Issuu on Google+

The staff of IMPRINT. would like to congratulate the graduating students henceforth featured. Through this publication, we hope to celebrate the capstone projects of this year’s graduates and the diversity in personalities and interests that they represent. As these graduates’ time at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Architecture and Design comes to a close, we wish them the best of luck in future endeavors and hope that this book will serve as a small token by which to remember our College as they embark on the path they’ve chosen.


Founded in 2013, IMPRINT. is a student-run publication seeking to cultivate memory, a vital driver in architectural discourse. By showcasing past and present student work, we hope to ignite interaction between the College of Architecture and Design and the community in which it resides. IMPRINT. seeks to broaden the perception and understanding of the work produced at on the future.


erin brelsford emily fike tiffiny hall michelle hawfield michelle hogue margaret jamison caroline mcdonald erin metelka teal nabors deanna olson lindsay payne hannah rice kathryn seeley abbey stepanek

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

alicia wetherington


The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Interior Design Program maintains a legacy of excellence in the sciences and applications of design as the leader of interior design education in Tennessee for more than eighty years. The program provides a foundation for the practice of design, collaboration, innovation and growth as a professional. The result of four years of study in the program is the Bachelor of Science in Interior Design, a professionally accredited degree from the Council for Interior Design Accreditation.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

Interior Design | Undergraduate


MICHELLE HAWFIELD Signal Mountain Inn

ADVISORS: Jeff Geren, Avigail Sachs, Jessica Zelesky

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

This thesis project is a design proposal for a Boutique Hotel in a small town outside of Chattanooga, TN on Walden Ridge in the town of Signal Mountain. This attempts to address the needs and wants of the town of Signal Mountain. Because the town is small, the program is limited to twenty guest rooms, a spa with an indoor and outdoor pool, a fine-dining restaurant, lounge coffee shop and a ballroom. The 27, 674 square-foot building is located on 100 James Boulevard within the Old Historical District and is part of the Alexian Village of Tennessee campus, which is a private Senior Ministry retired community. Research on the history of building led to the discovery that this building was the Signal Mountain Hotel in the early 20th century. The design attempts to restore the hotel with a modern twist. Elements of the hotel, such as placement of amenities and their style, will be brought up to date. The goal is to develop a resource for the community to encourage visitors to come enjoy the beautiful mountain and a place for the residence while keeping the historical aspect of the building.


MARGARET JAMISON Community School

Winner - Tau Sigma Delta Bronze Medal

ADVISORS: David Matthews, John McRae

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

This project focuses on the redesign of an urban school in East Nashville. A master plan and interior renovation transform the campus into a community school, a school centered around social services and student programs. The design is driven by a study of our human brain. The master plan looks at the organizational qualities that make our brain an ideal organ. The interior studies how perception of our environment can fulfill basic human needs.


ERIN METELKA RIVR

ADVISOR: Jeff Geren

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

Downtown Knoxville is full of beautiful, historic buildings in need of lively tenants to help rejuvenate the area. This site is located off West Summit Hill Avenue and has been acting as a dry goods storage facility for over 120 years. This project transitions this slow changing, static building into a high-speed technological corporate office housing a television production company. The idea of the building slowly changing for such a long time and exponentially increasing in its speed of change created the image of a shock wave as it increases in speed; this inspired the movement of the project. In creating a successful work environment, the organization and programming of the space were emphasized, as were the material selections. Research led to the discovery of a correlation between colors and materials to benefit the type of work being done by creating different energies in each area. The incorporation of this project will bring a new demographic into the area and enhance the downtown living atmosphere.


TEAL NABORS Senior Care Center

ADVISORS: Sandy Martin, Dr. Janet Witucki Brown

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

Chattanooga is in need of a Senior Care Center that meets the needs of seniors and their families and also benefits the community. The site is located on 8th and Cherry Street in downtown Chattanooga. The seniors can enjoy the local attractions while feeling like they are a part of their surroundings. With several schools in close proximity and Chattanoogans’ willingness to volunteer, the community will also be drawn into the Senior Care Center. With secure outdoor patio space, the elders are able to enjoy the sounds of the city.


KATHRYN SEELEY Pura Vida

ADVISORS: Mary Beth Robinson, Matt Hall

“This is life. This is living.�

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

This saying is a concept that permeates the Costa Rican culture. The people believe that when life is lived to the fullest, all other things fall into place for a peaceful and happy life. The connection between nature, people and over all well-being and happiness are the driving forces behind the Pura Vida way of life. Living simply, authentically and openly become the outcome of living in the context of these connections. When in Costa Rica, life and the essence is simply Pura Vida.


ABBEY STEPANEK Senior Living Center, Nashville, TN

ADVISORS: Shawn Boles, Dani Collins, Leslie Ann Wilson

This project is a proposal for a major senior living company, Brookdale Senior Living, for a new type of assisted living design accommodating a new generation of seniors. With 80 million baby boomers in the US all reaching age 50 by 2015, there is increasing demand for successful senior services and facilities. With a new generation comes new needs, thus a change in typical assisted living design will be necessary in the next 15 to 20 years. This project explores solutions based on research of current assisted living practices and design trends and research of the baby boomer history, characteristics and lifestyle.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

Research shows that this generation of seniors will be well-educated, embracing life and technology and focused on wellness. Based on these ideas, the concept that drives the project is the idea that the individual grows when the community grows. This project attempts to incorporate the community into the facility, bringing together people of different ages to grow together. Spaces are designed to allow community members and residents to interact inside the facility, as well as outside on the grounds. Residents are pulled from their rooms into community spaces and outdoor spaces, enhancing their overall experience and wellness.


DIPLOMA STUDIO Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews

This course provides a platform for development of the next phase of the Haiti Project. Phase I was begun in fall 2010, with a team of students and faculty traveling to Fond-des-Blancs, a remote Haitian village to collect material for a spring elective course in which a secondary school would be designed for the community. This Work was documented in the publication “One to Another,” developed by the students in spring, 2011. The first part of the school has now been completed. The second phase of the work in Fond-des-Blancs followed in spring, 2012, focusing on the design of a housing community to include, among other elements, faculty and staff for the secondary school. A second publication, documenting this phase, has now been completed. The next step in the work with Haiti will be in a different community, Ft. Liberté, in the northeast corner of the country and will focus on an entirely different project, a medical clinic.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

The work of the semester will include two projects. The first, of relatively short duration, will be the design of an Emergency Mobile Response Vehicle for Haiti. The second, more extended project will be the design of an addition to a small existing medical clinic in the “downtown” area of Ft. Liberté. This clinic is private and is staffed largely by Haitian medical personnel. Details of these projects will be revealed as the semester unfolds.


ERIN BRELSFORD Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

TIFFINY HALL with alyssa nealon Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

MICHELLE HOGUE Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

CAROLINE McDONALD Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

ALICIA WETHERINGTON New Beginnings

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

DEANNA OLSON with bevin brady and morgan oiler


ERIN BRELSFORD Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews

The medical clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti, is an expansion to the existing clinic facility. The project consists of several exam rooms, a pharmacy and lab, an observation room, staff facilities and an operation room for minor surgeries. The design was driven by several important heuristics such as, clear circulation, natural lighting and passive and ventilation and simple construction. All of these reflect cultural aspects already present within Haiti, as well as a need to satisfy the client’s wishes and desires. The final design is a simple U-shape for clear circulation. Large louvered windows were provided to allow for natural lighting and passive ventilation. A courtyard is also central to the design. Patients can filter into the space for additional waiting and enjoy the shade provided by the large trees. The space could also be converted into a classroom for after hours education programs. The materials and choice of color also reflected the culture of Haiti. Regional materials were used where possible, such as a concrete masonry structure and lighter wood columns for the circulation zones. Both of these materials are commonly used within Haiti and will make construction easier. A large amount of iron is found throughout the facility. This creates work for the local people, relates the people to other buildings in the area and helps with security. The medical clinic will serve the people of Fort Liberté. It will allow more people to be helped and healed in a more efficient manner.


TIFFINY HALL | alyssa nealon Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews, Chris King

Our proposal reacts to both the culture and environment of Fort Liberté. The existing building’s structural grid is to remain intact; however, it is being modified to hold the waiting and check-in areas. To prevent confusion for the returning patients after the renovations, the new entrance is located near the current location. Opening of the building allows for better cross ventilation through the existing building—which was previously an issue. This creates an area sheltered from the harsh sun, but still connected to the natural landscape of the site. Taking advantage of all the sustainable aspects of the environment, the new buildings are oriented to the natural wind and lighting patterns of the site. This is even more apparent in the building section; clerestory windows allow more natural light to penetrate into the building, as well as, vents at the base of the walls promote stack ventilation to cool the occupants and let contaminated air to clear out faster. Because doctor visits are family affairs, ample space is allowed for the family to be included in the healthcare process and education by varying scales of indoor and sheltered outdoor spaces, surrounded by plants used for both eating and medicinal purposes.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

Nestled in the unique culture and landscape of Fort Liberté, Haiti, the Eben-Ezer Medical clinic helps fill the gap in healthcare that plagues the northeast corner of the country. To increase their scope of services, the current clinic is in dire need of an expansion.


DEANNA OLSON | bevin brady | morgan oiler

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews

Located in Fort Liberté, Haiti, a small northern town near the bay, the addition to the Fort Liberté Medical Clinic seeks to provide adequate patient care with respect to the local Haitian culture. The design centers around an open air courtyard, providing various seating for families waiting and clear circulation paths for the numerous patients. Spatially, the courtyard provides visual connections between the programmatic pieces, removing the mystery of medical facilities to anxious families, as well creating opportunities for natural ventilation and light in a humid climate.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

Focusing on the contextual impact, the addition strives to comfort those Haitians who are first time patients. Bright colors color code the buildings framing the courtyard, providing a system of circulation to those who are illiterate. Modular shelving units line the walls of the medical rooms, providing work for local craftsmen while elaborate iron fences frame the site’s perimeter, offering great opportunities for local artists. The design of the addition respects what is available in Haiti while encouraging locals to engage in medical care.


ALICIA WETHERINGTON New Beginnings

ADVISORS: Jeff Geren

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

This project, a joint replacement center, is located on the seventh floor of the UT Medical Center. A joint replacement facility is unique amongst the health care professions. It symbolizes a dawn, a fresh start. Patients who have been hampered in their engagement with their environment have the opportunity to reclaim their involvement and begin again. This project seeks to visualize this symbolism through its design of forms and use of materials and light. The symbol if the dawn is key in this visualization. Floor patterns, walls and ceiling elements are angled and bent as though they were a ray of sunlight refracting through a window pane. Actual sunlight is allowed more access into the building by replacing the false windows with real glazing and windows from the perimeter rooms opening onto the core allow the sunlight to be carried further into the building. A primarily neural color palate allows the light coming in to paint surfaces with color as the lighting conditions change throughout the day. Other colors used throughout the project are inspired by the spring sunrise.


sam adkisson mark allmon jordan bailey adam bates sam bouck bevin brady casey brelsford aaron brown chelsie bush elizabeth cagle ashlynne camuti emmie corgan ricky delpilar emily dent austin finney tiffany gentry amanda gertsen andrew greene john halford monica harvey jesse hewitt leslie hood michael housley sarah howell

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

dakota montgomery


robert huber darren jett rochelle lo tyler loveday brandon mccloy matt mccrary alyssa nealon michael nelson katie o’connell morgan oiler nathaniel pall megan paris tyler puryear kirsten reed forrest reynolds josh ross emily ryan wilson sawyer laura sherborne rebecca shew zach smith kyter steffes brent swingle ben wathen cory wilkerson

Architecture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is pursued as an education dedicated to intelligent, critically aware, sustainable and innovative actions in architectural design. The School of Architecture’s commitment to excellence has lauded the undergraduate program as the top-ranked program in Tennessee for nearly fifty years and as one of the best programs in the nation. Its Bachelor of Architecture, a five-year, professionally accredited degree of the National Architecture Accreditation Board, enables students to advance to robust professional careers across the fields of design and industry in locales spanning the globe.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Architecture | Undergraduate


SAM ADKISSON Off-Ramp: an architecture of deceleration

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Brian Ambroziak

Life today is characterized by the desire to travel from place to place as fast and efficiently as possible. With this type of travel, we are typically focused ahead on what is to come and behind on what we left, paying little attention to our surroundings. Eadweard Muybridge’s series of photos analyzing a horse’s gallop revealed that there are certain things lost to our perception at the speed of normal life. Architecture has the ability to speed us up or slow us down. The experience of changing velocities amplifies our everyday experiences of a place.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Seligman, Az is a town made famous by the railroad and route 66 but it is now bypassed by the nearby I-40 and exists only as a small rest stop now. Roadside architecture is one of the few things that break the otherwise continuous pointto-point travel of the interstate. The [Off-Ramp] transitions us from the fast paced to a slower path. Weary from the day’s journey, the motel is a place for rest for a traveler but it is never the intended destination. Amplifying the experience of the motel provides a better understanding of place and an opportunity to slow down to understand.


