consultant on housing and urban development programs, has already suggested that aerospace’s management process be applied to these programs, and aerospace industrial teams have begun pushing Eor contracts in such areas as urban traffic management and water conservation (California’s waste disposal program is in the process of being .handed over to Aero-j et-General). Litton, for its part, has offered to contract whole local school systems, promising to put them on a sound footing and to run them smoothly and economicallya logical step since it is already a major textbook publisher and runs a college of .ts own in Michigan. It is a proposal ;hat may well appeal to harried parents md tax-ridden homeowners. Litton Industries has been the corporate success story of the postwar period just oecause it is the perfect product of the times, custom-made to fit the outlines of the new order. For the same reason, it is a perfect image of the economic developments of this period: the vast expansion

of the military budget during the Cold War and the largest corporate merger wave in U.S. history. While the notion of a military-industrial complex has gained currency in recent years, the technological underpinning of the new intimacy between governmeht and business has gone largely unnoticed. Yet fully 70 per cent of all research and development being done in the United States today (about $16 billion worth), is paid for by the federal government, whereas a little more than 20 years ago it supported almost none at all. The significance of this for the civilian economy was spelled out recently by Litton-s number two man, Roy Ash, in explaining his company’s relation to the military sector. Since “almost all new products have their first application in military uses,” said Ash, “we always want at least 25 per cent of our business in defense and space. r’

Ash’s statement and the facts behind it reflect the final collapse of the cornerstone of old-fashioned capitalism. In the old days private corporations would develop technological innovations at their own expense, risking the outlay with a view to being rewarded by future returns from the competitive marketplace. This was the very essence of entrepreneurship. However, technical research has now become extremely expensive, and because of the gentlemanly pace of competition among the monopolistic giants of the American economy, these corporations are no longer forced by fear of rivals to risk such investments. So they have become accustomed to getting the government to pick up the tab before they move. These corporations have grown economically lazy, in part because they really can live better on the largess of the SOcalled welfare state. One of the factors that has made it possible for them to pry such huge sums of research money out of the government has been the unprecedented increase in the concentration of economic-and with it, political-power in the last decade. This tremendous concentration movement in the economy has been spearheaded by the advance of the “conglocorporations, formed by the merate” acquisition of companies operating in diverse markets. Litton is the star of this movement, with enterprises in 18 distinct industrial categories. To an uninitiated observer of the conglomerate phenomenon, Litton’s fantastic rise has a distinctly mystifying air about it, like some kind of psychic levitation. For despite all the hullabaloo about new technologies and go-go management, Litton can point to no revolutionary innovation which has benefited the civilian economy and represents a tangible basis for its surging nonmilitary growth (about two-thirds of Litton’s present sales, ac-

cording to Roy Ash, are in civilian fields). One had only to think of Xerox and Polaroid, where jet-powered corporate growth and revolutionizing technology have gone hand in hand, to bring the contrast into focus. It is not that Litton produces nothing innovative or useful (if inertial guidance systems for missiles and fighter planes can be considered useful), but rather that nothing Litton has marketed seems to warrant its unparalleled record of corporate expansion. Indeed, most of Litton’s technological innovations were already being developed in the 70 and more businesses which Litton has acquired-before they became part of the parent firm. Yet to be mystified by this is merely to confuse what Thorstein Veblen called the “business system” with the industhat is, to mistake the SYStrial systemltern of developing and implementing technologies to meet human needs for the system of making a buck off them.

Litton’s success is a function almost entirely of a brilliant, if sleight of hand, business strategy, with the U.S. government as silent partner. If the constituents of its success seem somewhat insubstantial to the ordinary man, the cash it has made is real. And in the “business system, ” it is the cash that counts. “Tex Thorn ton-good abilities along 3 few lines but not a good all round man,. ;s unprincipled, ruthless and is universally disliked; cannot be trusted.”

-from

a confidential memo prepared of the prestigious Wall Street accounting firm of Haskins 8~ Sells; marked as an exhibit in the Steele vs Litton case.

by a member

r

j ‘EX THORNTON IS THE PARADIGM new corporate manager

of the paradigm new corporation. T His career follows the now well trodden path from civilian Washington to the military to the corporate elite. Thirty years ago Tex Thornton was a $1400~a-year clerk in Washington ; today he is a university trustee, a member of the President’s advisory commission on civil disorders (the Kerner Commission) and head of its special advisory panel on private enterprise. He was one of a handful of nominees considered to succeed Robert McNamara as secretary of Defense, and according to a Washington Post columnist he is-with typical military industrial bipartisanship-presently being considered by Richard Nixon for that job. He has already achieved the coveted seat next to the President at White House business meetings. In addition to being chairman of the board of Litton, he is an “interlocking director” of such giants as TWA, Lehman Corporation, General Mills, the Western Bancorporation (a (continued

friday,

february

over page)

14, 7969 (9:43)

759

y


bank holding company for the Bank of t America interests) and Union Oil. Needless to say, in Thornton’s new circles being a millionaire is not at all unusual, but he has already made $80 million and is aiming for the status of centimillionaire. If the market for Litton stock holds up, he will soon make it. Tex Thornton has come a long way, and the Horatio Alger award he received in 1964 was shrewdly given. Soon after Tex was born in a small north central Texas town, his father ran off, leaving his mother to drill him in the manly art of finance. When he was just twelve, she was already encouraging him to use his earnings from odd jobs to buy land, instead of frittering his money away like a kid. He eventually accumulated nearly 40 acres. By the time Tex was fourteen, every store in town would accept his personal check. And he was all of nineteen when he launched his first real business venture: a combination gas station and Chrysler-Plymouth dealership. Later, setting his sights always higher, he enrolled in Texas Technological College starting first in engineering, but switching quickly to business administrationafter all, the engineer works for the busiHe quit Texas Tech in his nessman. junior year and took off for Washington to check out the action in the School of Life. In Washington .he returned to college and got his bachelor of commercial science in 1937. His first job was as a clerk in the department of the Interior. For four years Tex was unable to find that combination of business-militarypolitical influence which he needed to power his ascent. When he did find it, its name was Robert Love& Wall Street banker and assistant secretary of War. Lovett was not just a run-of-the-mill Wall Street banker, either: he was destined to become-in the euphemism of such a scholar as Arthur Schlesinger Jr.-one of the co-chairmen of the American establishment. Highly impressed with the twenty-eightyear-old Tex, Lovett suggested that he join the Army (it was pre-Pearl Harbor 1941) as a second lieutenant. Apparently a brilliant officer. Thornton received his first promotion within 48 hours. A series of such jet-assisted takeoffs made him one of the youngest full colonels in the U.S. Army, at one point with as many as 2800 officers working for him around the world. Like the-present secretary of Defense, Clark Clifford, whose military career had a striking resemblance to Thornton’s, Tex never left his desk. Yet the War Department honored him with a Legion of Merit, a Cominendation Ribbon with two oakleaf clusters, along with a Distinguished Service Medal that Tex still wears on his lapel.

8

760 the Chevron

“It’s the kind of thing a guy would wear,” observes one of his detractors, “if he wanted you to think he had been a big combat hero during the war.” It was at this point that Tex’s instinct for the Combination manifested itself. The federal government, with an assist from banker Lovett, had gathered, as if for Tex’s own benefit, an array of managerial talent which, if offered in the right package on the business market, could command a premium price. So Tex organized nine of his subordinates into a team-later known as the Whiz Kids-and offered it to Henry Ford II with price tags of around $10,000 a year each on the nine, and $16,000 on himself, the commanding officer. With Lovett’s blessing, Tex sold his package. Ford did not do too badly on the deal, gaining four future divisional bosses and two presidents of the company, including Robert Strange McNamara who. was later to become-on Robert Lovett’s nomination-secretary of Defense.

T THIRTY-TWO COME director

TEX

HAD

BE-

of planning for A one of the giants of U.S. industry.[ A Within only a few years, however, Thornton’s ambition brought him into collision with his superiors at Ford. So he offered his services to Hughes Aircraft. Apparently, Thornton was not exactly welcomed with open arms. Noah Dietrich, then financial head of the company, strongly objected to hiring him. But with the help of two of Tex’s old Army buddies, Generals George and Eaker, who were on the board, Dietrich was overruled. As assistant general manager Tex took command of operations and hired his future right-hand man, Roy Ash-a Bank of America statistician with no accountancy training-to be assistant comptroller. Ash had been one of Thornton’s subordinates during the war. Hughes’ business, especially with the newly independent Air Force, boomed. In 1948, Hughes did a total of $2 million in sales. By 1953, when Thornton left Hughes, the figure was $200 million. The biggest boost came from the Korean War and an exclusive contract to produce a special Fire Control System (a device to regulate the firing of aircraft guns). The contract with the government for the control system was on a “fixed price, redeterminable” basis; that is, a price was agreed on at the outset which could be “redetermined” if costs increased. Based on the ongoing costs of material, Hughes received periodic “progress payments. ” Thornton and Ash were very anxious to have Hughes Aircraft make a profit on this contract-a little too anxious, it would seem. According to sworn court testimony which convinced the jury in the

case of Steele vs. Litton Industries (although the judge suspended the verdict on a legal point), and a number of other suits and counter-suits, the following picture emerges : Hughes Aircraft’s accounting depart&m was unable to keep tmck of the costs under the fire control contract and began falsifying the affidavits they were required to submit to the government regularly, stating the current costs. Thornton and Ash found out about this, but far from stopping the procedure, they encouraged it. James 0. White, one of the compan ys accountants, gave the following testimony: Q: In substance, did somebody tell you that Mr. Thornton had said that, “We want to file false affidavits” A : In substance, yes. Q: Who was this? A: Ash. Q: What did he say? A : He said. “Tex wants to get the money 3nd we’re to do it any way we can to get ;t. -=

Another means of cheating the government was arfully described as “midnight requisitions.” Clerical personnel were called in after-hours and on weekends and told to fill out millions of dollars worth of phony requisitions. Again James White’s testimony explains : “They (the requisitions) were filled out by people who had no knowledge of the facts, who had not used the parts, who had not withdrawn them from stores. They were put into the records as though they had. They were made to look as though they had been proper. They were backdated. They were made to look as though they had been handled by factory people instead of office people, dirtied, in other words, to make them look old and genuine as having come through the shop. They were complete forgeries. ’ ’ Eventually a group of five CPA’S revolted and refused to continue these pro: cedures for fear of losing their certificates. When they told Thornton they would resign, he told them to be quiet and be “good company men.” They went to General Harold George, nominally head of the company, but his position was that, “This indulged in is something . . . generally by other military contractors,” and he “didn’t think there was anything out of order. ’ ’ The CPA’s resigned after taking their case to the Hughes directors. But secretary of the air force Harold Talbott had already learned of the indiscreet management at Hughes and had given Howard Hughes himself an ultimatium: “Either change your management or sell the company. By God, I’ll give you 90 days.” On September 1, 1953, Howard Hughes locked Thornton and Ash out of their of-

fices.

By February of 7954, Hughes Aircraft had paid back some $43 million to the Air Force which had been “misappropriated” during the stay of Thornton and Ash.

T T

7

HE LOCKOUT AT HUGHES WAS TEX Thornton’s 1uck.y day. For

at the same time as he was being kicked out, there was a massive walkout of disgruntled top engineers and executives, men who went on to found such stars of the conglomerate aerospace field as TRW and Teledyne. Tex managed not only to lose himself in the exiting crowd but also to take some talent with him. Emmett Steele. with an ingratiating personality and invaluable contacts in the Pentagon, was to become his sales manager, and Hugh Jamieson his top engineer . Meanwhile, Charles V. Litton, owner of Litton Industries, having suffered a family tragedy, was ready to sell his small electronics firm. And Thornton and his team were on the lookout for just such a deal. However, Litton apparently regarded Thornton as untrustworthy and was reluctant to sell to him. At one point ’ he even broke off negotiations. According to Litton, it was Jamieson and Steele who finally convinced him to sell. With Litton ready to sell, all that Tex needed was cash to consummate the deal, and that meant a trip back to Robert Lovett’s milieu and the giant investment banking house of Lehman. Joe Thomas, Lehman’s partner and a fellow Texan, provided $1.5 million to buy Litton, in exchange for 75,000 of the original 575,,000 shares. Common stock cost Lehman’s investors ten cents a share. During the next decade and a half it sold for as much as $1.50. It was no doubt one of the best deals the Lehmans had cut since they helped finance the slave South’s cotton crop during the Civil War. w HEN TEX COMPANY

THORNTON

AND

took over Litton, it was essentially a laboratory ~ production office, a very modest enterprise. After four years under the new management, Litton’s annual sales had risen from $3 million to $100 million-and that was just the beginning. The traditional conception of the growth of a business brings to mind images of the firm selling more of its products, creating new ones, and building new plants to produce more to sell. Only a fraction of Litton’s growth, in fact, was achieved in this way. Of the $97 million increase during Tex’s first four years, for example, sales from Charlie Litton’s original firm accounted for only $11 million. The rest of the increase in sales resulted from the acquisition of some 17 previously existing companies and their incorporation into a new overall financial superstructure: “Litton Industries, Inc.” As Thornton explains, “We had to grow fast. There wasn’t


time to learn a business, train people, develop markets. . . We bought time, a market, product line, plant, research team, sales force. It would have taken years to duplicate this from scratch.” Buying, not building, was the formula of Litton’s growth. To understand how a small firm with limited resources -c&i buy itself into bigness, one must understand how corporate growth can feed on itself. For the very act of merger creates new power to merge on an even larger scale through its effect on the value of the corporation’s stock. The value of the stock and therefore of the corporation is not determined by adding up the values of tangible assets: cash reserves, inventories, equipment, plant and so forth. The value of the stock is determined by what people are willing to pay for it, and they will pay more now if they expect its value to rise in the future. Of course’ these are not just expectations of expectations, but are ultimately derived from an assessment of the potential for real growth of corporate assets and earnings. Expectations, however, are by nature intuitive, and intuition can be influenced by all kinds of intangible factors. Jack Dreyfus, head of one of the biggest mutual funds on Wall Street, once commented wryly on the subjective “glamour” factors which have gone into making the stock of corporations like Litton highly valued on the market, by offering his own prescription for such a success: “Take a nice little company that’s been making schoelaces for 40 years and sells at a respectable six-times-earnings ratio. Change the name from Shoelaces Inc. to Electronics and Silicon Furth-Burners. In today’s market, the words ‘electronics’ and ‘silicon’ are worth 15 times earnings. “However, the real play comes from the word ‘furth-burners,’ which no one understands. A word that no one understands entitles

you

to

double

your

entire

score.

Therefore, we have six times earning for the shoelace business and 15 times earnings for electronics and silicon, or a total of 21 times earnings. Multiply this by two for furth-burners and we now have a score of 42 times earnings for the new company.” g r o w th The key to conglomerate that a company s stock is the fact call be-and ordinarily isthe to purchast used is ‘mane y*’ that another corporation. So a smart business-

man can make the process come full circle. By successfully creating a glamous “growth image” on the stock market that excites expectations of real future growth, he can drive the value of his stock up. This then gives him new which to buy real ’ ‘money’ ’ with assets in the form of another corporation: in other words, his business can grow in fact and not just on paper, thereby confirming the expectations he aroused and further strengthening the image. And so the circle becomes a spiral of increasing growth.

It is a small wonder, then, that creating i glamour image is a major preoccupation If conglomerate managements like Liton’s Indeed, Litton was a pioneer in conrerting the traditionally staid annual rebort to stockholders into a high-class idvertisement for Myself. Litton’s reports look more like cataloues from Pasadena’s Huntington Musum of Art than informational materials ram a major industrial corporation. Abraham J. Briloff described it in the Financial Analysts Journal: “Litton’s .967 report is, as you undoubtedly know, r most beautiful document . . . which ;ymbolizes the ethics of 20th century comnercial life in the New Industrial State. . . distorted in my view is the series of graphs most beautifully set to type at page i5 of the annual report. . .The curves which the eye is invited to make are optical illusions capable of inducing inappropriate investment decisions.” Another art which is employed in the production of a glamour image is creative accounting. This. important technique of the Big Growth game is made possible by thf! looseness of the principles under which firms are audited. The usual methods are n.ot as crude as those that were used at Hughes Aircraft, but their zffects can be pretty significant. As the pseudonymous “Adam Smith” notes in The Money Game, “Numbers imply precision, so it’s a bit hard to get used to the idea that a company’s net profit could vary by 100 per cent depending on which bunch of accountants you call in, especially when the market is going to rake that earnings number and create trends, growth rates, and little flashing lights in computers from it. And all this without any kind of skulduggery you could get sent to jail for.” An explanation for this legal generosity was given by the real Adam Smith, the 18th century prophet of the free enterprise system. The very purpose of government, he wrote, was “to secure wealth, and to defend the rich from the poor. *’

,

ONGLOMERATES VIOUvSLY BASED

ARE

SO OB-

on highly speculative, not to say shady, principles G that even the Wall Street Journal has been prompted to take off its gold-rimmed rose-colored glasses for an instant and ask a few probing questions about them: how much of their growth is based on improved products and efficiencies and how much reflects the attractive arithmetic of acquisition and the temptations of empire building?. . . Can they be managed efficiently? This last question has an especially poignant ring for Litton’s supermanagers. In 1968, Litton’s second quarter report admitted a disastrous 30 per cent earnings drop (Litton’s stock price plummeted nearly 50 per cent at the news), reflecting nanagerial errors so gross that not even ;he most creative accounting techniques :ould cover them up. The mistakes affected several of Lit;on$‘s divisions, including its business

furniture, Royfax duplicators, Monroe calculators, and its Royal typewriter line. But the biggest error of all provided the clue to the overall pattern of Litton’s debacle. The Litton shipyard, which had been accustomed to a rich diet of costplus contracts at the government trough (“Your chances of losing money” under such contracts, admits a Litton executive, “are not too great”), had for the first time bid competitively on a package basis for the construction of automated merchant vessels-a civilian contract under which you don’t get to come back for more money if you can’t make it at the agreed-upon price. The result of this market test was that Litton underestimated the costs, submitted a bid that was too low, and instead of netting a profit, had to write off a loss of $8 million. In what must rank as the understate ment of the year, Fortune, after noting that the key to Litton’s setback was its inability to stand the test of the relatively competitive civilian market, observed: “The requirements for profitability in government work are less exacting than those of the private marketplace.” They certainly are. Under government contracts there is a decided lack of competitive strictures. Little or no capital is risked by the corporation. If it makes errors of judgment, timing, cost analysis and so forth, there are no competitors to take advantage of its mistakes. And it has an enormously understanding buyer. If costs are underestimated, they can always be adjusted up through contract renegotiation. One former Litton executive with responsibilities in this area estimated that as a matter of normal practice, Litton in the course of production and development renegotiated its contracts to one and a half times the original price-a nice margin for inept planning and mismanagement. In short, its vulnerable, soap-bubble growth strategy could never have carrieo Litton so far had it not possessed the ability, though a small firm at the Outset, to get a front-tine position in the prims military contract game and latch on tc that secret fuel which alone can launcl space age corporations towards the moon, the financial largess of the state. T

