Issuu on Google+

‘I’m disappointed’

hIand

-

acclaimed Stephen W. Ireland has been acclaimed president of theFederation of Students for 1966-67. When nominations closed‘ at five o’clock Wednesday’ MrJrelandwas the only nominee. More than half thestudents asked in an informal survey weren’t even aware of nominations in spite of ____-----------------Unanimity EditQrial: ------------------_-I__

or indifference? page 15 -

be, he said. Six thousand students and some of the braver faculty are not content with the decisions of the absentee-landlord board of governors . “Obviously,” he said, “theimpetus for charge is not going to come from the administration, and the faculty seem incapable of moving as a group. That leaves us.‘* What is needed first is “a decision on the part of faculty and students to take hold of ourselves, of our common and individualintellectual goals’ and determine what sort of community is needed to sustain those goals,” he said. “Then we must begin to act as that responsible community, and then bring about the changes in the present structure of university government to allow the community of scholars to thrive, both as a place of freedom and a place of relevance, ..* ‘“We’ve Rot to become invplved

frontpage notices in the last twoissues of the paper. Otliers Seemed entirely indifferent and only two or three expressed any real interest in the &s&s. At one point rumors said Neil Amason, a grad math student, was also considering running. Mr,Arnason said Wednesday night therewas no basis to the rumors. “I’d like to know who started them. I might not even be here next year--at least not as a student.” Ireland is a third-year honors English student, a Village resident and vice-president of the Federadon this year. In a prepared statement the president-elect said hehadhopedanelection campaign would be fought on the basis of principles rather than personalities’ on “important educational issues rather than bread- --m and-circus trivia.“’ “Campaigns run on any other basis, campaigns merely within the existing order of things mean we are in fact supporting the principle of the status quo”’ he said. “‘I don’t.” ~ There is no one who feels this university is everything that it could

prey in the process of evaluating anddetiding policy right from the classroom to the board andsenatechamber .” Issues he mentioned were restrictive residence rules, bookstore prices, who controls the campus center ’ food services, athletic buildings for general use and athletic fees. Mr. Ireland expressed the hope that the new Student Council will not be a debating society going until all hours of the morning, but a forum for thought and action. He summed up by saying, “Iwant to work with a Council which is dedicated to change, a Council which will become relevant to the individual student because it is working with him, a Council which can see over the petty issues and bickering and is willing to do some work on the important issue: the quality and direction of educati?n at the uriiversity of Waterloo.”

Standina room only for stuient of ‘76

For sale: ane pair of knees (along with anything attached). Buy them at fhe s1ai.e auction Thursday. If you think the guy who laid out this page likes knees -you’re right.

Watson

quiet

Will Patrick Watson be the next president of the CBC ? Is he the “brilliant rising star” that State Secretary Judy LaMarsh thinks Radio-Canada needs at its helm? When Miss LaMarsh said last week on the national television program ‘Twenty million questions’ that the CBC ‘s next president should concentrate on programming rather than developing more broadcasting facilities, that he must be “with it”, that he should be “a man of 36 or 38 or thereabouts”--“for instance, one of the people who has worked in the CBC for quite a long time and recently came back”-was she talking about Patrick Watson? Well, the Chevron asked him, “She hasn’t said anything to me,”

on possible

he replied. Mr. Watson, 36, was dropped as a CBC producer and co-host of ‘This hour has seven days’ last -------___________---Interview with Watson: page 6 ---------________ --___ springamid a national controversy. He has returned--free-lance-to produce a 13-week series on Russia 50 years after the revolution . CBC-TV will broadcast the second of these programs Sunday at 12:30 noon. He is also serving as part-time professor in the U of W politicalscience department. Canadian Press reports of the television show speculated that Miss LaMarsh had Watson in mind. “I think they hardly deserve com-

TORONTO (CUP)--Student enrolment at Canadian universities and colleges may exceed the half-m’llion mark by 1976. Dr. Edward Sheffield’ professor of higher education at the University of Toronto’ predicted thefigure in an enrollrnefit projection of fulltime students in Canada. The figure represents an increase of about 170 percent over the number of students enrolled in 1965. But there may be even more students around IO years from now.

CBC iob ment. They’re just rumors,” he said. He was asked if he would accept the post if it were offered him. “That’s the correct nex t question,” he replied-- “and the correct response would be that I wouldanswer that when an offer is made. “I would of course have to think seriously about it,” he said with a less-correct gleam in his eye. Miss LaMarsh’s ability to make statements off the top of her head was one of her most charming attributes, he said. Mr. Watson has known Miss LaMarsh since she first went to Ottawa as an MP, he said. “We’re personal friends--on a first-name basis, but not close friends. Once or twice a year we have a friendly drink.

The new student president, Steve Ireland, considers thorny issues which he will face in the coming year. claimed Wednesday. lie was the only condidite.

one of the many Ireland was ac-


Fraser

Simon

paper

incorporates

‘?‘his move will put the P&kina more autonomous position and allow it to develop freely,” said Barry J. Rust, national secretary of Canadian University Press, when he learned of the incorporation.

BURNABY (CUP)--The Peak, student newspaper at Simon Fraser University, Game the first Canadian campus newspaper to receive legal recognition when it was incorporated recently as a society.

But incorporation also carries number of legal obligations.

a

The Peak can also be sued under the societies Act of British Cohnbia .

Freshmen

Early admissiOns Will be giV=UJ Ontario grade-13 students next year. me a&-&&xx will be based on teachers’ and principals’ rer cornmen&tions, grade-12 averages and

1367 Summer Employment Program -SOCIAL-ECONOMIC WITH THE FEDERAL

to be accepted

DISCIPLINESCIVIL SERVICE

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new u&ersity admission exams, AU qualified students wfll know in June if they’ve been admitted but must write final exams. AU other students will be accepted on a regular basis.

OTTAWA Thinking of a career? Try us out for the summer!

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I QUALIFICATIONS: 1) You must be specializing in one of the following: Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology, Industrial Relations, Business Administration, Commerce, Economics, Statistics, Social Work, History, Home Economics or Library Science. 2) You must be enrolled in an honours program and entering the final year of this program in the fall of 196’7, or continuing studies at the postgraduate level. ’ SAL ARIES: a month depending on academic qualifications and previous work $350-$610 in exexperience. Most positions are in Ottawa, and return travel expenses cess of $30 will be paid. APPLICATION FORMS: Available at your Placement OfficeComplete and return to the Civil Service Commission of Canada, Ottawa 4, NOT LATER than January 31, 1967.

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On homecoming weekend, student.s who stayed at the Continental Motel, in Kitchener, -were complimented by D.E. Stager: “We wish to cornmeAd the conduct Of . ihOS e_ students. They were exuberant but neither boisterous nor .destiuctive. ??his caliber of student will always be welcome at the Continental:* Provost Scott was delighted to receive these two letters after all the complaints he has beensubjected to this year.

FRIDAY and SATURDAY - 8:‘30 p.m. - Theater of SATURDAY - 2:00 p.m. _ the Arts Performing Arts Series: “ST. JOAN” by G. B. Shaw. Michigan State Players.

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Along with numerous Compaq about student behaviorthis Y-r&e office of the provost received two letters complimenting student be havior . Both were from motel owners who had U of W students as guests, Goldie M. Silva,manager of Johnny% Dorado Motel in Ft. Lauderdale Florida, wrotei “Mel Ternan and Raymond McBeth (engineering 3) are a credit to your university and I am looking forward to having them visit me again. **

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on festival

There will be four speakers in next: years lecture series. Three of them are John Ciardi, Sidney Katz, and Dr. Murray Banks. No name has been chosen for the series. The drama club’s constitution has‘ been drawn up. The executive is Mike Ness, president; Tom Britten, vice-president; SandraPat Willis, secretary-treasurer.

Next fall’s arts festival was the main topic at the last creative arts board meeting. Included in the entertainment will be a Bach wncert, Sean O’Casey*s ‘Pictures in the hallway’ and harpsichordist Fernando Valenti. A theme for the festival was discussed buta decision was postponed until next meeting.

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Sheppard ,will try to crtmhmeeting Student president Michael Sheppard has vowed to attend Thursday’s meeting of the board of governors in spite of university president J. G. Hagey’s protests. In a letter to Mr. Sheppard January 11, President Hagey claimed the student president’s plan to attend the board meeting with other Council members and the student press could jeopardize the work of the senate study committee on un,iversity government. This committee, which has three student representatives, formed last term to study the Duff-Be&&l report on university government in Canada and to “bring forward proposals for any desirablereforms of the existing structure of government at theuniversity of WaterlOo*‘. Pr e&dent Hagey added that he and Carl Pollock, chairman of the board of governors, felt that any “arbitrary decision on the part of the student federation to change board

Chev’ron regrets

JaneStorey is one of the many attractive girls who will be up for sale when the GraduateSociety ;‘ts annual slave auction Thursday night at 8. The scene of the frolic will be the outstudent hall at the Village. Other examples of the fare can be found throughout the paper.

holds dining

Karate keepi Jane safe from masters but will other slave gikfare as well by Eva Mayer Chevron

staff

Girls for sale! The boys may be completely in favor of the idea but what do the slaves-to-be think? ‘Well...1 hate to think about it,*’ replied Jane Storey, phys-ed and English 2, when questioned whether she had any fears. Nineteen-yearold Jane is a S7*‘blue-eyed blonde. She enjoys most athletics and is acquainted with the fine art of karate. ‘T can chop any guy down-- as long as I get him by surprise, anyway*‘, she warned prospective buyers. Jane was volunteered for the job. She accepted becauseshe just couldn’t turn down charity. “I@ll try to give the guys their money% worth-within limits, of course. I can just see myself cleaning up 45 rooms.

“Actually I’m terrified! I heard about some of the things that happaed to the girls last year. But if I get out of this the same way I went into it, I?ll be happy.” Another slave-to-be thinks there may be a great deal in store for her. *‘I can see myself being a general housemaid,” prophesies Martha Brook, “although SOME OTHER THINGS have entered my mind. Of course it all depends on who buys the slave. If he knows her well, God only knows what would happen. ‘&But I heard that once the boys bought the girls last year, they didn’t know what to do with them&me of them have you make cups and cups of coffee.What scaresmemost is parading around in front of the other people.*’ , This seems to be the greatest fear of most of the girls. The long-ago

‘Self -respect The cooperative residence “respects a person as the creator of his own environment,” said Dr. Howard Adelman, a writer andsupporter of the co-op idea. He was speaking at a teach-in on the philosophy, and functions of university residences at Hammerskjold House Saturday. The 30 peoplepresent were treated to six speakers. During the morning session Dr. Howard Adelman spoke on the ideals and purposes of a co-op. Dr. Ron Eydt, warden of the Village, gave a parallel talk on university residences. Dr. Adelman criticized university residences as only interested in students “getting along with one another . ..they just don’t want fights .” Dr. Eydt felt that the university residence “should offer more than life in the YMCA.” He stated that

idea of a &ive--lugging rocks and being beaten--seems to have been forgotten. These slaves haveheard from some of those of the past that they probal5ly will be taken dining and dancing by their masters. Another, Kerry Thompson, says: ‘Xnowing the guys around here... I can imagine what might happen, l..~

+%.a-

1 r),.n

herra

+M

The Chevron regrets any misunders tandings arising from the story “Hagey censure beaten” in the December 9 issue. The stand of the various participants in the faculty salary fracas was misinterpreted. New salary arrangements have e-ted annual increases inprofeSsors’ salaries. Previouslyaprof received a raise of $300 for every year he taught. He could also get merit pay--an additional raise-at the discretion of his superiors. The annual increments have now been replaced totally by merit raiseS. Dr. Allan Nelson’s objection to the change was that nobody ever had to tell the prof why he was being denied a salary increase while a colleague got a hefty raise, The Chevron apologizes to Dr. Nelson and anyone else who suffered undue embarrassment as a result of this misunderstanding.

of governors procedure” would be interpreted as lack of respect for the committee. President Sheppard contends that the Federation of Students is not trying to alter board procedure. He stated it is impossible to change the structure of the board without first revealing its operations to the student body. ’ Furthermore, when the committee submits its report to the board of governors it will be debated in a closed meeting. How will the students determine what decisions and policies will r-esult from the report and the effect they will have, if the board insists on maintaining the present policy of closed meetings, Mr. Sheppard stressed. Contrary to a previous report in daily newspapers, Mr. Sheppard said that there is little likelihood of an organized student strike to support Council demands for an open-door policy for board of governors meetings. a He forcasts that initial Council action in its campaign to gain entrance to board meetings will take the form of sober debate and negotiation with the board. He warns that Council will not accept compromise solutions. Student observers should be allowed at all board meetings, headded. It was also stated that a student strike would be contemplated if all other methods fail. In a letter to Mr. Pollock, Mr. Sheppard said student representatives will attend the next meeting of the board of governors. Thebasis for the decision to attempt to gain admission to the board meetings is a motion passed by Council on November 14,1966. The motion calls for the governing ‘body of the university to make its decisions in a democratically open manner. This policy statement of Council is an extension of a resolution passed at the annual congress of the Canadian Union of Students in September.

t*

Hilda Abt, English 3, can envision herself pulling her master around in a jinrikisha, just like the exotic rum ad in ‘Playboy*. These are some of the girls who will go to the highest bidder at the slave auction Thursday night at 8 in the Village non-resident dining hall. The auction, which is organized by the Graduate Student Society, will forward all proceeds to World University Service.

in comop’

close contact with members of the faculty in the residence would ensure that “what we do, and what we are taught are not two separate aspects.” Realizing that “Co-0p involves students in active participation,” Dr. E ydt felt that some students do not want to participate in residence life. Prof. William Scott, provost for student affairs, started off the afternoon with the sociology of the co-op. He said, “‘We are being overwhelmed by a world of bureaucracy.” He felt that large groups should be decentralized. “The ideal residence is built in social modules which will not -be in excess of six, seven or eight.” Glen Greer spoke on Rochdale College, a co-op residence piesently under construction on the U

of Toronto campus. Due to cost and availability of land Rochdale is designed as a highrise complex. John Thurston, a U of W student, outlined plans for Waterloo Co-op expansion. The present plans call for housing for married students, graduate students and facultymembers across University Avenue. The type of buildings might be town \ houses or other such units. Single undergraduate accommodations will also be provided but the emphasis is on married and graduate students. These plans would replace those tentatively made by the university for the land across Columbia Street. Carleton Co-op was represented by Jim Russell. He criticized our university for using the Co-op for its own expansion purposes. The audience and speakers split into discussion groups for an hour.