CHELSIE BUSH NOTHING TO EVERYONE: Investigating the Potential of Neglected Space

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth

The American urban landscape is littered with ‘neglected spaces’ that chop up communities through lack of function and hostility toward potential occupants. This case study investigates how architectural strategies can realize the potential of a neglected space and bring focus to the forgotten. Site: The project is located in an oversized and unused parking lot with a few underused buildings in the West Side of Charleston, WV. The location has adjacencies to the Kanawha River riverfront walkway and Patrick Street, but remains disconnected in its current state due to poorly placed and poorly-maintained infrastructure. Proposal: The project reclaims the Patrick Street plaza and bridge area for the benefit of the West Side by transforming existing features so that they will address the unique needs of the immediate site and surrounding community. Phase I: The urban scheme strengthens the connection between the site and neighborhood by modifying and extending the existing means of circulation near the site. Objects made of recycled materials will define spaces, direct circulation and create a unified visual language that addresses the past and present conditions.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Phase 2: The building serves cultural and economic needs by operating as a community kitchen and complimentary spaces. Formally, it will function as a hinge between the vastly differing conditions of Patrick Street and the riverfront walk.


ELIZABETH CAGLE The Threshold of Insanity

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Brian Ambroziak

The Threshold of Insanity responds to the architecture of oppression prevalent in Poland. Under the Soviet regime, typical block apartments often crammed families of six into 730 ft2 units devoid of natural light. An attitude of oppression still permeates the older generation, whose downcast faces reflect the gray sky. But among the youth of Poland, a rebellion of joyfulness is brewing. They refuse to be downcast any longer, but rather seek release. Such diverse activities as winter sports, parties and various types of dance provide release through movement.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

mountainous Southern Poland, swing dance informs movement within architecture. Free spaces release visually and physically onto the landscape, creating an open learning environment, thus the school demonstrates to its students that an architecture, and therefore an attitude, of release is possible. Students are connected to one another and to the landscape through primary and secondary experiences of movement. A bowl-shaped courtyard in the center of the complex contains the movement of the children. The children also connect visually to their classmates’ movements. All the classrooms look into spaces of movement, such as corridors and indirectly, onto the courtyard. Smooth concrete massing walls protect occupants from the harsh mountain climate, but specific, child-height slots in these walls give students a privileged view into spaces of movement. This enhances project-based learning, connecting students to their classmates in other age groups, thus broadening their exposure.


RICKY DELPILAR Public Square

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth

The built environment is for people to interact in, spend their days and nights in and to live in. Cities need well organized, fun spaces within their streets, not only for cars, but for kids to explore and for young couples to stroll. Many public spaces in the United States have fallen victim to car traffic, putting the automobile before the walker or the bicyclist. Public Square in Cleveland, Ohio, is one urban center in particular that is dominated by the car with this project I intend to re-envision it for people.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Taking the form of a hotel, this building enlivens Public Square, priveleging those on foot. Expanding on a proposed design for the square, the building functions as much as an urban amenity as a hotel, providing lively spaces for everything from markets to concerts to people watching. The hotel itself adds to the new spirit of Public Square, with event rooms overlooking the square and vast, park-like ramps weaving through the building, allowing people to walk from the ground up to the first event room before stepping foot inside the building. A busy place on any day of the week, this building will help the revitalization of Cleveland and be a place its people are proud of. Ultimately, this self-directed project illustrates that America’s urban spaces taken over by the car can be evolved into enjoyable, buzzing places for people once again.


TIFFANY GENTRY Living Nature

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth

Architecture is designed in response to a variety of ideas, issues, history and perceptions. The role of the Architect is to create spaces and solutions within this net of broad ideas.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The goal of this thesis is to connect people back to their community and environment, dealing with the issue of separation between people and their context. The design will revolve around sustainable solutions to water consumption and local agriculture as well as how people experience the space around them, regardless of if it is built or organic. The scale of the project will delve into the intimate perceptions by people in their surroundings and discuss how individuals interact within a community. The project is located in Jamestown, Colorado, a rural frontier mountain town of 300 inhabitants. These people deal daily with issues of water shortage in relation to potable water as well as irrigation. Settled in 1864, the town maintains their culture and historical heritage through the preservation of the frontier architecture. Tourism developed in response to the rich historical experience attainable within the town as well as numerous hiking trails famous for their breathtaking views. Because of the seasonal changes is the program detailed within this project must remain flexible. Depending on the time of year some designed spaces change program and function. These spaces consists of a year-round hostel, a community eating area, outdoor kitchen and fire-pit, a hydroponic community garden, greenhouses, a storage/canning facility/cafĂŠ and an out-door summer camp.


AMANDA GERTSEN Transparent Landscape: Encouraging Collective Dialogue

Honorable Mention - Tau Sigma Delta Bronze Medal ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth

This proposal seeks to frame the discussion of collective memory through architecture. Collective memory comes out of significant and often tragic events in a culture’s history. These events are traditionally memorialized as static representations of the past. By challenging the stasis of traditional memorials, the counter memorial defines a space for the present influenced by the actions of the past. The counter memorial engages the people as a way to move forward. It yearns to provoke a community rather than consul it.

Through the counter memorial the people of Oslo are encouraged to engage with one another. It transforms the public space around the government quarter into a landscape for interaction and transparency between the people and their government. The inner courtyard skin unites the many divisions present within the complex. Meanwhile it invites the rest of the population into the skin as a place of growth and leisure. The altered landscape acknowledges the event yet pushes beyond grief to progress.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

July 22, 2011, Anders Breivik motivated by the politics of immigration, set off a bomb at the heart of Oslo’s government quarter and massacred the political youth camp on the island of Utøya. The twin attack is the deadliest event in Norway since World War II and will likely remain such for many generations. In the aftermath the nation united in defiance of Breivik’s actions, not his stance. The site is located in downtown Oslo in the attacked government quarter. The program involves the many federal government offices intertwined with public components such as major auditoriums, lecture halls, library and a café.


MONICA HARVEY Investigating the Non-Place

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

A piece of architecture can be thought of as poly-territorial place. There are major zones of programs that are linked together by connecting spaces, the interstitial zones. Luc Lévesque describes these zones as “interstitial constellation[s], made of discontinuous and even often left-over spaces.” Aldo van Eyck and Herman Hertzberger label this as “in-between space”. They describe it as “a place full of interrelations” where the zone acts as a threshold between major spatial programs. The in-between space belongs to both and therefore, it is part of both. This possesses a different quality of space than others because a transient space is a non-place. It is an interstitial zone that is dependent and defined by two adjacent territories. It has a “double identity of being (a) and also being (b)… and implies a sequential transformation from (a) to (b) and then on to something else, (c).”


MICHAEL HOUSLEY Coalescing Memory Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

Winner - Tau Sigma Delta Bronze Medal ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Katherine Ambroziak

Following the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear explosion, nearly 116,000 residents were evacuated from their homes; a few hundred residents, drawn by emotional connections to their homeland, illegally returned. The psychological effects on those permanently displaced from their homeland were devastating, including a loss of motivation, a desire to live and an overall victim mindset. A border station at the entry to the zone encourages a contemporary engagement with a place of the past. A testament of Ukraine’s ability to reclaim its physical and emotional well-being, the proposal ranges in scale from a master plan with a new village to the intimacy of a door stoop planting within a village. The station provides space for the collection and preparation of items to be distributed within the zone, encouraging past inhabitants to return and offer physical and emotional assistance, thus recognizing their ability to impact those around them. Typical tourists are exposed to the efforts and encouraged to participate. The architecture responds to the needs of both by challenging the notion of boundary and threshold, allowing moments of interaction and shared experience.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The time within the villages encourages the exchange of stories and memories, benefiting the listener and the teller. Upon returning to the station, volunteers record the experiences and stories collected within the zone, creating a collection that provides present and future generations a place to remember, discover and heal.


DARREN JETT

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Built space plays a critical role in the life of people and the development and awareness of personal identity. People may feel safe and confident when alone in one environment as opposed to another, for instance. However, architectural manipulation of preconceived notions about how a building functions may change a person in a more meaningful way. When spatial relationships in a building are subverted from normative conditions, the physical and emotional response will differ from person to person. When an acute agenda behind the simple subversion of space is applied, however, true personal and group identities are exposed. This exposure leads to questions that the designer intends for the occupants to ask of themselves including provoked responses that the designer cannot predict. Being forced to examine one’s identity and the identity of a group is the best way to provoke questions that must be debated. By examining how the LGBT population confronted the identity of the perverse, we can begin a dialogue which may force people to confront their own perverse sense of future self identity.


KIRSTEN REED Manufactured Landscapes Rankin, PA

The centuries of increasingly globalized industrialization have left great swaths of what can only be called manufactured landscapes as a part of the visual taxonomy of the built environment. The extraction, manipulation and production of raw materials into finished product leave, by means of process, marks upon the earth. My research into similar themes by which we, as designers, artists and humans, work as a process led to my investigation into an artist of interest for me, personally and the place he called home. Warhol and Carnegie expose the enduring testament of 20th century industrialization and the relationship of the hand to the machine. Carrie Furnace, outside Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania operated under Carnegie Steel and US Steel from the turn of the century well into the 1970’s. The cultural memory of this scarred landscape and place of visceral production is an analysis in the exploration of juxtaposition. Proposing the establishment of the Andy Warhol Foundation + Museum serves to study the proposed redevelopment of Carrie Furnace as a site, as well as the relationship of human scale and the artwork housed within. A second giant in the earth against which to juxtapose the first slumbering metal giant. The re-inhabitation by visitors to the museum, furnace and gallery spaces speak to a crafting of spaces and patterning within reminiscent of the extinct processes beyond the interior. Understanding the death of the steel industry seeks to bring the light of understanding and re-inhabitation back to this manufactured industrial landscape and explore the memory and physical evidence left behind of human processes within a new lens of image, repetition and the crafting of re-inhabitable space.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth


BEN WATHEN Vestiges of the Sacred

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, Tricia Stuth

As religiosity fades from Western society, a general apathy has begun to pervade contemporary life. The role of religion as the orientation point of life (for many people) has vanished leaving voids within the cultural fabric. The post-modern movement epitomized this well through the embrace of a life devoid of purposeful meaning and infinite interpretation. Through this we have lost the sense of the sacred and the careful reverence of things higher than ourselves. How can architecture induce this sense of the sacred? Site: Abandoned Railway Tunnel (Detroit to Windsor) Program: Pedestrian crossing and Contemplative Park Goal: design a daily ritual journey for the people of Detroit and Windsor

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The tunnel is devoid of context. The viewer has no immediate connection with the outside world, priming them for an emotionally altering experience. As the viewer makes his way through the tunnel, he experiences various aspects of the sacred (silence, isolation, darkness, edifice and the sublime) with the hopes that these experiences over time would prompt contemplation on a daily basis.


BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE


DIPLOMA STUDIO project GRAFT: Grafting Architecture and Urban Agriculture

ADVISOR: Jennifer Akerman

Architectural education is uniquely positioned to imagine and create the future by critically investigating complex conditions of the present and past. As designers, we examine how to craft space, light and material in the best interest of cultural exchange. This studio will explore the application of sustainable food production methods to the design of the built environment. The underlying goal is to consider how architects can instigate change in the relationship between food and the city, using ecological systems as a model. Through a critical exploration of existing and recent patterns in consumption, agricultural practices, as well as architectural, urban and infrastructural activities, we seek to project a future that is wholly sustainable and culturally enriching. In short, eco-logics will be grafted onto design logics.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

This design studio is an ongoing investigation into the potential for a hybridized architecture of food production to help revitalize urban centers spatially, environmentally, economically and culturally. A number of influences support a resurgence of urban agriculture as communities recognize the benefits of returning food production and distribution to city centers. Simultaneously, technological advances have enabled new possibilities for architects. We see an opportunity for critical investigation to suggest specific approaches rooted in a deeper context. We will analyze systems of sustainable food production— specifically permaculture—as a means of synthesizing a new approach in urban design. The approach of Project GRAFT enables shifting agriculture from rural to urban, from horizontal to vertical, from exterior to interior. Grafting blurs distinctions between previously dialectical conditions. The resultant hybrid posits spatial and experiential qualities that can transform what it means to live in the city while promoting environmentally-positive structures.


CASEY BRELSFORD Developing a Food Culture Through Urban Farming

ASHLYNNE CAMUTI Creating an Urban Closed-Loop Community

JOSH ROSS project GRAFT: Urban Farming

REBECCA SHEW

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

project GRAFT: Excess tp Access


CASEY BRELSFORD Developing a Food Culture Through Urban Farming

ADVISOR: Jennifer Akerman

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

In what way can architecture influence the making of a strongly regional and sustained food culture that incorporates the diverse cultural influences of its people and maximizes the bio-diverse potential of the Southern Appalachian region? Mapping the regions climates, geographies, densities and resources leads to a physical understanding of place. Studies of crops and weather patterns lead to a seasonal understanding of place. Finally, a knowledge of cultural influences, both historical and current, provides an immaterial sense of the cuisine and traditions surrounding a meal. The proposition is an urban farming center that encompasses residences, a community center and the work spaces for the farm. In the development of a food culture, the concept of food is pervasive throughout daily activities and pursuits; the meal is factored into schedules and composed of local and seasonallyavailable produce. In much the same way, the urban orchard and farm are the drivers of activity on site. In the winter, the orchard needs pruning, while springtime is the season for fertilization; during summer, the orchard is a shady park marking the entrance to downtown, late summer and fall are marked by the harvesting and consumption of apples, as well as preservation workshops and harvest festivals. The farm cycles based on the plants being grown, moving from seed bank, to greenhouse, to screen wall, to market and kitchen. The simplistic, sometimes opportunistic, society of Southern Appalachia is influential is the use of on-site resources to create several micro-climates on site. In the mountain ranges surrounding the region a prevalence of varied microclimates leads to greater and more varied growing potential. The Urban Orchard and Farm seeks to provide a common gathering place for the city, with a program defined by the growing, harvesting, enjoying, sharing and storing foods and meals that support a vital and pervasive Appalachian food identity.

“Cuisine is a function of the genius loci, the spirit of the place. And one who says “place” also says “season,” and one who says “earth” also says “heaven.”- Weiss


ASHLYNNE CAMUTI Project Graft: Creating an Urban Closed-Loop Community

ADVISOR: Jennifer Akerman

After researching the two scales of production and distribution of food - industrial and agrarian - the project proposes an urban closed-loop community with an emphasis on soil-based farming and sustainability in Knoxville, Tennessee.

By utilizing tactics of permaculture and the closed loop system, the project creates a system of living and gathering around the production of food, maximizing the consumer’s knowledge of the food process. By minimizing exterior inputs, the production of food becomes the identity of the neighborhood, simulating future growth around the principles of permaculture. Food becomes the hearth of the city; the community contributes to the health and well-being of itself. By taking a horizontal approach, soil-based farming is implemented to form a solid foundation for the nutritional capabilities of the foods produced on site. The use of soil minimizes inputs because it can be sustained on-site by composting– rather than importing mechanically extracted nutrients. Promoting conservation of water, recycling of food and material wastes and by using methods of enclosure and material sensitivity, the community aims to invoke an awareness of sustainable living in an urban context.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Because the industrial food system is serving a large market, inputs are maximized to sustain food along its journey from seed to table. This system is responsible for the massive amounts of processed food products, food additives and chemical processes in order to increase the marketability of food products while subsidizing cost hardly enough to compensate for its negative environmental impacts.


REBECCA SHEW project GRAFT: Excess tp Access

ADVISOR: Jennifer Akerman

Understanding how the downtown area of Knoxville works as a system was the starting point to this project. In contrast to the wasteful open-loop system of industrial agriculture, this project aims to mimic a closed-loop system. The goal of the project is to remove excess waste in the city by turning what was a waste point into an access point for the people of the city. This began by identifying more specifically what waste means in the city of Knoxville. Three issues of an open-loop system were identified and turned into initiatives. By addressing these, the goal is to eliminate the issues causing waste in the city.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The initiatives include Creating Connections, Using Waste and Creating a Local Scale. The first initiative happens on the scale of the city. Waste was identified by looking at the edges of Knoxville and what defines them--the system of interstates and highways that surround the downtown. There is a very obvious drop-off where the city and interstates meet and, more importantly, pedestrian movement stops here. The proposal is to extend the greenway into the city, creating connections, both for commuting and recreation, for city inhabitants to green spaces around Knoxville. The second initiative was carried out by first defining waste as any open lot on Jackson. The site chosen has additional issues of waste: grade change, as the site sits sixteen feet below Gay Street, making it currently inaccessible at street level and the empty view from the end of Gay Street. Adding a building in this view invites pedestrians to Jackson Avenue, bringing activity to the infill buildings envisioned for the street. The third initiative of creating a local scale is achieved at the programmatic level. The hydroponic food grown here is delivered by truck to local restaurants or sold at the on-site grocery store. This helps to reduce the wasteful transportation of food into the city of Knoxville.


BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE


DIPLOMA STUDIO Appalachian Memoryscapes: Spatial Codification of Ritual in Design

ADVISOR: Katherine Ambroziak

This studio seeks to examine contemporary ritual theory and explore its influence on architecture – spatial composition, habitation, human association and memory. Ritual actions are value laden. They present a form of behavioral communication, participatory spatial constructs designed and performed to illicit specific responses and shape communal/familial identity. They reveal cognitive meaning and hierarchic structure in both sacred and common place. As temporal manifestations of culture, they are a function of human association with memory. Through a critical analysis of various interdisciplinary theories about ritual, we will gain a better understanding of the specifics and nuances of the term and its potential (vital) bearing on design. Our studies will be explored through social, secular architectural programs in the context of an Appalachian culture. Appalachia provides a rich cultural context and spatial environment for our examination. This is part of our regional heritage, yet, like ritual, its true meaning often evades us as we relate to stereotypical representations. Laden with its own idiosyncratic value system, Appalachia presents us with unique opportunities to explore tradition, folklore, craft and identity.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

This studio was interested in how architecture could respond to both the cognitive and behavioral potential of ritual. To balance the academic research, we participated in a number of activities against which we tested our new definitions. We took part in a nonce ritual memory ceremony, visited a museum, planted heirloom tomatoes, attended a baseball game, decorated Easter Eggs, painted our school’s graffiti rock and explored place and culture with activities designed around a retreat in the Appalachian Mountains. Architecture is a participatory media through which humans may symbolize and render social and psychological conditions. Continuing our examination of the everyday, we tested our objectives on more mundane building types such as the high school gym, motel, bus terminal, pediatrician’s office and diner. These are the memoryscapes of our human consciousness, rendered significant through ritual’s foil.


MARK ALLMON A Ritual of the Pediatrician’s Office in Bristol, TN

LESLIE HOOD A Ritual of the Gymnasium in Damascus, VA

MEGAN PARIS

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The Flour Patch: A ritual of the diner in Appalachia


LESLIE HOOD A Ritual of the Gymnasium in Damascus, VA

ADVISOR: Katherine Ambroziak

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Damascus, Virginia is a primarily tourist focused town with a population of nine hundred citizens. Located on the crossroads of the Virginia Creeper and the Appalachian Trails, it is a prime destination for bicyclists and hikers alike. Driving through the small town, one can find many outdoor sport shops, but there is an overall lack of community that weaves the people of Damascus together. The Jeb Stuart Memorial Gym is more than just a gymnasium, but a community center where citizens can come together for town meetings, ball games, dances, voting, etc. Because of the size of the site, it was possible for more than one sport to be included, making the area more of a sports complex. The sports included were chosen based on their different emphases on focus. A gymnasium is traditionally a completely inwardly focused box and this design challenges the traditional gymnasium by turning the focus outward to the fly-fishing training fields through large glass doors. Fly-fishing was chosen because of its emphasis on self-focus, its ritualistic qualities and location to the river and lastly, soccer was chosen because of its focus on both the activity and the environment. These three programs are woven together through a path that extends off of the creeper trail. The use of tall grasses and other compressed space creates opportunities for the ritual of performance through foreground, middle ground and background.


MEGAN PARIS The Flour Patch: A ritual of the diner in Appalachia

ADVISOR: Katherine Ambroziak

Damascus is struggling to balance its identity of an authentic town and its desire to be an outdoor destination. Damascus is of true Appalachian origin based on local industry. As a logging town in its past, the railroad and travel paths always had great significance. The town of Damascus continued to live in Appalachian ways after resources were depleted. Damascus changed little and its economic development struggled to give the towns people what they needed to stay. The Virginia Creeper Trail was transformed from a railroad bed to a bicycle trail. Along with this, the 2,200 mile long Appalachian Trail also runs through Damascus. The trail conforms to the city grid, becoming an urban sidewalk through the town and picks up with the mountains on the east side of the town.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The site offers a keen setting with a residential fabric on one side, the passage of the Appalachian Trail and the sight of the Virginia Creeper Trail. The diner will offer an authentic diner experience while providing space to allow the true community to gather. The diner becomes a ritual of invitation, playing into a social role in the community. It becomes a place where tourists are invited in and welcomed but it also is a staple to the community as a comfortable space with a warming presence. It provides an Appalachian sense of invitation.


DIPLOMA STUDIO High Thought - Low Tech: Low Income Housing in Tennessee and India

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

ADVISOR: Mark DeKay

HOUSING THE OTHER HALF

50% of the world population lives in villages. The world population is predicted to stabilize at 9 billion. At least 4/5ths of these people are poorer than you. They will never afford architects for their housing. Let’s apply design thinking for the economic bottom 1/5. Much attention has been placed on the process of urbanization, but an equal and relatively unaddressed need is in the rural settlements where the poorest people still live. As resources are stressed in the 21st century with 9 billion inhabitants, and having passed “peak oil,” predictions are that urbanization will be partially reversed as people need to grow more food locally.