\ HE HIGH POINT OF LITTON’S CLOSE Connections in Washing-

ton was reached during the reign of Tex Thornton’s one time subord inate, Robert McNamara, as secretary of Defense. Thornton, who was often a break, fast guest at the Pentagon, claims never tc have talked business with the secretary during those visits. But, as the executive of another corporation in the contract field observed, “A clever man would mere ly let it be known that he was having breakfast with McNamara every other morning. When talking to procurement officers and the like, he wouldn’t even have to mention McNamara’s name.” The subtle but far-reaching significance T

of good connections was pointed out by the leading student of the military-industrial complex, Professor H.L. Nieburg: “Officials in the lower reaches of the government bureaucracy (both civilian and military) charged with administration of contracts, find themselves dealing with private corporate officials who often were their own former bosses and continue as companions of present bosses and congressional leaders who watchdog the agencies. A contract negotiator or supervisor must deal with men who can determine his career prospects ; through contacts, these industrial contractors may cause him to be passed over or transferred to a minor position in some remote bureaucratic corner, sometimes with a ceremonial drumming before a congressional committee.” But political strings are only half the story. More than anything else, it is the defense contracting system itself as it evolved after World Warr II, which has created the new and sinister relationship between the giant corporations and the state. Following the profiteering scandals of World War I, which revealed the American business had milked the American taxpayer by ‘ ‘ sliding” price policies on military contracts, and had spent the lives of many American soldiers by producing cheap, shoddy equipment, the practice of competitive bidding on government contracts was instituted to simulate the open market. The two armed services developed their own “inhouse” design and production capabilities which served to measure and check outside performances. Under the pressures of the Second World War, contracting procedures on aircraft, ordnance and ammunition reverted to the cost-plus basis which had inspired the earlier scandals. Then a series of developments after the war produced the current unprecedented state of affirs. First, as part of a movement heralded as a return to “free enterprise,” plants, factories and facilities built by the government during the war were either sold to private corporations, usually at a fraction of their original cost, or were leased at nominal fees to contractors, to use for military contracts. This largely deprived the government of the performance “yardstick” of its in-house facilities. Second, the Air Force was established as an independent military service. Naturally, it did not have the already built in-house capabilities of the other two services, so it hired out the entire process of designing, producing and even maintaining weapons systems, instead of presenting its own designs to contractors for production. This necessitated a cost-plus contractual basis, since no prearranged price could be fixed for so indeterminate a process. In addition, the Air Force’s prime contracting corporations, now responsible for complete weapons systems, had to esta(continued

cridag/, february

over page)

14, 7969 (9:43)

76 7 9

.


blish, in the words of one Congressional Report, “procurement organizations and methods which proximate those of the These prime contractors government.” were thus in a position to force subcontracting small companies out of business, acquire their proprietary inf ormake or break geographical mation, regions and decide a host of other critical issues of national import, without even the quasi-democratic checks imposed on the federal bureaucracy. No wonder H.L. Nieburg has warned of the ominous erosion of public control by the giant aerospace companies and has dubbed the whole relationship “the contract state.” \ ROM THE OUTSET, THE NEW Tex Thornton team at Litton had its eyes on the really big electronic equipment and systems markets. They were determined not to be pikers and they knew their way up the federal escalator, but they needed a break. In 1954, a team of Litton scientists headed by Dr. Henry Singleton appeared ready to give them one. He outlined a project for miniaturizing an inertial navigator and guidance system. Perfecting such a system was of paramount importance to the military, for it would be the only kind of navigational system that could not be electronically jammed. Further, a missile guided by such a navigator would not emit signals that would disclose its whereabouts. The military had already set out the objectives of such a system and various working devices had been produced, but they all weighed from 500 to 1000 pounds, too heavy for aircraft and missiles. Thus, Singleton was proposing an innovation that would revolutionize the field. All that was needed to attempt to develop the system was capital. Of course the Litton management, well oriented toward5 the new age, had no intention of putting up their own money, or of raising it through old-fashioned loans or investors. For to raise capital in that way would entail risks and obligations. What Litton really needed was a banker who would not seek repayment of capital (with interest) if the investment bore no fruit, and if the project should come through, who would not insist on reaping any return on his investment. Could there be such a banker? Litton thought so. With nothing but a wooden mock-up of the proposed navigator and a ten-centsa-mile expense account for its station wagon, the Litton sales team set out to sell a miniaturized inertial navigation system to the Army Air Corps. In 1956, they finally convinced the purchasing agents at Fort Huachuca, Arizona, to finance the development of a prototype. For its proposal, Litton got a fixed price redeterminable contract for $214,902. With the Fort Huachuca contract safely tucked away in their display kits, Litton salesmen then made the rounds of various other government agencies and

P ,

10

762 the Chevron

aerospace firms, stressing the advantages of getting in on the ground floor with contracts for the navigators while the opportunity lasted. In 1957, Litton contracted to produce for Grumman, the chief Navy aircraft supplier, 68 of the navigators for Navy planes. By 1959, this contract was worth some $7,400,000. In subsequent months, Litton used its new foot in the door with Grumman to sell them additional items, until their total contracts amounted to a full $10 million. A ccording to the Steele case testimony of John McDonald, then head of LittonS electronics division’s contract negotiations, Litton’s engineers did successfully achieve the new revolutionary design. But Litton never delivered the prototype navigator to the Army, which had originally paid for it; instead, it used the design to fulfil1 its contract with Grumman Aircraft. All the Army got was a bagful of disassembled parts. In 7960, the Army purchasing officials canceled Littons contract “for the convenience of the government. I’

As for Litton, it had won for itself a tremendous future contracting position for electronics and guidance systems in missiles, planes and even ships, on which all the federal giveaways on costs and profits would be multiplied a thousand-fold. No longer a little laboratory but a real comer in the field Litton was now ready for a really golden opportunity: a major subcontract for the guidance system oi the F-104 Starfighter jet. And when Germany decided to incorporate 700 F-104’s into its postwar Luftwaffe, Litton bought two German companies just to produce the guidance systems for their version of the plane. Unfortunately, the Luftwaffe’s Starfighter turned out to be, in the words of Business Week, “an essentially American product that now bears the blackest name in the history of German aviation. ” At least 83 of the planes crashed, killing 42 pilots and forcing Litton to modify the guidance system. Some time later a further modified version of Litton’s navigator was installed in America’s newest fighter plane, the ill-fated F-111, McNamara’s notorious pet project and one of the costliest boondoggles of all time. The prime Navy contractor

for that plane: Grumman

Aircraft.

\ HE AMERICAN MARITIME INDUSTRY had been ailing badly since World War II Even the capT tive business of the U.S. Navy and a big federal subsidy on non-military business (paying the difference, up to 50 per cent, between U.S. shipbuilders’ inflated prices and those of foreign rivals) couldn’t sustain sales. The Swedes and the Japanese had surpassed them technologically, and protective government assistance had merely allowed the gap to widen. So in the early 1960’s, the US. Navy, which bought 80 per cent of the industry’s output anyway. decided to act. The Navy-then the last holdout-decir

ded to adopt the Air Force’s “total package” or “weapons system” approach: a single shipyard would be given a supercontract to design a ship and build a fleet of them. The extraordinary scope of the order would require the contractor to build a new shipyard with modern assembly line features unavailable in then current U.S. shipyards. And because the contract was for a total package, the contractor would have to plan everything from the skills of the crew to the maintenance requirements. Long before the announcement came Litton somehow managed. to get a sniff of what was in the wind. As Roy Ash explained, “We saw some developments coming and thought we couldbe a part of them. One thing we foresaw was an expansion of the practicelit was already established in the Air Force and for Navy aircraft-of turning to industry for help in developing total weapons system.” So in 1961, Litton picked up Ingalls, an ailing shipyard with $60 million in annual sales, for $8 million and an agreement to pay $9 million in debts to the Navy. Ingalls got a number of contracts over the next few years-for one amphibious assault ship here, six cargo ships there. Then in November 1965, the big deal went up for grabs: McNamara announced approval of a large integrated system of East Deployment Logistics (FDL) ships. These “floating warehouses”-perhaps as many as 30 of them-would be stationed strategically around the world, ready to move quickly into “trouble spots” to back up U.S. troops with ammunition, C-rations, tanks, etc. The FDL was the first ship to be handled under the Navy’s new weapons system approach. Several shipbuilding companies were in the initial bidding for the contracts, but they all either dropped out or were eliminated. The final stage of bidding inchided three aerospace giants : Litton, General Dynamics and Lockheed. Each got $5 million in contracts to finish plans for the FDL and the yard. Of course each, would need a site for its yard. According to the Wall Street Journal, climate ruled out New England and the steep cost of steel and highly unionized labor made the West Coast undesirable. That left the U.S. domestic colony of cheap labor: the South. Litton, of course, luckily already had a location in the South, in Pascagoula, Mississippi: Ingalls shipyard, to be exact. But they still needed to find a way to finance the new yard, which according to informed sources at the time would cost $100 million to build. And this time the federal government was not putting up the money. But there are state governments too. Already the largest employer in Mississippi, Litton went straight to the

lease at a minimal price. Governor Johnson called a special legislative session in order to pass a $130 million bond issue (the extra $30 million was interest). In October 1967, the bond issue was approved by Mississippi voters. Of course the people of Mississippi would “own” the leased-out shipyard, though they would not reap the profits from or control its operation. For their $130 million investment they would get an estimated 12,000 jobs, at Pascagoula wages and under special “long-term” union contracts (“yellow dog” is such an old-fashioned phrase). Litton also rewarded its Mississippi friends by writing into its contract the latest in sophisticated legal loopholes to help the shipyard bosses keep blacks out of the good jobs for as

So they set 200 experts to work on a winning design, under complicated and difficult new CF-CD (Contract Formulation; Contract Definition) procedures that

again, Litton was in luck: in the Rubel had shuttled over from the Department to head the Litton

to appropriate But

the money

do not fear for Litton; it is an law of the contract state that Navy brings to birth it does to die. The Navy will see that answer to the decrepitude of aritime industry, is well taken of. Since the first congressional Navy has already salved Litwith at least $1.2 billion in

time companies, mark up its price to an buyers 50 per cent above the preworld market price and have the paid by U.S. taxpayers through Litton’s relationship with the . .Litton Part

de

has

got

Two of this article appearing in t issue, describes the most recentcaching-developments in the odyLitton Industries and the conte, the further supplanting of the the governance of include

the disturbing stories of International Development


July Trip Windsor to Prestwick (Glasgow) Scotland. Sponsored by the International Student Org. Univ. of Windsor. For details: I. S. 0. Charter Flight Trust Fund, c/o John 1165 Quellette Ave, 5 i 9-253-6974 Windsor, Ontario 4

The five planned their sortie carefully for two weeks. They showed up at different border stations bearing photostats of identification papers of a legitimate deserter now living in Canada, William John Heintzelman. They had draft cards, certificates of future employment in Canada, Canadian letters of reference-in short, all that would establish that they were deserters and that they had sufficient qualifications under the immigration law to allow them landed immigrant status. Not one of them made it over the border. All of this despite a statement in Parliament, July 12, 1967, by John Monroe, then parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Immigration, who said “an individual’s status with regard to compulsory military service in his own country has no bearing upon his admissibility to Canada, either as an immigrant or as a visitor. Nor is he subject to re-

6th at the Evanshen,

Then,treat yourself toa chat with Dr. Howard Petch,Vice President (Academic) Mondays,4-6p.m. Campus Centre (Pub Area) -m---t __- -

Canada

-

sit the exotic

Pl 1urn Tree Too Gift boutique 18 Albert St. Wloo or the small parent shoppeat 4 Erb St. East.

MONTREAL (CIIP)--The Montreal council to aid war resisters tuesday announced plans for a formal protest of discrimination against American draft-dodgers and resisters attempting to emigrate to Canada. Their brief, which will include a number of affidavits testifying to the alleged discrimination, is to be sent to immigration minister Jean Marcand by the Ottawa affiliate of the council, probably during the week of february 17. The group says American war resisters must often undergo unreasonable delays of up to a year in obtaining Canadian work permits and landed-immigrant status. Although Canadian immigration law states that military status

Lab points

ITHE 0cTows I ! Have

you

ever

I

g

I

tried

!

on a bun on a bun?

Why don’t you try these for a delicious in menu? Take

out

orders

7 am - 8 pm Tuesday 95 King

m m

“The

L

~~1~1mmIII’umI-i

Octopus

change

too! thru

Sunday

N. Waterloo

has so many

I

hands

to serve you

better”

m

serters

moval from Canada because unfulfilled military obligations his country of citizenship”.

01 in

because they had bethn instructed to, not because of’ a personal view of deserters. One of the students, Chris Wilson, was asked ‘immediately what his draft status was and when he informed the official he was a deserter, was told there was “no way” he could get in and not to bother applying. All the others were given similar run-a-rounds though two were rejected after hasty conferences between border officials and their superiors. And when they were rejected, all were immediately seized by American immigration officials who already knew they were deserters. Apparently. they were told that by the Canadian people. The immigration department requires the Canadian border to inform its American counterpart of a rejection of immigrant status but it is not permitted to explain the circumstances. All five had destroyed their American documents before returning to the American side but the border guards called them by the name on the American draft card and knew the circumstances of their return. One. Graham Muir was refused his right of attorney by the Americans. iMuir had earlier been told he was rejected because “there’s a difference between evaders and deserters. We’re under instruc-; tions not to let deserters in.” All were threatened with arrest until they were able to substantiate their claim to being Canadian citizens. They were hassled for a least a half-hour and threatened with action by the RCMP when they returned to Canada. The border crossings involved were: Windsor. Queenston. Niagara Falls and Buffalo.

The point test, which requires potential immigrants to score at least 50, in each of the five cases added to more than 65. Points are distributed for items like amount of money, languages spoken, job quarantees, recommendations, educational background. MacEachen said Sunday he took “a dim view of the impersonation tactics” used by the students but confirmed his depart: ment was investigating why nearly all deserters were turned away at the border. He said .his department hopes to make it easier for deserters to get into the country. The five students charged official directives were the reason for their rejection. Three said they met sympathetic border officials who turned them away

Mon’trecd wur resisters p/an

EMS?

Pfeffer Potthas FRIKADELLEN

refuses

protest

shall have no bearing on the acceptability of prospective immigrants, a department of immigration directive of last july 29 instructs immigration officers to consider whether applicants “are serving in armed forces of their country. ’ ’ The council says this situation has prevented draft-dodgers and deserters from obtaining the status to which they are legally entitled or has delayed applications for ~working papers so long that resisters are “starved out” for lack of funds. The council was set up in 1966 to give advice and moral support to refugees from American compulsory military service. Both Canadians and Americans serve on it.

out discriminatio

by Mark Allen Chevron staff‘

During a comprehension lesson in a French 100 class, another indication was given of how society is being fragmented, and prevented from achieving common understanding. The taped lesson began with a monologue by Joe Biname. of classics and romance languages. He mentioned that one of the speakers in the dialogue would prounce certain words with silent e:s and long o’s in a manner different from the pure french used in the classroom. Next, Don Derry, language lab technician, pointed out that the French of thespeaker would be disagreeable and unpleasant, but that only in cases where it was incomprehensible would it be corrected. A dialogue between a Frenchman who had returned from active duty in Vietnam and a hostess of an afternoon radio show was the substance of the tape.

The soldier proceeded to outline some of his experiences with the Vietnarnese people. His speech was filled with repetition and interjection. indicating a lower level of formal education. At these inconsistencies in speech, the class snickered and ridiculed. One asks why these men and women; on their way to an educational status second to none in the world, should put down someone of a lower level than themselves, perhaps someone who has not enjoyed the opportunities they have in obtaining the literary linguistics they possess. Could it be that this is what an education at Uniwat consists of-discriminating against persons of less expertise? We must be willing to dispense with such mockery . or be perpared to face conflicts with the groups we alienate.

