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IMPACT Health & Welfare Division Report 2009–2011

www.qualitypublicservices.ie


Front cover photo IMPACT members participated in a number of actions against community sector cuts including the 2010 ‘spectacle of defiance and hope’ pictured on the cover. Photo by Aislinn Delaney.


IMPACT Health & Welfare Division Report 2009-2011

www.qualitypublicservices.ie


CONTENTS

Organisation ............................................................................................................................5 Divisional executive committee ....................................................................................................................................5

Pay and incomes ....................................................................................................................5 Croke Park agreement ....................................................................................................................................................5 Background to Croke Park ............................................................................................................................................5 Minimum pay ........................................................................................................................................................................6 Pensions ................................................................................................................................................................................7 Travel and subsistence....................................................................................................................................................7

Modernisation and industrial relations ........................................................................7 Croke Park agreement: Modernisation ..................................................................................................................7 Health service employment levels ..............................................................................................................................8 HSE framework document ............................................................................................................................................8 Psychology ............................................................................................................................................................................8 Children and family services..........................................................................................................................................9 Social workers......................................................................................................................................................................9 Social care workers ..........................................................................................................................................................9 Community welfare services ........................................................................................................................................9 Procurement ........................................................................................................................................................................9 Finance ....................................................................................................................................................................................9 Population health ............................................................................................................................................................10 Medical laboratories......................................................................................................................................................10 Oral health services........................................................................................................................................................10 HSE West............................................................................................................................................................................10 Labour Court recommendation 19766 ..............................................................................................................10

Community and voluntary sector ................................................................................11

Other issues..........................................................................................................................11 Health services national partnership forum ......................................................................................................11 Transfer policies ..............................................................................................................................................................11 Garda clearance procedures ....................................................................................................................................11 Withdrawn HSE circulars............................................................................................................................................11

Appendices............................................................................................................................13 Appendix one: Salary scales ......................................................................................................................................14 Appendix two: Travel and subsistence rates......................................................................................................21 Appendix three: Vocational groups ........................................................................................................................22


Photo: Michael Crean Photography

Health and Welfare divisional executive committee members

Back row (left to right): Tony Martin, Gerry Dolan (staff), Stephen O’Neill (staff), Robbie Ryan (staff), Jack McCarthy Middle row (left to right): Denis Rooney, Matt Tully, Ruth Robinson, Sinead Wynne, Martin Brideman, Dave Hackett Front row (left to right): Adrienne Byrne, Dolores Callanan, Louise O’Donnell (National Secretary), Siopha O’Reilly, Jacinta O’Sullivan (staff) Divisional Executive Committee members not in photo: Sean Dowling, Eamon Hannan, Patricia Mellsop.


Divisional organisation Divisional executive committee The following were elected to IMPACT’s Health and Welfare divisional executive committee (DEC) at the 2009 divisional conference: Sophia O’Reilly (Cathaoirleach), Adrienne Byrne (Leas Cathaoirleach), Dolores Callanan (third divisional representative on the CEC), Martin Bridgeman, Ashley Connolly, Sean Dowling, David Hackett, Eamon Hannan, Jack McCarthy, Phil McFadden, Patricia Mellsop, Ruth Robinson, Denis Rooney, Matt Tully and Sinead Wynne. Tony Martin and Mick Quinn replaced Ashley Connolly and Phil McFadden when they resigned from the DEC to take up full-time positions with the union.

Pay and incomes Croke Park agreement Public service unions voted to ratify the Croke Park public service agreement by a margin of almost two-thirds in June 2010 and more unions have ratified the agreement since. IMPACT members had earlier voted to accept the deal by a margin of 77% to 23% in a national ballot of the members concerned. The turnout was 57%. The agreement rules out compulsory redundancies or further cuts in public service pay. It also contains important safeguards on pensions and outsourcing and includes a process for the reversal of public service pay cuts if sufficient savings flow from the substantial reforms set out in the deal. The number of public servants fell by around 16,000 between March 2009 and March 2011. This staffing reduction is now generating annual savings of €900 million and substantial additional savings will flow as Government plans for further large-scale staffing cuts are implemented between now and 2015. The Croke Park reform and redeployment measures are designed to maintain and, in some cases expand, services in the face of these huge staff reductions. The ongoing moratorium on public service recruitment and promotion accounts for most of the staffing reductions, although 2,000 left the health service through voluntary redundancy and early retirement schemes at the end of 2010. Between them, the so-called pension levy and pay cuts are also creating additional annual savings of €1.8 billion, while reforms in specific parts of the public service have delivered further significant savings. The website www.implementationbody.gov.ie sets out in detail the savings and reforms being delivered under the agreement.

IMPACT has worked hard to ensure the full and rapid implementation of the agreement and to build and retain support among key opinion formers in Government and elsewhere. IMPACT general secretary Shay Cody and other union leaders met finance minister Brian Lenihan in advance of the IMF negotiations at the end of 2010 and the minister confirmed his Government’s commitment to the agreement. An Irish Congress of Trade Unions delegation met representatives of the IMF, European Central Bank and European Union and discussions also took place with the European Trade Union Confederation. Subsequently, the November 2010 deal agreed between the last Government and the IMF, European Central Bank and European Union specifically said that the Croke Park agreement remains in place. However, the IMF-ECB-EU memorandum of understanding includes a Government requirement to “consider an appropriate adjustment” in the public sector wage bill if the Croke Park agreement does not deliver sufficient savings. IMPACT has also maintained communications with the major political parties, including the new Government parties. In response to questions from IMPACT during the 2011 election, all the major political parties said they would honour the agreement on the understanding that it would deliver very substantial savings and a reconfiguration of public services. However, the agreement continues to attract vocal and generally ill-informed criticism from commentators in the media, business and a small minority of politicians, who support compulsory redundancies and more pay cuts in the public service. This presents a real danger that the political ground could shift unless the agreement is seen to deliver real savings and reforms. For this reason, union representatives on the Croke Park national implementation body have continued to press management for tangible proposals that produce savings, avoid future costs, bring service improvements, or deliver quantifiable efficiency improvements. IMPACT also developed detailed training modules for branch representatives to help them to ensure that the deal is being implemented on the ground and that staff get the protections included in the deal. This training has been delivered to branches in all regions and remains available. delivered to branches in all regions and remains available.

Background to the Croke Park deal The Government-imposed so-called ‘pension levy’ became effective on 1st March 2009. Just before this, IMPACT’s Central Executive Committee (CEC) confirmed that it had no basis to sanction participation in a planned one-day strike after its members voted in favour of industrial action by a margin of 65% in favour and 35% against, which was marginally short of the two-thirds majority required under the union’s rules. Following extensive consultation, which included a joint meeting of the CEC and all five divisional executive committees (DECs), a consultative council meeting, staff meetReport 2009–2011

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ings, and the union’s 2009 divisional conferences, the CEC adopted a statement of campaign priorities, which covered pay, pensions, job security, working conditions, the protection of public services during the recession, and the pursuit of increased investment in public services as the economy recovers. The union then organised hundreds of workplace meetings over the summer of 2009, which were attended by over 10,000 members in total. As a result, a second ballot in September-October 2009 achieved a massive 86% endorsement for industrial action on a 69% turnout. Meanwhile, it became clear that the Government was planning a further public service pay cut. In October 2009 the union also launched a €450,000 advertising campaign, aimed at bolstering its defence of public services and the people who provide them. This included full-page newspaper adverts, nationwide billboard advertising, advertising inside buses and DART trains, a leaflet drop to over a million households, and a ‘viral’ campaign using Facebook, Twitter and the IMPACT website. A 24-hour public service strike took place on 24th November 2009 involving IMPACT and other public service unions. This led to resumed talks with Government representatives after unions received indications that the Government might negotiate an alternative to the imposition of pay cuts. IMPACT entered the talks on the basis of its agreed priorities, but recognised that any agreement would have to find alternative payroll savings. The unions said this could be done through a transformation of public services, which would generate huge savings while protecting services as budgets and staff numbers declined, plus agreed temporary measures to cut payroll costs in 2010 because the transformation was unlikely to generate the necessary savings before 2011. Between the end of November and early December 2009, sectoral negotiations about the transformation of public services had progressed so far that negotiators on both sides had finalised texts on transformation in health, local government, education, and the civil service and noncommercial semi-state bodies. These would have formed agreements in each sector subject to an overall deal being concluded. In addition, 12 days’ compulsory unpaid leave was to be introduced, on a once-off basis, to generate the required payroll savings in 2010. It was agreed that this would be implemented in ways that avoided any adverse impact on services. It was accepted by both sides that the value of the unpaid leave would not be redeemable by staff at any time in the future, and that the measure would not have negatively impacted on those retiring from the public service. The cabinet discussed the proposal at its meeting of 1st December and, following that meeting, the employers’ side confirmed to unions that, although an overall agreement had not yet been reached, the Government accepted that the unpaid leave proposal could form the basis of a deal. As the agreement was being finalized, the ICTU Public Services Committee decided to suspend a second one-day strike planed for 3rd December. Agreement between unions and employers was subsequently reached on the application of the unpaid leave in ways that ensured no adverse impact on services. But at the final meeting