RichardNeedham

(second

from left)

discusses freedom

Needham-for Richard Needham-Prof. bate on education Co-op first)

at the Co-op.

freedom

Seeley de(Or: another

Needham for freedom--Seeley-oh, really/ Seeley - discipline--NeedhamSummerhill system Classes too large --teachers not dedicated enough--parents too stupid to realize the uselessness of the present system--creative thought on the part of students repressed

on all formal education levelsalso, in ‘LIFE * (i.e., business)-hecklers never got off the ground, because Needham wasnrt as idiotic as the last time he visited our fair city--many intelligent questions-answers, yes, but we already knew them--no solutions--not even many suggestions, least of all from Seel~ ey, who seems to be immersed in a very thick solution of pessimism-oh, well, it was a session in communications .-

Friday,

January

13, 1967 (7:21)

3


Get entertainment atSunday:piano

fecital

_L

will appreciate this music as art as well as good entertainment. Gifford is a four&year honours physics student of this university who has been studying piano for 18 of his 22 years. He stopped formal instruction three years ago and h& given five complete solo recitals in the past four years. His home isin Waterloo.

Gifford Toole hopes to stimulate intellectually as well ‘as to entertain those who attend + piano recital in the Theater of the Arts on Sunday. Although he will present a.program of easily recognizable romantic

Jazz concert

plus

music of the nineteenth ten-

Gifford

Chevron

(with one exception--the Moonlight Sonata), he hopes his audience

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reviewed

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If one were this book, one that there are ence-fiction.

ON -STUDENT

744-4782 MEAL

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to believe the tQ.le of would be led to believe people who hate sciIf this is the case, it

It is apparentthattheeditor,Terry Carr has attempted to, present the reader with a broad range of story types. In doing so he has

HOUSE

Faclaris Waterloo

missed some obvious choices and made some n&takes. Sciewe-ficti& a in order to appeal to the general reader, has to sound sensible. Th& science-fictionwriter posits an idea, such as ‘timetravel. In this particular case, the author may belong to one of two schools.

Martin

staff

is probably because people have been reading collections like this.

HW &

- tricky parts yet still pretended to hently gone into their arrangements. use his feet,. ,Tsk, tsk. There was quite a bit more from a The audience seemed bored with technical aspect than a steady 4/4 their long tunes (Ifeelasleepduring beat or a blues progression. ‘Call me’). After all,. you can only As exhibited especially in ‘Martake so much swing. Examples of h’4 one found that Greg is not a their numbers were: ‘Hard day’s ’ drummer but. a percussionist. Davilight’, ‘Shadow of your smile’, id certainly is developing technique, ‘Mr. Sandman’ and ‘Winchester Cayet I &ink those present wouldhave thedral’, preferred more meoldic improviThe Greg Herring Trio,featuring ZadoIl. Dave McCallen on piano, Roman As for. Roman, he filled in well, Orenchuk on bass guitar and Greg yet I am sure at times thatIdetect.on drums, played fairly light jazz ed some rasp from his strings. All reminiscent of the Ahmad Jamal three members are in courses at style. It was obvious thatthis group theUof W. has just taken the initial plunge The group needs plenty of pracinto jazz. Otherwise they wouldn’t tice. but they have the feeling for what jazz is all about. Above all, have made the mistakes they did. However, a lot of work had evithey weren’t noisy.

You might hate scienceltiction’ after reading this collection

service

I’ w the &mm

I

will present

Chevron

and

RESTAURANT

staff

arts theater might have been called “You too can have fun on a Hammond organ*‘. The George Kadwell Trio (George sure looks like a Hammond dealer) leaned noi towards jazz but towards loud, up-tempo, bouncy pop music. Did you ever notice how a good trombone (Larry Crawford’s)’ could be drowned out by someone’s heavy foot on an organ? Furthermore, all that fancy footwork you saw on thepedals was fake half of the time. He switched from pPda.ls to the lower manual for the

a series of blues workshops cornmencing Thursday at 12:l5 inP150. There will be five tiorkshops in all, tracing the development of blue5 from their earliest origins to the present. Such fields as- gospel, bluegrass, rhythm-and-blues and rock-androll will be presented. Chairm& of the workshops will be Frank Bialystok, history 2, who has done extensive research in the

Toole

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Despite the hlling as a &zz concert, Sunday’s performance in, the

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Edna Staebler’s book ‘Sauerkraut and eaterprise’is beingpublishedas the Centennial project: of the Kitchener-W aterloo University Women’s Club. In the book, which tells the story of Waterloo County, the author has reviewed and expanded five articles about the area which wereoriginally published in Ma&an’s magazine. Kitchener and Waterloo consider themselves the finest twin cities ever raised on sauerkraut andenterprise. K-W boasts that it is one of the most highly industrialized communities inCanada,withtwouniversities and the head offices of six insurance companies.

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says that travellers to thepast could not affect the future without cone siderable effort (a nuclear weapon for instanCe). In choosing a story from the first school (Ray Bradbury’s ‘A iound of thunder*) the editor has chosen a story designed not to appeal the non-scientific. Only two stories come close to having that certain emotional appeal that has been present in muchof the best science-fiction. The first is Arthur C. Clarke% ?t’he star’, one of the most beautiful science-fiction stories ever written and a deserved Hugo winner. The second is ‘In hiding*, the moving story of a mutated boy with a fantastic IQ who is all alone. The only fault of including this story is that it is far too long for a collecdon of this size. The editor also wastes space by including two stories too short to have any impact. Neither ‘The weapon’ or ‘Not with a bang’ are of outstanding literary merit. The story by He&in ‘The year of the @ckpo? is not one of his better pieces. The collection is marred by the absence of such authors as Simak, deCamp, Laumer and Mack Reynolds. I certainly would not recommend this collection of ten-year-old storm ies.

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Gallery paintings philosophy “I hope to institute a series of exhibitions of the works of faculty, staff, and students. We have in our university community a number of excellent artists, both amateur and professional, said Nancy-Lou Pat: terson, director of art. Paintings by Prof. R. J. C. Burgener of the philosophy department are now showing in the lobby of the arts lecture building. “Quite often these people do not exhibit generally, and it will be very interesting to make their work available to viewers. “This has been possible before now in drama and music, for memt bers of the university frequently participate in these forms of expression. Wehope tomakethesame opportunity available in art,” she said. - The oils of Prof. Burgener * are remarkable for their luminous color and for their metaphysical syrnbolism. The artist has accompanied the exhibition with comtients of his own to make the meaning clear. His most recent work, done during his year in England at Oxford University, contains several paintings based upon children’s drawings . ‘“These paintings combine really painterly brushwork with exquisite control of the coloring, and show the most recent development of an artist for whom his work is genuinely a work of love,*’ said h4r.s. Patterson. Works of printmaking and textile crafts, by Gilda Hiuterreiter , a scheduled exhibition, are also on display on campus, in the gallery of the arts theater. The forms of Gilda Hinterreiter ‘S stitchery and fabric collages are

displays by prof drawn from the organic world, especially from plant forms. She uses the same subject matter in all the media she chooses. Her abstraction is of the type the dictionary defines as “a composition suggested by a concrete object or organic figure which is transformed into a non-representational design ,with r ecognizable elements .‘* Most unusual is her use of textile media, including stitchery. She won the 1966 American craftsman award for a wall-hanging in this medium. Gilda Hinterreiter is assistant professor of art at Kent State University in Ohio. An austrian by birth, she came to NorthAmericain the 54s, and has taught in bothcanada and the United States. She considers her graphics to be %tellectual*‘, making use of the “classical’* aspect of modern art, while turning to the physical pleasures of working in textiles as a part of the 8‘romantics’ aspect. This double division of modern art is often used by critics to explain contradictory tendencies in the choice of forms, whether very severe and exacting or very free and loose. Embroidery and textile work have formed major art forms at many times and places in art history and there is a renewed interest in it today among craftsmen. The term “stichery” is used when the artist works to his own original design without regard to the traditional or classical stitches except where they serve his purpose. This Hinterreiter showing will say until Mmm-y 5, that of Professor Burgener until the end of January.

Prints by Gilda H in terreiter professor R. J. C. Burgener

(above) displays

are his

hanging in the Theater “of the Arts gallery. Philosophy oils (below) in the foyer of the arts lecture building.

1967 (7:21)


Televised

Parliament

would

be ‘pithy,

right

to the

point’

On the hotseat: Patrick Watson by John It seems to me that ‘Seven days’ was conceived as a sort of sensationalist program, going off the beaten track and looking for something different. It was accused of becoming too subjective in its treatment of many cases (the Stephen Truscott case for example). Do you feel that this criticism was warran ted? No. Why?

Well, you better it was warranted.

tell me why you think

I’m not saying that it was warranted. Many peopl‘e connected with the CBC said that this subjectiveness was bad. For example, LaPierre’s wiping a tear from his eye after the interview with Mrs. Truscott was supposed to have been a bad piece of jcyrnalism. I thought it was quite an effective way to end the interview.

Well, tripes, you know, the thing is that particular piece was not a deliberate piece of showbiz. No, I realize live,

this on camera?

now.

Was this

all done

That particular episode was. Theinterview with Mrs. Tr uscott had been filmed the night before in Arnprior and was late getting to us and LaPierre didn’t see it until we went on the air. And he was deeply moved by it. And so what you were witnessing was a genuine event, it wasn’t anybody acting or masquerading or trying to make a comment, it was simply the reaction of a sensitive person. Currently, the have programs ‘Seven days’. Any comments?

CBC with

and the CTV both formats similar to

I thought ‘W-5’ got off to a promising start but didn’t fulfil3 its promise. Comments about it are unfair insofar as I liaven’t seen it lately and don’t know whether they have been able to build. I thought that oftentimes it was pretty ingenious and showed a lot of journalistic initiative but that it was kind of heavy handed and humorless, styleless, and imitative, and that its on-camera people were not totally creditable, But, I guess, had it been the only public affairs show on the air at that hour, I would have continued to watch it with a good deal of interest to see what it would come up with. ‘Sunday’ then began and one had obvious reasons to see what ‘Sunday’ was doing. I thought its opening program pretty shaky, and uncertain. I thought its second program an enormous improvement--particularly the feature on sex-education was brilliant and just about as good a piece of television as you can have. Its third edition was good, a little strange--there seems to be a little re-orientation of the overall style going on here but I think it is extremely promising. After another two or three weeks we ought to be able to say, “Yes, it has made it*‘, or “No, it hasn’t .” Ilow did you come defunct ‘SelTen days’ LaPiefle?

to co-host the nowprogram wtth Laurier

Douglas Leiterman and I first planned a co-production in 1962 and had gotten our plans in shape rather late, and got them to the network after the schedule for the following year (the 63-64 season) had been made up. When we began to develop the ‘Seven days’ idea, I was doing a fair amount of interviewing and other on-camera work, and Leiterman and I decided that the kind of partnership that we wanted would be one in which I was on camera and he was behind the s cenes . We would share equally the editorial responsibiJ.ities of what went into the show, but he would be primarily functioning as a producer -editor and I as a host-interviewer-producer-editor. It was in these terms that we first proposed the program to the CBC and the CBC 6

The CHEVRON

Beamish said, “Yes, we think it’s a superb idea. However we don’t feel the CBC is ready yet for the kind of personal journalism that you are proposing and we would like you to find somebody else to do the on-camera work or at least to be the host.” Through the summer of 1964 we auditioned or thought about severalhundredpeople to host the show and ultimately settled on the combination of the late John Drainie and Laurier LaPierre. It was a combination that worked out quite well and we were really pleased with it. But we still had the feeling that thepeople who were presenting the show on camera should be as fully involved as possible and still felt that the original plan of having me on camera was worth pursuing. So with those things in rnind, it just seemed very sensible to come back to the corporation and propose that I go on camera, take over the ‘Document* film series as executive producer, removing that from the people who were producing ‘Seven days’-because the year before, Leiterman and I had been producers of both ‘Document’ and ‘Seven days’, and so split things up. And the corporation ‘now decided that this was acceptable to them. YOU have

a number of outside What are some of your hobbies?

interests.

I don’t have a great many hobbies. Recently, the one that has become almost obsessive with me is flying. I got my pilot’s license this summer and I’ve found flying to be very intoxicating and theraputic. You do a lot of flying, then? Ye-s. I fly at least an hour a week and sometimes more. And because I travel a fair amount, 15an make practical use ofthis and fly to speaking engagements or involvements in broadcasting, 0:’ whatever. Why did you erloo?

Well, the is simply that my colleague Donald Gordon

choose

to teach

here

at Wat-

reason that I chose Wattirloo I was invited to come here by and long-time friend, Prof. (political science).

You have only the one graduate course here. What other work are you currently engaged in?