GROOVY

I ! I

1

Bd. of Education Announces ’

Weekly

I 6

Meetingd

1 WEDNESDAYS 4:00 pm i

1 i=

0 Federation off ice, Campus Centre i --I La -----

Generation fur coats for the now generation from away back as low< as $25. Rabit hood $10. Skins of all types wolf, sheep, fox etc. 690 Yonge St., 2 blocks south

friday,

February

14, 1969 (9:43)

763

I I


htv

answers given one-tier government The people who are supposed to know the answers about the proposed single-tier university government were invited to the student council meeting monday-but council didn’t get many answers. Interim administration president Howard Petch, chancellor Ira Needles and mechanical-engineering chairman Thomas Brzustowski were the respective chairmen of the board and senate subcommittees studying the university government report. Their subcommittees in joint session proposed a single-tier supreme governing body. Needles made introductory remarks in which he concentrated on the role of the board of governors in the development of the university. He said thev were *familiar with sources of funds as well as being good individuals or from good companies for giving funds. He went on to say that several years ago when the university was having trouble getting funds committed by the provincial government. “the board of governors went down in a body and ocupi ed the parliament buildings and they got the money.” Brzustowski’s opening remarks centered mainly on the decision by his senate subcommittee to move ahead on the one-tier proposal “because the university government report was already almost two years old when issued.” Former federation president Steve Ireland ‘replied that the unigov committee had really only made the decision to have a twotiered government last April, so it was only a matter of a few months old. Ireland challenged Brzustowski to say what really influenced the

Arts new

,

faculty college

Three briefs on the college of integrated studies were heard at an open meeting on january 30 of the senate committee studying proposals for this college and the college of general studies. Philosophy prof Judy Wubnig was vehemently opposed to a college of integrated studies. In her report she says “The brief submitted by poli-sci prof Don Gordon offers us no academic program but only some examples of what might be included in the program. The proposal is therefore a request for a blank cheque.. . . ” Wubnig was also opposed to the role students would play in the organization of the college. According to Wubnig, students are unqualified because “one who has more knowledge about a particular subject than another person has at the same time more of the knowledge required for: a ) deciding what is necessary for another to learn. . .b)evaluating the ability of others to learn. . . c) evaluating how much others havelearned. . . and how much others know of the subject. Wubnig referred to the successful educations people have been receiving at established universities as a reason for exercising caution in accepting new educational methods. English prof Rotraud Lister presented a very scholarly report. quoting many authorities, to show the need for changes in the methods of education and thus the need for a college of integrated studies. Mrs. Lister mentioned

12

764 the Chevron

on

change to a one-tier system. Brzustowski avoided answering the question directly. A few minutes later Needles said retiring president Gerry Hagey had said to him, “Let’s get on with the one-tier government.” Ireland asked Needles about the problem of corporate control over academic affairs and said if the present board members were so kind-hearted and concerned, why did they need a vote on internal matters. Needles replied hotly, “You won’t get anyone worth having if they are just visitors. If you want the kind of men you need, they have to be involved.” Petch said voting didn’t usually split in blocks anyway, and so students shouldn’t be too concerned about the number of representatives from various groups. Arts rep Tom Patterson told Petch he has seen block’votingparticularly in the 25-man university government committee where the three students where constantly voted against with only one faculty member voting with them. Patterson strongly questioned the approximately 50 percent external representation proposed in the one-tier structure. He asked why the proposed number was so high and whether corporate interests would still dominate. Needles said Patterson would have to wait and hear what the results were. He had given the same reply earlier when federation president John Bergsma had asked if outside interests would have a majority. Patterson concluded by saying, “We’re not supposed to argue until the decisions -are made and then it’s too late. That’s the type of sincerity we’re faced with.”

discusses proposuls Rochdale college in Toronto, as a model, but did not propose any details for such a college here. A report written by philosophy prof Jan Narveson was read by arts dean Jay Minas. Narveson feels it is unnecessary to found any new colleges in order to please students who are dissatisfied with the existing system, but that changes to make this system more flexible should be supported. His report has four suggestions: I) to reduce the academic load of honors programs as well as general to five full courses a year, 2) to initiate a liberal arts program which would be nonspecialized and nonrestrictive, 3) to establish certain courses which are more comprehensive and cover a larger domain of subject matter than present courses do. 4) to start ,a new studies program as an autonomous unit within the arts faculty where “the kind of freedom from initial or outside structuring of activities envisaged in the Gordon brief would prevail.” This unit would consist of five profs and 60 to 75 students, and if there were further interest, a new unit could be added. There is a possibility that other profs would be consulted by the students, and might come to associate themselves with the unit Arts faculty council, last Tuesday refused to approve of Narveson‘s motion in principle, but passed it on to the undergraduate affairs group for consideration.

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Any other item for the agenda of this meeting must be in the hands of the President of the Federation of Students by 5:00 pm Wednesday, February 19, 1969 to be considered by the annual meeting.

John Bergsma President Federation of Students

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Ring.. . Ring.. . Ann: Hi. This is Ann speaking. Can I help you? Caller : don’t think you can help me...1 don’t even really know’ why I’m calling but I’m sort of depressed... you see-really I guess I just want to talk to someone.. . This is an excerpt from one of the roleplaying training sessions undergone by every volunteer for UniWat’s new telephone service. Hi-line. This year, along with sponsoring small sensitivity and touch groups in which people may speak freely among themselves about their various hang-ups, Counselling Services is conducting *a Hi-line - Help immediately telephone service. This service is directed at those who have something bothering them that they’d like to talk about and yet who are not willing to commit themselves enough either to go directly to Counselling Services for help or to join one of the other groups. For hi-line is run on the basis of complete anonymity-anonymous volunteers and anonymous callers. Hi-line volunteers are not professional counsellors and will not attempt to operate as such. The role of the hiline volunteer is that of a sympathetic and interested listener. A hi-line service operating on this basis was started last spring on the Waterloo Lutheran campus. The group there was co-ordinated by Rev. Al Evans who organized their training sessions. he is a member of the Counselling Services at both universities. operated for nine service Their weeksat’ the end of the term last year and” the lines were opened up again last fall. As Lutheran’s service has operated with considerable success it was decided to see if it would be .possible to set up an office on the Uniwat campus to complement Lutheran’s service. went up advertizlng the Posters advent of hi-line oh this campus the first week after Christmas and training sessions started on January 14. These training sessions are very important. Lutheran students have received calls from people who are about to,, or who have. already started to commit suicide; from people who are attempting home abortions; from people who are high on alcohol or marijuana or who are on a bad trip from one of the hallucinogenic drugs. Often .it, has been necessary to refer students to those who can give concrete assistance. The purpose of the training’. sessions is basically to show what can and should be done in certain situations, what help is available and how to obtain it. Apart from knowing how .to get help, it is also important for the hi-line volunteer to know how to listen and respond. to a caller. For talking over the phone, especially to someone you don’t know. is difficult at the best of times, and in the case of someone calling hiline. the first 30 seconds to a minute can be crucial in establishing a working rapport between volunteer and caller. It is difficult to show the caller that you are sympathetic. actually more than that-empathic-without asking questions. But when you ask questions you run the risk of leading the caller away from a discussion of his own problem to something else which could lead him to decide that he was wrong to call in the first place. Another thing to remember is that quite often what the caller first says isn’t the real problem. If he is left to talk about what he wants, chances of his coming to the real problem faster are much greater. Also, should the caller himself ask questions.it is best if he is left to answer them himself. By answering questions for the caller. the hi-line volunteer risks imposing his own value system on his caller. It is important, too, that the hi-liner not be judgemental, for the caller wants some-

C

ALLER:

I

Contemplatifig suicide?

between the number of a person’s social contacts and his suicide potential. That is, the more contacts one has with a suicide the less chance of his committing suicide. When dealing with a suicidal person, a hiliner attempts to direct his attention away from the idea of suicide itself and onto the problem that made suicide the only solution. This can be very difficult as one girl at Lutheran discovered in talking to a caller seriously considering suicide. In trying to arrive at a discussion of the basic problem their conversation touched on, among other things. travel and books. Hi-liner: Do you do much travelling? Caller: Went to the states last summer . . .saw the Grand Canyon. Hi-liner: It’s beautiful there isn’t it? Caller: Yes, I guess so . . . I felt like jumping off. And later : Hi-liner : Do you read very much? Caller: Quite a bit. Hi-liner: Who’s your favourite author? Caller : Hemmingway. Hi-liner : Why ? Caller : He committed suicide. In this particular case the girl was successful, and four hours after he hung up, he was in a much better frame of mind. However, not all the calls received are this serious and any service of this nature is bound to receive a certain number of crank calls. The phone rings: Hi-liner: Hi. This is Sue speaking. Can I help you?

one who understands-not condemns. Some other qualities that make a good hi-liner-or indeed any good listenerare a certain sensitivity, a freedom from personal fears and an ability to express love easily. However all the love, sympathy and interest of the perfect hi-liner can really do nothing against the root ‘problem% causing people to need to call in the first place. The system

only has

effective produced

thing is

our

educational

the

successful

suicide.

These are the words of Roland Hersen, Executive Director of the KitchenerWaterloo Branch of the Mental Health Association, and his opinion is wellfounded in statistical evidence. Suicide is considered the second largest cause of student death in North America. It is also generally accepted that for every successful suici.de there are 6-8 reported attempts. On this campus last year there were 18 known either attempted or successful suicides among 7500 students. This is a much higher correlation than for the general public which is estimated at approximately 8 per cent every 100,000. The major causes of suicide are a loss of “status” and general depression. Depression often takes the following form in potential student suicide: the student is often older than his classmates (there is a high rate of suicide amongst grad students-the undergraduate has often been academically suc-

cessful until the term preceding his death). The peak time for suicides is at the beginning of the term, not necessarily at exam times as one might expect. Also the potential suicide experiences school, insomnia, worry over health, despondency and concern about interpersonal relationships and social isolation. There is one recorded case of a boy living in resilience who was not found until 14 days after he had committed suicide. Hi-line can play an important role in it has preventing suicide. Statistically, been found that 8 out of 10 people who have succeeded in self-murder have warned someone about it beforehand. For the most part people contemplating suicide don’t really want to die: it is just that they have reached a point where they feel attempted suicide is the only way to call attention to the urgent nature of their problem. One of the ,difficult things in dealing I with a potential suicide is the fact that the problem they are prepared to kill themselves over often seems insignificant and unimportant to anyone not directly involved. These people need to find someone and are often consciously searching for someone who will care about them personally and who will accept their problem at the level of importance it has for them. And this is where hi-iine comes in. Psychologists have found that there exists a perfect negative correlation

Caller: I’ve got this problem, you see. I’m failing boat-racing 300 and liquor control 252 given by Prof. So&. The reason I’m not doing well is that my girlfriend won’t sleep with me. Sue: Have you tried talking to Professor Soust about the problems you are having? Caller: Uh .. . no... sorry (hangs up). It is hi-line policy to treat crank calls asLserious calls, working from the point of view that if someone needs to call up as a joke, he may really need help. Often a crank call is a cover for a real problem. Such was the case in the call quoted above, which was actually received at Lutheran last year. About an hour after the first call was received the phone rang again. The same girl answered and recognized the caller as the one who had made the crank call earlier. As it turned out this particular boy was having trouble in his courses because his girlfriend wouldn’t sleep with him. This time the call lasted an hour and a half The hi-line service on this campus will begin operations on february 16th. The first week the service will be run exclusively by the University of Waterloo hi-line volunteers. After that, Lutheran and Waterloo will take alternate nights answering the phones. So if you have a problem, no matter how trivial you are afraid it may seem; if it has got you worried, upset and you want to talk about it but don’t want to bother your friends with it, call hi-line, for to be trite that’s what they are there for. Besides if you don’t make use of the service, the hi-line volunteers, feeling all their extensive training gone to waste, will develop problems of their own. Picture the following situation: Steven and Joanne have been on duty together every week now for six weeks. The phone rings: Joanne: Get out of the way Steve, it’s my turn to answer it. Steven : No it isn’t. You answered it last week. Joanne: I know;but that was only a wrong number. Steven : Ha! I’ve got it. Hi there. this is Steve and I’m so depressed and need to talk to someone so much . . . . you can’t imagine how lonely it gets‘ hcrc and..... If you want to call, the hi-lint numbci is 745-4733. friday,

february

14, 7969 (9:43)

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JPI by Norman Fadelle

Have you ever people, just you?

thought

of Jesus

looking

at you?

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crowds.

He “looked at” an eager young man, and loved him for the desire he had for personal goodness. But he also looked deep him. young man’> mind, to the love of money which corrupted steady gaze fitted his straight-from-the-shoulder words-“Get your money. Give it to the poor, and follow me.” The money wrong, the love of it was a dead load-like driving with the brakes He “looked at” Peter in the moment big, confident, self-assertive fisherman “wept bitterly”.

not

DINE

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IN THE Thurs.,

obvious into the And his rid of wasn’t on.

of Peter’s denial, and when the saw that look he went out and

:HE GUEVARA

He looked with compassion on the leper who pleaded with him for good health. The compassion of Jesus was so strong that it pushed aside his early training in the rigid law which said no man must touch a leper. He leaned forward, put his hands on the revoltingly diseased man and healed him. Most of US would be scared of infection, and repelled by the horrible sight, but the law of love in Jesus was stronger than these things, and stronger also than the law of Moses.

BY

He looked with cool eyes at the Pharisees and Sadducees who spent all their spare time thinking up trick questions to catch him out. Don’t run away with the idea that this was just a mental argy-bargy. Jesus was well aware of the risks. These questions were difficult to answer and though he was well able to floor his attackers, he knew that the price of doing so was to double their hatred and fury and increase his own danger. Not that this rated very highly with him but he had work to do and he had to stay alive long enough to do it.

Theatre of the Arts Universitv of Waterloo -

Yet Jesus could no more overlook shame and hypocrisy than you can. and he hated it more strongly than you do. The ‘squares’ of his day were full of it and wherever he met it he stripped it away, regardless of the danger to himself. He could not bear the kind of religion which led men to stand at streetcorners, praying aloud so that passersby could look with awe upon their holiness. Men who, all the time were soaking the poor and the widows while the Temple coffers were doing very nicely. He loathed the kind of mind that split .hairs over some trivial detail of the law and then made everybody else split the same hairs in the same way, till religion became a dead thing, with all the joy wrung out of it. He not only looked at people, he saw through them. If he looked at you, what would you have to alter, or throw

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by Tom Ashman, Sally liolton, Steve Ireland, and Bob Verdun Chevron staff

Sometimes a sober second look leads to a better appreciation of a theatrical presentation and if we look at FASS 69 a second time, it is still somewhat a sobering experience. Perhaps the sharp but not too penetrating ’ criticism of Larry Burko last Friday jabbed the FASS cast into action, but it must be said that the performance did have its redeeming moments and even occasionally, a flash of excellence.’ Sorinehow the very act of entering.the theater for this annual extravaganza foretold the changes to be found in our beloved FASS. Whe’re in previous years we had to submit to our king-size tickets being slashed by somber guards or our fake bills being denounced as cowenturfit, this year two of Circle K’s straightest merely took

our tickets and stamped our hands just like at any run-of-the-mill dance on campus. And the program wasn’t a monopoly board or an exciting paper airplane but a document as square as one used for the annual program of the Baden Junior Girls’ Figure Skating Club. Aw well, we settle back in spite of this and Larry Burko’s stinging words and wait. Wait to be reached, to be involved in that contagious FASS spirit. But we wait in vain. Instead we are insulted by too obvious puns (many of which weren’t even cute ), bored by the toofrequent presence of one K.D. Fryer, and embarrassed by just too gross jokes and tasteless religious spoofs. (It is interesting to compare the Fryer chorus verse which swiped

at supposed Chevron obscenity and. the actual content of many of the “funnies” FASS used. ) .Added to the crude put-down of fundamentalist religions (which many on our campuS adhere to) and a clumsy parallel drawn between followers of Christ and modern hippies (even the actors, let alone the audience, suffered etibarrassment at the crucifixion jokes) was an extremely vile called Frank Diary monolog which itself should have been aborted as soon as it was conceived. Incidentally, both of these latter two items are rumored to be thefts from Spring Thaw, uncredited. On the other hand, the numbers by the FASS chorus. were sometimes quite good and the composers and lyricists deserve a few compliments, although we do get so sick of hearing about “the good old U of W”, its wondrous Warriors and sophomoric inter-

01’ student faculty rivalries. (How could anyoycrkill by l’ryclr radicals. It could havcb been much one in the audience be so, juvenile as to hiss at the mention of a facmore clever. ulty other than his own? ) The Fryer rah-rah, go-WarriorsThe schmaltz was in fact just go, alma-mater-dear approach was too much-the tribute to Dr. evident from the moment you entered the theater with its chauHagey, no matter how deserved vinistic you think it was, was about twice trappings-two huge as long as it should have been. school crests and school-color bunting. Even Uncle Gerry would probably agree with that. The theme was supposed to It is interesting to contrast be ‘tell it like it is’, but FASS the farewell accorded to Hagey ‘69 was more like ‘tell it like we with that given to Ted Batke, who wished it was,’ with the slogan on is vacating the university developa flag and the letters dripping ment vicepresidency he assumed with mom’s apple pie. after serving for many years as * * * academic vicepresident. In a skit Something a great many people starring Batke and Lobban (based on this campus may not know aon Batman and Robin-hardly bout FASS is that it is supposedly original) Batke got a lot of the governed by a board of directors. jibes that should have gone to This board is made up of one PPandP alone, since he has never representative of each of the had anything to do with planning staff, administration, faculty boners. Not very friendly, FASS. and students, each having one And in that skit was a more subvote. A representative of the tle piece of evidence of the decline sponsoring group, Circle K serves of FASS. Batke and Lobban were as chairman, and the director and not played by themselves as FASS producer of the preceding show bf old always did (even bookstore are also members. manager Elsie Fisher took part in This group meets in march of a FA:S bookstore spoof in ‘67). each year to select the producers They were played by those tiring and directors for next year’s hams Ken Fryer and Jack Pearse. show. Ticket price-range, the Therein lies the fault. No more method for ticket sales and is it FASS-faculty, administranumber of performances are also tion, staff and students-but decided by the board. rather FAPSfryer, Adlington, At no time were a private tickPearce and stooges. Only Adlinget sale for faculty and staff, ticket ton still adhered to the FASS prices above the dollar mark, or code of spoof by spoofing himself seven performances ever apin the dirty-old-man role. proved by the board. As a matter of fact all these things were voted Fryer, it seems, has taken down as being unfair to either over FASS for his own ends. While the students or the cast as a body. FASS was once where the students were at-spoofing everything but The fashion in which the businstill pro-student -this year it ess end of FASS was conducted seemed to be, for at least half smells badly of the math & faculty the show, a poorly thought-out lounge.

Midsummer /ilight is one of CBS best The Night’s

Fryer’s rah-rah, almamater-dear

approach was a poorly done overkill of student radicals.

Royal

Shakespeare Company’s production of a Midsummer shown Sunday night on CBS, was one of the mo,st programs of this current season. In fact it ranks second of the Species with Paul Scofield.

Dream

entertaining only to Male

Dream was released as a feature film in England two weeks ago and the unfavorable reaction to Peter Hall’s direction is most likely going to affect many North American TV critics. These people are forgetting however the difference between films and television.