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between Government representatives and ICTU negotiators the employers said the Government had decided not to proceed to conclude an agreement. It had reneged on the proposed deal. The Government’s decision to reject the deal revealed its determination to drive down wages in the public and private sectors. The 2010 budget included pay cuts averaging 7% across the public service, although this was subsequently drastically reduced for a small number of senior civil and public service managers. IMPACT sought legal advice on the imposition of the pay cuts. Industrial action began at the end of January 2010. The action stopped cooperation with any new work practices or modernisation measures, introduced a ‘work to rule,’ and blocked work carried out on a voluntary basis outside of members’ formal contracts of employment. It also required members to refuse to cooperate with staff redeployment or take on work associated with newly vacant posts or unfilled promotional posts, and refuse to perform higher duties without the payment of appropriate allowances. On 8th March the ICTU Public Services Committee announced that there would be a second phase of the industrial action, which would include selective strikes and other forms of disruptive action. On foot of this, renewed discussions between public service management and unions got underway in Croke Park on 12th March. The talks were facilitated by Kieran Mulvey, Kevin Foley, Anna Perry and other senior Labour Relations Commission staff. At the request of Kieran Mulvey, the unions agreed not to escalate the industrial action while the talks were underway, but the work-to-rule remained in place. The talks concluded in the early hours of 30th March 2010. IMPACT subsequently sought and received clarifications on aspects of the proposals, which significantly clarified and strengthened its safeguards for workers. The union then put the proposals to a ballot of members concerned, who backed it by a large majority. The final budget of the outgoing Government imposed a further 10% pay cut for new entrants to public service recruitment grades. Staff who have previously been in temporary or permanent public service employment will not be subject to the % additional cut if they are recruited to the same grade or a grade analogous to their previous employment. This includes those who have previously been on fixed-term contracts or who were on approved breaks in service like leave, temporary assignments or secondments. The additional pay cut, which comes on top of the so-called pension levy and the average 7% pay cut imposed last year, applies to new entrants appointed on or after 1st January 2011.

Minimum pay The new Government elected in February 2011 said it would reverse the €1 an hour cut in the statutory minimum wage. This was a priority campaign issue for IMPACT and ICTU after the cut in the pay floor was introduced by the outgoing Government in its last budget. However, the new administration is to press ahead with


reform of the Joint Labour Committee (JLC) structure, which sets minimum pay and other conditions, above the statutory base, in certain sectors. Unions, who fear the declaration that “reform options will examine the rate of pay for atypical hours” could lead to a reduction in weekend and overtime rates set by JLCs, have vowed to keep up the pressure on the new Government.

Pensions Significant changes in pension arrangements for new entrants to the public service were announced in the 2010 budget. The Government also announced that it was considering significant proposals for an end to the current link between pay increases and pension increases and move to inflation-based pension increases for both existing and future pensioners. Neither was discussed with the unions and IMPACT has indicated its strong opposition to any change in pension terms including arrangements for indexation of pensions in retirement. The Government’s main proposed provisions for the new scheme for new entrants include raising the minimum public service pension age from 65 to 66 years (in line with changes to the old age pension), setting a maximum retirement age of 70 years and basing pensions on ‘career average’ earnings rather than final salary. Public service unions decided to engage with management in an industrial relations framework, as opposed to a consultative process, on the detail of the proposals and details of the scheme for new entrants. An outcome was concluded in the Labour Relations Commission, which was noted by the ICTU Public Services Committee. Legislation is required to give effect to the new scheme.

Travel and subsistence Civil service general council reports 1504 and 1505 set out agreed travel and subsistence rates for the civil service, which are generally applied across the public service. In 2009, the rates were reduced by 25% through legislation. No review of the rates has taken place since June 2008 when civil service unions lodged a claim to the civil service conciliation and arbitration scheme for the implementation of the agreed rates. The claim was processed as far as the arbitration stage. However, the unions judged that the arbitrator was unlikely to find in their favour in the current climate, particularly as Government had imposed the cuts through legislation. Therefore, the unions proposed a joint informal review of travel and subsistence rates in accordance with the normal criteria, which take account of motoring costs, hotel costs and foreign travel. The informal review will take account of figures gathered at the end of April 2011. Agreement to a joint informal review does not imply any change in the existing Government policy.

Modernisation and industrial relations Croke Park agreement: Modernisation Under the Croke Park agreement, each sector is required to establish an implementation body and produce action plans for the implementation of the agreed modernisation measures. A Health Service Implementation Body (HSIB) was established in October 2010 with an independent chair and equal representation from unions and employers. IMPACT national secretary Louise O’Donnell is a member of the HSIB. The health service employers submitted an action plan in October 2010 without prior consultation with unions. An updated action plan, which takes account of 2011 budget measures, was submitted in January 2011. This muchenhanced document was presented to the unions less than 24 hours before it was submitted and, as a result, only minor changes were achievable. The action plans outlines HSE proposals for national-level changes in accordance with the Croke Park agreement and the 2011 health service plan. The HSIB had met nine times by the time this report went to press and is generally meeting every two weeks. Its role is to oversee the implementation of the action plan and to address issues that arise, including disagreements about the scope of the agreement in accordance with the industrial relations forums set out in Croke Park agreement. It has received presentations from senior management charged with delivering performance management development systems, integrated service areas (ISAs), an agency staff tender process and mental health ‘vision for change.’ Briefings on the new children’s hospital, intellectual disability, children and older people, acute services and primary care are scheduled. Government, employers, unions and the IMF-EU-ECB ‘memorandum of understanding’ all acknowledge that the agreement will generate the most substantial savings through the reduction of staff numbers and the subsequent redeployment of staff to protect and, where possible, enhance service delivery in priority areas. Other significant issues earmarked for delivery under the health service action plan in 2011 are the transfer of community welfare officers from the HSE to the Department of Social Protection, laboratory modernisation, centralisation of medical cards, the nursing home support scheme, primary care teams, and shared services in HR, finance and procurement. Progress has been made on a number of these, including the transfer of community welfare officers and changes in the medical labs that will generate €5 million savings a year. Discussions on the implementation of the others are underway.

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A number of health workers have expressed an interest in redeployment and IMPACT has highlighted local management’s reluctance to release these staff members. Six arbitrators have been appointed to deal with situations where staff are earmarked for redeployment and cases can be referred to them if they cannot be resolved locally. The HSIB is working to improve communications about the implementation and operation of the agreement because poor communications has emerged as a barrier to engagement with the process.

Health service employment levels The moratorium on health service recruitment remains in place under the Croke Park agreement. The Croke Park national implementation body has estimated that the total number of public servants fell by 16,000 between 2008 and 2010, which is now generating savings of €900 million a year. Under Croke Park, HSE staff numbers are expected to fall to 2006 levels by the end of 2011. The new programme for government substantially reduced Fine Gael’s election pledge of 30,000 public service job cuts, but its objective of a 22-25,000 reduction by 2015 is a significant increase on Labour’s projected figure. Although they have given little specific detail of which jobs would go, both parties have distinguished between ‘front line’ and other jobs. The programme for government rules out compulsory redundancies. On 1st November 2010 health minister Mary Harney also announced the introduction of a targeted early retirement and voluntary redundancy scheme for staff in management, administration and support grades, which was to be completed by 30th December. IMPACT immediately sought to engage with management on the terms of the scheme, including the timeframe. Management refused to engage and IMPACT referred the issue to the Labour Relations Commission (LRC). Management agreed to engage in the LRC on the management of the consequences of the package, but refused to go to the Labour Court on the terms of the package. On 25th November the LRC produced parameters for dealing with vacated posts and identified processes to be followed. A template for seeking expressions of interest was agreed during further engagements and the union secured agreement that redeployed staff in receipt of acting allowances for more than two years would transfer at their acting grade. We also agreed criteria for the redistribution of work. In total 2,003 people left the system under the packages and IMPACT is still engaging with management in relation to managing the fallout. During the November-December 2010 period, IMPACT vocally raised staff dissatisfaction with the timetable and management of the schemes, and concerns over the management of health services on foot of the exits. This included a letter to health minister Mary Harney and a number of high-profile media initiatives.