Well, I’m doing a good deal of nothing, as a matter of fact, Or I was, I’ve started now to do a little television work as a writer and interviewer, but totally freelance. This is for economic reasons only, and I wish I didn’t have to because I’ve been enjoying the kind of perspective I was talking about earlier that comes from a relatively tranquil life sitting back and looking at things from the outside. I had been lecturing at other universities, a little bit , and doing some public speaking, a little bit of writing--there was a piece of mine in a recent Star Weekly, for example, about the CBC. This sabbatical that you now, this “taking it easy” you recommend it?

are on right interlude, do

Highly! Highly ! Highly ! If I were running the CBC, I would insist that a very considerable number of the people in key positions in the corporation be required to take a year off every seven or eight years. Your involvement with the communications media goes back a long way, a far as highschool, I’m told. What prompted to enter the field of broadcasting? YOU

Good question. I suppose just, HlTllL simple excitement in the first instance. I start& when I was 14, as a radio actor. A producer came to my school and a&don& half a dozen boys and three of us were ptied off to be on the cast of this It was a 150minute program, every thing. afternoon, and it was a tremendous exPerience. We got five dollars a week when it began and then the Performer’s Union, which was just nascent at that time, got into the act and insisted that this was exploitation

and that we ought to get $15 a week, which was absolutely marvellous. They were live programs with lots of sound-effects, activity, and a certain amount of instruction in the art of acting and using your voice in an intelligent way. I liked that and subsequently, throughout school, I was always involved in journalism, shows, school magazines, stage productions ) music and that sort of thing. This spilled over into radio. And then it kind of disappeared for a while as I started to do graduate work and got involved in the publishing business as a textbook editor for Gage% in Toronto. And again, almost by accident, a friend of mine who was producing a childTen’s program came along and said would I like to get involved in some programs that he was doing, and I did. And I became sold on television. I’d been an antiytelevision snob, I think, up to that point--hadn’t thought about it, hadn4 watched it, really. I became so involved that when someone said, “We could use you as a producer,” I said, “Dandy-Ill come.*’ Your tenure here is for one year. You once said, “I still exist in the hope that there is some formula which will enable me to continue my services to the corporation.” At the end of your year of teaching, do you plan to return to the CBC?

No. That quote, which is accurate, comes before the debacle, before it had all dissolved and fallen to pieces. The formula which I was talking about then was designed to rescue ‘Seven days’. ,Mass communications is your major field. It has been proposed that the House of Commons debates be televised. Do you feel that this is a good idea or do you feel that it will tend to turn the House

*into a circus of a political grandstand with each MP standing up before the cameras and spouting off his two cents worth for the people back in his home constituency?

In a nutshell, I think it’s a very good thing and I think that the argument about +he grandstanding is just crap. In fact, the quality of debating would go up when politicians realized how terribly intolerant the public is of phoniness in deI don’t think that politicians could bate. come in drunk as they did during the recent defense debates. They

have?

Sure they have. Oh, and I mean it’s not just during the recent defense debates; this is not something that is extraordinary, it is all too ordinary. I don’t mean to say that every day there are drunken politicians speaking in the House but it has happened. I doubt that this would happen with television in the House. I doubt that people could speak for 20 minutes when they have only oneidea. I think they would recognize there is an enormous intolerance for longwindedness in television and that if there was a chanceof getting what they wanted to say on the night capsule, the night edit of the day’s proceedings, it would have to be pithy, right to the point, and not waste anybody’s time at all. There are people in the galleries now. There are reporters there but the politicians know that enough of the people around are their friends, or their political enemies, that they can sort of play fast and loose with things and that they don’t have to worry about being exposed to the ridicule of the judgnent of the whole country. And I think they should be; There is a growing discontent with 2 Parliament bickering over many picayune points. Do you think that a Parliament


and several parties is best for Canada, or would a republid be best? Or perhaps do away with government entirely and merely have seniar civil servants working their pay up until they reaich waht is approximately a cabinet-level position, these persons getting together to-govern the country?

I don’t think I have a very well-defined or very particular answer to these questions. I think they are important questions. In principle, I am inclined to be against the increase of specific powers of central government and in favor in the increase of power in very small government, meaning municipal or smaller. I think there is considerable argument in favor of subdividing cities --even the size of Waterloo--into smaller groups in which people have a very genuine responsibility about making decisians about how their particular community, which may be a few blocks in size, and its affairs are conducted. Would you like to see a return of a local meeting?

to theidea

Yes m I think partidpatory democracy is what government is all about, I, don’t think you get it at the national level. A highly technologized society is an expensive one and to use technology efficiently you have to have great masses of capital, and to have great masses of capital YOU tend to have centr alization--whether it be governmental or economic, as in the big financial center in Montreal and Toronto. A great number of Canadians are moving to the United States to pursue their carbecause of the more lucrative job eers offers there. Would you?

No, I don’t think so. And I don? think it’s ,just because of the money that people go to the United States. Money has a lot to do with it, of course, but I think that even more it is the opportunity to do the kind of work they want to do, I might not be right statistically. For a number of people, it is simply a matter of a slightly higher standard of livfng* But the people ‘whom I know or hear about--who tend to be professional people, people in the information media or entertainment, doctors, scientists--they are not going there simply to make more money (although that makes the pill sweeter to swallow) but they are going because there is a context, an atmosphere in their institutions that will make it possible for them to do the kind of work they want to do.

best possible model of the total experience-that is, a sort of microcosm .or micromodule--of what happened in the whole hour SO that in viewing the edited experience you came away with something that represented the total experience. And this was relatively easy if it was an interview in which you were primarily concerned- with the nature of the personality which you were testing with a number of questions which were designed to reveal feelings and attitudes primarily. It is more difficult when you are dealing with issues. In that case you can’t always produce a model of the total interview because you will find there are some things said about issues which are extremely important and must be in, and others which are very dull and can he left out. So the& you have your other rule, which is to produce out of the total thing the most significant material. Now you said “edited to create an impression*‘. Yes. I think that this is what the editing process is about--but thatimpression has to be fair, it has to be valid, it has to be relevant, And that doesn’t always mean give the interviewee an opportunity to come off well. If I have been silly in the course of this interview your edit of it ought to reflect that. I think it is important that you do that. That is part of what I mean by fairness. And your obligation is not to m+-your obligation is never to the interviewee--your obligation is to your audience, your readers, to allow them to participate as fully as possible in the experience that you have had in doing the interview. Thank

you

very

much,

Prof.

Watson.

on ten grand a year you’ll never make it. If the after graduation lounging

an “E-type,” -the whole higher.

insurance business:

I think possibility.

insurance,

Are you

worried

is a VERY

considerable

a bout it?

Yes. Would you nationalistic

say that you are extremely in regards to Canada?

I wouldn’t say that I am extremely nationalistic, but I, have a strong sense of the fact that this is where I live and I like it here and I like it in many ways the way it is. I think that the same is true of French Canada. Somebody got up at a meeting1 was speaking at the other night and said that he hoped the old hyphen would disappear in in French-Canadian and Ehglish-Canadian. And I understand and respect the motives here, but I don’t think they are sound. I think that there is enormous value in the existence of two reasonably well-defined cultures within the federal bounds of Canada and I find that my life is richer from having contact with French-Canadians who are very conscious that they are French-Canadians and not just Canadians. And I like to see that kind of difference persevere and find ways of making it visible without blowing the lid off.

you’d

better

forget

better about

aim higher those

“safe”

than ten grand forty.

Your

kind

of

One of the best ways to make it, fast, is in life

sales ! We’re talking about the creative merchandising advising

a year. A lot

jobs that start at five thousand

you up to ten by the time you’re

takes real money.

Do YOU think that Canada will lose its national identity and be annexed by the United States?

there

bit-then

You’d

and nickel-and-dime living

scene you have in mind shows you at the wheel of on the balcony of a high-rise, listening to a super stereo

on personal

that takes discipline,

brains

earn it is up to you.

Want

the sophisticated side of the insurance of pension plans, business and group

estate and tax problems.

and drive.

How much

to hear more about

It’s the kind

of career

you earn and how fast you

it? Write

E. A. Palk, Vice-

President and Director of Agencies, at our Head Ofice in Winnipeg. Tell him where in Canada you want to operate after graduation.

Great-West ASSURANCE

COMPANY

Gi

Life HEAD

OFFICE,

WINNIPEG

One last question.. When I was discussing this interlview with one of my friends, he said that at the end I would have about an hour’s tape time from which I could extract. what 1 wanted YOU to say. Was this e\.er donT on ‘Seven days’ to create a certain impression or to create a certain image?

Yes, always, I would say. But I want to instantly qualify that. The impression that was created was oriented toward the achievement of one or both of two objectives. The first objective was to create the Friday,

January

13, 1967 (7:21)

7


WlNTERLAND Prices

for Winterland

167 1967

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1967 Basketball - U of W Warriors vs U of Windsor Dance at Caesar’s Forum with the “Creeps”

.50 .. .75

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2,1967 Hockey U of W Warriors vs U of Toronto . . . . .50 Dance at Caesar’s Forum with the “Knaves .75 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY Concert at Bingeman BROTHERS FOUR Hendra and Ullett

3, 1967 Park with - Abbey

. . 3.00 per person Tavern

Singers

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4,1967 Semi Formal at Paradise Gardens 5.00 per couple Souvenir Beverage Glasses included upon redemption at formal of above ticket Liquor and Beer for .50 per unit SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5,1967 Jazz Concert with Brian Brown Trio - Bernie Carroll Quintet PACKAGE

FOR

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PROGRAM OF EVENTS WEDNESDAY,

FEBRUARY

1

Basketbal I (W arrior vs Windsor) Dance (casual) with the Creeps

- Seagram - Caesar’s

gym - 8:OO p.m. Forum - TO:00 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2 Hockey (Warriors vs Toronto) - Waterloo arena - 8:30 Dance (casual) with the Knfues - Caesar’s Forum - IO:30 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3 Concert with: The Brothers Four, Hendra and Ullett and The Abbey Tavern Singers SATURDAY,

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY Jazz Concert - Arts

BASKETBALL at Seagram Stadium The Warriors play the University of Windsor Game time is 8:00 p.m. Tickets in package deal and gym. NC

E

arena

- 8:00

4

Winter Olympics - Laurel lake - 1O:OO a.m. Snow sculpture judging - 10:X a.m. Sleigh bell ball - Paradise gardens - 9:OO p.m. Crowning of Snow Queen - 12:OO p.m.

WEDNESDAY

DA

FEBRUARY

- Bingeman

5 Theater

-

2:OO

p.m.

at

featuring “THE CREEPS” Caesar’s Forum from IO:00 p.m. to I:00

a.m.

SATURDAY JAZZ COaNCERT The Arts Theater featuring Toronto’s Trio

2.00 p.m. Brian Brown

FRIDAY CONCERT featuring the fabulous FOUR singing their “Greenfields”, “Hard

THURSDAY HOCKEY ARENA

NIGHT

The Warriors of Toronto Game time

AT battle

is 8:30

WATERLOO the university

BROTIIERS popular hits, Travelling”

The comedy team of ULET and HENDRA .

SUNDAY

p.m.

WINTER from

DANCE featuring “THE KNAVES” Caesar’s Forum from lo:30 p.m. to I:30

8

The

CHEVRON

Snow

OLYMPICS at Laurel IO:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Sculpture

Semi Formal “Sleighbell I:00 a.m. a.m.

SNOW QUEEN 12: 00 p.m.

judging

at

Lake IO:30

at Paradise Gardens Ball” 9:00 a.m. to CROWNING

at

p.m.


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A REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE INTERVIEWING AT U. of WATERLOO JANUARY 19 ,

officer.

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COMPANY Head Office:

Friday,

London, Canada

January

13, 1967 (7:21)

C

1


Madame

Graduating Engineers Mechanical, Engineering and Metallurgical options:

in the

Physics

ment of the gas turbine power plants and propulsion machinery for four new Canadian destroyers. These will be the first destroyers in the world to be exclusively powered by engines of this type. United Aircraft of Canada now employs approximately. 5200 in its manufacturing, overhaul, supply, research and development operations. In addition, the Company’s long-term plans and its pre-eminence in the gas turbine field have created exceptional opportunities which will prove to be well worth the detailed consideration of graduating engineers. For further information, please contact your Placement Office.

You will find challenging engineering work, recognition, and above average advancement opportunities with United Aircraft of Canada Limited. For over 35 years, United Aircraft of Canada Limited has played a key role in the growth and development of the Canadian commercial aviation industry. As a member of the United Aircraft Corporation, it manufactures, sells and services in Canada the products of United’s Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Sikorsky Aircraft, Hamilton Standard and Norden Electronics divisions. In 1,957,the Company formed the nucleus of a design and development organization which has since expanded into a 400-man engineering force. Among this group’s many accomplishments are thepreliminary design of the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 3000-lb. thrust JT12 (560) engine. They have also developed the now massproduced PT6 (T74) free turbine engine for aircraft applications and its ground-based counterpart-the ST6, used in CN’s new,Turbotrain for example, as well as in oil well equipment, turbine-powered boats and other industrial applications. This engineering team is now embarked on what will be a world first . . . the design and develop-

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BP CANADA LIMITED REGRETS HOLD

THAT IT CAMPUS QRGINALLY

WILL BE UNABLE INTERVIEWS AS PLANNED.

TO -

Graduating Students at the Bachelors, Masters

and Doctorate levels from all Faculties ONTARIO

SOCIETY

FOR CRIPPLED

requires FIVE strategi

tally

CHILDREN

EmploymentInterviews

for its

SUMMER located

CAMPS

throughout

the following

Ontario

January

personel:

PROGRAM DIRECTORS WATERFRONT COUNSELLORS ( Red Cross Instructors) CHAUFFEURS (Males21 years) SENIOR COUNSELLORS MUSIC & DRAMA COUNSELLORS ARTS & CRAFTS COUNSELLORS SECRETARIAL ASSISTANTS REGISTERED NURSES KITCHEN COUNSELLORS for further in formation apply to: SUPERVISIOR OF CAMPS ONTARIO SOCIETY FOR CRIPPLED

Over two hundred to select personnel

and

companies for their

have reserved organizations.