Well, since its almost spring, I would like to talk to you about spring fever,‘commonly known as “the hots. ” Thats when the sun comes up and there’s no snow except in the PP&P garage where they practise snow shovelling during the summer. Anyhow, it gets warm out and everybody takes their clothes off.. ..of the hangers and puts them in the cedar chest. Once that’s done, you can go fall in love, play baseball, harvest pussywillows, smell the bear cage in the park, feed the ducks just west of Jack Pearse’s house in Beechwood subdivision, skateboard on the village hill or the Eng. Lecture Hall steps. Whatever you do, don’t feel you have to study. Thats silly. I would also like to talk about Hithere. Actually I wouldn’t, but I’m in a rotten mood, and simply have oodles of space to fill up. (yawn). Did you know that you cannot book a room in a building before the new appointment book arrives, or if the desired booking time is after those times found in most commercial a@pointment books. Thank your stars Joanz isn’t that bad. She just swears, drinks, wears slacks and everything, like any normal secretary. Sorry Joanz. I cannot mention sex here. Come to my office and I’ll mention it continually. (heh-heh) Harley and Are1 have plans. Actually they don’t have plans at all, they’re just engaged. Nyah-na-nana-na-nyah. Harley and Are1 up a tree. K-I-S-S-I-N-GIf youre ready, holler go, Eenie, --i meenie. minie, moe. (Chocolate cake. mmmmmmm-mmm. Oh. I l&e-,,

this recipe almost as much as I used to like wearing hip waders. when I went fishing over at Sunnyview Nature Camp. Take one commercial cake mix, purchased in some country store to ensure proper aging. When the mix is mixed you can better the batter by adding a portion of pressed cannabis fruit to taste, or rather, altitude. Beat it up. Put it in a pan and put it in the oven. Bake it. Take it out of the oven Let the temperature come down. Go up. J. Christie never had it so good.

While the many close up shots and economy of movement in the production may appear boring on a wide screen they are perfectly suited for TV which is a much more intimate medium. Television also has a tendency to speed up the pace of a film and therefore what may ’ seem tedious at the cinema is fast and funny on television (Providing that there are not too many ads). Hall had the good sense to eliminate the fairies with gossamer wings and glittering tinsel of many stage productions. His spirits are earth people with muddy faces and torn garments. The dream lies not in the visual images but in the mind of the viewer. His decision to leave the text intact also proved prudential except, in the scene where Bottom and ,his cohorts are< presenting their play. Alittle editing would have kept khe scene from dragging. The strong featWe of‘ t&e p\$‘howevey was the acting. Judi Den& dici a*marve!!ous j.ob as’ Titania, sexy and half-naked like Martha Henry at Stratfbrd Ont. last summer. We Certainly WUJA like to. see pr: of Miss Dench in the future. Ian Holm as Puck with trlt: dla ot special effects providedmost of the. laughter and confusion of the play. I can’t think of any male. performer more suited to the part. The acting honors however must go to Diana Rigg as Helena and Paul Rogers as Bottom. Miss Rigg in a small but difficult role succeeded in blurring her Emma Peel image and turning in a fine comic performance. She seems to have an infallible knack for turning the most mundane lines into comic masterpieces. This combined with her expressive face and body movements makes her a talent to watch in the near future.

really hairy man, like it hangs from his head, ant everything, ‘Not to mention his Botany 500 safar suity Or his revolutionary wheel. If I sur’&&e the attacks by the Morris mauraude and the oversexed women on her floor who are al jeAlous of my*mandate with.... oh, wait till nex

Rogers as the aspiring star who literally makes an ass of himself does a fine job of satirizing that little bit of ham found in all actors. He flits across the line dividing cunning from stupidity with remarkable skill. “These our actors as I foretold were all spirits and are vanished . into thin air “but you can still catch them in reruns this summer. friday,

f* ’

15 767 (J(?,ly",r{. . 1 *.*'

= 7969 (9:43)


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About a year ago Blood, Sweat and Tears was formed as an experimental group under the direct,ion of Al Kooper. His objective was to create a type of sound based on the elements of jazz and rock. The experiment proved to be highly successful as the group’s initial album ‘Child is Father to M the Man” received wide acclaim from both pop and jazz critics. Since then the band has undergone some personnel changes. Al Kooper was forced to leave the group because of differences of opinion. Toronto’s David Clayton Thomas was added in his place. Since the first album they have become increasingly popular. This past month their long awaited second album was released on the Columbia label, On this album their jazz-rock thing has risen to greater heights. Already in the States it has sold over 400,000 copies. The album itself is extremely tight in composition and the songs are well co-ordinated. Their horn arrangements are imaginative and powerful. The gutsy vocals of Thomas provide an extra thump to the bands R and B numbers. BS&T must be one of the first bands to blend jazzrock and some elements of classical music. This is done in the cut Variations on a theme. The album opens with the first movement and then proceeds to the second movement of the same composition. It ends with a repeat of the first movement. One of the best numbers on the whole album is an arrangement called Blues Part II. It features an ex-

Crimson Clover (Roulette) There is a new type of music out today. It’s called bubblegum music. Its the type of stuff little girls 12 years old listen to. Groups like the Ohio Express and the Monkees excel in it. If you should happen to be a girl of 12 years of age or else happen to think the Monkees are the in thing I’

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CHE GUEVARA Written by Mano Fratti; Starring Cedric Smith Toronto Workshop Productions Theatre of the Arts - 8:30 pm Admission $2.50 Students $1.50

Blood, Sweat, and Tears (Quality) tended

jazz rift on saxophone. It again shows the of the group. Another great cut is And When I Die. It seems like a western sound track at times. The idea sounds revolting but it actually comes across great. It features piano and harmonica solos. On the whole this is one of the best albums ever produced by a rock group. Its a must for any one who considers themself a blues fan. imagination

MONDAY,

FEBRUARY

17

NOON CONCERT Heather Hyman Pianist Theatre of the Arts - 12:l5 pm - Free

then this album is for you. It’s called Crimson and C/over, by Tommy James and the Shondells. Tommy James takes a great song, Crimson and Clover, and actually destroys part of it. The band tried to go the way of the Doors and fight My Fire. ‘Their two minute instrumental reminds the listener of electronical baby crying. They also mutilate another of their hits. Do something to me, by the same method. When will groups learn that the reason their hits were hits wasbecause they were good? If a fan buys their album with an old hit on it, that’s what they want, the actual hit. . Tommy and the fellas really do it to everyone. One song sounds like a bad Beatles tune heard through a long hollow tube. The title of this piece of music nonsense is I am a Tangerine. Even the name has the Beatles written all over it. But in the whole album there is one bright spot. Its called Kathleen McArthur. Its a typical song about a poor boy in love with the rich girl. The song is a good mixture of vocal harmonizing and for a change actual music. But the rest of the nine cuts go from bad to worst. On’the back of the album cover it says, arranged produced and written by Tommy James and the Shondells. No wonder they are the only ones who did ‘anything for the record. No else would want to get involved with such a shambles.

THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY

20

FILM: WHALEHEAD AL113,12: 15pm - Free 8

FRIDAY,

FEBRUARY

21

MONTREAL INSTANT THEATRE Theatre of the Arts - 8:30 pm Admission $2.50 Students $1.50

t

I by Mary

Rivard

Chevron staff

this story will make you think about the meaning of life. There is more than just a good story here if you care to perceive it. Maybe you will find yourself wondering and pondering about the value of money, success, suitide, sex and even life within the context of a life or death alternative. Who knows’? Do you? Do you want to live? Do you want to live like Jean Claude Marshal7 Recommended reading for all age groupsl

Freeling. Micolas The King of the R.ainy Country Middlesex. Eng., Penguin Books Paperback edition. 157~~. Do you like to read mysteries which feature a manhunt, millionaires. suicide. sex, a rebellious German teenager. and adventure in European ski resorts? Then this book is for you. Here you have suspense, drama and action all the way through. You don’t have to take it seriously. It’s a good story. It is just possible

Our

Chevronstaff

The Fiction. of Henry James.; a Reader’s Guide. Middlesex, England. Penguin Books Ltd. copyright 1966. Paperback ed. 376~~. Gorly Putt is a student and a writer, and no doubt, aspires to scholarship. This is his first major work on Henry James. According to the acknowledgements, several chapters were rewritten essays tailored for inclusion in this book. Each chapter appears to be a cohesive unit which revolves around a particular subject or theme in Henry James works. One could easily read the chapters in various sequences, without doing an in-

justice to the harmony of the book. This book is packed with detail, and therefore, one does not assimilate an easy perspective of the subject. Although it is subtitled “a reader’s guide”, it is not a guide to the literature of Henry James for the novice student. Portions of chapters, could conceivably be useful, to help generate ideas for a bibliographical introduction. It should also be noted that for a book of this size, the index is very small.

COMING!! University

of Waterloo

Festival Of Music Musical

Director:

February Saturday,

Alfred

Kunz

22 and 23

8: 00 pm

U. of W Chorus U. of W Dance Club Pianist - Joanne Elligsen Sunday’3:Oiip.m.

U. of W Stage Band Sunday,

8:OO p.m.

U. of ,VVLittle Symphony FREE Tickets

Tel.

ADMISSION at Theatre

744-61

II,

Box Office

Ext.

2126


e “The

most original

‘_ I “*-~ ~rury ---tl+ller . SUSt: wit and tens mc&3m film alone achie\

of wonders this modes1

Fromthe Producer of 'THE GRAD1:AT

-&’

Che Guevara, international revolutionary hero, is portrayed in the play by Mario Fratti of New from 1: 15 p.m. York. Che’s last four months are American movie of the year - Life magazine” depicted in the Bolivian jungle. The conflict between Bolivian communist officials the conflict between the Bolivian government and the conflict within Che himself make this an excellent play. A man with ideals fighting against the world. Fratti doesn’t idolize Che. He portrays a true picture of Che with his faults presented in the same light as his good points. :::::::::.:::::::::::::::::::::::: on This play is done by the Toronto .......~..__..... ::::::::::::::~:i:::::::::::::::.: .:, .;:..:, . _.::, .,..~...~.~,~.~.~.~.’ ..;:. ...:.. .;..........::.: Workshop Productions. This fully ._._.,.,. professional group has had gigs at Expo, Stratford, and various theatres in Toronto. Cedric Smith, from Waterloo, is in the title role. He has been “THE NICEST,NASTIESTCRIME FILM TO COME OUT OF tlOUYWOOO IN YEARS!” around the scene; folk singer in Vietnam, poet and actor, His 2STH CENTURY FOX PRESENTS A LAWRENCE TURMAN portrayal of Che was given rave PRODUCTION reviews. George Lescombe, an experienced director puts it out on stage with experimental stage settings, rock & roll backing and excellent movements by actors. ANOTHONY PERKINS - TUESDAY WELD This play should turn out to be an entertaining evening for radicals and theater lovers alike. Come and see what Che is really like. NO, he is not dead he will be hiding in the arts theater Febbruary 16. .,., ;: ;_ .:.:._ , , : : . : . : : . : , . , _._.,.,: :::::._.:.:.: ..:.: :,I._

,es

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gitres

1

2 COLOR HIT5

BAlIlO Nil/EN OEBOlUNi KERR @!!%!!

CUDL

spreads

Since 1940 the only student run organization that has been active on the Canadian theater scene has been the Canadian University Drama League (CUDL). This organization which has at one time or another, had as members most of the universities in Canada now has 25 participating grousp. During its quarter century of activity the league has seen many ups and downs. Howver, during the last few years its prestige has grown steadily. While the most obvious example of the leagues work is its national festival other aspects of its work are nowcoming forward.

and there arti good cops--and then there%

Biullitt.

Conference

STEVE MCQUEEN AswJuJTr’

Che has rock and roll backing and excellent movements

new

seeks

by IMartin Ahrens Chevron staff

Canadian universities may soon have a block booking system for bands, This type of system is used by a union of American universities in order to obtain entertainment at reduced rates en masse for all schools. If a band bombs, like the Supremes here, ’ the entire network boycotts them. This idea was first proposed for Ontario by Joe Recchia. A pilot conference was held at the University of Waterloo last summer. It is now going to be followed up with a mass conference’sponsored by WLU and Uniwat on May 8 to 12. All the Canadian universities and 450 American schools will be re-

Bud&t better lh? &ags

WATER101 4th

EVENINGS

SPECIAL MATINEE

WEEK at 7 and 9:30

SAT. 2 P.M. SU?t 2, 4:15, 7~60 and *:#)

prr

then

a

day

at

Steve Mcfwfitt; starring Queen, has to be one of the big hits this year, if, not for the political achievement of being able to close off many blocks of San Francisco, then for the excitement of the best chase scene yet in the movies (barring the Keystone Kops). ’ MeQueen plays a hard-boiled cop who meets a groovy chick and gets religion. It is by far his best role to date as it gives him a chance to display a little of his acting ability. It is also a chance for him to prove to everyone that he is the wildest leadfoot this side of Pomona Beach Dragway. The chase, between a Charger R/T and McQueen’s sleeper ‘Stang winds its

techniquk

The most important of these new aspects is the leagues attempt the spread advanced theater technique and at the same time provide a means for various drama groups to communicate with each other. In common with other drama activities in Canada money has always been in short supply and the resulting hand to mouth existence has greatly hampered the league. This year ‘however the financing of the league has been a little more substantial. As a result of this increase in finances the national festival which is being held at the University of Waterloo, Feb. 14,15,16,

shows promise of being the best ever. Dennis Sweeting and Walter Massey two of the foremost theater men in Canada are to be here to give both seminars and workshops on the last two days. These men experts in their field will be available to interested people on campus as well as those coming from universities as far away as Victoria BC. CUDL shows great promise of becoming an important force in Canadian drama and if this should occur then more of our drama students will remain in Canada to aid Canadian drama in taking its proper place in our culture.

solutions

presented. They will be entertained by the following tentative showcase of top line entertainers: Dionne Warwick, Dion, Simon and Garfunkle, the Bee Gees, and Eric Burdon and the Animals. This huge effort is going to need a lot of help. So if You are interested in assisting in any way to organize the conference contact George Stan, entertainment director of SUBOG at Waterloo Lutheran. Positions are available on committees dealing with entertainment, displays, secretaries, accommodation for 1200 kids, food, transportation, local publicity, registration, national publicity, staging, lighting, programmes, premail: and lots more exciting activities.

way up and down the city streets of San Francisco and out onto the freeways. As could be expected, McQueen does his own driving -the extras are NASCAR drivers getting their jollies on an off day. In a morbid sort of way it is refreshing to see a cops and robbers theme that comes across realistically. When someone gets shot you know it. These incidences, while present, are not overly heavy and the total effect is realism. Blood looks like blood and death looks like death. It is the way that McQueen faces death that is interesting, though, for there is an obvious antithesis set up between Bullitt and his girlfriend. He is always unaffected by the sight of death. Always. It never seems to bother himuntil the very end. At this time, the human being in him starts friday,

to show up and at the fade out, a whole new show begins. Well, it seems that I have five and a half inches of copy to write on this movie before I can go to bed. I don’t want to tell you anything about the story line because I’ll ruin a good story for you and I’ve thought of everything else that I want to write about it. There is one more thing, and that is the socio-politico influences that you might find in the picture. That is, there is a certain amount of legitimization of the cops present but I’m sure you don’t want, to read about that. If you do, read the features section and you’ll be more than satisfied. Have you ever tried to make up stuff about a picture you liked and didn’t . want to spoil for i,.d others? At four thirty in the morning? It’s damn hard. So I quit. Goodnight. february

94, 7969 (9:431

769

I/


r RULES

.

Start the game with any problem likely to cro‘p up in your life on campus and proceed through the proper channels recording the time spent at stops, until you reach finish and gain a solution. To win you must reach the finish box within thirty-two weeks (the most time any student has on campus) without crossing any line in the game and without crossing or re-using any path you’ve already used. By proceeding carefully from one stop to the next, certain steps may be circumvented tc reduce the time spent waiting. Members of any radical student movement may jump a proper channel four times: once for a picket, once for a sit-in, once for occupying the computer center, and once for threatening to do any of the above. In each case a wall may be crossed, a previously used path re-used, or a stop just passed through. For extra excitement, moderates and radicdls can compete.

r

START If your problem is of an academic nature, proceed through the channel below. If you have a problem with a university rule, or would like to see a change made in the university’s physical property (such as a residence room ) or organization, proceed out the left-hand exit. 1

’ 4

LECTURER Totally irrelevant to the decisionmaking process-this should be quickly apparent so only a day is lost at this stage.

Ill III

II II II II

III

II

1 D

II-I

1

UNDER GRAD (OR GRAD) ~- 43FFICER DEPARTMENT This man is the first person who will give you some feeling that vou are nearing a solution, because after meeting with you at least twice on the issue he . will.

1 1

tn11

xxrh

2 t

DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN An older and obviously very wise academic, he will tell you how glad he is that you’ve come to him with your problem and tell you many of his own. Eventually he will inform you that careful consideration will be given to a sol-

rnmn

tee.

I

‘1

I

1

I

1

bnd

3peIlU

STUDENT ADVISORY

1

1 m

REP TO COMMITTEE

As your representative this poor fellow will do all he can to get your problem solved. Unfortunately he can’t do anything because he is allowed only to exist to keep you happy and waiting. So wait here three weeks.

1 l-u

lIIL’t!e

WeeKS

IdlKlIIg

waiting. I

I

I ASSISTANT

II ii

1

These men abound in the administration, but unfortunately nobody knows why. They may be seen any day at five o’clock streaming out of the library in medium grey suits. Usually they spend their time preparing reports that will be ignored and double-checking something someone else has already double-checked. Wanting to feel important and looking for any chance to convince others they are, they will take up days of your time though proving in the end unable even to tell you what the next step is, because they don’t understand the system themselves. Spend three weeks here.

1 The key to academic administra1 tion is the dean. It is his job to carry out the decisions made by the faculty committees and senior administration committees. He also presents the demands of his faculty to the administration. He will carry your case to a closed meeting of the appropriate administration committee. Spend three weeks talking and waiting.

r A

1 1 LSpend atleast aweek here. I

DEPARTMENT COMiIiTEE Department committee meetings are very important steps in the decision-m&ing process as they can often reallocate funds from the paperclip account to the gestetner paper account. They spend hours talking about: the inadequacy of the library, who they should hire next year, what kind of research they are doing, and which committee or person is responsible for the kind of problems you are raising. Wait five days for someone to tell you what the next

Just as irrelevant to the decisionmaking process-but that fact is not as clear as in the case of the lecturer, occasionally even the professor himself not realizing it. Stop here five davs.