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HSE framework document At a Labour Relations Commission (LRC) conciliation hearing at the end of August 2010, IMPACT and the HSE agreed amendments to the framework agreement agreed when the HSE was established. The document was amended to reflect the Croke Park agreement and in accordance with previous Labour Court recommendations. However, a number of related issues remain to be addressed. On the regularisation of staff in acting-up grades, during the Croke Park negotiations the HSE agreed to regularise grades III-VII who were acting for a period of two years or more. The regularisation would only apply to these grades and would be implemented on a cost-neutral basis. The union has been actively seeking the implementation of this. It is currently envisaged that the regularisation would take place within the second quarter of 2011. During discussions on the 2010 exit packages, the union won a further commitment that staff who were redeployed under this process would do so at their acting grade. There were a number of meetings about standardisation of hours and annual leave for certain health grades at the LRC. The last meeting took place on 17th September. Management refused to concede IMPACT’s demand that HSE leave arrangements be rolled out across the health sector on the grounds that it would be cost-increasing. IMPACT disputes this and the issue will be heard in the Labour Court in April 2011. Discussions also took place on the non-payment of a Higher Review Body award to senor health service grades. The Labour Court eventually issued a recommendation. The union has also been pursuing the issue of people who had an expectation under ‘abolition of office,’ although management said in December 2010 that no further progress would be made. Other outstanding issues arising from the framework agreement, LRC hearings and Labour Court recommendations are being pursued.

Psychology In April 2009 IMPACT and the HSE agreed to conduct a joint review of psychology services in the context of ongoing discussions on a number of industrial relations issues. The review was completed in February 2011. It outlines the principles, roles, professional standards and training of health service psychologists and how psychology services could be structured in line with the proposed integrated service delivery model. It also identifies workforce planning issues and sets out an organisational structure for psychology services to ensure quality and competent service delivery. And it reviews the status of the 2002 ‘joint review recommendations’ in the context of HSE reform. The document is a useful and fine initiative in the context of a change agenda.


In the summer of 2009 a national recruitment process was held to fill basic and senior psychologist posts. Over 20 basic grade public service educational and counselling psychologists, who would previously have been eligible to apply for senior posts, were deemed ineligible to complete. The union is addressing the issue in meetings with management.

Social care workers

At the start of the 2010 academic year the HSE attempted to change the trainee psychologists’ contract and force trainees to pay all of their fees in advance. This breached an agreement that the HSE would pay 60% of fees. At a meeting in October 2010 the HSE agreed not to introduce the changes in 2010 and in February 2011 it was agreed that 2010 entrants would have no changes introduced during their three-year academic placement.

The proposed reconfiguration of children and family services is an important development for social care workers. IMPACT is working to reinvigorate the social care workers national vocational group and extensive discussions have taken place with the HSE to draft and agree national job descriptions for social care workers, leaders, deputy managers and managers. Financial constraints and the recruitment moratorium have hampered the progress on a range of issues including the working week, the European Working Time Directive, trainee social care workers, payment of 1/6 in certain locations and employments, and issues outstanding from the 2001 social care workers’ agreement.

Children and family services

Community welfare services

A draft report by PA Consulting, circulated in late 2009, outlined models of integrated care for children and family services. Inspiring Confidence in Children and Family Services has implications for social workers, social care workers, child care managers, family therapists, family support workers and other health professionals. IMPACT engaged with the HSE once the national dispute was resolved by the Croke Park agreement and meetings took place from June 2010. IMPACT said it was willing to engage in a change process in the interest of children and families, but sought clarity about how services would be rolled out. The union said it wanted a properly resourced national HSE office with responsibility for children and families, an indication that the new HSE chief executive supported the proposals, and discussions on a comprehensive set of proposals before any change was implemented. IMPACT wrote to the Minister of State for Children and Families in July 2010 and met him in September. The HSE has said it will put a final document to the union.

As a result of a Government decision, the community welfare service transferred from the HSE to the Department of Social Protection on 1st January 2011. Staff were seconded to the department for nine months, during which industrial relations issues arising from the reorganisation are to be resolved. In accordance with the Croke Park agreement, this will be done with the assistance of the Labour Relations Commission and the Labour Court as appropriate. Once the industrial relations issues are resolved, staff will transfer to the department and become civil servants. There is a dispute over whether generic staff like clerical and administrative workers should be automatically included in the conversion to civil servant status. This matter of interpretation has been referred to the national implementation body of the Croke Park agreement.

Social workers The proposed reconfiguration of children and family services has implications for social workers. The union has also been in discussions with the HSE over structural anomalies in disability and mental health social work. These include the absence of a grading structure for these specialists and the non-implementation of the singlehanded allowance for some members. Financial constraints and the recruitment moratorium have hampered progress on this issue, which the union continues to pursue as part of the change agenda. The filling of elder abuse posts have again have been delayed by the recruitment moratorium and financial constraints.

Procurement Agreement on a national operating model for the HSE procurement function was reached in 2010 and implementation, which began in November 2010, is being monitored by a joint HSE-IMPACT group. The group is addressing difficulties before seeking assistance from outside bodies like the Labour Relations Commission. In early 2011, the HSE issued confirmation that staff in acting and temporary positions are covered by the operating model agreement and will be regularised shortly.

Finance The HSE has briefed IMPACT on a broad overview of proposed changes in the finance function. In accordance with the Croke Park agreement, we have sought details of their priorities and timelines for 2011, the staff affected, the expected impact on staff, and the localities affected. The HSE has agreed to engage in local discussions to address issues arising from its proposals.

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Population health In national discussions, IMPACT told management that the union wants full details of proposed changes in population health and the expected impact on staff. The union has also insisted that the changes takes place within the provisions of the Croke Park agreement.

Medical laboratories The introduction of an extended 8-8 working day over a five-day week in medical laboratories, agreed under in the Labour Relations Commission under the Croke Park deal, will save an estimated €5 million every year. The arrangement was finalised in February 2011, when the Labour Court made a recommendation on how loss of earnings for biochemists and other laboratory staff would be handled. The Court agreed with the union view that loss of earnings for reduced out-of-hours payments should be calculated at 1.5 times the annual loss. This follows the formula agreed for loss of earnings related to redeployment. Local discussions on constructing rosters to facilitate the new arrangement will now take place. Local agreements covering Saturday attendance by clerical and administrative staff and laboratory aides are not altered by the agreement.

Oral health services IMPACT and the Irish Dental Association have had a number of meetings with the HSE over its proposed reconfiguration of dental services, where the focus has been on changes at senior dental practitioner level. The HSE proposes to establish a national oral health office and an inspectorate function to help the dental structure follow the integrated service geographical and management boundaries. Hygienists and dental nurses will be involved in discussions once the senior structures are agreed.

HSE West In July 2010, management in the mid-west said they intended to terminate the contracts of its fixed-term employees. There was no progress in local talks and IMPACT referred the issue to the Labour Relations Commission. Two meetings were held in August and a framework for local discussions, aimed at making savings without dismissing fixed-term workers, was agreed. After two weeks of talks, management acknowledged that innovative ideas had been put forward and it confirmed that its projected budget overspend was down to €65 million from €90 million. Talks continued on making further savings, which were equivalent to 200 full-time staff. By the end of 2010, discussions had resulted in saving that bought the deficit to less than €17 million and no dismissals happened.

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Labour Court recommendation LCR 19766 Labour Court Recommendation LCR 19766 refers to five national claims which affect all the unions. The recommendation established a method of application of sick pay scheme to fixed-term employees in officer grades. It was also agreed that the accrual of annual leave during sick leave would be done on the basis of the relevant Department of Finance circular with effect from 1st April 2010. No agreement was reached on the accrual of annual leave in respect of hours worked above contracted hours so, in accordance with the Labour Court recommendation, the agreements prescribed in the Department of Finance circular 27/03 apply with effect from 1st April 2010. On payment of night duty premium for hours worked after 8pm, the Court recommended that arrangements set out in the HSE terms and conditions of employment document be accepted unless alternative arrangements were agreed between the parties or by any public sector agreement. It was agreed that this would apply to all employees from 1st November 2010 except for those currently in receipt of alternative arrangements. There was no agreement on public holiday entitlement during sick leave and this matter has been referred back to the Labour Court. No hearing date has yet been set.