3

rooms

to interview

If you wish to obtain an interview, visit the Placement Office located on the sixth floor of the arts library building immediately in order to obtain a list of the companies who will be on campus, some of whom may be interested in your qualifications. Complete the Placement

CHILDREN

350 Rumsey Rd., Box 1700, Postal Station Toronto 17, Ontario, Phone 487 - 5311

Consolidated

16 to February

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of the

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at

Paper Corporation LIMITED

Chemical, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineers graduating in 1967 required by Consolidated Paper Corporation Limited. Mills located at Three Rivers, Shawinigan, Grand’Mere and Port Alfred, Quebec, with a new pulp mill at Shawville, Quebec, scheduled for operation in late 1967. Our research and Development Centre at Grand’ Mere also requires research-oriented Mechanical and Chemical engineers due to present active expansion program. All usual benefits (group life, pension, etc.) and a very attractive Company medical plan which is integrated with both the Blue Cross and the Quebec Hospital Insurance Plan. The Company will conduct interviews at the University of Waterloo on Tuesday, January 17, 1967. Please see your Placement Office for interviews and Company material.

National ResearchCouncil announces

opportunities

in its

COMPUTATION CENTRE MATHEMATICAL

ANALYSIS SCIENTIFIC

COMPUTER RESEARCH

CONTINUING

EMPLOYMENT

A number of Ph.D. levels employment ped with an sing computer

in 1967 for PH.

DS’,

MASTERS’

and

HONOUR

BACHELORS’

will

be held JANUARY

on the 18

campus

on

Salaries

will

Interviews SEE YOUR PLICATION INTERVIEW.

PLACEMENT FORM AND

OFFICE FOR AN TO ARRANGE

CONSULATION

SYSTEMS IN

DEVELOPMENT

NUMFRICAL

ANALYSIS

graduates at the Bachelor (Pass and Honors), Master’s and in Mathematics, Science or Engineering are required for in the Council’s Computation Centre. The Centre is equipI.B. M. 360 computer system with a number of teleproccslinks.

Programming and mathematical problems come to the Computatiolj Centre from various scientific. and engineering divisins of the Council. A major area of activity is the design and implementation of computer systems programmes (operating systems, teleprocessing systems, time-sharing system, etc.) Research in all areas of numercial analysis in encouraged.

Science and Engineering Interviews

AND

PROGRAMMING

APAN

SEE AND

depend will

on qualifications

be held

YOUR PLACEMENT TO ARRANGE AN

on campus OFFICE INTERVIEW.

and are on January FOR

competitive. 18.

AN

APPLICATION

Friday,

January

FORM

13, 1967 (721)

C

3


Profs encouraging VANCOUVER (CUP)--University of BrWsh Columbia’s presidenthas denied a charge that UBC faculty members are responsible for stu-

pot?

UBC denies

it

Vancouver

magistrate Les Bewley who claimed UBC professors encouraged the use of drugs on camp-

dent experimentation withmarijuana and LSD. President John Macclonald de&d statemmade late last term by

US.

ARTS aridSCIENCE Final Year Students

THE CANADIAN METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE offers professional

careers

to bachelor

graduates

in

MATHEMATICS -- PHYSICS (GEN

ERAL,

MAJORS,

and HONOURS

COURSES)

I

Students interested in investigating prospects of professional training in public accounting, leading to qualification as a CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT, are invited to discuss career opportunities. Clarkson, Gordon representatives will be on campus

JANUARY

as METEOROLOGISTS-(about Successful course

15 graduates

candidates

are enrolled,

in Meteorology

University

at McGill

of Alberta

required)

at full

salary,

University,

in a 2 year Master’s

the University

of Toronto,

18 and

19

Interview appointments may be made through the office of the Student Placement Office. If this time is inconvenient, please contact us directly. Phone

degree

Kitchener

744-117 1

or the

(Edmonton). and

METEOROLOGICAL Successful posted

OFFICERS-(about

candidates

to

are given

the various

50 graduates

a 7 month

civilian

and

in-service

National

Defence

required) training

program

weather

offices

and then across

I

Halifax Quebec Montreal London Windsor Winnipeg

Ottawa Toronto Hamilton Kitchener Regina Edmonton Calgary Vancouver

These

opportunities

offer

good

pay,

challenging

work

and numerous

employee

benefits.

ENGINEERING Final Year Students

INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS January Full

details,

applications

and 17, 1967

16

and interview

appointments

available

at your

Place-

ment Office.

Students interested in investigating prospects of professional training in public accounting, leading to qualification as a CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT, are invited to discuss career opportunities. Clarkson, Gordon representatives will be on campus

1967

z

JANUARY

GRADUATES

SCIENCE,

BUSINESS

CAREER

19

ADMINISTRATION

Halifax Quebec London Windsor

OFFERS

18 and

Interview appointments may be made through the office of the Student Placement Office. If this time is inconvenient, please contact us directly. Phone Kitchener 744-117 1

IN

ARTS,

Montreal Winnipeg

Ottawa Toronto Hamilton Kitchener Regina Edmonton Calgary Vancouver

YOU

Atomic

OPPORTUNITIES

Energy of Canada

IN

will

CAMPUS

limited

conduct

INTERVIEWS

* ACCOUNTING * COMPUTERPROGRAMMING MONDAY

* FINANCE

* SALES

staff

Chalk

Our Company representatives will be conducting career employment interviews at the University on

19, 1967

appointments

RIVER River,

Ottawa,

Toronto,

The CHEVRON

Pinawa,

available

at

LABORATORIES

Ontario

PRODUCTS

Ontario

PROJECTS Ontario

* WHITESHELL

We invite you to reserve an interview time and secure further information at the Placement Office.

NUCLEAR

* COMMERCIAL

*POWER

C4

ENGINEERS MATHEMATICIANS METALLURGISTS PHYSICISTS

ADMINISTRATORS BIOLOGISTS CHEMISTS COMMERCE GRADUATES * CHALK

Jcankry

16, 1967

for

Continuing

afternoon,

-JANUARY

* ADMINISTRATION

* ACTUARIALSCIENCE

Thursday

I

1

Canada.

NUCLEAR

RESEARCH

ESTABLISHMENT

Manitoba

For iob descriptions and interview appointment, visit your university Placement Office.

please


THEVii~UGECOR(vER ‘Pussycat’

a howling

Mattresses covered with writhing bodies lined the floor of the Village Hall last Friday. Another Village orgy? No, just 400 Villagers writhing with laughter over %!hat’s new, pussycat?‘, the first of 13 films to be shown at the ViLlage. Villagers up in arms because they were unable to get tickets might find this pacifying: negotiations are underway to get permission m run the movie twice per night. Tomorrow’s movie: ‘FromRussia with love*.

success

AN EARLY CHALLENGETO USE AND EXPAND YOUR KNOWLEDGE

there are at least two Conrad Grebelites (or Grebelians or whatever) for every Villager who shows up--and there are 20 times as many students in the Village as inconrad Gr ebel.

in operations

On Wednesday the hockey grudgematch of the season is to be played at Waterloo Arena: the Village northeast tam is battigthesouthwest team. Game time is 11 p.m., but even the late hour should pose no problem now that the first-year girls have no curfew.

Production

Maintenance

0 No, contrary to all indications, Diners Club cards are not being honored in the Village dining halls. Someone posted the DC symbol above the doors.

and fabrication of aluminum and alloys.

es

FOR

found

CHEVRON

words word 5 are

50 cents cents. Ads

I I I

generation, transmission, network communications.

Analysis and analytical chemical, physical,

development; instrumental.

engineering,

Technical and commercial analysis, operations

I

and civil engineering.

Chemistry,

physics,

geology.

I

Office has copies 103 of Canada

18 JANUARY,

Mathematics, engineering, business administration. Science (majors

I

Cost accounting, procedures accounting,commercial data processing.

is the date Alcan

Electrical

I

systems research.

Operation of technical libraries, literature surveys for research and development staff.

Your Placement See also page market Press).

Mechanical, electrical, civil engineering.

Ph.D., M.Sc., or BSc. in chemistry, physics, engineering physics, chemical, electrical, mechanical and metallurgical engineering.

Research : basic processes, properties and uses of alloys and chemicals.

and arts in chemistry

commerce,

or physics).

Commerce.

of “Alcan, A Growth Company”. Careers Directory: 1967 (Corn-

1967

.

Representatives

wiJ/

for interviews.

Aluminum Company of Canada, Ltd

$352.79.‘)

A Career rn Iron Ore! l

WANTADS: each for

addiarticl-

free.

IRON ORE COMPANY

Found Found in the Federation Office, one Physics Book II, Halliday & Resnick--claim at the Federation Office, Annex 1 University of Waterloo.

QUEBEC

NORTH SHORE AND LABRADOR SEPT-ILES,

P,Q,

- SCHEFFERVILLE,

P,Q,

-

LABRADOR

CITY,

Career

One pair of Ladies black leather gloves in the vicinity of the Coffee shop. Phone ‘742-0506

Sale

One Tuxedo size 46 with cumberband, white dinner jacket and 2 dress shirts. Phone 658~ 4231.

Housing Student room available with private entrance, bath and fluorescent lighting. A five-minute walk from the university. 743-7202. Undergraduate engineers only.

OF CANADA

AND

lost

For

Electrical

I

studies projects, installation.

be on campus

15

metallurgical, engineering.

Industrial engineering, engineering. I mechanical

“And the amazing thing about this car is that my insurance is

RATES

Chemical, I mechanical

Work methods, cost reduction, human aspects of method changes.

Power

l

first tional

ambitions

Mechanical engineering, I civil engineering.

But then poor turnouts are nothing new to the Village. We havetwo of the top teams in the league, but at the intramural hockey games

Anyone considering secondaryschool teaching should attend a special meeting Monday at 2 in AL113 with representatives of the Ontario College of Education. The discussion wffl include the various courses given by OCE and entrance requirements.

your

of production facilities, and equipment.

Engineering

The boys of North 2 second and third floors and North 3 third floor received a low blow Monday night when their toilet seats were stolen. After the last raid on their residence the girls screamed that the intruders would “get theirs in the end.** And so they did.

only

match

Chemistry, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, metallurgy. I extractive

Plant electrical equipment, and power supply, instrumentation, servo-systems.

Take, for example, THE PARTY last Saturday night. There weEe so few girls that the guys took to playing pingpong while waiting for the& turn in the stag line--and most of them were still playing when the dance was over. Let’s see if we get more than aten-percent turnout at tonight’s dance.

(Going to teach? OCE here Monday

to

Chemical process control, improvement development.

0 For shame, girls of the Village. Here a fresh crop of hopeful, eager-to-hustle engineers arrives and you go into hibernation. Maybe you did make that New Year% resolution to stop socializing and start booking it, but have a little consideration for those poor engineers.

a scope

FIELDS OF OPPORTUNITY 1 UNIVERSITY DEGREE REQUIRED

0 Tonight is the first Villagedance of the new year--a record hop with Larry Shannon spinning the “oldies but goodies **. Be in the non-resi- dent cafeteria at 8:30. Admission is 75 cents for men, women and others.

with

NFLD.

opportunities

b

GEOLOGY

)

MINING

)

GEOLOGICAL

b

CIVIL

)

MECHANICAL

)

ELECTRICAL

)

METALLURGICAL

PERSONNEL IRON SEPT-ILES,

Our representatives

RAILWAY

are offered

in

ENGINEERING ENGINEERING

ENGINEERING ENGINEERING ENGINEERING ENGINEERING

DEPARTMENT, ORE

COMPANY

8F

CANADA,

P. Q.

will be pleased to meet with you when they visit your campus on

January 49 Friday,

January

13, 1967 (7:21)


CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS Representatives from our 1966 to interview students throughout Canada. These merce, Further through

Firm for

will be on campus positions available

positions are available for the Arts and Science, Engineering information the Placement

graduates and Law.

and arrangements office.

for

Thursday, in offices in the

interviews

January 19, of our Firm

Faculties are

Representatives THE

of Comavailable

of

INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF

CANADA

LIMITED

Will visit the university tunities with graduating in

Find out I more about a future with Northern Electric

to discuss career opporand post graduate students

0

CHEMICAL

l

ELECTRICAL

0

MECHANICAL

0

CIVIL

CHEMISTRY and MATHEMATICS on January 26 and 27 We invite

you to arrange an interview your Placement Office

through

THE

INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA COPPER

LIMITED

CLIFF?

ONTARIO

r Campus

Interviews

JANUARY

17, 18, 19

Ford Motor Company of Canada,Li

Northern Electric is growing at a rate greater than a thousand employees a year. Over 1700 of our present 22,000 employees are university graduates, comprising more than 60% of middle management and more than 90% of top management. Although more than half of our 1967 recruitments will be for technical assignments, the balance will be from a wide range of non-technical degrees and disciplines. Starting salaries are substantial with increases based on performance as evaluated at regular intervals. To encourage your further professional growth, Northern Electric features liberal tuition refund plans, as well as employee scholarships and bursaries. If you’d like to work with an all-Canadian Company that ranks as one of the world’s leading manufacturers of telecommunications equipment, find out more about us. Arrange now for an on-campus interview with Northern Electric through your University Placement officer.

invites YOU to meet its representatives on campus

January

GRADUATING SE - INEngineering,

Arts, Commerce learn

IN

APPEARING JANUARY.

