OVERDOSE

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created by imogen downs

OVER OVER DOSE ose


the university edition

TIGM


part one: another night? part two: under pressure part three: i want to go UCD home 798 an at

exploration university

the into through

experienced stigmas artists by art

you can find more at

@imogen_downs_art


‘Another Night?’

Photography & Editing by Imogen Downs Model: Sophie Brasher




Photography & Editing by Imogen Downs Model: Jessica Harrison

‘Another Night?’



...unless there is someone to walk you home or an app that shares your live location or a phone call long enough to get you back safe or a taxi too expensive to describe, all of which shouldn’t be neccessary as a student just trying to enjoy a social experience.

This photoshoot illustrates how women no longer feel safe going out in Norwich, evenings out are almost a thing of the past...


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‘Another Night’ Linoprint, A5 Imogen Downs


sexualise me, I dare you I dare you

only

% of students reported their sexual assault to their univeristy according to the student news site, The Tab, 2021 Sexual Assault Survey that asked 4,000 students about sexual assault on campus. Nearly 60% of woman alone reported to have been sexually assaulted at university.



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feel getting catcalled in the street is unnecessary is far from fact. Establishing he pervasive stigma surrounding a safe space where topics such as body female sexuality affects girls and women positivity, sexuality and expression can be of all ages; whether you’re a “prude” or explored is imperative to the development a “whore”, (one of the two you have to of a generation that sees past the taboo decide nowadays), there is no way women topics that unrightfully halt conversation. in todays society can express and celebrate their sexual desires, thoughts and needs. ‘By speaking honestly, we create a We are exposed to objectification even by culture that embraces female sexuality the most simplest and innocent of acts, without demeaning it, a culture that serving as a daily reminder not to take the honors the most basic human desires indignities of other people too personally. and the beauty of women’s bodies. girls deserve nothing less.’ The concept that women and adolescent Our girls facilitating a discussion about how Naomi Katz, 2016, Why Is There Still a uncomfortable it may have made them Stigma Connected to Women and Sex?

‘sexualise me, I dare you’ Ink on paper, triptych, A5 Imogen Downs


Women cultivating the confidence to express a blatant and completely normal sexual appetite can stem from art and literature as the concept of the male gaze is scrutinised in contemporary studies. Judy Chicago, best known for founding the feminist art movement of the 70s, has received much criticism for her “vulgar” depiction of the female anatomy, despite the false and maledominated history of the female nude in art. Chicago’s work was radical and, alongside other twentieth century feminist artists such as Hannah Wilke and Guerrilla Girls, sort to revise the presumptuous prurience of female expression and promote feminist conversations.

The stigma surrounding female lust is repeatedly addressed in the media to illuminate to our ‘enlightened generation’ that women can actively seek sexual fulfilment without having to tolerate the sexist and misogynistic expectation that they must gratify the pleasures of another. The patriarchal society we live in leaves men believing in the common mistake that the attention they give women for their raw sex appeal is warmly welcomed - even in the art world. They are wrong; you are wrong. ‘sexualise me, I dare you’ illustrates the change in representation of the female nude in art, evolving alongside society with the twenty-first century youth having a more passé view. However, there is a long way to go before it becomes less something you have to be “brave” enough to express and more of something we do with no worry or paranoia surrounding us in the form of social media, social stigmas and the pressure we put on ourselves.


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These collages tell two stories. The first narrates the pressure women face at university to be feminine, innocent, and also not to be. The second illustrates the pressures we all face when tackling the concept and question of identity through finding people to live with, be friends with, and create life-long memories with; a decision to not take lightly.

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In reality, this stigma is created for ourselves by ourselves; we are our own worst enemy. It is common to eventually find that when we are our true selves, we feel most comfortable and it is a lot easier to find those like you and to find places that suit your character best. Places of common interests and social meeting places become a more prevalent part of your life when you start to explore with others and find new comfort zones as a cohort.

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banANana girl BAnaNA Boy ’robot check series’

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‘The robot check series in my practice has stemmed from an increase in digital learning since the start of covid-19. Students, especially young people, are expected to understand technology like a second language as they have grown up with it. The glitch, freeze, shut down, stress, no storage building building building. Computer crashed, work lost, is it normal to feel this angry over an electronic device? The pressure to conform to the digital age,

“take a photo on your phone”, “I’ll email it to you” is there ever an option to join this digital world? Not if you want to do a degree, even in the arts, submission of work is often digital. Paired with automated checks that almost mock your intelligence, “select the images with a car” how about you select the images with a car if your so clever computer.’

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Norwich based artist and student at NUA.

@bananagirlbananaboy

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@nicolafayephotography


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but as a strength and incentive to ressure isn’t something that is do better by ones self not by others. always applied to study and social encounters, but there is always an Architecture is arguably one of the underlying sense of stress, to be the most challenging degrees in the UK, best or to just be considered the best. and George Butler-Fenn, third year Architecture student at NUA, sent It can bring out an ugly side to people me photos of his sketchbook from his like competitiveness and jealousy, but recent project. I edited these photos it can also bring out the best qualities. layering the strokes and drawings, encorporating negative light and Universities should teach you to colour. This piece conveys a sense utilise that stress and pressure of urgency and stress that students placed on students from themselves, of creative subjects, as well as the teachers and parents, and turn it academic, struggle with day-to-day. into motivation, drive and teamwork. It is titled, ‘Adomania’, meaning the sense that the future is arriving ahead Another good quality stemming from of schedule. This is what I find most being under pressure is that it allows for distressing about the final year of my empathy and less judgment of others degree; the fear of the unknown and as you find yourself more preoccupied the terrifying prospect that maybe with your own feelings and start seeing I’ve left it too late to start worrying things from a different perspective. about what is next. It comforts me, as it should you, that there is The stigma against feeling the always someone out there thinking pressure at university is one of the and feeling the same affliction we most unhealthy stigmas there is; it all place on ourselves and others, in needs to be seen not as a weakness both our studies and all the above.