Community and voluntary sector When the Government introduced its public service pay cuts in December 2009, it was immediately forced to amend the legislation because it had illegally imposed the pay cuts on thousands of community and voluntary sector workers who are not employed directly by the state. Subsequently, the Health Service Executive (HSE) instructed the community and voluntary sector agencies it funds to apply the public service pay cuts and said 2010 funding would reflect this. Although Tánaiste Mary Coughlan told the Dáil that the HSE letter had been sent in error, the HSE continued to seek to impose the policy and proceed with funding cuts. IMPACT has continued to campaign against cuts in the community and voluntary sector. In May 2010, IMPACT’s Boards and Voluntary Agencies branch commissioned a report, written by independent researcher Brian Harvey, on the effects of cuts in the sector. The Harvey report remains the best indicator yet of how the sector has been disproportionately hit by cuts as service demand soars because of the recession. The report estimated that up to 5,000 jobs, or almost 10% of the sector’s workforce, would be lost despite increased demand for services. There are approximately 6,100 voluntary and community organisations in Ireland, employing over 53,000 people. The estimated value of the sector to the economy is €6.5 billion, while state funding is approximately €1.9 billion. The union has taken a number of cases under the Payment of Wages Act where voluntary agencies have moved to impose pay cuts. IMPACT members participated in a number of demonstrations over cuts in services and pay, including a 12,000-strong Dublin protest in September 2009. In September 2010 IMPACT, Siptu and the Community Sector Employers’ Forum hosted a seminar on community sector cuts, which was addressed by the union’s deputy general secretary Kevin. IMPACT members in the sector continue to campaign against spending cuts to services as part of the ‘communities against cuts’ coalition, which includes trade union and community activists. IMPACT members also took part in the ‘spectacle of defiance and hope’ in December 2010. The event, described as “an act of creative resistance to the redundant policies of a redundant regime” brought together a broad range of community and youth organisations, trade unions, cultural groups, students and campaigning organisations from Dublin and beyond.

Other issues Health Services National Partnership Forum (HSNPF) National level social partnership in the health services disintegrated as a result of the imposition of pay cuts and the so-called ‘pension levy.’ This raised questions about the role of workplace partnership and its ability to support the Croke Park agreement, which sets out clear industrial relations procedures for dealing with disagreements between management and unions. An exchange of correspondence between health service unions and management about HSNPF functions was underway as this report went to print. In the meantime IMPACT was in talks about the future roles and reporting relationships of HSNPF staff.

Transfer policies for IMPACT grades The IMPACT Health and Welfare Divisional Executive established a sub-group to engage with management to develop a workable transfer scheme for clerical, administrative and other grades. Some initial work has been done and it is hoped to progress this issue during the coming year.

HSE Garda clearance procedures A number of issues affecting all staff arose in relation to Garda clearance. A sub-committee of the National Joint Council was established to consider them and this work is continuing.

Withdrawn HSE circulars A number of HSE circulars covering acting policy, sick pay, career breaks and other matters were withdrawn because they had not been agreed with the unions.

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Appendices


Appendix one - salary scales Clerical/administrative Figures current 1st January 2010 unless otherwise indicated Clerical Officer 23,187 - 24,276 - 25,362 - 26,452 - 27,542 - 28,626 29,683 - 30,739 - 31,800 - 32,856 - 33,921 - 35,919 37,3411 Grade IV 28,330 - 30,346 - 32,378 - 33,891 - 35,354 - 37,329 38,764 - 40,209 - 41,5471 - 42,8912

Chef, Grade II (without a qualification) 25,158 - 26,010 - 26,801 - 27,656 Chef, Grade I 25,468 - 26,306 - 27,205 - 28,040 - 28,934 - 29,751 30,640 - 31,461 - 32,358 - 33,179 - 34,000 - 34,902 36,028 Chef, Senior 27,122 - 28,209 - 29,229 - 30,079 - 31,180 - 32,063 33,026 - 33,911 - 34,876 - 35,764 - 36,651 - 37,623 38,840

Grade V 40,209 - 41,522 - 42,834 - 44,146 - 45,458 - 46,9801 - 48,4962

Chef, Executive 28,875 - 29,799 - 30,797 - 31,717 - 32,719 - 33,644 34,655 - 35,586 - 36,599 -37,531 - 38,465 - 39,484 40,764

Grade VI 44,849 - 45,954 - 47,291 - 49,795 - 51,295 - 53,1571 - 55,0322

Community Welfare

Grade VII 47,015 - 48,186 - 49,558 - 50,933 - 52,314 - 53,545 54,801 - 56,022 - 57,234 - 59,3221 - 61,4172

Catering Catering Officer, Grade III 28,331 - 30,347 - 32,378 - 33,891 - 35,354 - 37,329 38,764 - 40,209 - 41,5471 - 42,8912 Catering Officer, Grade II 40,209 - 41,523 - 42,833 - 44,148 - 45,459 - 46,9791 - 48,4972 Catering Officer, Grade I 44,849 - 45,954 - 47,289 - 49,797 - 51,293 - 53,1611 - 55,0322 Catering Manager 47,015 - 48,186 - 49,558 - 50,933 - 52,314 - 53,545 54,801 - 56,022 - 57,234 - 59,3221 - 61,4172 Head of Catering 64,812 - 66,403 - 68,904 - 71,413 - 73,903 - 76,404 78,889

Chefs

Community Welfare Officer 29,218 - 31,381 - 33,361 - 35,299 - 37,199 - 39,020 40,839 - 42,675 - 44,451 - 46,246 - 48,084 - 49,849 51,652 - 53,5321 - 55,4182 - 57,2463 Superintendent Community Welfare Officer 61,966 - 64,257 - 66,518 - 68,748 - 70,978 - 72,264 74,5161 - 76,7672

Draughtsman/Technicians Draughtsman/Technician II 27,489 - 28,521 - 29,536 - 30,546 - 31,544 - 32,568 33,567 - 34,592 - 35,604 - 36,568 - 37,632 - 38,8861 - 40,1342 Draughtsman/Technician I 37,632 - 38,277 - 39,117 - 39,961 - 40,788 - 41,628 42,395 - 43,8071 - 45,2252

Supplies Officers Supplies Officer Grade D 28,499 - 29,426 - 30,351 - 31,280 - 32,207 - 33,134 34,066 - 34,993 - 35,919 - 37,3411

Cook Trainee 18,455 - 20,811 - 23,147

Supplies Officer Grade C 32,378 - 33,891 - 35,354 - 37,329 - 38,764 - 40,209 41,5471 - 42,8912

Chef, Grade II (with a qualification) 25,158 - 26,010 - 26,801 - 27,656 - 28,521 - 29,294 30,135 - 30,913 - 31,765 - 32,816

Supplies Officer Grade B 40,209 - 41,523 - 42,833 - 44,148 - 45,459 - 46,9791 - 48,4972

1 = After three years service at the maximum. 2 = After six years service at the maximum. 3 = After nine years service at the maximum.

14

IMPACT Health & Welfare Division

These scales do not include the imposed ‘public service’ levy introduced in 2009, but do reflect reduced pay rates introduced in 2010. Pay scales for new entrants to certain grades were reduced by a further 10% from 1st January 2011. See www.impact.ie for more information.


Nursing Grades

Supplies Officer Grade A 44,849 - 45,954 - 47,289 - 49,797 - 51,293 - 53,161 - 55,0322

1

Student Nurse III 24,014 Post Registered Student Nurse 25,975 - 27,523

Technical Services Officers Assistant Technical Services Officer 40,370 - 42,095 - 43,811 - 45,531 - 47,254 - 48,971 50,687 - 52,408 - 54,137 - 55,9041 - 57,6692 Senior Assistant Technical Services Officer 46,732 - 48,467 - 50,206 - 51,944 - 53,683 - 55,422 57,161 - 58,892 - 60,637 - 62,372 - 64,3731 66,3482 Chief Assistant Technical Services Officer 62,275 - 64,217 - 66,143 - 68,036 - 69,934 - 71,824 73,705 - 76,1161 - 78,5012 Technical Services Officer 79,234 - 81,114 - 82,991 - 84,871 - 86,748 - 88,633 91,4701 - 94,3092

General Grades Dental Nurse (formerly dental surgery assistant with qulification) 24,076 - 25,121 - 25,993 - 26,861 - 28,097 - 29,251 30,168 - 31,293 - 32,717 - 33,250 - 34,261 - 35,527 37,444 - 39,712 - 42,4871 Dental Surgery Assistant (without qualification) 24,076 - 25,121 - 25,993 - 26,861 - 28,097 Dental Nurse Senior 39,929 - 41,439 - 42,795 - 44,014 - 45,496 - 46,757 48,140 Fire Prevention Officer 46,733 - 48,467 - 50,206 - 51,944 - 53,683 - 55,422 57,161 - 58,892 - 60,637 - 62,372 - 64,3731 66,3482