I

I

JUNIOR ADMINISTRATOR

CHAIRMAN’S SECRETARY Undoubtedly you will have to see the chairman. Spend two weeks 1 at this stage waiting for an ap, p$nknnt. He’s continually out

I ,I

I TO THE

DEAN

These men are key to the higher echelons. It is their job to put the dean’s file folders on his desk in order of priority and to make apologetical speeches to you about why certain problems, which have of course long been known to the dean, can’t be dealt with in too great a hurry. Wait two weeks for ap appointment with the dean.

-I


by Stewart

Saxe

and

George Chevron

Loney stuff

I-

1 r

-

I I

-

I

L DEPARTMENT SECRETARY Ghere are two types of department secretaries. The first really wants to help the students and will try hard to. Unfortunately there is little she can do. The second thinks the world revolves around her. Flip a coin-heads you have the first kind and move on right away; tails you have the second kind and spend three weeks at this stage.

These men are very important in the structure because they usually serve as secretaries to the larger committees. If you don’t know why a committee secretary is important, you’ve never been to a ( rmittee meeting. and then read the minutes afterwards. When they aren’t taking minutes, they are preparing reports on committees or placing the files on the vicepresident’s desk in neat bundles. Wait here four weeks because administrative assistants are always so very, very busy.

1

t

I, J

1

VICEPRESIDENTS many, These men, sometimes sometimes few, depending how many resignations recently took effect, are the administration’s chief apologists. They are the ones who chair the study and advisory committees, they are the ones who bring together all the many different sectors into one small tight bundle. As they will clearly tell you though, they never, never make a decision. You will be directed to either a committee or the president, after waiting three weeks go on.

I-

1 sions, but he would rather not let too many people know, certainly not students.. So after explaining to you that the Board of Governors makes all the decisions, and making certain you’ve gone through all the proper stages so far, he will assure you your problem will be taken to the board. Se Move on after three weeks discussions.

-

II

II

I I

ADVISORY COMMITTEE Everybody and every problem has an advisory committee. Here the problem is fully discussed and studies of how the University of Northern California and Tanzania Tech are solving the problem are distributed. At least two meetings are devoted to every problem before (a) some kind of advice is passed up to whomever the committee is advising; (b) the problem being discussed is forgotten in side issues ; or (c) a subcommittee, which will never meet because everyone is too busy, is formed to investigate the problem in depth. Wait here four weeks.

I

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTA’NT

II

DEPARTMENT HEAD Department heads are very busy men. They arrive late, spend their morning in a committee meeting, take two hours for lunch, spend their afternoon in a committee meeting and leave promptly at 4:55 after having spent the last 25 minutes of their working day on the telephone to someone about yesterday’s committee meeting, the morning committee meeting or tomorrow’s committee meeting. They will, of course, be able to take your problem to a committee. Wait three weeks for the right committee to meet.

SECRETARY The vicepresidents’ secretaries have been around a long timeIn fact in most cases they’ve outlived their bosses-so you’ll have to wait here two weeks in homage. (Brenda Stanton is the exceptionyou’ll still wait two weeks, but you wouldn’t mind the homage)

THE

PRESIDENT’S SECRETARY The president’s secretary is mother-of-the-year and business tycoon all rolled up into one. Being motherly, she thinks students should be kept in their place-the crib. Wait one week to get an appointment, and then two more for it.

L L

-

THE PRESIDE1 1’T’S COUNCIL The president’s council co-ordinates all the committees everywhere. Every one of its members has at least one advisory committee. These men bring problems to the council where new solutions are dreamed up or the matter referred to a special subcommittee. Finally, however, a decision will be held, up pending a decision from the budgets committee as to whether or not financing is possible. So wait two weeks and then go directly to the budgets commit-

--

tee*

1

THE BUDGETS COMMITTEE Every decision costs money, money comes from the budgets committee. However, the budgets committee must know priorities for the entire university, so wait here two weeks and then go immediately to the president’s council for a decision on .how high a priority your problem is.

II

I I b .’

*

I I

THE BOAR1 GOVERNORS Your problem has reached the pinnacle of the decision-making process. Here many noble, wise and intelligent men will seriously consider your proposal (we know they are noble. wise and intelligent because most of them are wealthy). If your problem is novel, a committee or subcommittee may be formed to deal with it. If it is academic, it will of course be sent ’ to the senate for consideration. Eventually-the board meets every three months or so-a decision will be approved, provided some one responsible from the administration will recommend a decision. Proceed to finish after waiting one month.

SENATE Everybody gets together in the senate, the university’s academic decision-making body. Almost all final decisions may be made here; except if they require financing (if so you must go to the board of governors) I So after it has been determined that there is money to hire or promote faculty, here is where the job will be done. Except that the department head, faculty councils, department committee, other professors, etc., will be part of the decision along the way, it is still unclear exactly how. If your problem will cost money or mean a restructuring of the university, that of course must go elsewhere. But rest assured you’ve found the home of the decisions the faculty cares about-salary decisions. Wait three weeks and then move on. 1


Fencing, swimming open recreation center Saturday saw the official opening of Uniwat’s new recreation center. The jock department put on a display so varied that connois seurs of every aspect of athletic art would be satisfied. Fencing thrust itself upon the campus scene for the first time in history. Although Waterloo didn’t enter a full contingent we managed a first in the Epee class with Horst Jerusalem, and Al Fedoravicius sliced his way to a third

From your door to ANYWHERE IN THEWORLD

Although Uniwat was outclassed by the strokers from London, Waterloo’s George Roy put on a fine solo performance talking the individual medley and a distance freestyle event.

The OQAA (west 1 team laurels went to U of T followed by Mat Western and Windsor. Toronto also took the team honours in the OQAA badminton finals. After the last bird had settled to earth UofT was ‘on top with Guelph a close second. Waterloo finished fifth in a field of six. Those who thought the tourney was rather dry could have ducked into the pool to see the spash Warriors do battle with Western in

All day tourists from down town wandered about saying how nice it was that the students have such a wonderful place in which to learn the competitive skills so necessary for success in later life. Little did they know-- that they had paid

AIRPORTPASSENGER CHARTERED

- PARCEL COACH

AIR

EXPRESS

-

Lishman Coach Lines 41 FAIRWAY

Who ltgets

TWO gay blades stretch to make a point.

Nice Chevron

close playoffs With andintramurals coming to a have been prevailed moving in we upon to run these interesting statistics.

Hockey

coop St. Paul Renison St Jer Con Greb

GP 3 2 2 2

3

W L 3 0 2 0 1 1

T Pts 0 6 0 4 0 2

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GP Phys-ed West South North East

,

W L T Pts 3 3 0 0 6 2 2 2 3

2’0

0

4

1

1

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2

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2 3

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GP

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3 2 3 2 2

2 2

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Faculty

Math Eng B Arts Science Eng A

by Donna Chevron

0

0

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1

1

1

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McCollum

staff

The two Waterloo women’s basketball teams have been doing well. Both the Athenas and the intermediate Athenas were victorious in their last outings. The intermediate basketball Athenas met Centennial College from Scarborough on Saturday and came up with a 29-22 win. The Athenas allowed only five points against them in the first half and had a 15-5 lead going into the third quarter. Centennial College sunk ten points in the next quarter but could not catch the Waterloo team in the remainder of the game. Meredith Smye led the Athenas in the low scoring contest as she netted 13 of her teams 29 points. The intermediates will compete for the Stewart Trophy this weekend as they travel to the University of Toronto. Teams from Macdonald Queen’s; Toronto, 20

772 the Chevron

Basketball Village

GP East West North South Phys-ed

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Faculty

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4

College, Western and McGill will battle with Waterloo in the tournament. With one game remaining in league play, the basketball Athenas are tied for first place with Windsor. Their latest victory was a 59-27 win over the Ryerson entry here on Wednesday. Although plagued -by 27 fouls, the home team managed to keep the Ryerson scoring down. With a 28-19 lead at the half, the Athenas allowed only eight points to the Toronto girls in the final In the same two two quarters. quarters, the Waterloo girls netted 31 points. The Ryerson zone defence seemed much easier to penetrate than Waterloo’s man-to-man shield Bevie Stueck and Pat Bland gained 12 points each for the Athenas while G. Stevens sunk eight for Ryerson. Waterloo heads off to Lutheran for their final league game on Tuesday night at 8: 30.

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championship

North South co-op Arts West Conrad Science

Townson 1 St. Jeromes

2 3 4 5 6

134 129 125 123 106 96 92 60 50 50 _ 29

participation

St Pauls Renison Math co-op East 7 Eng B 8 Eng A 9 Arts 10 South s 11 Phys-ed 12 Conrad Grebel 13 North 14. Science 15 West

that

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Dept.

-

l/2 Price Crazy table of

137

The townson

of year

trophy

Pts 184 169 145

Grebel

time

Shetland Skirts & Sweaters

trophy

Phys-ed Math Renison St Paul’s

this

S

Residence

Renison St Jer coop Con Greb St Paul The fryer

the store

is running

Eng B Arts Eng A Science

T Pts

in February?

around

sfatktks

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staff ----.

SO lonesome

I

Number 16 looked sharp in the corqyetition.

intramural

by Peter Hopkins

shops

RD.

trophy

Trtz@v y Pts 192 133 122 117 106 90 80 79 77 74 69 63 60 52 50

ggc

&

Bbuses

q .gg SPECIALS

- Sweaters

- Skirts

h/lens Dept.

SIJITS -

SPORTCOATS

l/2 PRICE (me gwq3 d *wtceats

s9.99)

J

Sport Shirts - Casual Slacks As low As

s1.99


1

STUDENTS! SAVE 10% On Every purchase

In a lack lustre game Saturday night the dribble and shoot Warriors came from behind to post a victory. The entire game was marred by too tight refereeing. Fiftyfour foul calls slowed the pac*e to a crawl. Although the fouls bored the fans the Warriors needed their 27 gift points to win the game.

Waterloo took an early lead over MacMaster. The score was the end of the first quarter. The Marauders rallied and managed to leave the floor with a one point half time lead.

20-14at

Things were reversed in the second half. Mat took the early lead and Waterloo was forced to make the comeback. With five minutes remaining the Warriors opened an eight point bulge. They had to fight off a half-hearted Mat rally to end the game on the long end of a 69-63 count. Jaan Laaniste played his basketball of the season hooping 25 was big points. Stan Talesnick close behind contributing 21 followed by Tom Keiswetter with 13. The game was just plain dull. Parly because of the nit-picking officials partly because of the calibre of play. The Warriors will have to tighten up and play a full game if they want to finish any higher than fourth place.

CA LIKELY MBPNATION

Warrior Larry Sobol goes hinh to score.

wurriorswin Walters

tussel

Credit

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Saturday saw the grunt and groan Warriors locked in a struggle with MacMaster and U of T. _ Standouts for Uf?iwat were Houghton who won two bouts in the 130 lbs class and Saunders who successfully pinned his opponent in the 191 lbs cat_egory. Final standings show&d Waterloo in full control with 60 points U of T with 17 and Mat limping away with 27 points. Tomorrow the Warriors will wrestie U of T in a return meet.

Next week they scramble down to Montreal for the OQAA championships.

Ice plcmt puckmefi

9 0

nesday Uniwat.

will

Athena volleyball .

Due to a breakdown in the ice plant at the arena last friday’s hockey game has been re:scheduled for thursday february 20. With a playoff position assured that he shoots-he scores Warriors will be spending this week preparing for the approaching playoffs. A win against Toronto on wed-

give

first

place

to

host

The defending 0-QWCIA champions the Athenas from Uniwat will be putting their trophy up for grabs this friday and saturday when the championship tournament takes place in Waterloo. The Athenas under coach Pat Davis will be hosting eleven other Ontario and Quebec universities. diction starts on friday at 1: 15 and continues until late saturda!

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Walterkredit JEWELLERS St. Jeromes Robin Hoods won team honours in the intramural ing the most people.

; ,:

friday,

archery tournament february

14, 1969 (9: 43)

bq? entcr773

2 1

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~-__-______________--------------~~~

FEDERATION

Montreal

OF STUDENTS

student council place Wednesday,

seats for the 1969February 19, ‘l969.

Polls will open at 9:15 am and close at 5:OO pm and will in the foyers of the following buildings

Arts

Modern

(4)

Engineering SGraduate

Co-op

be located I

Languages

Creative

Telephone orders - 744-6111, ext. 2126 Arts Board . Fed. of Students

Engineering

(4) Studies

By faculty indicated

(4)

Mathematics

in the

Mathematics

(1)

Tired of cooking at home? Want a really different meal? Try our European style open faced sandwiches, You choose the meat and we’ll prepare it for you. Delicatessen meats of ail kinds. Take your pick.

buildings

& Comput

Take

out

orders

7 am - 8 pm Tuesday

Science you

Chemistry

(3) bring your student

must

Theatre

Presents The Hawk “A tone poem on the horrbr, sorrow, and futility of war, ” by Don Dorrance The Recluse “an avant-garde horror story”, by Paul Foster. The Wandering Student From Paradise by Hans Sachs . Friday, February 21,8:30 p.m. Admission $2.50 ’ Students $1.50 THEATRE OF THE ARTS

-COUNCIL ELECTION “he election for the following ; 970 term of office will tal(e

Instant

identification

& Biology

card

in order

95 King ‘The

to vote.

Octopus

.

too! thru

Sunday

.

N. Waterloo

has so many

hands

to serve you better”

,~imikImImImlumI

Graham Sutherland Chief Returning Officer

NOTICE This

ltst

rhe

editorial

ed

111 the

These for

of

Chevron

staff

board

members

acting

as

the

has origlnal

been

prepared

committee

by

Then,treat yourself to a Chat with

mention-

by-laws

people

edttor

and

at

the

to

this

only

these

selectlon

people

meeting

wil on

be

able

Sunday,

to

vote

February

23

<It 8 pm

Appeals chief

bv

At

Monday,

the

sentative editor

Declslons

must

to

that

to

Alldrlck

Rod Walter

Asl~man Bowman

Phil

Rob

Buchn

WIllam Wayne Brian

Bradley Bloomfield

Cam

Buresh

David Jim

Crap0

Donna

Gord

Gale

David

Cline

Rose

Coe

Piit

Connor

Paul

Matti

JIIII Mike

Jan

Cotto

Diilv

Gil

Cullen

Bob

Detenbeck Dol~han

Jim

Dunlop

Alan

Ken

Dlckson

George

Lorna Mike

Eaton Eitgen

Steve

Ewing

Phil

Elsworthy

Paul

Englert

Myles Paul Sally Rod Linda

Holton Hay

774 the Chevron

..

Parlane

Tom

Purdy

Dave

Kirk

Paul Jane Nicolichuk

Bil

McCollom

Alex

Prentice Anne

Sedy Pa&e

Peavoy

Rajnovich Robins Royds

Nieminen Natveson Maunder McKercher

X Stephenson D.

Murphy

Schneider Sheldon Smith Singh Smith Solomonian

Peter

Soroka

Ann

Stiles

Pat

Stuckless

Hal Bruce

Loney

Ross

Taylor

Nancy

Kampherst

David

Tucker Young

Pete

Wilkinson

Greg

Wormald

Brenda

Toni

Patterson

Ray

John

Pickles

Hans

P!erce

Timmins Suchlinsky Thompson

Nestel

Mussolin

Tonkin

Dave

Breunis Kovacs Keron

Strasfteld

Carol

Sydney

Bob

Saxe

Spittal

Morris

Lukachko

Lonsdale

Sergeant Smith

Wayne Paul

I

Roberts

Stewart

Kiloran Klink

I

Parlane

John

Ken

Ireland

Ted

Glenn

Hertzman

final

Norm

Levitt

Grace

I

There are openings for male and female students until the end of the term. 4 Room & Board $21.00 - $24.00 wkly i i

the

Bil

Huck

P OPENI

5 0

reprewith

Goldspink Hale

Cyril

Bev Jim

Genest Hughes

staff

Gary

Nancy

-

a

Grupp

Eleanor

Ken

committee

Anne Horsley

Ford

Brenda

Betty Carol

appeals.

Gail

Blaney

Crapo

a

all

Tom

David

Henry

meeting

on

Field

Pete

Burko

Ii

editor-in-

Fraser

Nancy

Larry

the

Ken

Steve

Lesley

of

Barb

Ed

Brown

be

Hickman

Frank

Brown

hands

staff sit

wil

Bryon

Brady

the

decide

committee

Allen

JIIII

17

elected chairman

of

111

at5pm

February be

board

JIIII Tom

be 17

Bev

Charlotte

a2

Monday, wil

and

list February

Wilson Worner Wiesner Verdun

i ! !

There is one Two-Bedroom $140.00 per month. ~ Inquire

at 280

Phillip

apartment

St. B4 or phone

available 578-2580

at I


is departmental control. Caesar expects to spend most of his time getting student-faculty parity in all departments. In addition he will support radical education projects, such as, the marxist lecture series and other speakers brought in by the board of external relations.

Charlotte von BeroId Charlotte von Bezold, psych 3, is running for arts rep because she is interested in problems of education and of financial priorities as related in particular to the library. Von Bezold is in favor of the colleges of general and integrated studies,’ but would like to see the arts faculty liberalized. She feels this would involve less specialization-a wider selection of fields to choose from and an interdisciplinary approach to questions raised in particular courses. She thinks it is important that university funds be reallocated from such things as trees and lighted signs to books, since it seems there are not enough for arts undergrads. She also thinks that arts undergrads would benefit from a good anticalendar, and better counselling in the form, perhaps, of a faculty advisor for each student. Von Bezold also has some ideas for changes in federation programs. She liked the orientation program last year but thinks it should be extended to a year-long educational program. She would also like to have only a few good bands hired for concerts, rather than many poor ones. She feels it would be important to her as a council member to make herself available for discussions with any arts students that had reasonable complaints. If a pressing situation arose she thought it would be worthwhile holding a referendum to keep in touch with the needs of arts students.