DIY meets the LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE

Most people on the planet build their own houses. What if architects created systems for self-building that were beautiful, frugal and environmentally effective? What if instead of a single building you could design a way of building that people themselves could replicate thousands of times?

TRANSITION TO PRACTICE

This includes two themes: “developing the whole architect” and “buildable ideals.” Developing the whole architect means addressing the current practice realities of collaboration and communication skills, along with working in different cultural contexts. We will work via digital exchange with design students in four “countries” for projects set in the four situations: China, India, Mexico and Mississippi. Buildable ideals means creating a transition to practice by grounding the idealism of design school (in this case housing for the poor) with the groundedness of design carried out through to the details and verified structurally, materially and with computer energy models and other quantitative tools of practice--just like in the “real” world. Good ideas are easy; good, buildable ideas, difficult.


SARAH HOWELL

[India]

ROCHELLE LO KYTER STEFFES

ANDREW GREENE

MICHAEL NELSON JORDAN BAILEY

TYLER PURYEAR EMILY DENT

SAM BOUCK FORREST REYNOLDS

ADAM BATES

[The Growing Community]

[India]

[Knoxville]

[India]

[Knoxville]

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

JOHN HALFORD


SARAH HOWELL | ROCHELLE LO | KYTER STEFFES CASCADE

ADVISORS: Professors Mark Dekay + Sharad Sheth

CASCADE is a community oriented around the collection and storage of rainwater. The climate of Waghnagar, India has an annual participation only 17.6 inches and only three months of the year provide substantial rainfall for collection and storage. Cascade is a community designed to collect and store excess rainfall during the monsoon season to be used throughout the year. Rooftops which displace 50-75% of each plot’s rainfall function as the primary collection source. An aqueduct system conveys rainfall from the rooftops to a cistern designed to hold enough water to reduce the communities per-capita external dependence on water by at least 50%.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Each house connects to a shared outdoor entry space which is oriented toward the central courtyard space. This shared space provides entry to each individual house, while emphasizing each house’s orientation to the central courtyard space. Three house plots share one outdoor entry that connects directly to the central courtyard space. The rainwater collected from the three adjacent houses combines with this shared space and is directed into a cistern located at the corner of the site. The community orientation takes advantage of prevailing winds by opening up towards the southern ocean breeze. This allows wind to move through the site alleys and between buildings to cool and ventilate the interior courtyard.


ANDREW GREENE | JOHN HALFORD The Growing Community

ADVISORS: Mark DeKay

“Creating an Architecture that (re)establishes a sense of ownership and community for low-income people living in Vestal, TN and Knox County.” The GROWING COMMUNITY of Vestal Tennessee seeks to provide living solutions that are not only efficient, affordable and comfortable but also facilitate and encourage productivity. In short, the GROWING COMMUNITY reaches back to the vernacular farm house, to a time when people used to grow most, if not all, of their own food. We anticipate that when individuals and families are given a chance to grow and harvest their own food, they will learn to appreciate it more.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

As this community develops, so will the heart of the Vestal. Not only does this development stimulate a new interest in Vestal and directly impacts the economy through an influx of new residents but it also will generate its own sub-economy by means of the market. This market, during the summer and fall acts as a farmer’s market, a place where the community involved in growing food onsite can sell their fresh produce to local restaurants and other members of the community. This market also offers a place where people can sell arts and crafts to the public during the off-season or during the harvest season. Finally, the market acts as a bus transit stop at the center of Vestal. By visually and physically defining a hub for public transit, we hope to redefine people’s prejudices of what the transit system is.


TYLER PURYEAR | EMILY DENT High Thought - Low Tech: Low Income Housing in South Knoxville

ADVISOR: Mark DeKay

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The project focuses on providing affordable housing for low-income families, specifically in the Vestal community of South Knoxville. The chosen site has unique conditions, which include steep topography and a creek running through the middle of the site. The vision for the project is to develop a sense of community throughout. This is accomplished on the site level through the use of a common house, as well as a large community garden running through the central corridor. Parking also contributes by being placed away from the houses and therefore encouraging residents to interact as they walk home. Within the site we have designated five lots, with each lot containing two houses. On the lot level, community is explored through the use of a shared front porch. As for the actual houses, six different prototypes were developed. Each house starts off as a one-bedroom 450 sq. ft. home, with the potential for later (vertical) expansion. Each house has an open floor plan that encourages community within the family. Due to affordability and expandability, construction was very important in this project. We chose to use a pole barn system that would allow for vertical expansion to easily take place. We explored using Hempcrete as our insulation. This allowed for the construction system to become innovative.


SAM BOUCK | FORREST REYNOLDS High Thought - Low Tech

ADVISOR: Mark DeKay

Designing innovative housing for rural India requires research and thought. Working closely with University Students from Vasad, India, we are able to get an on-theground look at the design needs. Understanding cultural criteria is as important as understanding local construction materials and methods.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The construction methods chosen for this project use heavy masonry construction for the base and lower floors, while lightweight bamboo construction is used for upper floors. This basic structural strategy is helpful for seismic reasons. The schemes developed allow for expansion as a multigenerational family grows. Responsible strategies within the design system help conserve valuable rainwater and allow for a variety of thermal zones. Natural and passive systems are needed for these projects that lack many modern conveniences. As a team, our vision was to ‘construct prosperity through integrated community for the other half’ and our intent was to ‘preserve form and instill function.’ To achieve these goals, we researched traditional climatic strategies, family patterns, seismic design, construction methods and life cycles to provide innovative solutions.


ADAM BATES High Thought-Low Tech Affordable Housing in Knoxville

ADVISOR: Mark DeKay

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The intention of this project was to create a simple, affordable and efficient home in the small community of Vestal in South Knoxville. A prototype housing model was developed with the intention of expansions in mind. Prefabricated SIP panels as well as engineered wooden truss systems were employed to minimize construction time. This project was, for me, a study of not only sustainable design but an exploration of building convention. Through this study, I came to further understand conventional methods of wood construction as it pertains to housing. The project relies heavily on day lighting for passive heating and employs thermal masses in both the floor and North wall. Along with stack ventilation in both the living space and bedroom, a variation of the dogtrot home was used to provide a core for passive heat buildup in Winter, as well as utilizing the breeze way to assist in air movement throughout the home in the summer. An interesting challenge associated with this move is the use of the dogtrot in a high density situation. The project succeeded in placing 11 homes, within less than 1 acre of land.


BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE


DIPLOMA STUDIO New Rural American Deal: Revisiting a Bucolic Ideal of Frontier Arcadia for the 21st Century

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Lost Americana, the ruins of rural America, are evident everywhere. We are used to talk about redensifying cities and re-urbanizing suburbia, - sort of. At the same time we are neither realizing that the spreading cancer of un-urban dystopia results from a gene that the pioneers brought and spread when pushing the frontier, nor are we aware that taking over land is more or less complete and that after its exploitation and intoxication we do not know where to go from here and what to do with where we are. Despite the inherited spirit of the frontier we have not yet arrived at dealing with the rural beginnings anew, which would still carry an ideal of a poetry of the prosaic, as involved in making a living by working the land[scape], today. This diploma studio project suggests and provides options for students to develop a thesis based upon a scenario of radical or even total changes in our current cultural context of the American Way of Life have occurred or may be assumed. Within this general framework projects may suggest radical changes for the way we build places, landmarks and landscapes, proposed as a way we interact with the un-built environment to be changed because our view of the world had changed. Along with a context and site based approach we will seek to produce a ‘New Rural Americana Deal’ for a direction that could occur in the vast vicinity of the American Landscape in a world of post Terra Incognita, where its crisis of scale and apperception shapes our way of building the landscapes for a future world. Proof for a premise in - its double meaning - is to be provided in the form of research and the presentation of facts that give validity to rural architectural landscapes we may imagine. Concurrent with the design project, based upon research and the position that shapes it, students will explore diagramming in the form of a manifesto. This manifesto will be both verbal and visual expression of advocating to help form the framework for the design.


AUSTIN FINNEY

KATIE O’CONNELL

Atmospheric Redemption

Fusion of Waste

JESSE HEWITT

NATHANIEL PALL

The 28th Amendment

Predict | Decide | Prepare 2030

ROBERT HUBER

EMILY RYAN

ecoPRISON

Vending Machine

TYLER LOVEDAY

ZACH SMITH

rEVOLUTION

An American Miner’s Cemetery

BRANDON McCLOY

BRENT SWINGLE

The New Homestead Act

The National Park

Self-reliance over self-indulgence

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

MATT McCRARY


AUSTIN FINNEY Atmospheric Redemption

ADVISOR: Hansjรถrg Gรถritz

Through investigations into the various interactions with and transformations of the American landscape, it became evident that manipulations of the atmosphere were intrinsically involved. American society as a whole has articulated its landscape and atmosphere mostly to exploit it of its resources irresponsibly and immediately, without much thought to the damages it has done to environments, ecosystems and atmospheres. Only recently has this nation realized its destructive path and the ominous, imminent future if change is not enacted. This initiative - Atmospheric Redemption - proposes a new energy production strategy that harnesses wind-power with new efficiency and continued innovation; an air-purification facility that passively cleanses the atmosphere from contamination; and a procession of immersion, juxtaposition and amplification that enables a greater understanding and appreciation for our atmosphere and landscape.This experience aspires to convey the necessity for changing current methods of energy production, resource extraction and landscape utilization.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

When people connect their lifestyles and demand for energy with the scars on the landscape and contamination of the atmosphere they have caused, their understanding and appreciation can be amplified and the necessity to change can be fully realized.


JESSE HEWITT The 28th Amendment

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

A new amendment is needed. A new rite of passage is hereby established. Young men and young women must now venture out and experience our national landscape. They must immerse themselves in the natural landscapes, but they must also know the story of our society’s impact. They must witness the devastated and desecrated land in order to fully grasp what can and has been lost. By understanding the multiple facets of our countryside, we will create a new generation that is informed about the consequences of our actions. The first stop in the rite is a two-week stay in a bucolic natural landscape. The idea is to connect the populace to their natural environment in order to give them a better understanding of what is in need of protection.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

After the ideal experience in nature, the next step comes as a surreal awakening. The young adults are subjected to man’s destructive force in nature. From the previous experience, they are acutely aware of what has been lost. The visitors are isolated from one another in singular pods. Being removed from all distractions, the young adults can more easily focus on the destructive forces being displayed.


ROBERT HUBER ecoPRISON

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

The United States has become a police state and we are all paying for it. The current system encourages a “revolving door” incarceration, spurred by for-profit prisons and a culture within prison that teaches small-time criminals how to become better criminals. This leads to a high rate of recidivism and a massive problem of overcrowded prisons. What if we taught prisoners how to be better people, to become better citizens, through architecture? By placing them in a system in which they must depend upon one another for the benefit of the community, then it could be said that prison is a teaching tool. This design intends to teach responsibility through creating a microcosm of society on an island, in which prisoners must assume active roles in the cultivation of crops, maintenance of power generators and teaching skills to other prisoners. Located on Fremont Island in the Great Salt Lake, the salinity of the water and distance from land acts as a natural barrier, allowing for a more open-air prison.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The radial structure itself is similarly responsible for collecting fresh water and wind energy, while the rain and snow melt water trickles down the terraced crops on the ridge to collect in the basin of the prison complex. Easily controlled by observation towers and locked down at night, the minimum security prison is otherwise open during the day, allowing prisoners to move about the island at leisure. The goal is not to isolate them and separate them from society, but to teach them the skills and empathy to better reintegrate back into the world, reducing the cost on tax-payers and reducing the number of crimes committed.