Staff Nurse (including registered midwife, registered sick children's nurse, registered mental handicap nurse) 30,234 - 31,710 - 33,189 - 34,666 - 36,137 - 37,408 38,683 - 39,952 - 41,222 - 42,469 - 43,8001 Senior Staff Nurse 45,954 Dual Qualified Nurse 34,100 - 36,312 - 37,492 - 38,399 - 39,400 - 40,731 42,028 - 43,938 - 45,2711 Senior Staff Nurse (dual qualified) 47,497 Clinical Nurse Manager 1 43,288 - 44,100 - 45,245 - 46,408 - 47,554 - 48,708 49,993 - 51,191 Clinical Nurse Manager 2/Clinical Nurse Specialist 47,089 - 47,886 - 48,559 - 49,659 - 50,874 - 52,067 53,260 - 54,604 - 55,852 Clinical Nurse Manager 3 54,336 - 55,430 - 58,199 - 59,288 - 60,382 - 61,491 Clinical Instructor 49,176 - 49,988 - 50,589 - 51,705 - 52,829 - 54,042 55,262 - 56,480 - 57,697 Nurse Tutor 55,599 - 56,368 - 57,133 - 57,903 - 58,671 - 59,441 60,206 - 60,977 - 61,746 - 62,514 Principal Nurse Tutor 58,359 - 59,479 - 60,501 - 63,696 - 64,814 - 65,855 67,134 - 68,849 Student Public Health Nurse 31,504

Home Help Organiser 40,209 - 41,523 - 42,833 - 44,148 - 45,459 - 46,9791 - 48,4972

Public Health Nurse 45,857 - 46,634 - 47,297 - 48,342 - 49,544 - 50,708 51,881 - 53,199 - 54,426

Home Helps (pay path) 27,504 - 27,994 - 28,494 - 28,987 - 29,492 - 30,044 30,525

Assistant Director of Public Health Nursing 54,339 - 57,380 - 58,629 - 59,780 - 60,943 - 62,535

Home Helps (non-pay path) 27,884 - 28,041 - 28,199 - 28,287 - 28,376 - 28,466 28,552 - 28,642 - 28,730 - 28,827 - 28,918 - 29,016 29,109 Nursery Nurse 29,724 - 30,604 - 31,337 - 32,094 - 32,858 - 33,613 34,374 - 35,153 - 35,928 - 36,714 - 37,4321

1 = After three years service at the maximum. 2 = After six years service at the maximum. 3 = After nine years service at the maximum.

Director of Public Health Nursing 71,978 - 74,084 - 76,197 - 78,309 - 80,419 - 82,532 Assistant Director of Nursing (band 1 hospitals) 54,870 - 55,952 - 56,996 - 60,201 - 61,210 - 62,382 63,477 - 64,566 - 68,853 Assistant Director of Nursing (all other hospitals) 52,059 - 53,189 - 54,339 - 57,379 - 58,629 - 59,780 60,943 - 62,534

These scales do not include the imposed ‘public service’ levy introduced in 2009, but do reflect reduced pay rates introduced in 2010. Pay scales for new entrants to certain grades were reduced by a further 10% from 1st January 2011. See www.impact.ie for more information.

Report 2009–2011

15


Director of Nursing Band 1 73,106 - 75,069 - 77,035 - 78,995 - 80,956 - 82,925 84,885

Cardiac Catherisation Technician, Senior 42,611 - 43,914 - 45,291 - 46,700 - 48,151 - 49,498 52,8301 - 56,1672

Director of Nursing Band 2 68,940 - 70,811 - 72,686 - 74,554 - 76,433 - 78,306 80,180

Cardiac Catherisation Technician, Chief I 46,521 - 47,507 - 48,817 - 50,088 - 51,360 - 52,619 55,8741 - 59,1942

Director of Nursing Band 2A 73,232 - 74,539 - 75,849 - 77,154 - 78,465 - 79,769 81,078

Cardiac Catherisation Technician, Chief II 47,888 - 50,265 - 52,583 - 54,913 - 57,280 - 60,332 63,7871 - 67,0532

Director of Nursing Band 3 63,652 - 65,061 - 66,447 - 67,821 - 69,190 - 70,570 71,939

Care Assistants (intelectual disibility agencies) 26,590 - 27,031 - 27,746 - 29,434 - 31,409 - 31,942 33,269 - 34,261 - 35,070 - 35,977 - 36,6801

Director of Nursing Band 4 59,410 - 61,238 - 63,060 - 64,890 - 66,688 - 68,462 70,232

Chiropodist 37,743 - 38,982 - 40,031 - 41,118 - 42,191 - 43,293 44,389 - 45,484 - 46,638 - 47,851 - 49,062 - 50,0331

Director of Nursing Band 5 55,513 - 56,737 - 57,959 - 59,178 - 60,399 - 61,626 62,849

Chiropodist Senior 50,134 - 51,224 - 52,348 - 53,463 - 54,578 - 55,750 56,987 - 58,220 - 59,208

Health and Social Care Professionals Analytical Chemist, Executive Without Branch E Cert 46,730 - 48,467 - 50,205 - 51,944 - 53,681 - 55,421 57,157 - 58,892 - 60,635 - 62,372 - 64,3731 66,3482 Analytical Chemist, Executive (Advanced practitioner) 52,662 - 55,020 - 57,350 - 59,706 - 62,077 - 64,437 66,750 - 69,7001 - 71,8042 Audiologist 33,005 - 34,174 - 35,136 - 36,103 - 37,111 - 38,106 39,064 - 39,8301 Audiologist, Senior 41,808 - 43,484 - 44,563 - 45,792 - 47,043 - 48,321 Audiologist, Chief 48,321 - 50,950 - 53,644 - 56,402 - 59,225 - 62,113 Biochemist 37,518 - 38,611 - 39,650 - 42,109 - 43,700 - 45,306 46,938 - 48,568 - 50,203 - 51,851 - 53,510 - 55,188 56,818 - 57,9391 Biochemist, Senior 52,871 - 55,310 - 57,474 - 59,688 - 61,968 - 64,210 66,489 - 68,712 - 70,951 Biochemist, Principal 64,253 - 68,296 - 72,007 - 75,711 - 79,429 - 83,134 87,242 - 89,979 - 92,735

Clinical Specialist Chiropodist 55,564 - 56,654 - 57,776 - 58,893 - 60,006 - 61,180 62,415 - 63,648 - 64,638 Clinical Engineering Technician 31,749 - 32,423 - 33,780 - 36,463 - 38,456 Clinical Engineering Technician Senior 39,828 - 41,834 - 44,029 - 46,350 - 48,831 - 51,314 53,845 - 55,8031 - 57,6332 Clinical Engineering Technician Principal 55,891 - 57,760 - 60,335 - 62,084 - 63,581 - 65,300 Clinical Engineering Technician Chief 58,408 - 60,723 - 63,117 - 64,959 - 66,863 - 68,739 70,808 - 72,554 Counsellor Therapist - National Counselling Service 46,529 - 49,141 - 51,756 - 54,368 - 56,982 - 59,594 62,206 - 64,820 - 67,379 - 69,922 - 72,465 - 75,002 Director of Counselling - National Counselling Service 87,593 - 89,497 - 91,403 - 93,308 - 95,212 - 97,117 99,021 - 101,918 - 105,199 Dental Hygienist 37,860 - 39,188 - 40,406 - 41,670 - 42,945 - 44,232 45,677 - 46,440 - 47,756 - 48,895 - 50,054 - 51,0391 Dietitian 37,743 - 38,982 - 40,031 - 41,118 - 42,191 - 43,293 44,389 - 45,484 - 46,638 - 47,851 - 49,062 - 50,0331

Biochemist, Top Grade 89,899 - 94,124 - 97,566 - 101,064 - 104,615

Dietitian, Senior 50,134 - 51,224 - 52,348 - 53,463 - 54,578 - 55,750 56,987 - 58,220 - 59,208

Cardiac Catherisation Technician 37,466 - 38,273 - 39,168 - 41,511 - 42,931 - 44,355 47,8661 - 51,3202

Dietitian Clinical Specialist 55,564 - 56,654 - 57,776 - 58,893 - 60,006 - 61,180 62,415 - 63,648 - 64,638

1 = After three years service at the maximum. 2 = After six years service at the maximum. 3 = After nine years service at the maximum.

16

IMPACT Health & Welfare Division

These scales do not include the imposed ‘public service’ levy introduced in 2009, but do reflect reduced pay rates introduced in 2010. Pay scales for new entrants to certain grades were reduced by a further 10% from 1st January 2011. See www.impact.ie for more information.