ON

LIMITED 6066.13

The CHEVRON

YOU

SIGN NOTICE OF INTERVIEW BULLETIN BOARDS EARLY

FOR

C6

what FORD can offer

Eifiectffic COMPANY

23,

COMPANY

LITERATURE CONTACT PIIACEMENT OFFICE

THE

.


4

PROCTOR g GAMBLE

Texaco

TE..-....:................. CO .*. .....*.. :*:.:. a.* . Exploration .-.+..1.1, .*.*. .-.*. .*.-. .a.*. .-.-. .a.-. ..A .=-.

Company

c

ALBERTA

CALGARY

REPRESENTATIVES - FROM ONE OF CANADA’S LEADING OlL ANDGAS EXPLORATION AND PRODUCING COMPANUES WlLL BE ON CAM\PUS TO INTERVIEW STUDENTS IN THE FOLLOWING COURSES ON

23,1967

January REGULAR

EMPLOYMENT

PETROLEUM For further P Iacement

information Office.

POST-GRADUATES

-GRADUATES,

ENGINEERING-All

Branches

and appointment

of Engineering

please

contact

the

ONTARIO WATER RESOURCES COMMISSION Representatives

will

be on Campus

January To

Meet l

BACTERIOLOGY,

.

CIVIL

0

CHEMICAL

8

HONOURS

Graduating

in

BIOLOGY,

ENGINEERING

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS WITH ALCHEM Technical selling offers a challenging opportunity to grow with a growing company. Your technical background may well be the kind of experience that will open the door to an exceptional growth opportunity with ALCHEM. Selling Alchem’s industrial chemicals is challenging, rewarding and satisfying. You represent an outstanding line of products that solve specialized processing problems in the steel, paper, petroleum, mining and many other industries. As a trained Alchem expert, you follow a very successful andhighly respected policy of CUStomer assistance and service. You are backed by a large staff of Al&em technical and research specialists. Also by the staffs of affiliated companies, Nalco Chemical in U.S.A. and C-I-L in Canada. and a real desire If you have a degree, some chemistry, for a career in sound, technical, professional level selling’ ask your placement officer for Alchem brochure,

for to join

The success of Procter & Gamble in Canada and throughout the world is make up of the individual successes of each of its employees. Because the Company recognizes that personal achievement is a major source of individual satisfaction, every opportunity is provided for its realization.

At Proctor & Gamble 1. To be able dividualized,

you

can

to develop your business on-the-job training.

2. TO be challenged daily stimulating environment cogn i zed.

expect

education

in a program

of in-

with new ideas and new problems.in where intelligence and enthusiasm

3. TO be given responsibility to advance based on your

based abilities

a are re-

on your capacity to absorb it, and to do a more demanding job.

4. To oe encouraged and rewarded with continued opportunities, income, and an uncommonly sound program of profit sharing benefits.

increasing and other

You will want facts on which to make an intelligent choice of your career. To learn more about Proctor & Gomble ask your Placement Office for o descriptive brochure and arrange for on interview on

JANUARY 24 and 25 for positions

MARKETING,

PURCHASING,

FINANCE, and SALES

in

SUSTEMS

ANALYSIS,

TRANSPORTATION

MANAGEMENT.

Stand Out With Alchem” Graduating

or send

management can offer you unsurpassed opportunities responsibility and growth if you select a company strongly believes in the value of its people.

ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY

TECHNICAL GRADUATES

“You

A career in business personal achievement, after graduation that

23

of Classes

Members

CAREERS BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

resume

Alchem c/o Dr. John BURLINGTON,

students

from all academic

disciplines

are

invited

tS>apply.

to:

Ltd. W. Ryznar ONTARIO.

Friday,

January

13, 1967 (7:21)

C7


Jack the Pickpoints to truth by Cam Morton Chevron

Jack . . . minister

staff

Pickersgill of trains

and planes

So, like I was saying, this Newfie with no oilskin and no souwester, not a sign of his codfish, and not even humrning ‘Squid-j&gin time’ comes bouncing...no I really mean it, bouncing...out on the stage and announces that equalization has a place in Canadian federalism. Now this is no cause for alarm for all the tight-fisted-only-slight-

ly-money-grubbing - home-grownOntarians in the house, except that the Newfie is Jack Pickersgill, and when the light dawns that he’s inthe federal cabinet (one of the ones who helps decide where the tax dollar is going)# well that average K-W businessman or student-aspiring-tobetter-things begins to squirm. After all, youalmostseehim reasoning...and in fact, if you stay for the question period, you can hear him ask...why should we pay for those might-as-well-be-colonies like Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and Saskatchewan. Well, says Jack, and yes he’s still bouncing, that’s one of the things Canada is all about . ..and besides, he intimates, if they didn’t buy your gOdieS you Wouldn’t have so many Oldsmobiles. So then some wiseguy asks him what about theCPR. Well,healmost admits that they’ve been robbing us blind, but then he says something about how WE rnade these promises 96 years ago and that we have to “adhere to our pledged word- and keep our bargain in “good faith”. But I keep thinking about all that oil and gas and all those valuable mines, and I start wondering about that phrase “good faith**. Next somebody sends a nota up to the moderator (one who moderates,

tempers, or otherwise quashes-Oxf.) asking what this cabinet minister, who has to watch what he’s saying every minute, thinks about Walter Gordon% return to the cabinet. And our minister of trains and planes gets his Grebs r$ht inthere when he says ‘?he Prime minister said he was pleased and that his colleagues were pleased. what more can I say?*’ W ell...what? I

Join Circle K ‘Tis the 16th of January and all around the gray not a responsible young man is stirring who isn’t pondering Circle K. The new members are placed in ML349, with care, in knowledge that the whole Circle by 6 p.m. will be there --when what to their wondering eyes should appear but many active members eager for the new year! They waste not a word and do whatever they c8n to serve campus this winter by means of these plans:

Annualeng blast to be held at Ceasar’sForumJan. 19 Toks O~hin~wo, president of Engineering Society B, called for better relations between the two engineering streams and more participation from engineers in all activities. He was addressing ing of EngSoc B on Engineers in stream ed from four months iv ork.

thefirstmeetTuesday night. B just returnof off-campus

ENGINEERING SOCIETY BRIEFS: --Engineering Nite will be held Jan. 19 at Casar’s Forum. Blake Goodings of the APE0 will speak. Engineering Weekend will be held Feb. 17-19. --There are plans to form an interclass hockey league for interested engineers who are not playing intramural hockey. Streams A and B are to split the cost for 15 sweaters for the intramural team. --It was recommended that B stream hold an intervarsity boat race to continue the custom -begun last term. There was also a request for a publicity director and committee so that events can be better advertised. --The planning committee of Engineering Council has secured a new office for the EngSoc, in E2339. --The curriculum committee reported that the questionnaires for the engineering anticalendar will be ready for distribution in February. ‘Focus’was requested to helpinthe publication of results since Gus Cammaert of ‘Focus* thought the board of publications estimate for printing was not worth attention.

--‘The Chevron is more interested in a national universitynewspaper contest and Vietnam than in covering campus events,** said Steve Russell, president of the other Engineering Society. The society is considering appointing a member to work for the Chevron: --The signs banning bridge at lunch hour in the engineering ammonroom were removedTuesday.If the problem arises again the dean of engineering will be requested to enforce the ruling again. --Members of EngSoc B will conduct a salary survey in order that students will have some idea of the salary they should expect. The results will be known before interviews begin. --EngSoc B is holding a contest to design an engineering ensignia. The A-stream will do the same in the summer and then a committee will judge the entries. --‘F ecus ’ repor ted a balance of $200 on the sale of 2,000 copies. In its third edition, coming out in March, there will be six articles devoted t o the tenth anniversary of the university. --Anyone wishing to buy pads of paper left from the engineering bookstore should go to thenew Engsot office. --EngSoc voted $50 for the grad trip--either to Chicago or Montreal. --The next EngSoc meeting is Jan. 24 at 5:30 in the board and senate room.

K

on snow sculpture, on Galt Training School and FASS Nite, on tour-guiding, blood clinic, district convention site. Their reward is building character, leadership, service, and have a lot of fun in serving this purpose. So how about you, lively, responsible young man? See Circle K, Monday; get in on the plan, POST-POEM PASSAGE: 7 . New members are welcome Circle K, Mondays at 6 p.m. ML349.

at in

Kerry Thompson, history 1, is among the goods on sale at the Grad Society’s slave auction on Thursday. She was 1966 frosh queen.

The eoncertllfindy The Brothers Four are the highlight of this year’s Winterland concert. Along with the Abbey Tavern Singers and Hendra and Ullett, a couple o f young British comedians who have received rave reviews wherever they went, the Brothers Four will provide the show whichis the climax of the winter weekend. Total cost of the entertainmentis $7400 plus rent, lighting and sound equipment. Tickets will be sold for $3 each because of what thewinterland committee considers the high caliber and the high cost of the entertainment provided. Frank D’Andrea, the committee chairman, said that if no financial loss is incurred this year, the-n ‘Leven better and greater names’* can be promised for next year. This year% committee ran into great difficulties trying to get and sign up performers for the concert, Dozens of names were conside ered, but each time the thing fell through f@ one reason or another.

Names were suggested all fall until the Brothers Four were signed in late November. At one point, Frank D’Andrea resigned his position as Winterland chairman because of personal differences with Mike Sheppard, president of the Federation of Students. The program as it now exists is

planned for Feb. 3 at 8 p.m. in the Bingeman Park Arena. A large crowd and much support is expected for the most expensive program ever attempted by the U of W, Reaction to the entertainment program was r-nixed. Many were enthusiastic while others expressed mixed feelings.

Woman elected pres of CUP at Montreal MONTREAL (CUP)--A third-year University of Saskatchewan tdrama ma jar became the first woman president in the 29-year history ofCanadian University Press Dec. 31. Lib Spry, editor-in-chief of the Sheaf, student paper at U of S, was elected to the post by editors of 37 campus newspapers. She defeated Jirn Schaefer, editor of the University of Western Ontario

Gazette, in the election held at the conclusion of CUP’s 29th national conference. Miss Spry will begin her ninemonth term of office in Ottawa July 15, heading up a four-man office staff which she will appoint. Elected unanimously to the position of honorary president of CUP for the coming year was T.E.Nichols I vice-president and publisher of the Hamilton Spectator.

Friday,

January

13, 1967 (7:21)

9


_ with

Wayne

Braun,

Chevron

sportseditor

There once was a small town called Waterloo. This town had two universities. The leading university in this town, henceforth called U of Waterloo, had a hockey team. So what, you say to yourself. But wait! The name of this hockey team was the Warriors. And the Warriors had much scoring power. Alas, they had a team of great potential. However the Warriors lacked a much-needed defense. And, as any great hockey oracle will tell you, defenseis an integral part of the world’s fastest game. So, as the story goes, the Warriors entered an important contest: on one fateful night, with but three defensemen dressed for the game.. Woe to the Warriors. For soon the defensive corps was reduced to two and a half members. “How can this be?” saith the skeptic. But, forsooth, it is true. Yea, one of the aforementioned members had decided to increase his league-leading penalty sum. Henceforth he saw only partial action as he spent much of his time spectating from the penalty parlor. UWO Mustang Smith

goalie

Gary

out of the play.

Bonney

Moving

Stops

a shot

in is Warrior

by Warrior

Bob Murdoch

captain

Ron

(9). Mustangs

Smith as Walt Winnik

won 6 -4. (Chevron

photo

takes

by John

Nelson)

PuckWarriorsdrop first of season6-4 by Hugh Chevron

Miller sports

Surging forward with three goals in the last nine minutes of play, the University of Western Ontario Mustangs overcame a Waterloolead for the third time to down the Warriors 6-4, The Warriors, aside from the abscence of Orest Romashyma, were aT full strength. Lady Luck as several Warriors whose shots hit the post \ repeatedly will confess,.

Sunar THE

Design

We Lead

By

LEADING

IN OFFlCE

NAME

FURNITURE

Representing SUNSHINE

OFFICE

EQUIPMENT

Waterloo,

On t.

ART

WOODWORK

Montreal, Subsidiaries Visit

our showrooms

LTD.

Ferguson

in Toronto, and Waterloo

Industries Montreal,

WAYNE BRAUN . . . oracle doth predict

And so the game progressed. The defensive corps fluctuated in number o It changed from 25 members to 3.5 members. But never did it reach the magic number of four, Hence the Warriors began to decerior ate with increasing rapidity. Soon .the opposition took advantage of the Warriors’ defensive lapses.Andthey began tofirethe little black missile at the Warrior goaltender so that he became shell-shocked. And, even as the Warrior goaltender became shell-shocked, the aforementioned missile began to travel past that same goaltender into the confines of the goal which stood behind that very same goaltender. And even as the missile passed between the goalposts, the little red light which flashes to signal the scoring of the opposition verily began to flash. And, evenas the light flashed, the scoreboard reflected the mounting score of the opposition. Hence the Warriors came out on theshort end of the final tally as the opposition was awarded six red lightbulbs on the scoreboard to a mere four green ones for the Warriors. Alas ! This was but the first loss in the season for the Warriors. Because of the powerfully unpowerful defensive squad, the oracle hath predicted that the Warriors will lose many, many more. Donald Hayes will try to bolster his defensive squad with the addition of one Douglas Shuh, a former member of yet another Warrior team, who excels at football. But because Douglas Shuh.hath dared to wear the colors of a Warrior grid squad, he is therefore a born loser. So the puck Warriors shallnot bea powerful squad. Not because the team desire or talent but because it is wanting in depth.

Sports day starts today

LTD.