TYLER LOVEDAY rEVOLUTION

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

Sprawl and the destruction of our environment in the name of creating energy resources are key factors influencing the ideas promoted by this design. In order to address and begin to change these problems, it is paramount to change the fundamental way Americans live. Globalization and technology have infected the way we live and we must learn to decrease our dependence on these things in order to have a better quality of life for ourselves and future generations. To accomplish this, a series of schools would be built across the country that would begin to define and re-establish a regional architecture in each location and teach life skills specific to those areas. People have grown lazy and forgotten how to perform simple tasks such as cooking without a microwave, growing their own food, or even having face to face conversations without cell phones, iPads or e-mail. These schools address those and several other issues while developing a sense of community and camaraderie. Passive design techniques would be included in all designs in order to educate people on how to live with less electricity and energy consumption.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The first of these schools is sited on my family’s old 115-acre farm in our hometown of Sevierville, TN. The design is a simple gridded layout of buildings oriented on two important axes: one North/South axis through the teaching gardens and the other East/West axis through the educational buildings and main assembly hall.


BRANDON McCLOY The New Homestead Act

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The Homestead Act of 1862 forever changed the American landscape when the US Gov’t gave away millions of acres to feed a quickly growing nation. The New Homestead Act redefines the old act by not relying on individual families but creating a new city. The size of the city is in direct relation to the population of the city.


MATT McCRARY Self-reliance over self-indulgence

ADVISOR: Hansjรถrg Gรถritz

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Self-reliance over self-indulgence: This project was developed as a repurposing of a coal-powered power plant into a regionally-specific resource development center. Embodying research, education and accountability, it serves to improve upon renewable resource technologies and methods, educate and bring awareness to the public and serve as a method of measurement for efficiencies regarding materials reused and produced on site.


KATIE O’CONNELL Fusion of Waste

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

If we continue down the destructive and wasteful path we are on, we will ruin the nation’s landscape. We must stop using the land for our gain and then abandoning it when it is no longer of use to us. Around the country, abandoned or cancelled nuclear power plants can be found, with many of them being TVA projects. Specifically, the Hartsville Nuclear Power Plant, which is about 150 miles from Knoxville, sits in a state of disrepair and abandonment. Now it is a scar on the landscape showing man’s control of the land and the abandonment when the land was no longer of value to us.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The site can be used to demonstrate ways to deal with exploitation while creating a space for people to enjoy and a place for people to brutally understand what we have done. It must boldly show the exploitation that has occurred and teach people that we must change our ways of using the land. From the existing nuclear buildings remaining, three scars were formed that stretch across the site as trenches representing three harmful energy harvesting techniques, natural gas, oil and coal. As a juxtaposition, four healed landscape scars indicate what the land could become once we return value to it. The remainder of the site serves as a beautiful landscape garden, contrasting experiences of positive and negative when moving from the brutal trenches to the appealing landscape.


EMILY RYAN Vending Machine

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Urban sprawl is a problem of our time as much as the American Way of Life is to become successful in terms of social mobility, which is apparent in a choice of home and its location. Thus, the notion of dwelling and settling has a negative impact on the relationship between urban and rural. This project focuses on an architectural research of a connection between man and nature, resulting in a settlement of “homes and gardens” versus “homes or gardens.” The project, in turn, creates a vertical dwelling titled “Vending Machine” as an urban module that constitutes a different settlement pattern and proposes an enduring urban and rural future.


BRENT SWINGLE The National Park

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

The American landscape is a terrain that is known for its diversity and beauty. The built environment is also a beautiful thing, but only when it is properly juxtaposed against the landscape. This contrast rarely occurs today due to lack of organization, density and boundaries of our constructed surroundings. Our landscape is peppered with a messy and disorganized sprawl of semi-urbanism that we call a built environment. Before humans began to build on our landscape, America was a clean slate. We began to create the built environment, organizing it into cities and states. These cities grew out of control. They began to lose their density and spread across the landscape like the spores of a virus. This is what we refer to as “urban sprawl.” The effects of the sprawl have left us with today’s image of America, a semi-urban nation spotted with bits of “preserved” landscape, our national parks.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Shouldn’t the relationship be reversed? Imagine if these spots of “preserved” landscape could undergo a process of “natural sprawl,” and take back over the country. The built environment could then be organized along the global coordinate grid, contained within set boundaries and therefore maintain a proper density within which urban communities could operate more efficiently. The entire nation would become “The National Park,” and our fabricated system would stand out as a clear juxtaposition against it.


ZACH SMITH An American Miner’s Cemetery

ADVISOR: Hansjörg Göritz

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Since the dawn of time, Man has scoured the Earth for its useful minerals, its energy, often polluting the environment and surrounding populations with its practices. In a future scenario, where renewable sources of energy have replaced coal and other fossil fuels, TVA must provide retribution for those whom they have wronged. Kingston Fossil Plant, the site of a fly ash spill in 2008, shall become an American Miners Cemetery, a place for all those whose lives were shorted by the refining of resources. TVA shall revitalize the expansive fields of fly-ash detention and replace them with orchards of trees. The fly ash on site shall be generated into masonry construction products. This fly ash, the product of the precious resource that has shortened the lives of so many people, will forever memorialize them in profane, eternal stones. The smokestacks and generator frame cuts shall remain in a silent courtyard of stillness, invoking profane and sublime emotions upon those of the future who visit this place. They will come here and they will see these monuments. These are the monuments of energies past. Huge in scale and terrifying in being, they will teach people who exist in the future about the mistakes of energies past.


DIPLOMA STUDIO Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews

This course provides a platform for development of the next phase of the Haiti Project. Phase I was begun in fall 2010, with a team of students and faculty traveling to Fond-des-Blancs, a remote Haitian village to collect material for a spring elective course in which a secondary school would be designed for the community. This work was documented in the publication “One to Another,” developed by the students in spring, 2011. The first part of the school has now been completed. The second phase of the work in Fond-des-Blancs followed in spring, 2012, focusing on the design of a housing community to include, among other elements, faculty and staff for the secondary school. A second publication, documenting this phase, has now been completed. The next step in the work with Haiti will be in a different community, Ft. Liberté, in the northeast corner of the country and will focus on an entirely different project, a medical clinic.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

The work of the semester will include two projects. The first, of relatively short duration, will be the design of an Emergency Mobile Response Vehicle for Haiti. The second, more extended project will be the design of an addition to a small existing medical clinic in the “downtown” area of Ft. Liberté. This clinic is private and is staffed largely by Haitian medical personnel. Details of these projects will be revealed as the semester unfolds.


BEVIN BRADY MORGAN OILER with deanna olson - id

WILSON SAWYER LAURA SHERBORNE with alicia wetherington - id AARON BROWN with caroline mcdonald - id EMMIE CORGAN

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

ALYSSA NEALON with tiffiny hall - id


BEVIN BRADY | MORGAN OILER | deanna olson Fort Liberté Medical Clinic Addition

ADVISOR: John McRae, David Matthews

Located in Fort Liberté, Haiti, a small northern town near the bay, the addition to the Fort Liberté Medical Clinic seeks to provide adequate patient care with respect to the local Haitian culture. The design centers around an open air courtyard, providing various seating for families waiting and clear circulation paths for the numerous patients. Spatially, the courtyard provides visual connections between the programmatic pieces, removing the mystery of medical facilities to anxious families, as well creating opportunities for natural ventilation and light in a humid climate.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Focusing on the contextual impact, the addition strives to comfort those Haitians who are first time patients. Bright colors color code the buildings framing the courtyard, providing a system of circulation to those who are illiterate. Modular shelving units line the walls of the medical rooms, providing work for local craftsmen while elaborate iron fences frame the site’s perimeter, offering great opportunities for local artists. The design of the addition respects what is available in Haiti while encouraging locals to engage in medical care.


WILSON SAWYER | LAURA SHERBORNE Eben-Ezer Clinic Addition, Ft. Liberté, Haiti

ADVISOR: John McRae, David Matthews

The project was to design an addition to an existing clinic in the town of Ft. Liberté, Haiti as part of a group. The clinic is currently too small to handle the volume of patients that arrive on a day-to-day basis. This project is anticipating the submission of a design to actually be constructed. My group’s proposal strove to provide a sense of order and organization while emphasizing community involvement and interaction. The design heuristics that were chosen to influence our project include incorporating the existing building into the complex of our clinic, phasing the construction of the project in order to maintain usability of the clinic during construction, introducing a color-coded way-finding system for the mostly illiterate population, designing in section for natural ventilation and lighting and designing a comprehensive circulation scheme that minimizes crowding and confusion.

The clinic addition is designed around a courtyard that enforces the interaction between patients and members of the community. Such skills as furniture building, painting, cleaning, landscaping and general maintenance will be allowed for bartering for medical attention in the clinic. This process and protocol will be the driving force and the success of the clinic.

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Our design proposal utilizes existing construction techniques familiar to Haitian builders. They manufacture their own concrete blocks, they have access to concrete mix and rebar and corrugated tin and fiberglass roofing materials are available. The only materials that would be outsourced would be the lumber for the wood trusses and rafters.


AARON BROWN Vending Machine

ADVISOR: John McRae, David Matthews

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Focusing on the interactions, both visual and physical, between a healthcare provider and a patient the Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic Expansion located in Fort Liberté, Haiti, provides a courtyard space surrounded by circulation. Designing a building in Northern Haiti, a location with little consistent electricity, the building is designed to take full advantage of natural day lighting and ventilation. While the building provides ample natural daylight to the interior spaces with the use of split roof forms, it also provide shelter from the heat of the direct sunlight to patients who are waiting on medical treatment. Waiting areas expand from the interior of the existing building to the exterior covered porch providing an unbroken path of shade from the entry to the exit. Exam rooms are located on the southwest side of the site, not only to capture the prevailing breezes from the Northeast, but also to locate the “sickest” air on the down-wind side of the site, which prevents it from carrying air-borne pathogens throughout the remainder of the site. A multipurpose educational space is located on the street front to allow visitors ease of access without having to enter and traverse the entire facility. A service zone is located adjacent to the perimeter wall on the Northeast side of the site to allow ambulance parking and supply deliveries that will not affect visitors to the clinic.


DAKOTA MONTGOMERY Net-zero Energy Brewpub

INSTRUCTOR: Mark DeKay

eating area. Because of the extremes of the climate in Alaska, there was a challenge in

located in the parking area and to capture the heat in our closed loop collection and radiant discharge system that would collect and store heat. The project also

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

produced more energy than it used.


BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE


kate armstrong brantley bass daniel berger james cain jeff castor matthew clever mitzi coker aubrie damron peter duke sam funari kathryn greer ashley lenentine kelly may lauren metts emily miller gregory morrison jordan nalley jason pimsler ester schwartz stephen shepherd jeffrey stahl deepa surendranath rob thew james wines

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

cori wojdak


CORY WILKERSON Beaumont Center Fall 2012

ADVISOR: Katherine Ambroziak

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Beaumont Center is a teaching kitchen, meal center, library and community garden. It is sited in the Beaumont neighborhood of Knoxville and is proposed to be a surrogate home for the community. In the Beaumont neighborhood, the center provides the low-income area a place to go for fresh produce and healthy meals prepared for the community by the community. The design pulls from the surrounding community and is reflective of the gabled roofs on the houses that surround the building. Large volumes with attached courtyards differentiate the main programmatic spaces from the auxiliary spaces and provide a large spatial experience for the occupants. The program is organized around an interior street which connects the program elements together and leads visitors outside to the community garden where the street terminates at a butterfly pavilion. To enter the center, visitors must ascend a twelvefoot elevation change then enter the building where you are welcomed by a landscaped interior plaza where the entrances to the main program spaces are located. In this interior street one can come to relax, grab a healthy snack or continue through on the way to the community garden.