Dietitian, Manager 60,641 - 62,858 - 65,072 - 67,242 - 69,400 - 71,559 73,713

Medical scientist, Chief 58,683 - 61,347 - 63,690 - 66,029 - 68,365 - 70,655 73,005 - 75,283 - 77,575

Dietician Manager-in-Charge III 71,169 - 72,293 - 73,414 - 74,597 - 75,840 - 77,082 78,077

Neuropsychological Measurement Technician 37,466 - 38,273 - 39,168 - 41,511 - 42,931 - 44,355 47,8661 - 51,3202

Dosimetrist 36,128 - 37,826 - 39,409 - 41,186 - 42,586 - 43,954 46,483 - 47,938 - 49,458 - 50,973 - 52,901 - 53,582 54,6401

Neuropsychological Measurement Technician, Senior 42,611 - 43,914 - 45,291 - 46,700 - 48,151 - 49,498 52,8301 - 56,1672

Dosimetrist, Senior 51,868 - 54,536 - 56,930 - 59,352 - 61,792 - 63,602 65,434 - 67,231

Neuropsychological Measurement Technician, Chief I 46,521 - 47,507 - 48,817 - 50,088 - 51,360 - 52,619 55,8741 - 59,1942

ECG Technician, Student 22,670 - 23,481 - 24,072

Neuropsychological Measurement Technician, Chief II 47,888 - 50,265 - 52,583 - 54,913 - 57,280 - 60,332 63,7871 - 67,0532

ECG Technician (with a formal qualification) 27,992 - 28,564 - 29,183 - 30,869 - 31,863 - 32,850 33,933 - 34,933 - 35,965 - 38,2991 - 40,6532

Occupational Therapist 37,743 - 38,982 - 40,031 - 41,118 - 42,191 - 43,293 44,389 - 45,484 - 46,638 - 47,851 - 49,062 - 50,0331

ECG Technician (without a formal qualification) 27,992 - 28,564 - 29,183 - 30,869 - 31,863 - 32,850 33,933

Occupational Therapist, Senior 50,134 - 51,224 - 52,348 - 53,463 - 54,578 - 55,750 56,987 - 58,220 - 59,208

ECG Technician, Senior 35,623 - 36,538 - 37,518 - 38,522 - 39,568 - 41,8541 - 44,0802

Occupational Therapist, Clinical Specialist 55,564 - 56,654 - 57,776 - 58,893 - 60,006 - 61,180 62,415 - 63,648 - 64,638

ECG Technician, Chief I 38,100 - 38,933 - 40,015 - 41,075 - 42,319 - 44,4961 - 46,6552

Occupational Therapist, Manager 60,641 - 62,858 - 65,072 - 67,242 - 69,400 - 71,559 73,713

ECG Technician, Chief II 40,657 - 41,940 - 43,162 - 44,396 - 46,125 - 48,3391 - 50,6512

Occupational Therapist, Manager-in-charge III 71,169 - 72,293 - 73,414 - 74,597 - 75,840 - 77,082 78,077

Environmental Health Officer 40,370 - 42,095 - 43,811 - 45,529 - 47,254 - 48,973 50,688 - 52,408 - 54,135 - 55,9031 - 57,6642

Orthoptist 37,743 - 38,982 - 40,031 - 41,118 - 42,191 - 43,293 44,389 - 45,484 - 46,638 - 47,851 - 49,062 - 50,0331

Environmental Health Officer, Senior 46,733 - 48,467 - 50,206 - 51,943 - 53,681 - 55,422 57,159 - 58,892 - 60,638 - 62,375 - 64,3741 66,3502

Orthoptist, Senior 50,134 - 51,224 - 52,348 - 53,463 - 54,578 - 55,750 56,987 - 58,220 - 59,208

Environmental Health Officer, Principal 62,275 - 64,217 - 66,145 - 68,038 - 69,932 - 71,822 73,725 - 76,1161 - 78,5042 Medical Scientist 34,498 - 35,501 - 36,455 - 38,712 - 40,172 - 41,646 43,144 - 44,640 - 46,141 - 47,654 - 49,176 - 50,717 52,213 - 53,2411 Medical Scientist, Senior (without FAMLS) 47,979 - 50,189 - 52,150 - 54,156 - 56,222 Medical Scientist, Senior (with FAMLS) 47,979 - 50,189 - 52,150 - 54,156 - 56,222 - 58,253 60,344 - 62,414 - 64,500 Specialist Medical Scientist 53,410 - 55,619 - 57,580 - 59,586 - 61,653 - 63,683 65,767 - 67,781 - 69,810 1 = After three years service at the maximum. 2 = After six years service at the maximum. 3 = After nine years service at the maximum.

Pathology Technician, Basic 30,383 - 31,216 - 32,060 - 32,893 - 33,725 - 34,558 35,392 - 36,230 - 37,064 - 37,897 - 38,652 Pathology Technician, Senior 32,911 - 34,104 - 35,301 - 36,496 - 37,691 - 38,887 40,085 - 41,280 - 42,475 - 43,672 - 44,877 Pharmaceutical Technician Student 24,550 - 25,494 - 26,439 Pharmaceutical Technician 34,768 - 35,688 - 36,607 - 37,526 - 38,446 - 39,365 40,284 - 41,204 Pharmaceutical Technician, Senior 42,862 - 43,797 - 44,733 - 45,669 - 46,605 - 47,542 Pharmacy Student 24,031 These scales do not include the imposed ‘public service’ levy introduced in 2009, but do reflect reduced pay rates introduced in 2010. Pay scales for new entrants to certain grades were reduced by a further 10% from 1st January 2011. See www.impact.ie for more information.

Report 2009–2011

17


Pharmacist 35,368 - 38,265 - 41,016 - 43,799 - 46,595 - 49,425 52,271 - 55,171 - 58,122 - 61,130 - 62,3381

Physicist, Chief 97,969 - 100,757 - 103,547 - 105,821 - 109,1291 112,4322

Pharmacist, Senior 59,427 - 62,204 - 63,093 - 63,979 - 65,086 - 66,325 67,641 - 69,936

Play Therapist, Basic 37,743 - 38,982 - 40,031 - 41,120 - 42,191 - 43,293 44,389 - 45,484 - 46,638 - 47,851 - 49,062 - 50,0331

Pharmacist, Chief II 66,883 - 71,237 - 73,781 - 76,926 - 80,286 - 83,763

Play Therapist, Senior 50,134 - 51,224 - 52,348 - 53,463 - 54,576 - 55,752 56,987 - 58,220 - 59,208

Pharmacist, Chief I 75,739 - 79,212 - 80,573 - 82,456 - 84,544 - 86,674 Phlebotomist Trainee 18,648

Play Specialist, Basic 37,710 - 38,814 - 40,009 - 41,112 - 42,123 - 43,318 44,018 - 45,525 - 46,629 - 47,824 - 49,019 - 49,9841

Phlebotomist 30,392 - 32,062 - 33,511 - 34,980 - 36,457 - 37,971 38,716

Play Specialist, Senior 48,664 - 49,881 - 51,190 - 52,688 - 53,998 - 55,224 56,328 - 57,078

Phlebotomist, Senior 33,701 - 35,605 - 37,239 - 38,933 - 40,620 - 42,363

Psychologist, Trainee Clinical (pre 2006) 40,866 - 42,757 - 44,630

Photographer Clinical (basic grade) 29,431 - 31,443 - 32,971 - 34,435 - 35,898 - 37,330 38,764 - 40,173 - 41,620 - 42,988 - 44,110 - 45,5871 - 47,0572

Psychologist, Trainee Clinical (post 2006) 35,761 - 37,652 - 39,525

Photographer Clinical (senior grade) 44,110 - 45,426 - 46,741 - 48,016 - 49,330 - 50,638 51,943 - 53,288 - 55,2331 - 57,1772 Physiotherapist 37,743 - 38,982 - 40,031 - 41,118 - 42,191 - 43,293 44,389 - 45,484 - 46,638 - 47,851 - 49,062 - 50,0331 Physiotherapist, Senior 50,134 - 51,224 - 52,348 - 53,463 - 54,578 - 55,750 56,987 - 58,220 - 59,208 Physiotherapist, Clinical Specialist 55,564 - 56,654 - 57,776 - 58,893 - 60,006 - 61,180 62,415 - 63,648 - 64,638 Physiotherapist, Manager 60,641 - 62,858 - 65,072 - 67,242 - 69,400 - 71,559 73,713 Physiotherapist Manager-In-Charge III 71,169 - 72,293 - 73,414 - 74,597 - 75,840 - 77,082 78,077