Que.

of Massey-

P

from Rae Clark to Workman put Workman in a shooting posit.i~~~ Western’s defense covered him, but a quick and accurate pass put Smith in front of an open net. He scored to put Waterloo in the lead again. A minute later Corbett tied the score, and the second period ended at 3-3. In the next period Barry MacDonald and John Corbett put Western solidly in the lead. Workman brought Waterlooto withinonepoint, but Clark, who scored thefirst goal, finished the game at 18:07 as he put Western at a 6-4 advantage. Ruest managed four Footnotes: penalties one of which was a fiveminute major for fighting in the third period. . ..Mel Baird played over 40 minutes . ..Popkey scored a shutout last year at Western. . ..Waterloo outshot Western ineach period and finished outshooting them 33-26.

must have had another engagement. The scoring opened at 13:02 of the first period as Rich Clark put the Mustangs ahead 1-O. But their succss was shortlived, as Marc Ruest and Laverne Miller assisted on Don Mervyn’s tying goal, Two minutes later,GeorgeWorkman scored for Waterloo on a pass But Gord Lackenfrom Mervyn. bauer of Western retaliated and the period ended in a 2-2 deadlock. In the second period, a pass play

Ltd. Vancouver

J 1

Today and tomorrow thewomen’s basketball, volleyballand badminton teams travel to Guelph for sports day. They will try to win the tiger trophy which was won by McMaster in the last sports day held here in November. The Waterloo entries should make a strong bid to come on top in the tournament. Although they have had a long layoff they should be ready ,by the weekend. Jean Richmond, Waterloo’s first singles badminton entry, should repeat her performance and win all her games.

Scott’s curling

rink nears championship

by Ray Worner Chevron

sports

“‘From the rock comes the statue” is a simple and sensible adage of everyday life. However sf rom these rocks come exercise, sportsmanship and competition. Curling is the sport, interscholastic is the competition and sweating is the exercise.

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Featuring

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But this is not the end of our adventure. The fearless leader of the Warriors, henceforth called Donald Hayes, said to himself, he said, “Self, why not transfer one of your forwards (whom you have just transferred from defense to forward) to defense and thereby greatly -increase the strength of weakened corps of rearguards?“And s& said to Donald Hayes, “So what are you waiting for ?” Hence it was done.

section

i s your ONLY

in color

this

and LAST

year chance

to buy!

John MacDonald, Ted Chase, jim Hill and skip John Scott comprise the rink favored to win the campus curling competition and as a result they will comprise thevarsity curling rink for Waterloo. There are several obstacles in this team’s way however, and this is where the sweat comes in. Due to the co-op system here, twoplayoffs, one for each term, are necessary. Scott% rink has alrnos t completed the “double knockout** competition of the first term,which was delayed. (Double knockout means that any team with two defeats is eliminated,) They have to defeat the only other remaining rink on&to clinch the fall term championship. They must also defeat the winterterm champions twice to become the U of W entry in theOQAABonspie1 to be held February 17 and 18 at the Granite Club. Whether or not they make it or not should beknown by thefirst: week in February. GAPS & LOOSE ENDS: Intramural b-ball and hockey have resu.med...also volleyball and badminton have started...An intramural all-star b-ball team will play the Jayvees as a preliminary to the W ar rior -Toronto Blues game Wednesday at Seagram Stadium...Any-body inter&ted in league curling should note that league play is on Saturday mornings starting at 8 on Jan. 21 at the Granite Club.


by Frank Chevron

able to hit as well as Power. At the half the score stood at 44-19 with Power accounting for 16. In the second half, the Warriors zone press continued to work as the Redmen hit for only two field goals in the first seven minutes. The remainder of the game,however, was marred by the failure of the Warriors to play an aggressive defense plus their failure to hit from the outside. Power was high man with 24 points. Glober added 16 and Pando threw in 14. Neil Rourkeplayedhis usual strong game in the pivots netting eight points and nabbing 12 rebounds e Lo me Johnson, a 6-4 rookie, spelled Rourke and gave indication that he has the potential to develop. Ty Burch, the Redmen% leading scorer with a 21.5 average, was held to nine points but was stillhigh man.

Bialystok sports

According to Dan Pug&se, coach of the Warrior basketball team,two factors will make the offense click. The first is a fast break that will wear down the opposition. Thesecond is getting off at least 80 shots per game. Both these factors were apparent on Wednesday night as the Warriors defeated the U of Guelph Redrnen 86.46. It was the Warriors’first win without a loss in OQAA contests and Guelph’s third loss without a victory. Warrior supporters * however o shouldn’t be heartened by the victory. Their floor shooting was poor as they hit on only 35 shots in 108 attempts. The defense was extremely effective in the first half. But it was sloppy in the second, allowing the Redmen to get second and third shots at the basket. Sol Glober I the WarrioTs top scorer, had a bad night t making only seven shots in 30 tries. If theteam is to make a concerted attempt for second place, Glober must hit more consistently. In the first half, the W ar riors used a l-2-1-1 zone press that completely bottled up Guelph. Combined with fantastic outside shooting by Mike Power, the Warriors ran up a 33-9 edge at the 15-minute mark. The score would have been higher if the rest of the team had been

Jayvees

win

72 - 43

The game was preceded by a contest between the Waterloo Junior varsity squad and the Newtex Juniors. The Jayv&s romped to a 72-43 victory. They successfully employed a zone press which for ted the Newtex team to commit many turnavers. Jumping out to a 10-3 lead, the Javees were never headed and commanded a 39-20 margin at the half. Jim Edminston was impressive as he fought inside and came up with 17 points to lead the scorersc

of the week by

Frank

Bialystok

After a month sabbatical from the strains of picking the outcome of various sports events awe’re back to try to improve on our record of last term. We feel that by picking only collegiate hockey and basketball and avoiding most of the pro sports field, our average should irnprove. In our last column, we struggled through with our usual 6‘27’0average with a 15-10-l record making it 122-75-13 on the year. Warriors’ Bill McKechnie (45) defends unsuccessfully The Warriors won the OQAA basketball-league opener

as Dave Leslie (44) dumps in a two-pointer. 86 -46 Wednesday night. (Chevron photo by Ralph Bishop)

B-ball Warriors rop 5 of 6 contests In the last month the b-ball Warriors dropped five of six exhibition contests before Wednesday night’s game against Guelph. Against Carleton on December 9, they were triumphant with a 58-47 victory. Sol Glober and Mike Power threw in 22 and 18 points respective.ly,but vet Bob Pando missed the game because he couldn’t get a flight connection from Toronto. The next night they 10s t to Queen’s 77-71 for their first loss of theseason. Glober threw in 30 with Pando adding 16 and Power hitting for 10. During the holidays,theWarriors

Women’s 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

standings

Physical education University Village St. Paul”s Renison Conrad Grebel Notre Dame

-

135 pts 127 l/2 125 l/2 82 73 61 17

Standings include participation and championship points. Results are accumulated from golf, volleyball, swimming and badminton (singles and doubles).

played three games against Pikesville State Teacher’s College, a small school in eastern Kentucky. The scores were 95-80, 105-70, and 95-63. Glober was top man with 70 points, including 35 the first night o Pando threw in 49 in the three games while Power had 32. Last Saturday night, the team

Mat

umets

Nobody took McMaster hockey coach Bob Mahoney seriously when he predicted that his Marlins would beat University of Toronto Blues in the next meeting between the two clubs--especially after his sq lad had just dropped a 9-l decision to the Blues. Wednesday night Mahoney made his critics eat their words as his team dropped the top-ranked Blues 2-l. Mike Kerr and Mike Brierly scored the Mat goals while Hank Monteith netted the Lone Blues’marker. All three goals were scored in the first period.

played Fredonia State in Buffalo, but the defense let down as they dropped the decision 103-85. Neil Rourke played his best game of the season as he led the Warriors with 24 points, while Glober netted 21 and Steve Chris dropped in 13. The Warriors record stands at 4-5 over-all including that win over Guelph. They are thirdintheOQAA with a 1-O mark, behind Windsor and Western who are tied with two wins and no losses. Glober is the team’s leading scorer with a 21.1 aver age in nine games. Power follows with a 15.1 mark in nine contests and Pando owns a 14.3 average in six games.

Standings W Toronto Western Montreal Queen’s McGill Lava1 Waterloo McMas ter Guelph

L

5 1 4 2 3 3 2 1 2 2 2 3 1 1 2 3 0 5

T

GF GA

0 64 0 29 1 32 2 19 1 21 1 17 2 17 0 16 114

10 14 33 12 28 42 15 31 44

P 10 8 7 6 5 5 4 4 1

In this week’s intercollegiate hockey, our Warriors are travelling to Quebec. They will defeat the Lava1 team on Friday night by a goal but the next night our overworked defense will falter and we will drop the conteSt to theMontreal Carabins by two goals. In other games, Toronto will keep winging along with lo-goal and fiveover McMaster and goal wins Queen’s while Western will fall out of second place with one-goal losses to both McGill and Queen’s, In upcoming b-ball games our Warriors, who sport an unimpressive 3-5 record in exhibition contests, will win their first two OQAA games with a 35-point victory over U of Guelph and a 20-point margin

and

Chuck

Kochman

over McMaster . In another game, U of T should knock off Mat by 15 points. Q 9 * The big game of the season in pro football is coming up on “Super Sunday”. We feel that Green Bay will go to the air while Kansas City may try some ball-control tactics. These efforts would be”contrary to these teams’ offenses during the season, but the Chiefs will have to control that ball if they hope towin. We feel, however o that the Packer defense will be too much,, Green Bay by 10. As an added sidelight, look for a real dogfight between the Chiefs ’ flanker, Otis Taylor, and Green Bay cornerback HerbAdderlY* QUESTION OF THE-WEEK: who was the only man to lead the nation in scoring all three years that he played intercollegiate basketball. in the U.S.? What school did he play for ? Keith Gauntlett, math 1, got last issue% correct answer. The last year Notre Dame was ratednumber one was 1949. If anyone wishes to submit an answer to our questionof the week, leave it on the sports desk at the Chevron office.

Bluescaptur tourney MONTREAL (CUP)--Varsity was victorious again. They chalked up an 8-4 victory over Sir George Williams University to capture the Canadian Centennial College toumament last week. Following the defeat by the U of Toronto Blues, coach Paul Arsenault of Sir George Williams University denied the common belief that the Blues are invincible. After falling behind 4-O in the first period the Georgians matched U of T in the final periods, scoring all four goals in the secondperiod.Defenseman Harry Wagner suffered a separated shoulder during the game

w bile their top player, Paul Len-&e, missed the complete tournament. Toronto goals were scored by Steve Montieth and Paul Laurent, with two each, Hank Monteith, Murray Stroud, Ward Passi and Bob McClelland. Bob Verry, Phil Sutton, Ted O*Brien, and Dave Parker scored for Sir George. The win was Toronto’s 14th in a row against Collegiate opponents and their fourth tournament victory in the past two years. Last year Toronto won the Boston Garden, Great Lakes and Canadian Intercollegiate tourneys.

Friday,

January

13, 1967 (7:21)

-1 1


AS MEMBERS OF A ~UNIQUE STUDENT COMMUNITY WE WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE

ted00 Co-Operative Residences The Co-op residence was built by students who wished to live independently while learning to responsibly manage their own affairs. Since that time the Co-op has expanded from thirtyin order that mere students may seven to over 300 members. enjoy these ideals. By operating this venture ourselves we are able to keep the cost reasonable and at the same time directly control our environment. May

we tell you

more

about

the Co-op?

ACCOMODATION The physical facilities presently. in use include twelve houses which accommodate over one hundred students and a new residence building which serves 105 men. All buildings are within close walking distance to either university. Each house is completely equipped with new furniture and provides an intimate atmosphere for nine to twelve students. The houses are also equipped with kitchens where house members take their breakfast and snacks. HAMMARSKJOLD HOUSE, the first residence specially built for a student co-operative in North America, has been a success in many ways. Three residence floors provide excellent accommodation in single and double rooms with lounges, kitchenettes and laundry facilities close at hand. The main floor includes our offices, a modern kitchen and dining facilities. A huge fireplace is the focal point of the main-floor lounge, to which the Co-op often invites varied outside groups fro meetngs and dscussions.

FOOD With excellent chefs and efficient student managers, our food is second to none on campus. Both resident and non-resident members obtain three meals, seven days a week at one of two dining halls now operated by the Co-op. Unlimited snack privileges are understood. Each term many students become non-resident members of the Co-op. They enjoy complete use of the Co-operative’s faclities, including the dining halls, but do not live in the residences. Until our residence capacity becomes adequate we hope to share our activities with as many of these members as possible. Non-resident members have full voting privileges and may run for all Co-op offices.

FEES Double room Single room NON-RESIDENT

-

-

$275

$295 -

to $305 to $330 $170

per

term

Upon joining the Co-op each member is requested an additional $25.00, which acts as a member loan or share in the company for ten : years. All fees are set by the members according to estimated operating costs. If there is a profit at the end of a term it is returned to the members. Residence fees are relatively low because members operate the residence themselves, therefore saving on wages for cleaning staff and administration personnel. Each member hours a week ized in many to serving on “fags” as they keep our costs

is required to do roughly three for the Co-op. This work is realactivities, from washing dishes the Board of Directors. These are called, are in essence what 25% below other residences.

In closing, we would like to est in us in the past. We hope Presently we have space for If you are interested, please 139 University Ave. Our secretary’s name

thank those who have shown mterto merit your interest in the future. a number of non-resident members. call or drop in at the office: WT., 745-2664 is Diana.