The Graduate Architecture Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, fosters students to make meaningful impacts to the world through research, design and scholarly work. Distinguished for its project-based education and research, the program has pushed its students to pursue multi-disciplinary learning that re-invents conventional design/build operations and explores innovative uses of sustainable methods in the built environment. As the only professionally-accredited graduate architecture program in the state, it has become a leading force in pushing research in areas of urban design, sustainability, high-performance buildings and conservation and stewardship.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Architecture | Graduate


KATE ARMSTRONG Considering Preservation, Porosity and Progress: A Case Study for the Legacy of Regional Modernism in Sarasota, Florida

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

ADVISORS: George Dodds, Avigail Sachs, Tricia Stuth

Sarasota High School, designed by Paul Rudolph in 1958, physically embodies the central ideas of Regional Modernism that developed in Sarasota, Florida in the 1950s. Covered breezeways, monumental sunshades, deep overhangs and sliding glass doors promote natural ventilation and sun shading as ways to deal with Florida’s hot climate. As an example of progressive architecture of the time, it is a seminal work of Rudolph’s and significant to Sarasota’s architectural legacy of climatically responsive, modernist buildings that captured international attention. Sixty years later, Sarasota High School is now unoccupied and in a state of disrepair. The school board released plans in 2007 to rehabilitate it after razing Riverview High School, another nationally recognized Rudolph design. A battle between preservationists and the school board has since ensued over the recent renovation plans, which will potentially erase the most significant, character-defining elements of Rudolph’s Sarasota High School. In my analysis of the complexities surrounding Rudolph’s building, I am proposing the reinvigoration of Sarasota High School at three scales: a re-design of the campus, a selective adaptation of the 1958 building and a systems intervention to achieve optimal thermal comfort. A unified master plan will bring ideas of sun shading and temperature amelioration to the entire campus. In the building, a mixture of editing Rudolph’s form and inserting new program will make it functional as a 21st-century learning environment. To consider these spaces as living environments, Rudolph’s passive environmental strategies will be paired with active, energy-efficient systems tailored to handle the extreme heat and humidity of Florida. Respecting and responding to Rudolph provides an opportunity to bring Sarasota High School into a heightened state, both critically and technically. The reclaiming of the addition addresses critical conservation as a means of achieving a sustainable, culturally valuable and provocative architectural solution.


BRANTLEY BASS Aging in Urbanity

ADVISORS: John McRae, T.K. Davis, Mary Beth Robinson

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

As the number of Americans over the age of fifty continues to rise, there are growing concerns over the quality and availability of health care facilities. There are those who prefer the idea of growing older in a more suburban landscape and history has proven this to be a normative response to retirement living. Yet, there could be other ways of introducing this type of living in a more accessible, lively and urban environment. There are many different options of living for younger generations and families, so the potential for providing similar options for the aging population is a practical solution. Involving them in the community by location and opportunity, can provide a healthy interaction with people of varying social and ethnic demographics. Positioning them in a more urban and exciting setting can potentially influence a more positive and hopeful outlook on their own futures. History has placed the aging population apart from the hub of community interaction and subsequently segregated their ability to continue to be involved and influential upon society. My thesis will explore the expansion of the retirement community into the urban fabric and the physical, mental and societal implications that the design could positively accentuate.


DANIEL BERGER Re-envisioned Housing in Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati

ADVISORS: Matt Hall, T.K. Davis, Gregor Kalas

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

A new era of urban revitalization has recently occurred in several major US cities, many of which must deal with outdated or dilapidated urban housing choices in inner city neighborhoods. Many of these broken neighborhoods require new housing alternatives. The proposition of this thesis is how can urban architecture alter the economic viability of a neighborhood. How can new housing typologies help to rehabilitate a blighted neighborhood? What social and neighborhood problems can architecture actually address? These questions seek to address the problems that encompass Over-the-Rhine.


JEFF CASTOR Urban Schools: A Way to Better Cities

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, T.K. Davis, Marleen Davis

To bring the school into the urban condition, it must be re-imagined as a school and community center, a place that supports the children’s education, the varied community members and a program beyond the typical 8:00 - 3:00 school day. I propose four key ways this urban school will fulfill the needs of a diverse urban population. The first, BOND, focuses on education and advancement through interaction. The next, MOVE, addresses designing spaces in support of physical activity and that add to the program outside of the typical elementary school program. The third is CARE, promoting the development of the children and the community. The last, GROW, entails protecting the future through a safe and sustainable design.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The lack of public education in urban areas is causing a lack of diversity in urban populations. Because families with young children must retreat to the suburbs for schooling, downtown populations are largely limited to young professionals and empty nesters. Inviting families with children to the city through the provision of quality public education will improve cities economically and socially. The economic improvement comes simply through the number of residents and increased tax revenue. The social benefits are increased safety, vibrancy, stability and civic engagement. Safety comes through “eyes on the street,” an idea from Jane Jacobs in “The Life and Death of Great American Cities”. Because there are people on the streets and people watching the streets, there is less fear of “barbarism” and a greater feeling of safety. Vibrancy and stability are achieved through keeping residents who will be active in civic functions for an entire life cycle.


AUBRIE DAMRON Parking Lots: The Killers of Vibrancy and Culture in Downtowns

ADVISORS: Greg Spaw, George Dodds, Mark Schimmenti

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The purpose of this thesis is to propose a solution to a world wide condition, most noticeable in the US, that is the plague of the downtown parking lot. Vibrancy and local culture are crucial factors to the existence of a successful downtown area, but excessive surface parking lots are not allowing downtowns to grow. These gaps in the fabric of downtown are killing downtown vitality and identity. The current parking lot density in many downtowns is a cause for concern if there is to be continual economic progress and growth. My proposal is to address the issue of prime, underdeveloped land used as surface parking. In the current property tax system, the value of land and value of improvements are calculated together which penalizes those who choose to improve their land and rewards those who do not with lower taxes. I propose a re-engineering of the tax structure, such as a Land Value tax, which emphasizes the value of land and discourages underdevelopment. This will free the land and allow public/private partnerships to construct buildings with highly dense programs that will activate the area and generate revenue to define and revitalize their area.


PETE DUKE The Steel Tower: A Proposal for US Steel’s New Corporate Office Building in Pittsburgh, PA

ADVISORS: Marleen Davis, Ryann Aoukar, James Rose

As the new world headquarters for US Steel, the new 1.5 million square foot facility is situated and developed strategically in Pittsburgh’s Golden Triangle. Its prominent location in the heart of the central business district optimizes public transportation and further enriches the downtown experience.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The building’s height, orientation and grounding are designed to relate to external environmental factors. As a site specific high-rise, view corridors and skyline composition are emphasized. Furthermore, its dominant vertical orientation creates an urban landmark and an observation platform available for public use. The steel mega-structure uses a highly articulated diagrid in an effort to minimize material while accentuating an organized loading strategy. The innovative structuring concept works as a dialogue for steel’s future involvement in 21st century high rise building construction. By combining sheer height and size with an innovative structural system, the Steel Tower seeks to become the tall building among many in Pittsburgh, PA.


SAM FUNARI The Architect As Developer: A New Approach to an Old Problem

ADVISORS: James Rose, T.K. Davis, Robert French

Program: Mixed-use, mid-rise building in downtown Boston, MA to house retail, office and residential spaces.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Abstract: The current architectural landscape of strip malls and big box stores is the antitheses of what nearly every practicing architect avails to while in the security of the academy. Upon entering the real world of budgetary constraints and hard deadlines, it seems that most architects are content to simply earn a paycheck rather than produce meaningful work. This destructive method of designing is a result of a supposed lack of choices and can only be combated when architects have more to lose than their principles. By architects playing the role of both designer and developer, it is possible to see a more sustainable, meaningful and beautiful architectural landscape to emerge. This architecture will ideally be tailored to the specific community in which it resides, it is not meant to be a prototype that can be inserted in any hurting neighborhood, or a top-down solution to a worldwide problem, but rather an example of one possible solution used to inject life back into an under used or undervalued locality.


KATHRYN GREER Urban Transient Spaces:[RE] Appropriating Knoxville, Tennessee’s World’s Fair Park

ADVISORS: Matt Hall, T.K. Davis, Brad Collett

Transient Space: An urban site that way developed for a temporary event or shortterm program.

In this thesis, I will explore urban gaps created by transient events, such as the Olympics, World Fairs and the World Cup. I believe urban environments created to accommodate for these transitory events present an interesting predicament for planners and architects. In several cases, theses sites are not properly developed or programmed for post-event occupancy and create gaps in a city’s urban fabric.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

I will specifically be examining World’s Fair Park in Knoxville, Tennessee. This site was once hosted the 1982 World’s Fair, Knoxville International Energy Exposition. Now, more than 30 years following the event, World’s Fair Park has become what I refer to as an “urban gap”. In my research, I will examine Knoxville, Tennessee’s World’s Fair Park and how it can be further developed with an appropriate scale and program to better blend into the city’s urban context.


ASHLEY LENENTINE Encapsulating History of Place

ADVISORS: Brian Ambroziak, Katherine Ambroziak,

Michael Olson

Architecture has the ability to reveal the culture and history of a place, to support the community and educate society. The design becomes the vessel that retains the history of the place and increases cultural appreciation throughout society. This thesis looks to reinterpret how design responds to a historic context and incorporates culture and memory into the method for new design. A place is an accumulation of layers that tell a story of the past and overlay conditions of the present that enhance the experience of the place. The site, context, history and culture can be identified as various layers that drive time-responsive architecture. The stratification of the site creates a complex ground from which to develop a program to inform society and respond to the culture of the community.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The site that was chosen for investigation through this thesis is located in Cherokee territory. The site is situated along a hiking trail in the mountains of Northern Georgia and is within a protected archaeological zone. The architecture emerges through careful interpretation and revelation of traces within the site. The traditions and culture of the Cherokee are significant as well as the remnants uncovered from the remains excavated on the site. The architecture protects the sacred conditions of the history and educates the public through experiential interpretation. The history and culture of the place is perceived through passage across the terraces revealing the strata that stitch together an authentic understanding of place.


GREGORY MORRISON Main Street: an Avenue of Culture and Commerce

ADVISORS: Avigail Sachs, Katherine Ambroziak,

T.K. Davis

Contemporary interventions should adapt to the present needs of those consuming what is for sale on Main Street. Over time, what has been for sale on Main Street has changed greatly. What started as an area for selling goods to the community is now a major destination for selling the experience of the city to both residents and visitors. The fact that the street always relied on a commercial culture makes its resurrection a viable and authentic avenue for development. The project proposes a new hotel at the intersection of Main Street and Beale Street, currently a parking lot surrounded by several of Memphis’ important cultural icons, as the means of achieving this goal. Ultimately, paying homage to the site’s commercial identity provides an opportunity to represent an authentic memory of Main Street in Memphis – a place particular to its setting and yet recognizable within the greater context of American urban history.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

This project seeks to capitalize on the American Main Street’s historically commercial identity to provide the means of strengthening the presence of this important place in Memphis, Tennessee. We often nostalgically recall Main Street as a homogeneous entity, relegating its existence to the late-nineteenth and earlytwentieth centuries alone. Investigation into the history of Main Streets across the United States, as well as more specific analysis of Main Street in Memphis, TN reveals the fallacy of this assumption. To build in a way that only references this historic part of Main Street’s past not only belies the true history of the street, but also creates problems for its current users. Main Street has had a long and complicated history, making use of multiple building types suited to the everchanging needs of its users.