Psychologist, Clinical 53,983 - 56,324 - 58,652 - 60,959 - 63,864 - 68,209 72,096 - 76,034 - 79,241 - 81,7151 - 84,1942 Psychologist, Senior Clinical 78,344 - 80,146 - 81,964 - 83,771 - 85,565 - 86,253 88,9491 - 91,6492 Psychologist, Principal Clinical 91,015 - 93,135 - 95,260 - 97,369 - 98,960 102,0361 - 105,1122 Director of Psychology 98,959 - 101,332 - 103,708 - 106,081 - 107,875 111,2361 - 114,5972 Radiographer 36,186 - 37,256 - 38,344 - 39,446 - 40,518 - 41,586 42,695 - 43,777 - 44,825 - 45,901 - 47,011 - 48,0541 Radiographer, Senior 44,068 - 45,782 - 47,567 - 49,379 - 51,215 Clinical Specialist Radiographer 49,591 - 52,162 - 54,345 - 56,530 - 58,758

Physicist 39,435 - 41,435 - 43,420 - 45,764 - 47,308 - 48,789 52,560 - 54,165 - 55,860 - 57,553 - 59,242 - 60,951 61,893

Radiographer Service Manager I (formerly radiographer, superintendent I and II) 51,484 - 54,324 - 56,733 - 59,165 - 61,644

Physicist, Senior 60,795 - 63,550 - 66,283 - 68,963 - 71,647 - 74,327 77,008 - 79,691 - 82,1621 - 84,8622

Radiography Service Manager II (formerly radiographer superintendent III) 56,177 - 58,842 - 62,495 - 66,187 - 69,852

Physicist, Principal 76,277 - 81,569 - 86,954 - 92,390 - 97,420 100,4601 - 103,4962

Regional Public Analyst, Deputy Without Branch E Cert 64,556 - 66,176 - 67,741 - 69,352 - 70,916 - 72,513 74,8241 - 77,2102

1 = After three years service at the maximum. 2 = After six years service at the maximum. 3 = After nine years service at the maximum.

18

IMPACT Health & Welfare Division

These scales do not include the imposed ‘public service’ levy introduced in 2009, but do reflect reduced pay rates introduced in 2010. Pay scales for new entrants to certain grades were reduced by a further 10% from 1st January 2011. See www.impact.ie for more information.


Regional Public Analyst, Deputy With Branch E Cert 69,745 - 71,125 - 72,501 - 73,902 - 75,275 - 76,663 79,1051 - 81,6332

Speech and Language Therapist 37,743 - 38,982 - 40,031 - 41,118 - 42,191 - 43,293 44,389 - 45,484 - 46,638 - 47,851 - 49,062 - 50,0331

Regional Public Analyst 80,890 - 82,638 - 84,369 - 86,114 - 87,859 - 90,6781 - 93,5872

Speech and Language Therapist, Senior 50,134 - 51,224 - 52,348 - 53,462 - 54,577 - 55,750 56,986 - 58,219 - 59,208

Respiratory Technician 37,466 - 38,273 - 39,168 - 41,511 - 42,931 - 44,355 47,8661 - 51,3202

Speech and Language Therapist, Clinical Specialist 55,564 - 56,654 - 57,776 - 58,893 - 60,006 - 61,180 62,415 - 63,648 - 64,638

Respiratory Technician, Senior 42,611 - 43,914 - 45,291 - 46,700 - 48,151 - 49,498 52,8301 - 56,1672 Respiratory Technician, Chief I 46,521 - 47,507 - 48,817 - 50,088 - 51,360 - 52,619 55,8741 - 59,1942 Respiratory Technician, Chief II 47,888 - 50,265 - 52,583 - 54,913 - 57,280 - 60,332 63,7871 - 67,0532 Trainee Social Care Worker 27,026 - 28,460 - 29,689 Social Care worker (with a qualification) 33,325 - 34,550 - 35,788 - 37,031 - 38,294 - 39,577 40,851 - 42,148 - 43,451 - 44,3061 Social Care Worker (without a qualification) 33,325 - 34,550 - 35,788 - 37,031 - 38,294 - 39,577 40,851 - 42,148 - 43,451 Social Care Leader 44,063 - 45,047 - 46,031 - 48,631 - 49,636 - 50,637 51,650 Social Care Manager Children's Residential Centres 53,463 - 54,634 - 57,728 - 58,923 - 60,115 - 61,321

Speech and Language Therapist, Manager 60,640 - 62,859 - 65,072 - 67,243 - 69,400 - 71,559 73,714 Speech and Language Therapist Manager III 71,169 - 72,293 - 73,414 - 74,597 - 75,840 - 77,082 78,077 Chief Executive Officer - HSE Midland Area, Mid-Western Area, North Eastern Area, North Western Area, Programme Managers from EHRA, Chief Executive Beaumont, St. James, St. Vincent's, Mater, Adelaide and Meath (inc NCH) hospital, General Manager University College Hospital Cork, University College Hospital Galway, Programme Managers (formerly EHB) 145,959 Grade VIII, Financial Accountant, Management Accountant, Internal Auditor Health Boards 64,812 - 66,403 - 68,904 - 71,413 - 73,903 - 76,404 78,889 Functional Officer (formerly EHB) 69,181 - 70,867 - 73,534 - 76,221 - 78,886 - 81,558 84,219

Social Worker 35,945 - 37,841 - 39,802 - 41,767 - 43,723 - 45,707 47,666 - 49,171 - 50,680 - 51,6801

Deputy CEO - Beaumont, St. James's, Mater and Tallaght Hospital 86,600 - 90,339 - 94,076 - 97,814 - 101,551 105,290

Professionally Qualified Social Worker, Medical Social Worker and Psychiatric social Worker 43,132 - 45,242 - 47,351 - 49,462 - 51,570 - 53,677 55,789 - 56,8891

Deputy General Manager - Cork University Hospital and Galway Regional 84,026 - 87,650 - 91,272 - 94,897 - 98,519 - 102,143

Social Work Practitioner, Senior 48,157 - 50,318 - 52,509 - 54,693 - 56,869 - 59,039 61,206 - 62,3071 Social Worker Senior Medical/Single Handed 55,789 - 57,408 - 59,028 - 60,648 - 62,266 - 63,886 65,506

Technical Services Manager - St Vincent's Hospital 53,489 - 55,021 - 56,582 - 58,110 - 59,676 - 61,216 Technical Services Officer Mater, Tallaght Project, Technical Services Manager - Beaumont and St. James's 51,660 - 53,876 - 55,123 - 56,340 - 57,544

Social Worker, Team Leader 55,789 - 57,408 - 59,028 - 60,648 - 62,266 - 63,886 65,506

Engineering Officers (formerly EHB), Mater, St. James's, Tallaght, Beaumont and Crumlin 51,293 - 53,513 - 54,782 - 56,012 - 57,234 - 59,3221 - 61,4152

Social Worker, Principal 63,886 - 66,754 - 69,576 - 72,399 - 75,221 - 78,047

Chief Ambulance Officers (formerly EHB) 61,940 - 63,925 - 65,916 - 67,870 - 69,810 - 71,850

1 = After three years service at the maximum. 2 = After six years service at the maximum. 3 = After nine years service at the maximum.

These scales do not include the imposed ‘public service’ levy introduced in 2009, but do reflect reduced pay rates introduced in 2010. Pay scales for new entrants to certain grades were reduced by a further 10% from 1st January 2011. See www.impact.ie for more information.

Report 2009–2011

19


Chief Ambulance Officers - (HSE non-Eastern Regional Area health areas) 64,812 - 66,403 - 68,904 - 71,413 - 73,903 - 76,404 78,889 Child Care Manager (where parity exists) (formerly non-EHB) 69,181 - 70,867 - 73,534 - 76,221 - 78,886 - 81,558 84,219 Chief Execuitve/Secretary Managers (voluntary hospitals) Group 1 86,600 - 90,339 - 94,076 - 97,814 - 101,551 105,290 Chief Executive/Secretary Managers (voluntary hospitals) Group 2 64,812 - 66,404 - 68,904 - 71,413 - 73,903 - 76,404 78,890

1 = After three years service at the maximum. 2 = After six years service at the maximum. 3 = After nine years service at the maximum.

20

IMPACT Health & Welfare Division

These scales do not include the imposed ‘public service’ levy introduced in 2009, but do reflect reduced pay rates introduced in 2010. Pay scales for new entrants to certain grades were reduced by a further 10% from 1st January 2011. See www.impact.ie for more information.