OPPORTUNITY The Co-op is operated and directed completely by its own student members. The Board of Directors (the final executive body) is elected by the members at a general meeting. Over a third of our present membership have management positions controlling an annual turnover of over $240,000. A variety of management positions include bulk food purchasing, public relations and maintenance. Normally these duties come at a time when a student is not able to become acquainted with the facets of a business enterprise. To encourage a broad spectrum of ideas developing in co-operatives, plans are being made to include faculty and administration in an integrated community. In this atmosphere the student can more easily consider different points of view while expressing his ideas and exchanging experiences. Recently the Co-op was split into two divisions which operate autonomously through the Board of Directors. Difficult though it was to complete, the split was necessary to allow effective participation from every member who wished to influence policy and decision making. We feel that the Co-operative residence does give the students a useful singular tained elsewhere.

with its many identity not

interests to be at-

MEMBERSHIP The Co-op has attracted a complete spectrum of student interests. Several members from almost every campus club make the Co-op one of the livliest information centers around. Over two-thirds of our students are in senior years. Cur membership now includes a large number of students from both universities. The present men-to-women ratio: 75-25. ASSOCIATES: We would like to welcome more interested faculty and businessmen as associate members of the Co-op. In this capacity much valuable advice has been received, particularly in outsi,de matters. Associate members may run for Board positions, have access to all Co-op activities and enjoy full voting privileges.

EDUCATION In order to realize education in a fuller sense, programs of special interest are carried out by the IMPACT committee. Faculty members have been invited to carry out informal evening discussions. Trips to other co-operatives have. been popular and will continua shortly. Many students have expressed a desire to arrange formal seminars of hi,gh caliber. The TOAD LAKE REVIEW is a popular collection of ideas, views, happenings and activities in the Co-op and is published every two weeks. Recently we acted as hosts for two large conferences. IMPACT also takes care of newspapers and magazines and arranged a teach-in on co-operative sociology and philosophy.

We would also like to welcome outside speakers, discussions) to the Co-operative. tion are now being accepted.

parties (campus Summer-term

clubs,

appka-

CO-OPERATIVE RESIDENCE 12

The CHEVRON


Neil

Rourke

Bob

Pando

Sol Glober

Don

Collins

Mike

Power 4

B-ball Warriors have promise by Frank Cttevron

Bialystok sports

Last year the Warriors basketball team lacked outstandingheight, good outside shooting and an experienced defense, yet they finished in second place in the westemdivision of the OQAA. This year the Warriors have improved in their shooting, defense and all-around depth. However, they will do well to finish second again. All the teams in the league, including the Warriors, have improved their teams. As a result,thisyear*s schedule promises to be faster, more exciting and generally betterplayed basketball. Returnees from last year’s squad include forwards Bob Pando (height 6-1) and Bill Bourne (6-O), center Neil Rourke (6-3) and guard Mike Power (6-O). Impressive-looking rookies are forwards Sol Glober (6-4) and Ted MacKechnie (6-2), pivots Lorne Johnston (6-4) and Dave Crichton (6-3) and guards Art Webster (6-O) and Les Slowiskowski (5-8). Transfer students on the team have bolstered the back-court: Don Collins (5-11) from WLU, Cliff Lebrun (6-3) fro m Carleton, Andy Stothart (5-11) from Mount Allison and Steve Chris (5-11) from Western. At present, the Warriors sport a 3-5 won-lost record in exhibition contests . This ehow ever, should not indicate the team’s possible potential. Coach Dan Pugliese has done considerable experimenting with both his offensiveand defensiveformation in these games--andit must be remembered that four of the lossoccur red against American es schools. The Warriors will start Pando and Glober as forwards,Collins and Power as guards and Rourke in the bucket. Lebrun, an outstanding defensive

Steve

Chris

Jayvee Dave Crichton (55) avoids a foul in a game at Waterlootheran as teammate Art Webster looks on. (Chevron photo by Ralph Bishop) player, has a broken foot and will miss most of the season. This will definitely hamper the Warriors’ playoff hopes. Stothart, another fine defensive player, has been plagued by injuries and academic difficulties and is temporarily off the team. Bob Jansenburger, a 6-7 rookie, will miss the entire campaign because of work-term conflicts. Without these three key players to help out, the bench may be too weak to carry the team. Pando is the outstanding Warrior--rebounding, scoring and on defensec-making up for his lack of

Bill

Bourne

height with the experience culled through six years of league experic mCe. Glober may become the finest shooter in the school*s history. And as soon as he learns tobecome belligerent on defense and under the boxards, he will be an all-star. He was the Warriors’leadingscorer in the exhibition series with an 18.9 average. Rourke, at center, has the ideal size to be an outstanding cornerman but he will have to fffl the bill in the pivot. He should be Warriors’ top reboundert as well as

Art

Webster

excelling in his defnsfve play and shooting. Bourne and McKechnie are both accomplished shooters while Johnston has the size and potential to be a fine center. Crichton also should help. At the prds, Power has established himself as a good shooter and averaged 14 points per game in the *on series. Collins fs the floor leader but is still working himself into shape after a back injury. Collins can also shoot (he got 26 against us last year) but has been reluctant to shoot this year. Chris lends experience while Webster, a good shooter and fine jumper, and Slowiskowski, who has all the moves despitehis height, have the potential to eventually be come starters. Pugliese will employ the 1-2-1-I zone press defense popular&d by Johnny Wooden at UCLA and Bob &u-naps at Windsor. He feels this is necessary because the Warriors lack height but possess of speed. On offense, Pugliese has hopes of using the running game also; The Warriors have been unable to employ the fast-break in their eXhibf-’ tion series I but if they can overcome this deficiency, they will be tough. The running game relies heavily on control of the defensive boards. The muscle of Rourke and Johnston plus the savvy of Pando will have to be used extensively inthis respect. *** The top three teams in the western division of the OQAA plus the top team iu the eastern division go into the playoffs. Windsor should occu@ts accustomed spot atop the league standings again this year. A big, strong forward line headed by Marty Kwiatkowski and Bob Navetta WithAngelo ~az~~chin directing the team should mean first place. Western, despite the loss of Marv Mor ten (6-7) and Dave Crowe (6-5)

Cliff

through academic troubles, haveacquired Bob Horvath, who may be the top collegiate player in the country. They also acquired rookie Marnix Heersink, who can really leap. U of T lacks speed in the backcourt but has great forwards inNolan Kane and Jim Holowachuk. The Blues, however, have a yearly teudenvy to be unagressive. McMaster looked unimpressive in a 44-point loss to Windsor while Guelph is still trying to develop an effective sports program. The predicted finish: Windsor, Western, Waterloo, Toronto, McMaster , Guelph. The Warriors should edge outthe Blues for the third and final playoff spot, but the loss of LeBrun, Stothart and Jansenburger may hinder them from nudging out Western. However, they have the shooters in Glober, Power, Pando and Rourke. And if they can put it all together on any given night, nobody in the league will beat them.

John

Lebrun

Dave Friday,

January

Quinn

Crichton

13, 1967 (7:21)

13


Campusquestion byviepeters Should Red China be admitted ‘to the UN? - Charlotte English

Chris

Cahill

Moe

Leslie

sociology biology

by Wayne Tymm Kingston

A

MONG OTHER is an endless stream We include a few.

Yes. It represents such a large part of the world’s populat.h it’s unrealistic to restrictthemfrom the UN.

then by confirming and denying one has announced before one has decided. -- Anthony Wedgewood-Benn, British MP.

bureau

leftovers from 1966 of quotable quotes.

W

I

DON’T Lollobrigida.

LIKE

sexy films .--Gina

LECTURING,

as we know it today, contributes nothing “to encourage undergraduates to develop powers of intellectual analysis, independent thought and effective claims the University of Torexpression”, onto philosophy chairman, T. A. Goudge, in a brief to the Macpherson committee onarts and sciences . Branding the universities’ present system of lecturing .superfluous and time-wasting, Dr. Goudge recommended a cutin the amount of lecturing in the faculty. He called exarns mere “mass feedback and puzzle-solving exer &es “. Yea for our side.

tends

IT

IS TEMPTING to deny, but, if one to confirm what one does not deny,

E HAVE THE capadty to destroy the world after being attacked, but will we have the patience and restraint to save the world after being provoked?--U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy.

that

those

involved

The action seems to have fulfilled its purpose. Neither Saskatoon police nor the RCMP has made any arrests or found the drug used on campus. “We have men on and around campus at almost aI times, and it is doubtful that drug trafficking could be going on without their knowledge,” said an RCMP spokesman. In Vancouver’ however, a UBC consultant psychiatrist, Dr. Conrad Schwarz, said that during one weekend six people took LSD and within five days he treated five for complications and heard of one suicide. He added

were

not all students.

Doubting that the drug was all or even part LSD, Dr. Schwarz warned of the dangers of using LSD indiscriminately. LSD is noted as a-mind-expanding drug but it can have the opposite effect 0 “LSD users are all suggestive to outside influence and their moods can be controlled by another person”. Although LSD can be a useful psychiatric tool, it is no more successful than other aavailable treatments, according to Dr. Schwarz, who is planning an L&awareness campaign.

T

HE BASIC characteristics of uncertainty will almost surely continue to be operationalIy significant for the forseeable future .--World Meteorological Organization on Weather Forecasting.

A

NYONE WHO IS an aggressor to the United States can’t get off Scot-free. They must be punished and suffer penalties.-Dwight D. Eisenhower.

FASHION many

loopholes

Marie

Steger 1

Yes. They’re big and they’rethereand it’s childish not to let them in.

A

CCORDING TO an associate professor of psychology at the University of Saskatchewan, the recent legal measures against illicit traffic in LSD have made it difficult for researchers to obtain the drug in required quantities.

2

Yes. It’s the UN and all the nations should be in. It’s vitalto the nuclear issue.

Latin

2

Wells

English

Anne

Ellis

psychology

Yes. Definitely i I don’t see how they can ignore them. They ‘r e a world power. No one knows what they’re doing.

Monica

3

Until they solve their immediate problems, the UN would be in a dangerous position if they let them in under these conditions.

Reg

1

Pilkey math

Simon

3

Yes. All the countwould have ries more control over them if they were in. You’ll at least have them at a conference table.

Chevron

Dennis 1

As far as peace is concerned, morally, they should let them. in. Politically, I don’t know.

I think they should. You can’t negotiate with someone you’re ignoring.

Dave

Alcock

philosophy

2

DESIGNERS are leaving so in unexpected places these

&YS that ‘L ey have begun designing ladies’ unmentionables to match. Their basic tenet seems to be ‘Underwear should be seen and not hid’. Many styles are being designed to , .. aouble as outerwear. Elle von Schair made her debut as a lingerie designer with striped paper underclothes which she hopes will be seen on the beach. ‘Cyou can take them with you on weekends and not bother to bring them back,” said the young designer, who also has a practical turn of mind. --John Kloss has designed a leather/Whatis-it? which has more cutouts than coverage. He feels it could beworn under pants-or under nothing at home. For the woman who has almost everything, there is a bra and girdle studded with jewels-- “ terribly chic under a simple black dress ,” says its designer. (And also rather lumpy). She doesn’t see anything wrong with diamonds or even rhinestones. Sitting down in this outfit will be an endurance test requiring the knowhow of an Indian fakir. Or perhaps it’s weU padded.

T

HE EXERCISE of power in this century has meant for the United States not arrogance but agony. We have used our power not willingly and recklessly but reluctantly and with restraint .--U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson.

ost studentcouncilsianorethe realDroblems OTTAWA (CUP)--The chief architect of Canada’s student movement has condemned student councils for abdicating their responsibilities . Canadian Union of Students president Doug Ward suggested last F r iday in an interview he is getting fed up with student governments which give a higher priority to yearbooks and dances than to soda1 change. “If I were the student press or a candidate in the upcoming council elections, I wouldn’t tolerate the neanderthal priorities of the average student council,” the 280yearold CUS president said. “Student councils are acting as if the issues of most vital importance 14

The CHEVRON

to students were yearbooks, dances, model parliaments and the budget of the outing club.” The CUS chief accused elected coundls of “bIissfu.lly ignoringthat students are being cut off for lack of adequate preventative mental health facilities and for rack of decent aid programs.” Charging that potentidl university students are being funnelled out of further academic study by a society that ‘doesn’t really believe in accessibiIity on the basis of merit,‘* Ward blamed student government for failing to take hold of theissues and become reIevant to their electora te. “The funny thing is that when student councillors go off to the f araway

CUS congresses, they do talk about the contemporary problems of SOdety, and they pass resolutions on them. “‘And then they mandate the national office to work very hard at implementing social change in the academic community. “But when they go home, they feel they have done their littlebit,” Ward said. “They go back to their council chambers, take the line of least resistance in the poIicies they have formulated nadonally,and settle into a year of tinkering with a budget devoted largely to issues irrelevant to their electorate.” Ward accepted part of the blame for this year’s apparent collapse of social conscience among student

government leaders, noting that a massive national headquarters reorganizadon, financial and personnel shortages all combined to keep CUS field workers away from campuses last fall. He said he hopes this difficulty will be licked during the current term, when all eight CUS secretariat members take to the road for field-work assignments. And plans are already beingmade to provide field workers trainingfor next year’s CUS staff. Another aspect of the current CUS hangups beyond Ward’s control can’t be licked by program outlines, newsletters and other CUS publicadons. It’s the CUS chairman’s ‘bottle-

neck’ which occurs when local CUS chairmen fail to pass such material along to student government and the student electorate. Ward suggested the CUS secretariat can work indefinately formulating implementation programs without achieving anything. Right now, Ward says heisforced to rely on upcorning elecdon campaigns to recoup losses incurred during this year’s post-congress %* “Underneath it all’ local campuses are going to have to resolve this tension between the way they talk to the outside and what actually goes on on their campus, if student government is going to have any relevance at a& the upcoming elections are going to be fought on the issue,”