Charlotte van Bezold

Duve

Cubberley

Dave Cubberley, poli-sci 3, feels the most important issue is trying to get people within the university community to start thinking and to evaluate their decisions. He feels that too many people (on all sides) are just following and really don’t have any ideas of their own. Cubberly has been on council for the last year and is running again because he feels there are many basic things wrong in the university community. Cubberly thinks that general meetings are the best means of ’ maintaining communication between council and students. Although he said CUS could not achieve many of the goals he has as a radical, he thinks that CUS is a useful body for the students. He feels that there should be another referendum next fall preceded by a massive education program. Cubberley thinks external representatives on governing bodies should be cut down but not eliminated. Cubberley drew up the motion for council suggesting that 10 percent of university finances should be spent on the library. He is concerned about the library

Mel

Dave Cubberley situation and would support action on the issue if negotiations fail. Cubberley said students should definitely participate in the hiring and firing of faculty since it is the students’ interests that are at stake. Cubberley is running as a radical and he is disgusted with the job done by Bergsma and his executive. He said, “No concrete proposals have come from the executive since Bergsma was elected. ”

Larry

Rotman

Mel Rotman, arts 3, feels that being a student is both the only necessary reason and the only necessary qualification for being on council. And as a student he wants to have his say. Believing as he does in the total involvement of the student in his education, he will take an active line. He admits it is difficult to guage student opinion and feels he will work according to his own conscience when the feelings of his constituents are not clear. However he said definitely he will not represent the apathetic faction and doesn’t feel he should.

Caesar

Larry Caesar, history 3, is running so that a radical voice will remain on council.” Most of the experienced radicals are leaving, ” he noted. Caesar is presently a student rep on arts faculty council and the undergraduate affairs committee of the history department. With regards to CUS, he said, “It can be a radical national body or it can be a moderate parlimentary pressure group. It can’t be both.” Caesar supports CUS in the former sense. He feels another referendum should be held. “Seventeen votes out of 28 percent is not decisive. ” The university should be controlled by faculty and students. “The administration should be what the civil service is to the federal government. The board of governors, as it is now, should be abolished. “I support outside representation in the university if, and only if, it is representative of the community at large, not corporate interests. The one-tier proposal of the administration is the best step backwards we’ve had in a long time. Corporate interests will now have more control than ever over academic affairs.” Caesar feels the library situation is atrocious. “There’s not enough books or study space. “He agrees with council’s demand of 10 percent of the university’s budget to be spent on the library. Though he has reservations about the effectiveness of confrontation tactics, he felt there would be no alternative to direct action if the administration rejects the demands entirely. The most important issue now

Larry Caesar

Rich Hastings be put to the students again. Any organization of universities is essential for mutual benefit, he said. Hastings expresses a feeling that the only way the proposed one-tier system can work is if all those involved with the campus have an equal say in affairs. As far as the library is concerned, he is willing to go as far as is necessary to ensure a decent system is provided. He feels confrontation is an important weapon in-the student arsenal. He labels himself as an independent. He feels that if elected he would vote better if he was not aligned with any political faction.

Rick

Mel Rotman He is in favor of complete democratization of the university. He sees student representation at present as representation without information and therefore meaningless. He is also of the opinion this representation is used as a method of justification by the administration. He feels the proposed one-tier structure cuts out some of the checks that exist under the present system as it gives too strong control to outside interests-who should have only limited control. He would agree with equal say between faculty and students in the hiring and firing of faculty. Rotman said, “The library situation is “disgraceful for a university of this size”. He favors action if necessary to bring about an improvement of the facilities. He believes CUS to be a dying institution, but feels there is need for a national radical organization to lobby in Ottawa. Politically he terms himself a radical, partially-affiliated with the RSM.

DeGrass

Rick DeGrass, planning 1, is running because he feels that he can do something for council. His experience goes back to running a hi-Y group. He expressed a feeling that apathy is a large issue in this election. Meetings with constituents are one way to solve this problem, he said. DeGrass feels the one-tier system will only work if there is equal representation of all those concerned. He feels people from the community should be involved, but industry should not be the only source. He is in favor of having another referendum on CUS. The library could develop into a major problem but he is not really aware of the situation. He wants to return to having many general meetings in order to provide students with a knowledge of the situation. DeGrass describes himself as being to the left but not a radical.

Rich Hastings Rich Hastings, poli-sci 1, feels council is lacking in experienced people. He believes he is the one to give it this missing quantity. Hastings has been out of school for several years and became very active in the labor scene. While he was working in Hamilton he became chief steward of the local union of the United Steelworkers of America. He was a delegate to the local labor council and was a member of the strikers welfare board. Because of his labor commitments he became an active member of the youth-wing of the NDP. One of the big problems facing the students is the apathy they themselves exhibit. Hastings wants to reach his constituents at least once a week as a possible solution to this. He feels the CUS issue should

Vern

ly have a voice in academic affairs and says the final decision should rest jointly with students faculty and administration. All decision-making bodies should be composed equally of students, faculty and administration. Control by the external community should be minimal. The one-tiered structure proposed by the administration is a step in the right direction if the majority of voting members on the new senate are students and faculty, he said. He says library facilities are not sufficient for a university this size. He would support confrontation tactics as a last resort only. “If I am convinced that channels are exhausted and there is no other way to bring about reform, then I think students owe it to themselves to use confrontation.”

Bob

Sinasac

Bob Sinasac, arts 3 and Bergsma’s creative-arts chairman, is a non-voting member of council. He feels he is representing students in certain areas now but would like to represent them more totally. Though he wouldn’t term himself a radical, he feels there are certzin revolutionary changes to be made on campus and he feels he has started making them in the creative-arts board. He also sees the arts society as playing an important role in the making of these changes. He feels the CUS referendum is binding at present and that the proper time for another referendum is after the next CUS congress. As regards the one-tier university government proposal, at present it is not acceptable but he feels that through negotiation it will become so. He would agree the library situation is bad and would support action, in order to gain a more equitable distribution of funds for the library. He also feels students should have a 50-50 say in the hiring and firing of faculty. Sinasac sees the quality of education, communications, the library, CUS and the gaining of responsible student power as the important issues. He will support involving the arts . programs society and the campus center board.

Cope/and

Vern Copeland, psych 3, is running because “there is a need for a change within the university. I want to be involved in bringing about this change and council is one of the most direct routes for acquisition of reform. ” Copeland says a representative must keep in close touch with his constituents and suggests they take one evening a week for open meetings with students. “I’m a believer in referendums on important matters,” he said. He says students should definitefriday,

february

74, 7969 (9:43)

775 L3


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Reuben Reuben Cohen

DONUTS

Reuben Cohen has a hunch that not too many people are pushing for action besides the radicals and would like to push for nonradical action. He feels that Bergsma and his friends need a bit of a push. Cohen has served ai vicechairman of orientation and homecoming.

arts

l#ii?trh University and

Reuben Cohen He feels that if elected he will consider himself representative. He will attempt to take new issues to his constituants by word of mouth. Cohen would like to remain in CUS and feels that another referendum is necessary as soon as possible. He favors ’ a two-tier government with the senate comprised of faculty and students. Cohen feels the library facilities must be improved and will press for action if the improvement does not come through proper channels. He feels students should

can

have little say in the hiring and firing of faculty. He says the library., student voice on how we receive our education and CUS are major issues. If elected he will support such programs as orientation, anti-calender, course critiques, speakers and general programs of education on various issues. Cohen states that he has no political affiliation but considers himself to be a radical. He points out, however, that he is not a Marxist. He also feels student government experience will help him in later employment opportunities.

Sandra

VARIETIES

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student opinion. She did not say how we could change this union since we no longer belong to it. Driver thinks democracy should be limited to the areas which directly concern the student-residences and curriculum. Students should also have the power to fire but not hire professors. To guage student opinion, she suggested council members be available for discussions at certain times and general meetings should be continued. She has neither political affiliations nor any definite programs in mind. She feels negotiations with the maximum cooperations from all parties can produce a compromise suitable to most.

Robert

Kihmnik

Bob Kilmnik, economics 3, says student involvement in this university’s environment is his main reason‘ for running for council.

Con of Students invites appka from students to sit on the , Senate and the Board of Gotiernors.

24

776 the Chevron

.

. l . . . . . . . .I . . . . . . . . *. . . . . . . . .

Robert Kilimnik

The+ Federa

On January 24,1969, the University announced that its Senate and Board of Governors had approved in’ principle a proposed new one-tier system of government. It was also announced hat a joint meeting of the Senate and Board would be called to establish ways and means of effecting the transition to a one-tier system, which will involve establishment of a committee to draft a revision of the Universitv of Waterloo Act. Until the University Act can be revised to give students a vote, two students are invit-

.

He is acting treasurer of the Arts Society, a member of the House of Debates. and is on the political-science union executii-e. He sights the main problem on this campus as one bf cornmunications between council and the student body. If elected he hopes to improve this communication. He is willing to listen to the ideas of his constituents and would consider their views when voting on major policy decisions by the council. Although he presently does not support the CUS platform, he would support re-entry if the policies of the union were changed. He feels the main issue this election is one of a problem-solving approach. He feels that the existing structure is still 01 value and should not be abandoned: He is a Bergsma supporter and agrees on most of Bergsma’s views concerning the student government.

Driver

Sandra Driver, arts 2, is pleased to see the decline of partisan elections on campus. She feels that voting for individual students is more representative and democratic. Although not experiencedin federation politics, she has worked with the student co-ops for the last two years. She is entering this election with an open mind and quite willing to listen to all sides through varying levels. The main issues involve improving the coordination between the many student organizations and more open-minded discussions with the board of governors over their one-tier proposals. On CUS, Sandra thinks that the organization is far too political and requires some basic changes from within, or it should be replaced by another national union. She feels that the referendum was representative of present

.

tions

Board an-d six Cstudents (4 u’ndergraduates and 2 gradu3~ ates) to attend Senate meet-, ings. Also, an additional two students appointed ’ by the Federation may attend the j 1 joint Senate and Board meetIng which will discuss the recommendations for change, which will be held March 6. I

Therefore, applications for the Board of Governors: Senate: 6 students: Joint and

Meeting Sena te :

All applications the President

are

2 students4 undergraduates

as follows:

2 graduates

of Board 2 students

Any further information men t at the University Federation of Students -

requested

regarding of Waterloo on request.

for the above by February 2 7.

the proposed is available

positions

should

change of governin the office of the

be in the

Jo‘hn Bergsma President

hands

of


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Canadian students is mandatorv and the results of the referendum were much too close to sacrifice our ties with CUS. Self-determination for students is prerequisite to a greater education and all governing bodies of the university must be representative of the campus population. Community members on the governing board must be representative of the community not just the present corporate elite. “The library situation is almost hopeless if not ridiculous”, said Gordon, “We must insist that 10 percent of the total operating budget be allotted to the library, anything less would be disastrous. ’ ’ “I have found that hiring and firing of faculty must be done on the course union level where grads and faculty have parity with the undergrads. ” he continued. \ Other issues he sees are the college of integrated studies, CUS, the roles of the kampus kops and also the university in society. Gordon wishes to be classified as a left-liberal with RSM ties.

Brian Gordon Brian Gordon, poli-sci 3, is running for office because he feels he can help fill the vacancies in arts representation left by the graduation of Sandra Burt and Tom Patterson. He feels the experience he gained in helping to establish the political-science union on campus will serve him well on council. Gordon was recently-defeated in an attempt to become president of the

Steve Earl PSU. He also feels his experience with the recent Epstien-Rawling affair gives him an understanding of admin-faculty maneuvers. Gordon feels the apathy displayed in the past elections indicates council should assume the leadership required to conduct campus affairs; a continuing dialog between council and constituents will result in a rapport that is needed to forge ahead. He said a strong union of

Steve Earl, arts 3, feels he is aware of student problems and thinks the federation is one place to solve them. He states that it will be impossible for him to be representative on council for there are as many opinions as constituents in arts.‘If he is elected, he feels he should be free to use his own judgement. However, he would make a sincere effort to keep in

Science

Society

DINNER

seek

touch with the general the students.

feelings

of

cially in terms of the courses offered. Students should be able to decide the nature of their courses . He said it is up to the executive of the federation to initiate programs and at present he is not aware of any such leadership.

Rob

Steve

Earl

CUS has a definite role yet Earl is afraid it is being destroyed by all the withdrawals. He feels that if student councils are worried about the political tone they should send delegates who can change

;+ IL.

He is convinced students should have a strong voice on any decision-making body within the university. Outside control should be limited but with a wider scope, that is, labour groups as well as big business should be representation. In keeping with this idea he is strongly in favor of an important role to be played by students in the hiring and firing of faculty, hoping in this way to avoid a repeat of the fiasco that occurred in poli-sci last term. He sees the educational process itself as the important ;I :ue, espe-

.-.-.-.-.......................... .....-..I........ seats ........................... .

four

Fennel

At present Rob Fennell, arts 2, feels there is a definite need for more organiza tion within the federation. With his experience as co-chairman of want-ad, a promotion committee of the creative-arts board, he feels that he can help in bringing about the necessary re-organization.

Fennel1 feels student representation within the university should be substantial but not over- ’ powering-the ideal situation being a balance between students and faculty with a token representation of outside interest. In line with this he feels students should be involved in the hiring and firing of faculty yet is afraid that if too extensive it could lead to undue pressure on faculty.

TREV

DINNER’7:OO DANCE

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day

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Wednesday

9am

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main

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faculty

foyers.

co-op ture,

council

in

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phys-ed, and

St.

the tions and

architecJeromes.

BENNET

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couple

$7.00

BAR OPENS

Rob

& ORCHESTRA

Tickets Non Science

Be calls himself an independent, and said he should be openminded about what programs he would support.

He favors another CUS referendum as he feels the last one was defeated through lack of interest, not through knowledge of the issue. Here again he sees the need for more organization and representivity.

HIS $5.00

He considers effective organiza’tion within the federation and .its boards, the one-tier proposal, and housing as the important issues facing council.

He recognizes the difficulty of being representative yet will do his best through talking with his constituents.

DANCE

Science

Fennel1 states the library is grossly inadequate for a university of this size and should it become necessary, he would support action.

couple

6:30 pm

on sale

Chem.,

in

Biolink

& Physics

Bldg.

SPEAKER: EL WY YOST

pm

9:00 pm

TOPIC: “The

CAESAR’S

Mixed

Mad up

friday,

Scientist

and

Media”

february

14, 1969 (9:43)

777

25


Rich

WHAT: W

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Rich Lloyd lists an active interest in university affairs and membership in the delegation to the Congress of Engineering students as his main qualifications for a seat on council. Lloyd would like to see the retention of CUS but he thinks the union should reflect student opinion, even if the opinion is apolitical. ���CUS is not necessarily a forum for poli-sci types”. Lloyd views the service programs CUS offers as a good side of the union. Also CUS supplies a lobby for student demands in Ottawa; for that reason membership should be maintained. Lloyd sees the one-tiered government as a great idea. However, he feels faculty members should be in a majority on the governing

Elections

7 7, 7969

Nominations

Feb.

WHY:

24

- 5 pm

your

Open

March

3

money

4 3

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7 7 7 7 7 7

Reg. Co-op

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Bob

Rich Lloyd

shop

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Students

board with administration and outside representation kept to a minimum. He doesn’t support library demands for 10 percent of the operating budget until the entire area of allocations is reviewed. He does see need for big improvements in the libraries. The main issues in his view are: next term’s budget, council goals, direction of board of education and board of external relations. Lloyd has been endorsed by John Bergsma but he is not holding any particular political line.

AVAILABLE Martin

FO’OTBALL JERSEYS and

CAMPUS NIGHTIES JACKETS-Terylene

Winter

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26

ASSORTMENT T SHIRTS

OF

& Navy

Squalls Leather

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EQU I PM ENT-Wallie tape, laces

sticks,

SCARVES

& TOO’UES-in

colours

778 the Chevron

of the budget was stupid. It was confrontation for confrontation’s sake. “He feels they should have publicized the issue first and made 3 more negotiable demand.

His personnal project will be to get more commonroom space for engineers. “Right now guys are playing bridge in the washrooms.

NOW

UNIVERSITY

Martin Holmberg

Holmberg feels students should have a say over who teaches them. We should not, however, push our demands too far.

7 President

HOW for.

March

HC3036

WHE-RE:

Apply

Society

Lloyd

school

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pucks,

Holmberg

“Every election, candidates promise to be truly representative. When they get elected they just goof off. This time its going to be different. I intend to really represent my constituents,” said Martin Holmberg, electrical 3A. Holmberg proposes to maintain close contacts by actively seeking opinion. In addition he wants to publish a council news. This would include not only what has already happened, but also what is going to happen on council. Holmberg was personally for CUS. He says that another referendum should be held. Seventeen votes out of 28 percent of the student body is not a binding vote. The issues should be presented. Then, of course, he would abide by the will of the majority. On democratizing the university Holmberg said he would push hard for changes. “The university can be a social research center. We should be a model for society. ’ ’ The board of governors as it is presently constituted should be removed. “These guys are on 25 corporations each. How can they really represent anything but vested interests. It is in our interest to have community-elected representatives.” He criticised the present council on its handling of the library situation. “Demanding 10 percent

Floyd

Bob Floyd, mechanical, 3A is more interested in seeing changes in the university community as a whole rather than concentrated at the faculty level. He believes in representation of the people and will follow closely the platform he is elected on. Floyd would do this by talking to engineering students and also their EngSoc reps. He would like to have seen CUS retained, but feels it should reflect a more moderate stand. Students should be made aware of the many plans, such as the CUS insurance plan. Floyd feels another referendum should be held some time next year. On university. government Floyd said he was in favor of the one-tier proposal but he favored increased student representation on all committees and decisionmaking bodies. In principle, the one-tier system is good because it brings the financial and academic members of the university_ community closer together. Outside members of the community

Bob Floyd should have some say in the running of the university, but not as much as they have now. On hiring and firing Floyd feels students should be able to submit an anti-calendar on their professors but that they should not be involved in the actual hiring or firing procedure. Floyd is in agreement with the Bergsma platform, and calls himself an independent liberal.