Appendix two - travel and subsistence rates

Motor Mileage Rates Scale A Rates per kilometre effective from 12th March 2009 Official motor travel in a calendar year

Engine capacity up to 1200cc cent

Engine capacity 1201 to 1500cc cent

Engine capacity 1501cc and over cent

up to 6,437km 6,438km and over

40.11 21.70

47.82 24.33

60.88 29.43

Engine capacity up to 1200cc cent

Engine capacity 1201 to 1500cc cent

Engine capacity 1501cc and over cent

64.54 34.91

76.94 39.14

97.95 47.36

Rates per mile effective from 12th March 2009 Official motor travel in a calendar year up to 4,000 miles 4,001miles and over

Motor Cycle Allowance Rates per mile effective from 12th March 2009 Official motor travel in calendar year

Engine capacity up to 150cc cent

Engine capacity 151cc to 250cc cent

Engine capacity to 251cc to 600cc cent

Engine capacity 601cc and over cent

up to 4,000 miles 4,001 miles and over

23.29 15.07

32.34 21.42

38.16 24.61

46.01 28.31

Rates per kilometre effective from 12th March 2009 Official motor travel in calendar year

Engine capacity up to 150cc cent

Engine capacity 151cc to 250cc cent

Engine capacity to 251cc to 600cc cent

Engine capacity 601cc and over cent

up to 6,437 km 6,438km and over

14.48 9.37

20.10 13.31

23.72 15.29

28.59 17.60

Domestic subsistence rates Effective 12th March 2009 Class of Allowances

A1 B2

Night Allowances

Day Allowances

Normal Rate

Reduced Rate

Detention Rate

10 hours or more

5 hours but less than10 hrs

108.99 107.69

100.48 92.11

54.48 53.87

33.61 33.61

13.71 13.71

1 Salary of €55,780 and above 2 Salary of €55,779.99 and below

Report 2009–2011

21


Appendix three – vocational groups Ambulance Officers John O’Brien, 21 River Valley Avenue, Swords, Co Dublin. Audiologists Ann Marie Gallagher, Audiology Dept, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont, Dublin 9. Biochemists Ger Collier, Biochemistry Department, St Vincent’s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4. Catering Officers Yvonne Dowler, General Hospital, Mullingar, Co Westmeath. Child Care Managers John Martin, Child Care Manager, Health Service Executive South, Wexford Local Health Office, Georges Street, Wexford. Chiropodists Carmel Devine, c/o County Clinic, Bindon Street, Ennis, Co. Clare. Clinical Engineering Professionals Bernard Murphy, Biomedical Engineer, Cork University Hospital, Cork. Clinical Measurement Scientists (Cardiac Cateterisation) Ann Simpson, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Clinical Measurement Scientists (GI) Patricia Lawlor, St. James’s Hospital, PO Box 580, James’s Street, Dublin 8. Clinical Measurement Scientists (Respiratory) Michelle Agnew, St. James Hospital, PO Box 580, James Street, Dublin 8. Clinical Measurement Scientists (Vascular) Clare Dooley, Vacular Medicine Department, Tallaght Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Community Welfare Officers Des Stone, HSE - Eastern Region, The Maltings Business Park, Marrowbone Lane, Dublin 8.

Family Support Workers Bernie Brady, HSE - Dublin North East, Community Child and Family Services, Drumalee Cross, Cavan. Fire Prevention Officers Nicholas Keogh, Central Office, HSE - Midland Region, Ardeen Road, Tullamore, Co. Offaly. FOI/DP Liaison Officers Liam Quirke, HSE - Western Area, Merlin Park Regional Hospital, Galway. General Managers Mary Murphy, National Contract Office, Block 8, St Stephens Hospital, Sarsfieldcourt, Glanmire, Co Cork. Grade IV-VII Patricia Mellsop, Midlands Regional Hospital, Tullamore, Co Offaly. Grade VIII Eamon Hannon, Chairman, Laughil, Ardagh, Co Longford. Healthcare Risk Managers Debbie Dune, HSE Community & Primary Care Services, Unit 7, Swords Business Campus, Balheary Road, Swords, Co Dublin. Health Service Librarians Ann Murphy, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Health Promotion Andy Walker, Heart Health Team, Carnegie Centre, Bishop Street, Newcastle West, Limerick. Home Help Organisers Brona DePhaor, Leinster Walk, Kildare Town, Co Kildare. HSE Capital Projects & Technical Service Project Managers Arthur Ward, HSE - Western Area, Gate Lodge, Merlin Park Regional Hospital, Galway. Information and Advice Officers Charney Weitzman, Child Care Unit, Tullamore General Hospital, Tullamore, Co. Offaly.

Dental Surgery Assistants Una Breathnach, HSEWestern Region, Shantalla Health Centre, Shantalla, Galway.

Internal Auditors John Banks, HSE - North Western Region, 10 The Mall, Co Sligo.

Dental Surgeons Joe Mullen, HSE - North Western Region, Community Care, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co Leitrim.

Instructors Sheila Duddy, St Joseph’s Training Centre, Snipe Avenue, Newcastle, Galway.

Dieticians Ita Saul, Our Lady’s Hospital for Sick Children, Crumlin, Dublin 12.

Irish Development Officers Bairbre Uí Theighneáin, Oifigeach Forbartha Gaeilge, Inniúlacht Corporáideach, Lár-Oifig, Bord Sláinte Lár Tíre, An Tulach Mhór, Co Uíbh Fhaillí.

Dosimetrists Louise O’Neill, St Lukes Hospital, Highfield Road, Rathgar, Dublin 6. Draughtsman/Technician Rosaleen McDonagh, Technical Services Department, Gate Lodge, Merlin Park Hospital, Galway.

Maintenance Supervisors and Officers (Health Boards) Stephen McLaughin, St. Mary’s Hospital, Castlebar, Co. Mayo. NCS Helen O’Malley, Penrose Warf, Penrose Quay, Cork.

Environmental Health Officers Shane O’Flynn, North Lee Community Care, HSE South, Floor 3, 26 South Mall, Cork.

Occupational Guidance Officers Donal Hoban, HSE Western Region, St Mary’s Hospital, Castlebar, Co Mayo.

Executive Analytical Chemists Liam Dolan, Dublin Public Analyst Laboratory, Sir Patrick Duns, Lower Grand Canal Street, Dublin 2.

Occupational Therapists Emma Benton, Meath Community Care, Child & Family Centre, Navan, Co Meath.

22

IMPACT Health & Welfare Division


Orthoptists Sheila Callanan, Boherquill, Lismacaffrey, Co Westmeath. Personnel Officers Mary Kelly, HSE - Northern Area Region, Swords Business Campus, Swords, Co. Dublin. Pharmacists Eileen Butler (HPAI), Our Lady’s Hospital for Sick Children, Crumlin, Dublin 15. Pharmacy Technicians Nóilín O’Hora, Senior Pharmaceutical Technician, Pharmacy Department, St Luke's Hospital, Highfield Road, Rathgar, Dublin 6. Physicists Niamh Byrne, Adelaide & Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Physiotherapists Clodagh Barry, Central Remedial Clinic, Vernon Avenue, Clontarf, Dublin 13. Play Therapists Audrey Gregan, St Paul’s Hospital, Beaumont, Dublin 9. Psychologists Veroinica Doherty, Tallaght Hospital, Dublin 24. Public Health Nurses Eileen McCarrick, Kilbarrack Health Centre, Kilbarrack, Dublin 13. Regional Directors of Care/Regional CoOrdinators/Regional General Managers Maria Flemming, HSE Eastern Region, Mill Lane, Palmerstown, Dublin 20. Regional Materials Managers John O’Donovan, Materials Management, HSE - Southern Region, St Finbarr’s Hospital, Douglas Road, Cork. Secretary Managers Nicky Jermyn, CEO, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4. Social Care Workers Kevin O’Connell, HSE, Loughmahon, Bessboro Road, Mahon, Co Cork. Social Workers Neans Ni Rathaille, HSE, Social work Department, St James Hospital, Dublin 8. Specialist Property Managers Martin Beirne, HSE Property Management, Waterfront House, Bridge Street, Co Sligo. Speech and Language Therapists Frances Shinkins, SLT Department, Mater Misercordiae Hospital, Eccles Street, Dublin 7. Supplies Officers Frank Nicholson, Central Supplies, Shragh Road, Tullamore, Co Offaly. Technical Services Bernard Pierce, Chief Assistant Technical Services Officer, HSE - Western Region, Gate Lodge, Merlin Park Regional Hospital, Galway.

Report 2009–2011

23


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Health & Welfare Divisional Report 09-11