JASON PIMSLER Revitalization through Rehabilitation: Enhancing Communities through Re-use

ADVISORS: John S. Rabun, Jennifer Akerman, Scott Wall

Program: Master planning an 11.3 acre post industrial complex in the west side of Atlanta and the renovation of a 22,000 sq. ft. saw tooth structure on the site into a cultural center.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Abstract: The densification of an existing community through the implementation of sustainable design principles, such as adaptive reuse, promotes revitalization. The re-inhabitation of the proposed abandoned structure along the BeltLine can lead to further development of the existing arts complex. As part of this revitalization, linkages established along a city-wide master-planned path provide nodal connections between the local art district and the artists of the Goat Farm and educate visitors of the significant industrial history of the area.


ESTER SCHWARTZ Architecture as Pedagogy: Designing Green Schools as Three-Dimensional Textbooks

ADVISORS: John McRae, James Rose, Mark Schimmenti

The goal of this thesis is to demonstrate how architecture can become an important part of educating our children, in healthy environments, priming them to create a sustainable future. Here I propose a study in which a combination of green school design and educational goals set the stage for the attributes of green schools. These become teaching tools that help children develop a conscience of sustainability and complexity of living within the built systems around us. Assuming that school facilities, whether functioning well or not, serve as powerful pedagogical instruments, if the power of these attributes was connected, the impact on learning for the next generation of students would be limitless. School buildings could then provide students with opportunities to connect with themselves, their community and their local environment. Finally, I propose an innovative school design that blurs the distinction between indoors and outdoors, transforming building systems and ecologic design into manifestations for learning. A school that allows teachers to teach kids in multiple styles, allows children to explore themselves and give students the skills they need to succeed in the new economic environment.

A school that also works as a community center, bringing the neighborhood together, with spaces that can be used other than the typical 8:00 to 17:00 daily period.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

A school that fosters participation, where learning becomes not a passive mode of behavior, like in the teacher centered approach, but it is active and creative.


DEEPA SURENDRANATH Aging in a Suburban Context

ADVISORS: Tracy Moir-McClean, Jennifer Akerman,

Avigail Sachs

Retirement and Aging are very important aspects of a person’s life. Yet, these are the most neglected aspects as well. The many changes in environment and quality of life after a person retires are often associated with the conditions faced in old age like diminishing physical ability and disenchantment. The once advantageous suburbs do not help alleviate the situation the elderly face and in fact turn disadvantageous and contribute to the physical or psychological issues faced by the population. These can be addressed through designing a community in which the residents continue to feel independent, get adequate stimulation of the brain and good physical activity as they age. Living arrangements, food, gardening, water and past memories, all affect the lifestyles of the elderly retirees. The quest of this thesis is to design a community that maintains and even improves the quality of life for people after retirement by providing them with a condensed neighborhood which is still connected to the suburbs, but ties into water, gardening and food production and allows them to relive past memories.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The goal of this thesis is to design a sustainable Senior Housing community that provides a smooth transition from being employed to being retired. A successful Aging in Place program maximizes the personal dignity and the functional independence of the resident being retained. Support should be provided only with respect to the individual’s needs (Heumann & Boldy, 1993).


JIM WINES Meeting the Needs of Contemporary Education and Community, Revitalization of the Domino Sugar Factory - Brooklyn New York.

ADVISORS: Gregory Spaw, George Dodds, Matt Hall

This project would activate 1,500 feet of waterfront property on the East River and create a greenway that would be a gateway for this community. The greenway will move residents through the new research center, creating an awareness of the developments taking place there. The research center will support a progressive school that will utilize distinctive architectural design coupled with an innovative educational curriculum. The school will be designed with a digital focus that is on the cutting edge of education reform as competitive schools make a neighborhood attractive to families. By bringing in new jobs, creating greenways, new opportunities in education and encouraging occupancy by residents who have a longer-term commitment to the area, the project will help foster a cohesive community that is invested in the Williamsburg neighborhood.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The revitalization and re-purposing of the Domino’s Sugar Plant will foster a vibrant and engaged community for the local neighborhood in a distinct way differing from the recent history of growth. The plant is located in Williamsburg, a north Brooklyn, New York community, that has been struggling for its identity since the 1970’s. The reprogramming of this abandoned industrial site will include the addition of a new technological research center that will contribute to the economic growth and stability for the neighborhood. At present, most of the new residents live there due to the neighborhood’s proximity to Manhattan. However, the new jobs will help bring more people into the neighborhood who will be committed to both live and work there.


DIPLOMA STUDIO project GRAFT: Grafting Architecture and Urban Agriculture

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, George Dodds, Scott Wall

Architectural education is uniquely positioned to imagine and create the future by critically investigating complex conditions of the present and past. As designers, we examine how to craft space, light and material in the best interest of cultural exchange. This studio will explore the application of sustainable food production methods to the design of the built environment. The underlying goal is to consider how architects can instigate change in the relationship between food and the city, using ecological systems as a model. Through a critical exploration of existing and recent patterns in consumption, agricultural practices, as well as architectural, urban and infrastructural activities, we seek to project a future that is wholly sustainable and culturally enriching. In short, ecologics will be grafted onto design logics.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

This design studio is an ongoing investigation into the potential for a hybridized architecture of food production to help revitalize urban centers spatially, environmentally, economically and culturally. A number of influences support a resurgence of urban agriculture as communities recognize the benefits of returning food production and distribution to city centers. Simultaneously, technological advances have enabled new possibilities for architects. We see an opportunity for critical investigation to suggest specific approaches rooted in a deeper context. We will analyze systems of sustainable food production— specifically permaculture—as a means of synthesizing a new approach in urban design. The approach of Project GRAFT enables shifting agriculture from rural to urban, from horizontal to vertical, from exterior to interior. Grafting blurs distinctions between previously dialectical conditions. The resultant hybrid posits spatial and experiential qualities that can transform what it means to live in the city while promoting environmentally-positive structures.


MATTHEW CLEVER project GRAFT

KELLY MAY FarmBREW

EMILY MILLER Urban Dairy Farm Center

JORDAN NALLEY The Urban Kitchen: A Center for Sustainable Agriculture within the Context of Knoxville’s Old City

SHEHREEN SALEH project GRAFT: An Urban Food Forest

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

CORI WOJDAK Missed Opportunities: Turning Waste into Architecture


KELLY MAY FarmBREW

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, George Dodds, Scott Wall

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The project FarmBREW tests opportunities for comparing seasonal variable growth of crops against a controlled and constant system. The importance of this system is derived from the research of what is seasonal versus what is controlled and constant and how to test these food production methods. The project is used as a vehicle to test what grows locally in Knoxville and inform the local community of these growing techniques. Architecturally, the systems vary in many ways and the project seeks to test these methods through juxtaposing forms. The program of the project was developed as a brewery based on the ingredients needed for the brewing process. Brewing beer consists of four constant ingredients: barley, hops, water and yeast. For the seasonal component, fruits were added to the crop list and function as an additive to the brewing process. The constant ingredients used to brew beer are raised on an aquaponic system to preserve water and create a closed loop system integrating the brewing process and aquaponics as one. The variable ingredients are grown in a system with less control and more exposure to the local climate. The result will be used as a device to inform the local community not only of the processes used, but also what crops are seasonally available in Knoxville.


EMILY MILLER Urban Dairy Farm Center

ADVISORS: Jennifer Akerman, George Dodds, Scott Wall

This project explores the benefits of bringing modern dairy production into the urban context by designing an Urban Dairy Farm in downtown Knoxville. After noting the absent connection between the dairy industry and the city, researched dairy production and associated factors. I was thoroughly impressed by the rapid turn around of a bottle of milk from the goat to the shelf in two days. I was dissatisfied that milk products have to travel a far distance and the fact that a single dairy product can be made from thousands of different goats from every corner of the country. The project becomes a model for how dairy production can be returned to the city to provide fresh, organic, local milk. Instead of having few massive industrial sites nationwide, local milk production can be a major feature of every metropolitan community. A major effort is made to raise awareness of dairy production by combining an urban farm with an educational institute. The last goal of the project is to create a architectural spectacle in the city to promote social and economic development.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The Urban Diary Farm will combine three different program types: the community center, the urban farm and residences. The dairy farm will contain dairy goats for milk production, raise grass for both the dairy goats and local farmers and grow produce to be additives in dairy products. Through the architectural approach of multiple towers among a plinth, a dairy farm and its production can thrive in an urban setting.


JORDAN NALLEY The Urban Kitchen: A Center for Sustainable Agriculture within the Context of Knoxville’s Old City

ADVISORS: Gregory Spaw, George Dodds, Matt Hall

The goal of this project will be to unify sustainable agriculture within the context of Knoxville’s Old City through its connections to local restaurants. This project will provide an urban farm that provides the ingredients that these restaurants need to serve their patrons.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Sustainable agriculture reflects the process in which the quality of growth and cultivation support the environment, economy and the well-being of the community. The blurring of agriculture and the urban context will be supported by an architectural design that relates to the basic principles of sustainable practice. Inherently, the design takes into consideration the available site resources. The site location is in close proximity to Jackson Avenue restaurants and First Creek and is exposed to natural sunlight. The proximity to the local restaurants will enable this project to provide sustainable ingredients for use in recipes. The exposure to an abundance of natural sunlight allows for the plants within the building to grow efficiently. The relationship between First Creek and the Urban Kitchen reflects a revival of the current condition of the creek. The waste water that is existing will fuel an algae bioreactor that is key to the building‘s production of clean water. The design program includes a community center, working farm and a residential component that will support the local restaurants through live/work residences for the chefs, constant development of sustainable cooking practices and the ability to encourage social interaction throughout the community.


CORI WOJDAK farm opportunities

ADVISORS: Gregory Spaw, George Dodds, Matt Hall

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Waste equals food. Americans are wasting forty to fifty percent of edible food per year. This statistic could be cut drastically if we made some improvements on how we think of waste. By creating an urban farm that have both sides of the food processes, production and consumption, we help to eliminate the excess waste at an urban scale, as well as teach visitors how to do the same at a smaller scale. One way we are being wasteful is in the amount of land we are using to grow our crops. We are using more then fifty percent of our land now and statistics claim this will only rise with the growing population. We are also using eighty percent of our freshwater just to grow these crops. This is a huge amount of our resources being used on something we eventually waste. By growing our plants hydroponically, we cut down on the land use by eighty-seven percent and lower our use of water, ironically, by twenty percent. We also have the ability to grow these fruits and vegetables anywhere, allowing almost any city to have access to fresh fruits and vegetables, which opens a new realm of possibilities.


DIPLOMA STUDIO Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews

This course provides a platform for development of the next phase of the Haiti Project. Phase I was begun in 2010, with a team of students and faculty traveling to Fond-des-Blancs, a remote Haitian village, in fall, 2010, to collect material for a spring elective course, 2011, in which a secondary school was designed for the community. This Work was documented in the publicationr One to Another, developed by the students in spring, 2011. The first part of the school has now been completed. The second phase of the work in Fond-des-Blancs followed in spring, 2012 and focused on design of a housing community to include, among other elements, faculty and staff for the secondary school. A second publication, documenting this phase, has now been completed. The next step in the work with Haiti will be in a different community, Ft. Liberté, in the NE corner of the country and will focus on an entirely different project type, a medical clinic.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The work of the semester will include two projects. The first, of relatively short duration, will be the design of an Emergency Mobile Response Vehicle for Haiti. The second, more extended project will be the design of an addition to a small existing medical clinic in the “downtown” area of Ft. Liberté. This clinic is private and is staffed, largely, by Haitian medical personnel. Details of these projects will be described as the semester unfolds.


MITZI COKER Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

LAUREN METTS Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

STEPHEN SHEPHERD

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti


MITZI COKER Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort LibertĂŠ, Haiti

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews

Haitian people die senseless deaths every day from treatable diseases and injuries simply because they cannot reach or afford medical attention. This project is a design expansion to an existing medical clinic in Fort LibertĂŠ, Haiti. The EbenEzer expansion will serve those Haitians typically turned away from the larger government-run hospitals because of their inability to pay. Poverty and the lack of basic life skills are the primary catalysts for the spread of infection and disease. Clean water, adequate sanitation and access to medical care are essential to reducing unnecessary suffering and premature deaths.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The goal of this expansion is not simply about providing the medical rights to the poor; it provides them health security through education and preventative care.