My, my,

my.

is possessive

He

sure

of US

To the editor: Your features department should change its name to the sensationalists. From the last three ~SSUCSit seems they are trying to arouseour sentiments for Vietnam% , draftdodgers and many assorted pa= As a result of this mass addict-s. coverage, they have only succeeded in rallying my indignation for this I once thought this panewspaper. per was very good but it seems To have greatly decreased in its reading value. I wish MY newspaper would do a few more features worth reading about MY university. I fail to see the reason for spewing the tripe that is beingplasteredover the front and ensuing pages of OUR Chevron. If someone wants Vietnam peace news, they can find plenty in the folders, pamphlets and circulars distributed by the various ABC peace people. But I don’t want my money wasted providing entertainment in the form of anti-American propaganda for a minority group. I’m not in favor of the war in Vietnam but I do think our paper should spend less space on world affairs and more on university life when at least three larger newspapers are available. JEREMY COOI( engineering 1E

More bolster To

dances social

needed

to

life

the editor: For the past several months it has been impossible not to hear the constant gossip on campus about the sad state of social life here. You know the usual lines: “I had one--I left one--I came to Waterloo and there was none.** It has even been said this school is the biggest social failure in Canada. I don’t know if this is true or not, bd this is the only school which still has many kids going home to see their steadies on the weekends. Sure, I can see this in October or November --but in January ? No wonder social life here is rank. Where can you go to meet. someone of the opposite sex? To the jazz concerts or the film series or maybe to the local hy-mnsing. NUTS! What this school needs is a few welltimed, well-planned dances. Well, where are they? You guessed it--down at WUC. Man, if you cleared all of us plumbers out of one of their Saturday-night dances there wouldn’t be a soul left. So what’s to be done? Not a damn thing. We tried, but even with the help of the president of the Student Council, we were washed out. The first step took us toseagram gym, that huge house of muscle and sweat but no luck. W ould you believe the directors have passed a rule prohibiting any further dances using live bands ? The reason for this ludicrous law was that the neighbours complained about the noise. What do they want? We should have quiet dances maybe? Would you believe “Mantovani and his silent strings **? Well we weren’t frustrated entirely. We pushed on to see the masterminds of the Village council. We hoped maybe to be able to have one of those neat dances on a wall-to-wall carpeted floor. But here we came up against another brilliant strategy for eliminating social interaction. They have a plan to smge animal dances every To our question for three weeks. permission to stage dances they said, “We’re sorry but any additional dances would possibly make our dances too commonplace. But if you wished to put on a semiformal this could be arranged.** Can you imagine thinking one dance every three

weeks is enough for almos.t 6,000 studats 1 we were at a disadPossibly vantage in asking to put on these dances, as we weren’t a school club, a charitable organization. But it seelns that these groups have not provided a service that is obviously needed. We feeI that since we have been hiring American and Canadian talent for the last four years that we do have some experience, we do want to provide this service and we do want to do it this year. May I say we are ready, willing but UNable. DON FLEMING arts 1, St.Jerome’s

Treasure

Van

are

in Canada

sixth

proceeds

To the editor: On behalf of the Treasure Van committee I would like to express my gratitude to all clubs ,organizations and individual students who helped to make Treasure Van ‘66 a success. Net proceeds from the sale were This was an all-time $10,881.85. high for the university and the sixth-highest sale in Canada in 1966 e Waterloo was one of the few universities that managed to pass $lO,O% This is impressive considering the size of the K-W area and the fact< that it is only the fifth year of the sale. Over 300 people as well as the Faculty Wives club, Circle K club, Student Wives Association, folk dance club, Ukranian club and the folksong club were involved in the sale. The money realized from the sale will go to further the work sf World University Service in Canada and abroad. This includes -organizing seminars and conferences, providing scholarships) helping overseas students in Canada and contributing generally to the growth on universities in developing countries. Waterloo can be justly proud of its impressive accomplishment this year.

ANDY TOMAINO math physics 2 Treasure Van organizer

Who did it m$$$$lha~~~~‘e~~~~~ Victor Klassen, A&y Bailin, Alld Class, Jim Baxter, Romney White, Rod Clark, Rod Cooper,. Morley Don, Doug Gaukroger, Chris Lawson Sandra Savlov (Toronto bureau), Barry McNicol, Lynn McNiece, Cam Morton, Barry Parker, Dave W&not, Irene Lizun, Dale Martin, Eva Mayer, Chris Swan, Terry Wright, Arla Oja, Sue Watkinson Keith Gauntlett, Frank sports: Bialystok, Chuck Kochman, Barb Mikulica, Hugh Miller, Peter Webster, Ray Worner photo: Brian Minielly , Ralph Bishop, John Nelson, Julian Sale, Barry Takayesu, Doug Seaborn, Pade Fadare (and Lyn Hostein took the pit of the troops last week) desk: Mary Bull (assistant feaF rank Golds pink, tures editor), Norm Finlayson, Ray Vilbikaitis, Diane Boyle, Charlotte von Bezold (formerly of the Bootleg) cartoons: Ross Benn, Paul Grignon, Peter Stevens-Guille,Don Kerr circulation: Jim Bowman (manager)xauntl.ett, Larry Burko, Ralph advertising: Ken Baker, Ross Helling, Dan Mabee, Ramamurthy Natara Jan library: Lynn Allen (chief mortician), Martha Minaker cleaning, ideas & tea: BobRobinson Wedon’tpushthepanicbuttonaround here.W esitonit.

Unanimity

or indifference?

The selection of a student president has been made for another year. This year, though, the job was done without goingthrough the messy business of asking the ordinary student who he thought was best for the job. Instead the so-called activist segment of student leaders at Waterloo decided that Steve Ireland would be the next president of the Federation of Students, The editors of the Chevron heartily agree with this selection. Two of them signed Mr. Ireland’s nomination papers. No other faction on campus could produce an opponent. The result: an acclamation, In a year that has seen so much uproar over universal accessibility, student participation in the university, and even the running of orientation, homecoming and Winterland, it is amazing that the campus could be unanimous on the choice of a new president. Engineers have had many complaints this year - often justified. They hold only one seat on the present student executive although they make up a third of the student body. Yet when nominations closed, no engineer was willing to run for student president - the first time this has happened in years. Another significant group of students has objected to President Mike Sheppard’s activism in promoting student involvement in the fight for Indian rights, univer-

sal accessibility and other social and political measures. Some of Sheppard’s moves have brought complaints from those who object to thousands of their dollars being spent on offcampus activities. Yet none of the people who complained loudly in private over items like $3,440 for Council’s activities in Indian affairs would fight a presidential election on the issue of how Council was spending the funds it receives from the students. There should have been an election --based on discussion of these issuesif only to assure the new president how strongly the campus backs his programs. Mr. Ireland had hoped for that. At least part of the reason for Steve Ireland’s acclamation must rest with Mr. Ireland himself - to his credit. He has an admirable capacity for stating his opinions forcibly and yet staying friends with all sides. A reluctance to surrender a year to a job that is now full-time, twelve months of the year, may have prevented many potential candidates from running too. But whatever the reason, the fact is that Steve Ireland has been acclaimed president of the Federation of Students. In a few weeks, nominations open for the Student Council that will spend your money for the next year. Let’s hope men as good as Mr. Ireland can be chosen by by a method more open to decision by the 5,600 students who are governed. It’s up to you.

It’s just plain ridiculous l Canada may have its Senate, but the U.S. is ruled by a “portable freak show” according to one American student on campus.

0 Sir Johnls axiom two kinds of weather cold and too wet.

l

l “The covered

A first for the Chevron: Clarlr took a whole set of pix- - WITHOUT film in the camera.

0 He who has one for OPq for a chaser.

the road

has

an

#29687: around

window of the world by a newspaper.” -Let

(formerly

published Fridays Waterloo, Student

by the Ontario, Council

editor - in - chief: Jim Nagel news editor: Grant Gordon photography: Brian Clark features: J oachim Suri ch sports: Wayne Braun entertainment: Heather Da vi dson 744-6111 Toronto Kingston

local2497(news), 2812(advertising), bureau: Donna McKie, 782 -5959; bureau: Wayne Tymm, 71 Morenz

are Too

can ‘62

be

0 The height of frustration: trying to make opium from poppies handed out by old veterans.

A ZLMWFVPoThe Chevron is University of Waterloo, those of the university, Uni versi ty Press. \

There here.

the

board of publications of the Federation Canada. Opinions are obviously not or the board of publications., Member

board of publications David R. Witty advertising manager: Heidebrecht lithographed by Elmira Signet Ltd., Elmira, 7,500 copies

CORYPHAEUS) of Students, necessarily of Canadian

chairman: Ekkehard

Ont.

2471 (editor). Night744-0111. office 487 -4343 local 417. Crescent, 546 - 99 1.3. Friday,

January

Telex0295-759

13,

1967 (7:21)

15


Waterloo. 8:OO p.m. Panel - South African apartheid. ALl13. 8:00 p.m. Notices for this column should be handed in to the Chevron office on the forms rovided. Deadline Wednesday nig R t. (*means every week)

CKKW

1320,

Thursday Film:

Sunday

Today Record

*‘Campus sound’. 11:15-2:OO a .rn.

hop.

Village,

Gifford

8~30

Toole

- pianist.

Theater

Monday Tomorrow Film:

horn Russia with love’. Village Basketball vs. McMaster. Seagram gym. 8p.m. Sock hop. Seagram, lo-12

Students

required

to help in distributing, COI letting and

Tuesday film series‘Alexander Gal? . Theater . 12:15 p.m. Lecture-Neil Arnason on Turkey. CD271. 8:00 p.m.

questionnaires and in production of the ANTICALENDAR. (Math

students

be especially Leave

your

*Folk

Tickets for Western game go on sale. Village Circle K: New members welcome. ML 349. 6:00 p.m. International film series: ‘The big sleep* P145, 6:30 and 9:O0. Student Council. Board and Senate Room. 7:30 p.m. Dialogue-Christianity vs. Marxism AL113. 8:00 p.m. Film - ‘WUS International’ CB 271. 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday

processing

would

Wednesday

helpful.) name with

Noontime art - ‘African Art’. Theater. 12:15 p.m. Basketball vs. Toronto. Seagram Gym. 8:OO p.m. S.C.M. Inter-faith Seminar unitarian-Hindu Dialogue. Rotary International , 193 Albert St.,

the

board of publications secretary.

-

“Because They Are Different”-sponsored by the Native Canadian Affairs Commission. AL105. 12:00 noon.

song club -This week, The Blues, #I. Physics 150.12:15 Noontime theater. Theater. 12:15 Village. 8:00 p.m. Slave auction. Engineering Nite: Caesar’s Forum. 8:Oo p.m. Hockey Vs. Guelph. WaterlooArena 8:30 p.m. S.C.M. Education Seminar. Chernical Eng. Lounge. 9:OO p.m.

French

club

Quebec

trip

drops plans

The French club has cancelled its proposed trip to the Quebec Winter Carnival. The cancellation came as a result of the club’s failure to procure suitable accomodations . Another campus group is also plaag a trip to thecarnival, APplications are available at the Federation Office. Incoming co-op students should pick up their copies of the student affairs handbook and Compendium ‘66 in the Federation general office.

Al1 for

35’

Returning students who aresharing apartments or boarding may find it worth the 35 cents a month to get their names listed-with telephone information (411). For instance, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Johnson would have been much easier for their friends to contact while sub-leasing Prof. M. Snorkle’s apartment last term. Just call the telephone company’s business office, 742-3501.

Utopia,

Ontario

There really is a Utopia. Naomi said so, and she lives there. It’s about nine miles from Barrie, Ontario, “‘and it’s not very big--only abcut one store.*+ Grad Ball will be Friday,May26. Last week’s paper mistakenly said May 21, but that’s not a Friday anyway. The German club is holding its annual ‘Bunter Nachrnittag”~ sponsored by the German department and the Concordia Club on January 29, at 3 in thearts theater. The ‘(Bunter Nachm.ittag’* has become a traditional event withthe students of the German language and those interested in the German club. It is thefourth ‘4Bunter Nachmittag” that the German club has presented.

No profits. No promotion. No Christmas bonus. Here’s just the job for you.

If these words have a challenging ring to them, instead of a depressing one . . . read on. There’s a place for you in CUSO. And you join hundreds of others who are working in 35 countries, meeting the challenge of a world of inequalities - in education, in technical facilities, in engineering and medicine. This year, the Canadian University Service Overseas -a non-profit, non-government organization - has already sent 350 young volunteers to countries in Asia, in Africa, South America and the Caribbean . . . a total of 550 CUSO people altogether in the field, or about 1 to every50,OOO people who askfor their help. The pay is low.. . you won’t make a profit. Unless you count it profitable to see developing nations master new skills and

new standards of health and science. You can’t earn a promotion . . . but you can promote. You will promote new learning, and enthusiasm, and a desire to succeed in people who are eager to help themselves. There are no Christmas bonuses.. . but you earn a bonus every day in the response of the people you work and live with. And you’ll be amazed at how quickly you’ll find an opportunity to develop your ideas, your dreams. Willing to work to build a better world? Here’s just the job for you. How do you apply? Get more information and application forms from local CUSO representatives at any Canadian university, or from the Executive Secretary of CUSO, 151 Slater Street, Ottawa.

CUSQ The Canadian Peace Corps

-

16

The CHEVRON

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*-m . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . ‘b

. .. . .. . . . . :

. . . . . 0 . . . . :

c1’ 3

*.

:

. . . . . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . . . . . . . .

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ST 0 WI c

. . . . 0” -I . . . . . . . Y x 25


‘I’m disappointed’