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University, it’s the start of the rest of your life they say. You wave your parents good bye from the pavement looking around at your new family: 11 strangers, adults, supposedly. You are all about embark on the same journey into adulthood, but none of you can stop the feeling you’re missing something. Homesickness is as common as a cold; any emotion of nostalgia, anxiety or loneliness can be associated with it. Despite university being full of activity, friendship and other fulfilling things to do, paradoxically, your early twenties is one of the loneliest experiences of your life. There’s a stigma surrounding adults experiencing homesickness; ‘confessing to homesickness as an adult can feel like admitting that you’ve failed as a grownup’ (Stauffer, Adults Can Get Homesick, Too, 2018).

Due to the increased mobility of adult-hood, most people lack roots in their community, causing an uncertainty and lust for the sense of security felt only at “home”. In reality, this “home” is only “elsewhere”, with changing routines and intertwining relationships taking everyone out of their comfort zones even further as social distancing comes to an end. There should be no stigma about experiencing homesickness as an adult as it encourages establishing new roots in a new place, and change is only something that should be embraced and used for personal development. That feeling of missing the past, both in a physical and emotional way, is a testament to the strength of the sense of place.

a symptom of HMMESICKNESS:

MONACHOPSIS

“there’s solace to be found in knowing that homesickness means there is something worth missing” (Stauffer, Adults Can Get Homesick, Too, 2018)


HOME A W AY FROM Home


I think what I admire so much about the average student, is their ability to live life and get through the most troublesome situations with a ‘que sera sera’ attitude.


making wide angle shots of Norwich using my panoramic film camera, I see Norwich differently it’s familiar or is it? is it to you? or am I just trusting my gut Norwich feels comfortable, it feels like home. but its not my home I know that questionable contradictions but still, I know it like the back of my hand every road every lane it is my home home away Imogen Downs




Today, 16:20

“i’m going playhouse” “just passing playhouse” “at the playhouse having a pre pint before mischief” “yeahh really nice actuall went playhouse” “think i’m going to socialist meeting at playhouse later” “just left playhouse, but I might see u later”

Playhouse, Imogen Downs

a compilation of the texts on my phone featuring the word playhouse


Norwich

is my home away from home. I live here, reside here, love here, but I’m not from here. I sometimes feel uneasy and foreign walking around the lanes and one way roads; I’ve been here nearly 3 years and I still don’t have the same attachment I have with Cambridge. Over the past few months, since exploring Norwich further, taking my camera wherever I went, I realised Norwich is my home, but a different version of home. Different places can make you feel a certain way and catalyse memories from just a scent or skyline. Even when digitally tampered with, I still recognise my home away from home.




when i think of home, i see my garden, but the memories fade; i express this using glitches and distortion i create whilst taking the images using a panorama setting on my iPhone


the concept of home is not

black and white


Photography and Text by Imogen Downs

Do we consider home to be a concept of the past or do we regard it as a statement of the present? Your determination between memory and your sense of place will affect the considered location of your home and, in turn, your identity. At university, identity is what sets you apart as individuals, which makes us question whether the home of our childhood should be placed on the same pedistal as the place we enter adulthood alone, experience together and move on from, curiouser.


Lewis is a third year film student living in Norwich, here are his opinions on homesickness and his ideal of home... “i dont get homesick a lot because im emotionally independent and i dont associate place with emotion, ill go where ever i want to in the moment because i have the freedom to do so it’s not that i dont have feelings about my home before university, i see it as Norwich being my next move which is exciting to me, not sad the people are what i miss the most”


Kareem is an artist and former student still living in Norwich. “I’ve never really seen home as a home as much. I’ve been someone who’s very much go go go and out and about, so the feeling of moving to uni seemed to be a natural progression in that “go go go” mindset. Home to me is where I feel the most comfortable and Norwich is that for me right now with the people around me. Since dropping out of uni the feeling towards hasn’t changed - I don’t think. I guess I haven’t thought about it too much so I guess it’s not a thing that has that much on impact on me. I think living in the now and location you are really sets a place as your home and right now Norwich is my home.”


to some, home is simply a place, a small, isolated location that makes their connection to that even more powerful.

i explored this using a digital film camera i picked up in a charity shop in Norwich using black and white film to capture the character of the places and people i see.











Natures Cerebral Evocation,

2022, Screen Print on card, 27cmx27cm By Imogen Downs is being shown at the Graduate Show (Festival 22) at NUA from Saturday 28 May to Tuesday 31 May 2022 in Guntons basement. the glitching effect created by the screen printing process perfectly captures the array of different aspects of the photo captured in my garden at home. Using the panoramic setting on my iPhone, I stretched the image multilpying fruits, leaves and stems signifying the slowly degrading memories of natural locations as places evolve, develop and become reclaimed by nature itself.


Snowdonia, 2022, Digital Drawing



with special thanks to the following: Sophie Brasher Jessica HaRRison Ashley Foster BanANana girl bAnaNA Boy Nicola Faye Bates George Butler _ fENN Lewis ParkeR Kareem Codabaccus Matilda Downs michael dOWNS


OVERDOSE Created by

Imogen Downs