-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. ‘.*.*.*,*.*..,*...*.*.*.*.*.*.~,. eight wanf four Anne

I

Bun&s

Anne Banks, civil 2A, is running because she doesn’t like the way council is being run at the present time. Her experience includes EngSoc council, Village council and some highschool politics. She stated she would try to reach her constituents, but only if they were interested in becoming involved. Banks is in favor of joining CUS again. She believes the new one-tier system of university government will work only if there is equal voting powers by all those involved. She realizes the library situation is reaching a crisis and will do anything to ensure the students are provided with decent study space and acquisitions are increased. Banks feels that students should have a 50 percent interest in the hiring and firing of students. She has expressed an opinion that slates provide a poor stand

Anne Banks on issues because of the need of political alliances. Anne Banks has no political affiliations but does express distaste in the way Bergsma does the job. She agrees with many of his ideas but feels that he will take too long in instituting reforms on council.

Renzo

courses, ‘with community representation (labor only ), faculty and students controlling administration. If negotiations in the library situation broke down, he would use confrontation tactics to the ultimate. Bernardini wants student parity with faculty in the hiring and firing of profs. He wants a minimum of ten Marxists in the social sciences. He sees unigov, course content, the library’ situation and parking as important issues on campus. “These are issues which students must gain control of, by any means including extreme confrontation.”

Dave

Parsons

Dave Parsons, chemical 3B, is a John Bergsma supporter. His experience ranges from his acclamation to the last council to second vicepresident of Engineering Society B. He looks at engineers as a callous lot, although he would turn to them for reflections on issues that affect them. Parsons would try to improve communications with his constituents by frequent meetings with them, bear-pit type interviews and the publication of council happenings in a readable form. Another referendum involving at least 60 percent of the student body before council takes action is the aim of Dave on the CUS issue. He personally favors remaining in the union. Parsons believes the administration is acting in good faith with their one-tier governing body for the university community. The number of students on the body would depend on its size. He would like a 10 percent cut off the top of the budget to solve the library problem. Further

Bernardini

Renzo Bernardini, elec. eng. 2A is running on a hard-line neoanarchist platform. He entered the race because he feels the Engineering Society and faculty have an ultra-conservative fascist meaningfui attitude toward change. His experience includes chairmanships in the federation, the RSM, CUSO and WUS. On the question of representivity he said, “I know what the engineers want, but the best way to represent them is to give them what they need. I know what they need.” Renzo would call for another CUS referendum if the majority of students wanted it. He personally does not support it because it is not a revolutionary vanguard as he would like it to be. Student and faculty control of

Renzo Bernardini

Dave Parsons action would require consultation with the engineers. The issues he sees as most important include unigov, the library situation, French-English relations and CUS.

He&y

Sunday, F&b. 23, 8:00 pm SELECTION OF EDITOR

APPLICATIONS Henry Older in what goes on. “He feels we must first gain experience, and work gradually towards the 50 percent mark. On outside control of the university (board of governors 1, Older said community representatives should be elected at large. l “Certainly business should not have influence. The public pays for the university, why should businessmen control it.” Older recognizes the need for students having a say in selection of faculty. Students should have control of all teaching roles. Research, however, was best left to the faculty alone.. Older is running as ‘an independent but is on a slate with Martin Holmberg.

Bi//

positions with

l

Liontayles

l

Handbook

l

Directory

l

Compendium

must be submitted the office of:

in writing

by April

15, 1969 to

Gerry

Fish

Chairman

Bill Fish, civil 3A, feels many things are wrong with the university but that changes can be made within the existing structures without confrontation. He is concerned with the lack of communication between students and council and if elected he hopes to set up regular meetings with the other reps to talk with students. Fish feels an organization such as CUS is required and he would support the calling of another referendum but only if it is preceeded by a massive education -program. He feels the one-tier government proposal has potential and that students should participate. He said the number of reps students have is not that important and the student reps selected should put forward “responsible, representative viewpoints”. He does not think that people from outside the university should have any more say than each group in the university. Fish feels a bad situation exists in regard to the library particularily the arts library. He said, “I am prepared to take a responsible

Wootton Bd. of Publications Campus Centre

FEDERATION

OF

STUDENTS

EXECUTIVE BOA-RD Applications are invited for the following positions on the Executive Board of the Federation for 19694970: Vice-President member

(must be a voting of Students’ Council)

Treasurer Chairman,

Creative

Arts

Board

Chairman, Board la tions Chairman, Board

of Education

Chairman,

of Publications

Chairman,

Older

Henry Older, electircal 3B, is running to give engineering students a more effective voice on council. “The former council got too far removed from the people. Bergsma’s council is no better.” He proposes to have weekly meetings with his constituents. If these fail he will actively seek their opinion. In relation to CUS, Older said that a national student body was a voted good thing. He himself for CUS. “But CUS seems to be folding. ” If it wins its remaining referenda, however, Older said he would seek another vote. Older said ideally students should have 50 percent representation on all committees. “We form the largest part of the university and we should have a say

for editorial

Board

Board

Chairman,

of External

of Student

Re-

A ctivities

Communications

Executive

Member

Speaker

of Council

A t Large

Written applications stating qualifications should be submitted to the undersigned not later than Friday, February 21, 1969 at 5:00 p.m. For more information, call Bill Fish stand towards rectifying the situa- , tion.” He believes students should have a large voice in the hiring and firing of faculty. Fish did not want to classify himself as a radical or a Bergsma supporter.

John Bergsma President Federation of Students

friday,

february

14, v7969 (9:43)

779

27


. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . .. -. .. .. .. -. .. -. .. .. .. .. .. -. .. -. .. -. .. -. .. -. .. -. .. -. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....

....................

Hugh

. ...............

-

running

five

for

Hugh Campbell

Char/es

Gdagher

Charles Gallagher, them and physics 3. is running to represent the wishes of science on council. He thinks withdrawing from CUS was a mistake and another referendum should be held. Gallagher

science

“We need CUS,” it has to be changed representative. ” He ther referendum on ship.

Campbe/!

Hugh Campbell, optometry 3, says he has no experience in Federation politics but is interested and plans on representing student opinion rather than his own personal views. He feels CIS does not represent the feelings of the majority of Canadian university students. but thinks withdrawal from CLJS does not accomplish anything since we cannot reform an organization that we do not even recognize. The referendum only proved student dissatisfaction with the recent political trend of CUS. Campbell believes only faculty and students should judge the value and content of courses. He feels outside interests and even administrators are not in a position to decide what or even how courses will be offered. He considers himself slightly radical but he will base his official duties on obvious student opinion. The main issues he sees are Bergsma’s educational department proposals and the proper representation of students in council and throughout the university. Campbell believes that if a student proposal is legitimate and important, it should be pursued to its furthest extent and pressure should be employed to achieve recognition.

three

he says, “but so it ismore supports anoCUS member-

. .: : : : : :. .. .C. .. -. -. .. .. .. .. “. .. .- .. .~. .. -. -. . . -

seats

Minken is Science surer and a member pus center board.

Society treaof the cam-

To maintain his representivity he will talk to as many people

He says everyone connected with the university-students, faculty, staff and administrationshould have a chance to solve the problems of the university. Students should have the largest bloc of power but not necessarily a majority. The people on the present board of governors “should have a very small part to play in university government.”

Charles Gallagher finds the one-tier system as it now unacceptable. He stands thinks more student representation is necessary in various fields of government, but he worries that there are not enough capable students around to fill these positions. Gallagher thinks faculty should have the controlling number of votes on the one-tier structure with outside interests kept to a minimum. On the library issue he feels books are more of a necessity than fancy buildings and sodding twice a year. He would support action on the issue if negotiations fail, but he does not support violence. An anti-calendar should be published by students of all faculties but they should not be involved in decision-making on the hiring and firing of certain professors. Gallagher does not think there are many issues or platforms in this election. His one big hope, though, is to draw the federation’s attention to the poor facilities science students are forced to work under:

He favors a one-tiered system of government but expressed reservation about the administration’s proposal because of its lack of detail. He agreed the library needed more books and more space. He said students should go through proper channels but would support quiet confrontation. “I don’t know whether you could get a mass demonstration but the problem is serious enough to try it if necessary.” He

Wootton

Gerry Wootton, physics 3, is a self-proclaimed socialist who sees his candidacy as a moral obligation to the students he now represents. He is currently publications board chairman in Bergsma‘s esecutive. Representivi ty is an absolu\t~ impossibility to him. escept 01: basic principals. Another CUS referendum \vouI~i prove nothing unless an intensi\c education program were instituted Wootton personally favors remaiiing in the union, but would like to see it more active in pressuring government before problems arise. “I’m all for the democratization of the university, but I wish the students would get off their asses.” He sees more awareness and communication as the primary objectives in the forming of the proposed one-tier government.

He said students should participate at all levels of university government but “we can’t go to the administration and say ‘we demand’; we should work on the committees we have and show the administration we are responsible.” He sees 50 percent student representation as a desirable goal. The administration’s one-tiered proposal is a step in the direction of more participation at departmental levels. He feels few major decisions are made at upper levels and that the new one-tiered senate will be mainly a rubberstamp.

Bruce McKay

Gallagher is an independent candidate and considers himself a moderate radical.

suggested useful.

Bruce Mclby

Students. he said. should have an equal ‘say with deans and department heads in the hiring and firing of faculty.

Bruce McKay, physics 2, says council hasn’t done as much as it should have. He calls himself an indepent radical. He plans to take pains to find out the opinion of his constituents. He said he will talk to as many science students as possible and will visit classes to gauge opinion.

Charles Minken possible and work with the Science Society. He suggested he might publish flyers telling constituents how he voted on council motions.

a

.char/es

petition

might

be .(1

Minken

Charles Minken, them 2. is running because he thinks he can do something about the bickering between the radical and Bergsma factions on council.

He said the library is very short of books. He would push the faculties to spend their budgets and allocate more if necessary. Questioned about confrontation, he said, “I don’t think negotiation will fail.”

Gerry Wootton Wootton wants ten percent off the top of the budget to acquire more books for the EMS library and expand the facilities of the arts collection. He laughed at the idea of students hiring faculty and suggests a program of evaluation of the* profs by students. The quality of education is Gerry’s prime concern and he sees the board of education on the way to giving more constructive criticism of values. “Decentralization is an equally important issue. ”

Minken feels students should be involved in the hiring and firing of faculty only to the extent of making suggestions. This could be done by student reps on faculty councils. He criticized the board of education and said it should pursue definite programs instead of just handing out money to various activities.

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In council he would be a Bergsma supporter.

Gerry as

..........

UNIVERSITY


...\

.................................. ..................................... ........................................ .......................................

Dieter

...

six graduates

Haag

Dieter Haag, grad German, is running to keep involved in campus affairs. He is presently John Bergsma’s vicepresident. Haag believes students should become more involved in their own interests. Haag is in favor of CUS and is disappointed in the results of the vote. He feels that if the rest of the universities come back into CUS, then we should follow them. If not, a new student union should be formed. He is not opposed to the idea of another referendum.

Bailey Wang

Dieter Haag The one-tier system is acceptable to him. He feels students must participate in order to make it work. He sees the administration, faculty and students having an equal vote in the new system. Haag is in favour of decentralization, a policy that should be instituted in the next council. Haag said the library should be changed in order to ensure proper student facilities. If nothing else works, non-violent confrontation should be used to achieve these means. Students should be involved with hiring and firing of faculty members, but only at the grad level, because of a lack of experience at the undergraduate level. He sees the issues in the next council will be decentralization, cooperation with the setting up of the new system of government and also helping to select the new administration president.

Bailey

on the board but they should act cautiously. ” Students should have a say on committees but not control, Wang feels. Senior students are more qualified to judge teaching ability and should have some say in hiring and firing. Wang said that though the library is inadequate it is not a priority. “Housing-is my main concern. Books can come later. Enrolment has grown faster than available housing. Planning is lousy. There’s not enough green. This place is so crowded it looks like an industrial area.” Wang is an independent candidate.

Gdshan

four seats

pects of university government as hiring of faculty, decision-making within departments, and a singletier governing body. He would support the one-tier proposal if it were controlled by students and faculty with only nominal outside representation. Although grads can get books on inter-library loan, Dhawan thinks our own library is not sufficiently stocked, and he will favor any action that will result in an improve-ment. He thinks that the idea of a national student union is a good one, and would like another referendum on CUS, since the last one was so close. Other ideas Dhawan would like put into effect are an anticalendar and a directory of research going on in the various departments.

John

Stegman

John Stegman, grad astronomy, wants to be in a position to discuss the ,running of the university. He

Dhawan

Gulshan Dhawan sees for the federation include an orientation program for grads, as well as special social events that would be more appealing to them. Dhawan believes students generally, but specially grads, should have a decisive role in such as-

WHAT:

The

John Stegman is active in the Grad Society. He holds the opinion that if students have a real say in things then the new one-tier system of government will probably work. He believes he can carry the meetings back to the grads by his ties with the Grad society. Stegman wants to get back in CUS if organizational problems can be worked out and better representivity achieved. The solution is to take a larger cut of the budget for libraries and allocate it wisely. Stegman’s main efforts center around breaking down the barriers to communication that exist between the various campus factinnc CI*“XaU. He says he is politically independent, but committed to the grads. ’ , Nick Kouwen Nick Kouwcn. grad civil, interested in council affairs.

An exciting experiment in mediwm An international, interdisciplinary

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Gordon is in favor of CUS and eels it provides many services sequired by Canadian students. He feels Waterloo must change CUS from within to increase representivity but would not undertake to reverse the recent referendum or advocate re-entering CUS until it has changed.

Nick Kouwen has served past term.

on council

during

the

He feels he should be representative and would consider himself representative if elected. He endeavour to remain would representative by talking to people in the engineering lounges. He would like to have a CUS referendum after the next congress and send observers. to that congress.

Gordon supports the administration’s proposed one-tier system and feels the student voice on the university’s governing body must be greater than the token vot,e offered. The body must involve people from the community who have an interest in the university and will insure the university is respected by the community.

is He

Concerning the library, Kouwen feels the facilities are grossly inadequate in arts but not bad in the EMS library. He would support improvement and insists that negotiations with the administration on this point will not fail. Kouwen feels that students should be allowed to sit on the committee involved with hiring and firing of faculty. In his estimation the important issues are university government, housing, the Chevron (the things that council can’t get in unless they buy space 1. The programs he. is. planning to support are curriculum evaluation, support for faculty society newspapers, and society control of major weekends. Kouwen has been Bergsma supporter.

an

ardent

Dave Gordon As a grad student he is disturbed with the library situation on campus and feels all steps must be taken to insure the presenS, lack of facilities is remedied, even to the extent of sit-ins. Gordon feels students should have some means of expressing their opinions on faculty memhers’ competence so that hiring and firing will be representative of the students’ opinions. Gordon continues to support the Bergsma ticket Council

a

Al

were

Chevron

Ken

Coe,

Detenbeck, Nestel,

Burke,

Jim

Dunlop,

Tom-

Ashman,

Phil Ken

LesJim

Elsworth Fraser

inEaton,

Larry

Eagen, Buresh,

inter-

team Lorna

Lukachko,

Mike

Dave Gordon, grad math, is presently on student council. He feels council requires a sane approach, and he can give the grads the strong voice they need on council.

and message. free university

by

cluding:

le y

Dave Gordon

candidates

viewed

y, and

Sid Bob

Verdun. Photos X

were

Stephenson

son

with

taken and

by

Dave

Pete

Wilkin-

other

notable

14, 1969 (9:43) L, -&

7829 ,

help

from

photogs.

A project of World University

Service

of Man

in the Third

Rochdale

For further

__-

le attempts to maintain repr .sentivity by presenting his opi ions to his constituents and askg them for their sentiments on Fitical issues.

of Discussion:

Analysis of Industria!ized Society Relationship between Industrialism Problems

..........

......................................... ‘..........f.~ . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . .

He would not want each member of the university to have one vote on all decisions made concerning the university but would want students involved in the decision-making. He feels that the administration’s one-tiered proposal is quite satisfactory.

Gulshan Dhawan, grad chemical engineering, feels the present representation on council of graduate especially those of forstudents,eign origin-is inadequate. He serves on Grad Society council. Some new programs he

Wang

Baily Wang, grad civil, hopes that he can do something for the foreign students on campus. Wang feels CUS was irrelavent. “They don’t do anything for us.” Another referendum wouldn’t be worth - it. He feels that often students aren’t informed when they act. We should study the issues more. “Students should have some reps

contest

DEADLINE

and

the Third

World

Toronto

contact

the

Federation

FEBRUARY

of students

28

friday,

febndary


MANIFESTO f or a

ING BUREAUCR N THIS TIME OF CRISIS, it behooves the honest individual to relate to the people of his nation, the full extent of the ideological value structure he has come to formulate over the course of his life. Where this cooperation is not it seems in the best interests of the forthcoming, state to banish said individual to the farthest reaches of psychological exile, denying him the solace of personal companionship, the warmth of human affection and the Love of his fellow man. We, the government and the Lawful Expression of our people’s wishes and desires, have so dethis day-the Fourteenth day creed, by enacting of February, in the Year 1969-the following stiputo be recognized as “An’ Act lation, in the form To Deny Humanness In The Name Of The Community Of The State”.

ARTICLE

ONE:

WHEREAS the efficiency of the State and the Order of our Purpose is manifest in the Unity of our people’s thought and action, and WHEREAS the aforementioned Unity is imperative to the functioning of representative government in times of national emergency and threatened internal strife, and WHEREAS the methods of attaining this Unity are vested, a priori, in the hand of the people’s elected government, BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED AND HEREBY ENACTED THA T. 7. All persons and citizens shall submit arbit rarily to ’ the dailv published and announced Psv

the stipulation in part two (2) shall suffer, at the hands of the duly appointed courts and judiciary of the following punishments, humiliations our nation, or their equivalent, as determined by and denials, said tour ts and/or judiciar y : a. Public interrogation and confession, and 6. Physical humiliation in an approved public place, and C. Psychological conditioning to Approved Sensibilities, and d. Trial release for a period of ten years parole and various interim conditioning, if necessary,. or e. Death by stoning in an approved public place.

chological Submission Directives, and all directives and. orders, stipulations, procedure and advice therein,. 2. All persons and citizens not submitting themselves as directed shall suffer, at the hands of the duly appointed tour ts and judiciary of our nation, the following punishments, humiliations and denials, or their equivalent, as determined by said courts and/or judiciary.. a. Confinement in maximum security with no fewer than five persons,. 6. Confinement in maximum security alone; ~ C. Death by stoning in an approved public place.