LAUREN METTS Expansion to Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic in Fort Liberté, Haiti

Winner - Tau Sigma Delta Bronze Medal

ADVISORS: John McRae, David Matthews

Haiti is a very impoverished nation where organized, public healthcare is virtually nonexistent. The majority of the population suffers from disease and sickness caused by unclean water and has never experienced a clinic-type setting. More than anything, there is an overwhelming sense of chaos and disorder throughout the nation. Because Haiti is still a developing country, it was a necessity for the design of this medical clinic to accept and implement passive strategies with natural daylighting and natural ventilation. A series of screens act as shading devices from harsh direct sunlight and as a permeable ‘wall’ in the main served spaces to allow for ventilation. The clinic has been designed to blanket outside chaos with a calming sense of organization and way-finding and through the use of bright colors found all around Haiti a sense of comfort and familiarity is achieved throughout the various spaces. Mostly, this medical clinic has been designed to allow the patient to leave with something more than they came in with: new-fangled knowledge.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Because of the lack of clean water in most regions of Haiti, I chose to implement a simple system of water collection, allowing this visual process to take place in the check-in and waiting area, where most patients congergate and wait. From here, they would move into an exam room. En route, patients would pass by the central focus of the exterior courtyard, a solar still, which would be constantly filtering water throughout the day for the clinic’s use, providing them with a better understand of the way in which anyone can produce clean water.


justin bruno william e. copeland III david dalton troy gardner luke murphree danielle norman patrick osbourne james brandon smith xue yue

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

xi wang


An interdisciplinary degree program offered in partnership with the College of Architecture and Design and the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Landscape Architecture Program delivers an education balanced across the applied arts and sciences. It is the first and only program in Tennessee accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board. As a leader in addressing contemporary issues facing landscapes and communities of the state and region, the Landscape Architecture Program prepares its students to become experts, researchers and professionals of natural and constructed environments.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Landscape Architecture | Graduate


JUSTIN BRUNO Breaking the Fast Food Chain: Designing Urban Space to Foster Healthy Eating Habits in America

ADVISORS: Sam Rogers, Jennifer Akerman, Brad Collett

Americans know food well, but few understand where it comes from, how it is produced and distributed, or the uneven access between multiple groups of people. Healthy food and sustainability are hot topics today, but the food industry remains both unhealthy and unsustainable. The lack of access to healthy, local food in cities is causing health of residents to suffer needlessly. Changes are necessary in these communities to incorporate urban agriculture and food education for children. The California neighborhood within the city of Louisville, Kentucky, suffers from limited food access. Urban agriculture can supply local and healthy produce. Growing food combats the problem, but hands-on education about how to maintain gardens and use food produced in their daily diet, is the real solution. Distributing this food to the residents is imperative as well.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Here, I’ll introduce urban agriculture in under-utilized spaces to provide community gardens, resident education and food for the needy. My design serves as a prototype for how food can be incorporated into planning of neighborhoods. This education can make an impact on individual health and the onset of climate change. Overall, it seeks to accomplish these goals and begin to ‘break the fast food chain in America.’


DAVID DALTON Ecological Restoration: Building the Gap Between Science and Design

ADVISORS: Sam Rogers, Joe Bailey, Avigail Sachs

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Ecological Restoration is an act that intends to re-create an idealized ecosystem on a disturbed site. Although it is inherently a design response to a human emotion, it involves the understanding of a very complex language, one that changes perpetually with the arrival of new information. The language is ecology. For the designer, its proper usage is crucial for restoration. Trained scientists derive the language from objective observations, but many concepts are lost in translation for those who are not trained scientists. A shift in educational and informational systems could result in a more efficient ecological alphabet for use by designers or other stakeholders in restoration efforts.


TROY GARDNER Transit Oriented Development: An Alternative to Sprawl

ADVISORS: Brad Collett, T.K. Davis, Avigail Sachs

Transportation modes have historically influenced forms of growth. The personal automobile has had the most impact, producing a form of development known as sprawl. This unplanned form of development has become the dominate pattern of growth in many parts of America, which has brought about a number of social, economic and environmental challenges. In addition to these challenges, sprawl often produces amoebic forms without clearly defined centers. Sprawl typically consists of low-density development, single-use zoning and wide roads. This creates an environment that is almost exclusively designed for vehicles and dangerous for pedestrians. Because sprawl usually lacks an identifiable center, it can be challenging to distinguish between different places in the city.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Other growth patterns may potentially reduce or overcome these negative impacts. One alternative growth pattern is transit-oriented development (TOD). TODs create compact, high-density, walkable, mixed-use centers in greenfields or as redevelopment of existing under-utilized properties near existing or proposed transit stops or corridors. This thesis proposes a TOD in the Donelson community of Nashville, Tennessee, to demonstrate some of the advantages of TOD compared to sprawl and to establish an identifiable center for Donelson.


LUKE MURPHREE Retrofitting Knoxville: A Case Study Comparison of Integrated Stormwater Best Management Practices for Urban and Suburban Neighborhoods

Winner - Tau Sigma Delta Bronze Medal ADVISORS: Brad Collett, T.K. Davis, Avigail Sachs

This thesis proposes a retrofit of suburban sprawl through the application of principles of New Urbanism and Landscape Urbanism in order to reverse these negative impacts, with a focus on enhancing community and sense of place. The community of Halls Crossroads, a ‘bedroom suburb’ of Knoxville, Tennessee has been selected for a suburban retrofit that uses existing New Urbanist retrofit practices from which planners and designers of Halls and similar sprawling suburbs can begin to address issues of isolation, lack of identity and poor sense of community.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Suburban sprawl, characterized by low-density, scattered, single-use development, is an ever-increasing concern for the environment, economy and sense of community in cities today. Sprawling communities have been designed with poor neighborhood connectivity, a lack of walkability and are isolated from public space, jobs and schools. This creates a place that is virtually devoid of social interaction or distinguishing identity. Suburbia constitutes roughly 75% of contemporary development in the United States. Many buildings in these suburban areas are either vacant or out of date and demographic and market shifts indicate a growing demand for more diverse housing types and urbanstyle living. Given current population growth projections, new development strategies must be considered. One such strategy is known as retrofitting suburbia and involves the rehabilitation, adaptive re-use and redevelopment of the built and natural environment in order to induce holistic, long-lasting, transformative change (Dunham-Jones and Williamson vi-xii). While retrofitting suburbs requires a holistic approach to address economic, environmental and social issues, this thesis posits that community building and place-making are fundamental to retrofitting suburbs.


DANIELLE NORMAN Social, Economic and Environmental Benefits of Best Management Practices for Stormwater Runoff in Urban and Suburban Neighborhoods

ADVISORS: John Tyner, Tracy Moir-McClean,

Joanne Logan, Madhuri Sharma

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

This thesis is a case study that compares and contrasts two polarized residential neighborhoods within Knox County and assesses some of the social, environmental and economic impacts of stormwater runoff. Each neighborhood is associated with an impaired water body due to municipal separate storm sewer systems. It proposes a master plan retrofit that incorporates Best Management Practices to reduce these impacts within each neighborhood. The implications of each design are assessed and compared to understand the social, environmental and economic benefits unique to each design and then recommends which design is most beneficial in each area of analysis. The first neighborhood is a low density, high-income suburban neighborhood located within the Sinking Creek Watershed along George Williams Road. The second neighborhood is a high-density, low-income urban neighborhood located within the Second Creek Watershed located in the Oakwood/Lincoln Park Neighborhood. Both watersheds directly contribute to the Tennessee River Watershed and have dominant residential land uses within their fabric. A specific criterion was followed throughout the site selection process to locate the two watersheds, watershed sub-basins and then the neighborhoods being compared within those sub-basins. The selection criterion used in this study is: gross area, land use, median household income, topography, development density and an associated impaired water body.


PATRICK OSBORNE Connection Through (RE)Use: Repurposing

The thesis seeks to promote industrial reuse and sustainable planning principles as catalysts for adaptive redesign of public space in Kingsport, Tennessee. During the middle to late decades of the 19th century, the southeastern United States experienced a period of extreme industrial acceleration, stemming from the mining, manufacturing and transportation advances of the Industrial Revolution. Concurrently, a transatlantic transition toward utopian planning principles was being cultivated by Briton Ebenezer Howard under the Garden City movement. In 1919, American landscape architect John Nolen developed a plan for Kingsport, Tennessee motivated by the principles of Howard’s Garden City model. However, as the town’s industrial, commercial and residential centers expanded and its population increased, newly enacted zoning sanctions led to instances of sprawl and a digression from the core values on which the “Model City” was founded. Today, in an era of post-industrialization, Kingsport’s once thriving factories are now idle landscapes of social, economic and geographic detachment, occupying valuable property that could be reclaimed as public space. The objective of this project is to create a new sense of place for Kingsport through the reclamation of derelict vacant lots and abandoned industrial space as landscapes of economic prosperity, environmental stability and social and cultural connectivity. The redevelopment of abandoned industrial sites in downtown Kingsport as parks and public spaces has the potential to integrate isolated neighborhoods, revitalize a struggling downtown and reconnect the city and its people to the industrial heritage and cultural diversity that helped shape it into the town that it is today.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Kingsport, Tennessee’s Industrial Landscapes


XUE YUE Translating the Cultural Landscape: A Chinese Garden In East Tennessee Honorable Mention - Tau Sigma Delta Bronze Medal

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Cultural landscapes are valuable representations of humans’ interaction with nature. These world’s heritages need to be protected since a lot of them are losing their influence within numerous of cultures in the world. Based on today’s modern context of efficiency and simplicity, the vanishing precious could be translated in a way of extracting the essence rooted in the culture and translated it into distinctive but concise characteristics that can be used in modern landscape design. The Chinese garden referred to in this paper is an example for analyzing the essence accumulated throughout history and the features come out of it that are recognizable. At the The University of Tennessee’s International House, by designing a simplified Chinese garden with translated features base on the essence that is elaborated in this thesis, a place is created for the preservation and spread of culture, as well as benefit and appreciation for all visitors. In this way, these translated cultural landscapes will not only stand as a symbol on their own, but also serve people from all backgrounds and therefore add interesting benefits and diversities to the existing landscape.


MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


IMPRINT.staff

AMANDA GANN

CHLOE LANE

editor-in-chief

web graphics

MARIANELA D’APRILE

CAMILLE LANE

copy editor

cover | stamp

CHRISTINA CLOUTHIER

KENNA CAJKA

managing editor

finance | stamp

WHITNEY MANAHAN

ALLI RANDALL

communications director

finance

SIERRA JENSEN

KELSEY JULIAN

internal communications

graphics

MICHAEL SENA

ELLEN HYRKA

communications

graphics

RICHARD MURRAY

ALEXIS PORTEN

graphics

graphics

HALEY ALLEN

BEN DANCE

web graphics

colunmist

MARION FORBES

CAMERON BOLIN

graphics editor

columnist


Founded in 2013, IMPRINT. is a student-run organization seeking to celebrate scholarship and collaboration between the three disciplines: Interior Design, Architecture and Landscape Architecture. By showcasing past and present student work, we hope to ignite interaction between the College of Architecture and Design and the community in which it resides. IMPRINT. seeks to broaden the perception and understanding of the design and scholarly work produced at the College by documenting its place in the past, its impact on the present and its influence on the future.


IMPRINT. Commencement 2013