ARTICLE

TVVO:

ADDENDUM:

WHEREAS the consummate expression of Love and Affection that a nation’s government can demonstrate for its people is the demonstration of a kindly, fatherl-y Concern and Discipline, and WHEREAS this Concern and Discipline is Universal Truth, BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED AND HEREBY ENACTED THAT Universal Truths shall hereafter be the ex1. clusive jurisdiction of the people’s government, *2 No persons or citizens within the state shall dogma, purport to advise or consent to beliefs, formulae, dicta, or any other such written or verbal expression which sets upon itself the value of Truth, Universal Truth, Reality, Wisdom or Right, An:’ persons or citizens not complying with 3

It is the desire of this government to protect, in as the moral and thorough a manner as possible, that ethical standards of our people, in order For this the National Purpose be main tained. we feel it is our duty to delineate for One reason, National And All, what must come to be the unified Identity, as it is known psychological fact that the most facilitative Mass Identity breeds I the Absolute Best in social Cohesion, Adhesion and Stickto-it-iveness. As this conception is the hand of my Will, and as my _Will is the hand of your Being; I hereby sign into effective Law, the above Articles. BY MY UN1VERSA.L AUTHORJTY, FOURTEENTH DAY OF DECEMBER, WILLIAM ROBIN, RULER

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It is sometimes said that sociology is a very inexact science and I have no reason to dispute that contention. But sociology should sen‘sitize us to aspects of social structure and social behaviour, so that we can act more intelligently relative to the predicaments generated within human social life. At least one sociologist has just demonstrated this kind of sociological foresight. Professor Kurt Jonassohn, chairman of the Department of Sociology at Sir George Williams University, is my research partner in a Study of Family Structure and the Health of Children. Two weeks ago he visited me for a day to discuss some problems of data analysis. On meeting him at the station I tried to pick up his suitcase and found it unusually heavy. I remarked jokingly that he had apparently scraped all his valuables together and was fleeing 1’Etat de Quebec. It turned out that this was truer than I had thought. Kurt had brought with him five computer tapes to be stored here in case of trouble at his university. My reaction to his anxieties was laughter: obviously this was paranoid behaviour. If students had taken over the sensitive installation of the computing centre they had done no damage to it. Now I am grateful that at least one of us had been alertsed to the destructive potentialities of the student revolution at Sir George Williams University. It seems out of place to be modelling the university presidency the university burns. NOW is the time for asking more elementary more pressing questions.

t

while and

Among the segmented publics of the university are the students. and it would be both absurd and irresponsible of me to suggest that they represent a homogeneous public. If there is an inert mass of dissatisfied students, there is a vocal and active minority of student leaders who are driving toward action. What is it that these relatively articulate people want from the university? Are they really addressing the focus of their discontent to the university as such, or is the university for them the model of the larger society with its inequitable distribution of opportunities ? Such questions will have to be confronted soon, and with candidness, if the major values of the university are to be salvaged. Most of us can readily agree that the despicable mob tactics that denied freedom of speech to Clark Kerr at the University of Toronto recently, and the mob actions that resulted in the destruction of corriputer equipment at Sir George Williams University, cannot and must not be condoned by any responsible public within the university. If there are to be haves toward orderly change, toward more humane centres of more humane learning, we shall need to be clear about both our goals and the means for achieving them. The latter implies that we are in need of rules to regulate individual and collective conduct within the university, as well as eqqitable but strict enforcement of the rules. Such rules must give assurance that no mob, and no minority of wild men, will be allowed to smash the all too brittle structure of the contemporary university. It may be a structure with more faults than virtues, but it is all we have. What is more, it is one of the few remaining places of relative sanity within the society, and indeed it is the place from which we may be able to create models and means toward a saner society. Let the responsible critics of the university come forward and disown the mob. Then let us set to work to list our various grievances and work with diligence at plans for reconstruction. In my next column I shall raise the question of what constitutes responsible behaviour on the part of university teachers. As a member of that public I am justified to pose the issue. Not being a member of the student public somewhat limits me in raising similar questions regarding it. If I shall nevertheless approach the issue here it is with hesitation. * * * Student critique of the university has currently taken two main forms: the printed and spoken word on the one hand, and direct action on the other. In a few places students have opted out of the system altogether and have created substitute colleges. Let me suggest here a pattern of critique that combines features of these preceding ones into something more organized and more’forceful. I am suggesting that students create a university within the university, that they make use of existing facilities when these are not in use.

If you’re a member of Air Canada’s Swing-Air Club, you’ll never have to worry about getting into this predicament. Because you’ve got a way to get away in style-for half fare in Economy Class with Air Canada on a standby basis. Where would you like to go? Los Angeles? Miami? New York? We’ll take you there, or to almost any city in Canada, any day of Yhe week. Your Swing-Air I.D. Card is your key to travel fun nearly anywhere in North America. If you’re under 22, and you haven’t joined the Swing-Air Club yet, get the details from your Air Canada campus rep. Or call your local Air Canada office for information.

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@

This shadow university would operate at night time when regular classes have ended, and when more staid citizens retired to bed. If it seems cruel to suggest a double shift for students some of us will recall that in our own student days we would sit up until the middle of the night conducting our bull sessions. Instead of a mere anti-calendar students might develop a shadowcalendar with at least two types of courses. The first might be a re-run of existing Fourses in which students could reorganize the subject matter and experiment with different ways of inquiry and learning. The second might be skeleton courses on problems\ and issues currently not dealt with in the university. Such courses would deal not only with problems of human societies, including our own, but with the very stuff of-the sociology of the university. If this is done well, I suspect that there will be some curious professors who will sneak away from their night-time reading or even out of their warm beds to watch you cultivate your intellectual gardens. This recommendation for a shadow university may have little merit in itself; it may not be workable for technical reasons; if workable ity may be unattractive to students; if attractive and workable, it may be incapable of fostering the kind of awareness within and among publics in the university whereby social reconstruction would be made possible. What I have sought to do with this recommendation for student action is to draw attention both to the possibility and the necessity for making social inventions that will lead to responsible critique and to energetic reconstruction. r

friday,

february

14, 7969

(9:431

783

3

1


Do you think athletics should be controlled a committee of students and aciministration?

by

Gail Robertson

Bill Sweet

Sandy

kinesology

civil 3A

arts 3

engineering 1B

Yes !

The students should control them completely ; unless the administration wants to start it’s own football team.

I really

16

Definitely-the stu dents should have a say in the athletics program.

!

Edwards

don’t give

%

\ H

Marvis Ball

Uwe Sehmrau recreation

I 0

Joanne

Murray

Intramurally-yes Intercollegiately -no, administration only.

Athletics should be run by the stu-

.

Jane Schneider

arts 1

math 2

1B

arts 1

Yes Definitely!

Isn’t it already?

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Address letters to Feedback, The Chevron, U of W. Be concise. The Chevron reserves the right to shorten letters Those typed (double-spaced) get priority. Sign it - name, course, year, telephone. For legal reasons unsigned letters cannot be published. A pseudonym will be printed if you have a good reason.

feedback Does what

Bergsmu fek students, about those meetings?

What has happened to the general meetings of our Student Federation? Mr. Bergsma seems to fear bringing into the open the fine leadership abilities which his voters realized in him when they put him into office. It seems the engineering buildings being John’s “happy hunting grounds’ ’ have been burdened with the load of taking these meetings as a regular occurrence. How about moving these meetings back where they should be held, the campus center, where everyone can have a look at what Bergsma and his “government” are doing. I hope that hiding away in a small room in the engineering does represent building not Bergsma’s fear of bringing our student government to the people. With the diplomatic capabilities posessed by our noble leader, he should not fear direct questioning from an audience, or should he? Come on John, give us a sample of your diplomatic and political technique. You’ve nothing to fear except a vote of non-confidence. And who would try to do a silly thing like that? PETER

Peterboro u basic

DESROCHES arts 1

strikers lucked undefstancfing-

A couple of weeks ago I went with a busload of University of Waterloo students to Peterborough to try to get an unbiased slant on the Examiner newspaper strike. -Overlooking the cold, the strike was quite an enjoyable experience. People from assorted unions. specially from Peterborough and Toronto added glamor by singing lovely little ditties such as “We shall overthrow ( the factory 1,” and “We shall seize the plant,” to the familiar tunes of olden. golden demonstrationpeace-victory songs. Asked why assisting the strike, students pertly responded with slogans from the . Acme Protest Handbook. such as “we students identify with the worker”. Very noble-keep this in mind upon graduation. Asked why striking, guildsmen responded with tones of cold hatred for Lord Thompson of Fleet and his capitalist policies of which they knew‘ little. Actually, the strike began within two days of Thompson’s take-over-meaning that any editorial policy deterioration cannot be attributed directly to Thompson (as is claimed 1. After weighing the events of the day, I am left with the conclusion that the guildsmen are on strike because they want security. (They are only interested in the newly established Peterborough Free Press as a strike weapon and don’t give a damn for its possible growth. ) They want a nontransferrence clause (a valid claim) but are on strike mainly because they want the little green papers that only the government is allowed to print. As for the students many lacked the wisdom to explain their presence. After student withdrawal

from the strike, the Chevron quoted Andy Wernick as saying that the students withdrew because they felt that they were being used by the Guild. But-wasn’t that the idea? MIKE

FASS where

really ure

sad new

VOLKER eng 2A

news, ideas?

There are times when it’s a relief to know that a performance is meant only for “home” consumption. I’m quite relieved that most of the FASS audience Thursday night consisted of students, faculty and staff-so we can keep the sad news to ourselves. It seems incredible that stude/tts ( of all people! ) would help put together such a square collection of jokes, reminiscent of the Rotary Club Follies of the 1940’s. Is this the wave of the future? Are we so devoid of originality that we must steal directly, without the slightest subtlety, from LaughIn? And whose idea was it to include a kindergarten recitation about a baby about to be born? I kept waiting for the joke-but it got more lugubrious by the minute! And whose idea was the long, bad pun on deodorants? Some of the most exciting, new ideas are coming out of the universities, and particularly out of this one. Wasn’t there one good writer on the fass committee? Or was he out-voted? MURIEL

Clothes don’t make man, well u little

DeGRE

the

Last Friday’s Chevron reported that the students at St. Clair College at Windsor had voted in favour of keeping their shirt and tie image. I don’t think that shirt and tie are needed, but I have to agree with their view that appearance -makes a difference. We all know that clothes don’t make the man, but they do contrih!lte in a large way to the impression the man makes. It occurs to me that it wouldn’t hurt U. of W. to have a general clean-up. There are too many slovenly people on this campus! Most of these people think of themselves as reformers, radicals or hippies, and since they reject many traditional values they believe neatness is not important either-consequently they have helped to turn the campus centre into a slum area. Do these people not realize that their slovenly appearance and habits are offensive to others? Do they not realize that their which is often very message, worthwhile, is lost because they refuse to conform to the standards of dress and cleanliness that most people accept? To these intellectual slobs, I suggest that you start taking better care of public areas like the Campus Centre and the coffee shops ; and that you get rid of your costumes beasties you around. If you cate with the “the system”

and whatever wee may be carrying want to communiaverage victim of here on the campus

or in the real world outside, not being so revulsive to him. DEREK

A community then all points

try

BROWN arts 1

of scholars, of view

The january 28 issue of the Chevron notes that several professors are giving leftist\ and radical courses. I have heard a number of people in this university say, including socalled leftists and radicals, that the university should become a true community of scholars. Who can argue with such a noble goal? Since this search for truth would, I assume, require dialog and debate on all points of view, I wonder if the Chevron would inform its readers about the courses on conservatism. When and if we achieve such .dialogue with courses on both radicalism and conservatism, perhaps the graduates of either stream can find employment with the major political parties of this country. Those who graduate with courses in both areas, in a state of confusion, can perhaps join the ranks of the liberal mass. RALPH HAAS associate professor civil eng Fresh planners challenge engineers to boat-face

I want to speak for my fellow select 125 first year planners. Upon completing our 7-9pm labs thursday evenings, we have crawled over to the pub for the past two weeks only to find no booze at all or discrimination by age. The cause for these handed tactics definitely the Engineering Society fearful of loosing’ their drinking identity to the coming superior “frosh“ ners.

underrests in who are national up and plan-

Come on plumbers, grow upillegal tactics are used only by the CIA and the Canadian immigration. Let’s hope we can meet you at the pub next time and who knows, we might even challenge you to an ‘urban sprawl’, (that’s a boat race in your jargon). MICHAEL

Month where

In dents ment yellow

EVERARD planning 1

o/d news useless, is our Chevron?

the envelope outgoing stureceive from the departof co-ordination is a small card.

This card states that it must be returned with our off-campus addresses if we wish to receive the Chevron and other assorted and minor correspondences sent out by the university, such as our marks. We sent in our cards on jan. 6 but we have yet to receive a single Chevron and any mail we .have received has been rerouted from our home addresses. We have paid our fees that include the subscription price of the Chevron but somehow the news is a little less thrilling when its a month old. It is really much more convenient to find out where and

when to buy hockey tickets, or that the Vanilla Fudge concert was moved from Saturday to thursday before these things happen. The next time the university puts out a blurb on how wonderful the co-op plan is perhaps they should include a small note on how out term students are usually isolated from the on-campus activities as soon as they get 15 miles from the campus. And the next time uncle Stewart starts to bitch about the inefficient administration maybe he could take a look at his own wonderful subscription service. In conclusion we would like to make one small request: get your ass on the move, we want to get the paper before we come back to campus. TOM SAYER PAUL PAULIN them. 3A

Mail to out term students was delayer in January due to a computer breakdown. The Chevron is dependent at all times upon the computer for its mailing labels and on the post office to get the bundles moving as soon as they are delivered. Foulups in both areas are common: Given that the labels have been printed friday’s Chevron is always at the post office by Monday. The computer is of course dependent upon the students to report their out term addresses. Foul-ups there also seem to be very common. -the lettitor German left-wing

SDS produces Vuehfefs”

Do you really know what guy you invited. 3 Your last article

“German youth in revolt” needs some additional remarks. At first a correction : it is a common error to think SDS stands for “Students for a Democratic Society”. The German SDS stands for “Sozialistischer Deutscher Studentenbund’ ’ (Socialistic Federation of German Students). When I asked Mr. Wolff in the discussion after his speech: why SDS avoids political involvement, such as the running of candidates, he * made quite clear that SDS doesn’t accept democratic rules. They want to destroy the democratic system and replace it by what? The arrogance of some of the SDS leaders, who liked to be called by their disciples, “Fuehrer” reminds me very well of the past. What Mr. Wolff didn’t make quite clear was that there are a lot of German radical students who split from SDS because of criticism againt the leadership of some of those “Fuehrers”. The lack of support among workers is not due to the fact that there is no working class tradition in West Germany right now, in France and Italy fascism destroyed the working class system even more and nevertheless French students managed to bring masses into the streets, but to the very fact that SDS leaders are arrogant and talk down to workers. If you ever visited Europe you will find that the borders between the classes are more distinct in West Germany than in Canada and perhaps you will understand what I mean by the word “arrogant” ! From the fact that you interpreted the meaning SDS wrongly, friday,

-

I learned that you possibly didn’t know what kind of a radical “Fuehrer” you invited to visit this university! BERND THAMM grad civil Re-boiled iock-hut

linseed oil, brain wave

One of the rare pleasures of life is seeing good 01‘ UniWat produce another world shaking revolutionary first. This time the physed types bring us the honor. I could be wrong; it might be our most devoted physical-plant planners. Case in point: after spending _ random hundreds of dollars covering the inside of the sauna in the new recreation center with aromatic cedar, some brilliant member of the jock-hut establishment decided it would be cute to coat the cedar with linseed oil. Ah! ! ! ! the glorious scent of boiled linseed oil in the process of a second boiling. Can anything go right with that building. TOM ASHMAN eng’ cum arts iv Ruling affluent

elite hypocritical decry welfare

I think your article on ‘social science was quite well put. On feb 6 I was walking past an insurance building in Waterloo. I passed a long line of Cadillacs, all black and each with a chauffeur in his spotless uniform standing by the door. ’ That evening I heard on the news what was said by one of those responsible for this vulgar display of ,affluence. A man was putting forth the proposition that welfare payments were one of the reasons for the governments financial problems. This same man grew rich by methods ~bordering on extortion. That is, by’ means of advertising he made people aware of their insecurity so that they would buy more insurance. People must be made to see poverty, and fear it, so they will buy more insurance. Welfare payments are only wasted on food and clothing, anyway. The government should not compete with the security offered by insurance companies. Insurance companies need people’s money so they can make tax free capital gains. Any man with a black cadiliac and chauffeur will tell you this. The people should be taxed to a maximum however. This brings them closer to poverty, increases their insecurity so they will buy more insurance. Why do sociologists overlook the hypocrisy of the ruling elite? Are they pawns of those who hand them a paycheck? BILL MCKAY Arts I FASS chorus vefy but script hampers

poised them

Last week Larry Burko wrote an article concerning FASS nite. Unfortunately, because he was so repulsed by show as a whole he left out mentioning the chorus. This group did a fantastic job considering the material they had to work with. Choreography and poise made up for the dull lyrics. Hopefully the writing will improve for next year so that the people who work so hard to put on a good show won’t be impeded by a lousy script. JIM DETENBECK civil 3A february

14, 7969 (9:43)

785

33


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workers, soviets, if one can still use the term and does not think of what actually happened to the Soviets; some kind of what I would like to call organized spontaneity. Let me come to the summary of the perspectives for the New Left. I believe, and this is not a confession of faith, I think this is at least to a great extent based on what you may call an analysis of the facts. I believe that the New Left today is the only hope we have. Its task-to prepare itself and the others, not to wait or to prepare today, yesterday and tomorrow, in thought and in action, morally and politically for the time when the aggravating ’ conflicts of corporate capitalism dissolve its repressive cobesion and open a space where the real work for libertarian socialism can begin. The prospects for the next year, the prospects for the New Left are good if the New Left can only sustain its present activity. There are always periods of regression. No movement can progress at the same pace; sustaining our activity would already be

a success.


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