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NEWS

Progress made in developing greenhouse gas strategy for international shipping

NEWS

The magazine of the International Maritime Organization WINTER 2017

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NEWS

Ocean change requires global solutions - UN Oceans Envoy

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FEATURE

Global treaty to halt invasive aquatic species enters into force

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FEATURE

IMO promotes fishing vessel safety agreement to save lives


IMO NEWS

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IMO NEWS

WINTER 2017

CONTENTS

OPINION

Looking back, 5  looking forward

FEATURE

FROM THE MEETINGS

Global treaty to halt invasive 14  aquatic species enters into force

on carriage of 17 Sub-Committee cargoes and containers

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IMO promotes fishing vessel safety agreement to save lives

on 19 Sub-Committee implementation of IMO instruments

Convention / 23 London London Protocol

NEWS

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Progress made in developing GHG strategy for international shipping

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New warning on hazards of carrying bauxite by ship

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Unsafe mixed migration by sea – an ongoing humanitarian challenge

Change requires 10 Ocean solutions - UN Oceans Envoy

IMO AT WORK

holds workshop on drafting 11 IMO national legislation

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World Maritime Day 2017 –

12 Connecting Ships, Ports and People

MANAGING EDITOR Lee Adamson Email: ladamson@imo.org 4, Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom

ASSISTANT EDITOR Natasha Brown Email: nbrown@imo.org

Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210

EDITORIAL PRODUCTION Mark Combe

Email: imonews@imo.org Website: www.imo.org

ADVERTISING Sally McElhayer Email: SMcElhay@imo.org Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611

Ref N174E

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News and stories from around the world on IMO’s work to promote safe, secure and sustainable shipping on clean oceans

IMO News is the magazine of the International Maritime Organization and is distributed free of charge to qualified readers. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of IMO and the inclusion of an advertisement implies no endorsement of any kind by IMO of the product or service advertised. The contents may be reproduced free of charge on condition that acknowledgement is given to IMO News.

Please allow at least ten weeks from receipt at IMO for additions to, deletions from or changes in the mailing list. Design by FLIPSIDE www.flipsidegroup.com Copyright © IMO 2017 Printed by Micropress Printers, Suffolk, UK, using vegetable based inks and with FSC accreditation. www.micropress.co.uk

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IMO NEWS • WINTER 2017Secretary-General Kitack Lim A message from IMO

OPINION IMO AT WORK

Looking back, looking forward N

ext year, IMO will celebrate its 70th anniversary, and we are The rules and regulations adopted at IMO can be difficult planning a series of events and initiatives to commemorate or challenging for the industry to comply with. But nothing truly this landmark. I sincerely hope all readers of IMO News will be worthwhile is ever easy. IMO’s mission is to promote safe, secure, able to participate in some of them. environmentally sound, efficient and sustainable shipping; and The theme we have selected for next year – “Our heritage – these are the yardsticks by which we should measure better shipping for a better future” – looks both at the past and our success. into the next 70 years that lie ahead. It provides an opportunity to IMO is actively working towards the 2030 Agenda for reflect and showcase how IMO has adapted over the years as a Sustainable Development and the associated Sustainable crucial player to the global supply chain. Development Goals. Indeed, supporting Member States in With shipping transporting more than 80 per cent of global their implementation of the 2030 Agenda is enshrined in the trade to people and communities all over the world, it is clear that vision statement captured in our new strategic plan. Because our actions have an effect beyond the ships we regulate. IMO most of the elements of the 2030 Agenda will only be realized represents the collective views and decisions of its 172 Member with a sustainable transport sector supporting world trade and governments; and they represent the billions of ordinary people, facilitating the global economy, aspects of IMO’s work can be all over the world, who rely on shipping every day of their lives, linked to almost all of the individual SDGs. whether they realise it or not. Much has been said and written about the “blue economy”. These people are IMO’s constituency; and these people need The search for growth in this sector is a balancing act. The varied a viable, sustainable shipping industry. Their prosperity, their and sometimes conflicting stakeholders all have a legitimate well-being and, in some cases, their very survival, depend on it. interest in the process, while the overall health of the seas Therefore, when IMO regulates about themselves is a common concern. issues related to safety, security, human What is needed is collaboration IMO is actively element and protection of the marine within and across different sectors to environment, the overarching objective address impacts and reduce conflicts. working towards the is to ensure that the people of the world The various actors and stakeholders 2030 Agenda for can continue to benefit from shipping in a in shipping and transport have a sustainable development manner that meets modern expectations tendency to operate in isolation and the Sustainable about safety, environmental protection and from each other. We often find that so on. areas such as maritime safety and Development Goals. navigation, port and infrastructure development, transport policy, environmental protection, fisheries, security, customs and border control all fall within different departments or different ministries. And yet, in reality, all these areas are linked to one another and have a mutual influence and bearing on each another. Although IMO is primarily concerned with regulations for ships, in a world where shipping is part of a continuum, can the international regulatory authority really be confined to dealing only with ship-related matters? I don’t think so. Indeed, there are countless areas where our work also impacts ashore, as clearly stated within the IMO Convention – from safety and traffic facilitation, efficiency of navigation, through security to environmental protection, we share so many areas of mutual concern with other stakeholders in the logistics chain. Establishing a sustainable maritime transportation sector is essential to the development and growth of the world’s economy as we move forward. We must develop a coordinated and integrated approach to maritime policy and ocean governance.

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Progress made in developing GHG strategy for international shipping

More than 50 Member States attended a week-long meeting to further IMO’s greenhouse gas strategy.

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he second meeting of IMO’s Intersessional Working Group on Reduction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions from Ships (23-27 October) made progress in starting to shape a draft initial GHG strategy, including refining the vision for IMO, which will express IMO’s further commitment to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping. While the structure of the strategy has been largely agreed, the detailed text to be included is still under discussion. A wide range of detailed proposals were put forward for inclusion in the draft initial strategy, relating to the vision, levels of ambition, guiding principles, candidate measures, barriers and supportive measures and follow up actions. The group agreed that the draft strategy should incorporate a process for its periodic review. The group agreed that candidate short-term measures could be finalized and agreed by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) between 2018 and 2023; candidate mid-term measures could be finalized and agreed by the MEPC between 2023 and 2030; and candidate long-term measures could be finalized and agreed by the MEPC beyond 2030. Dates of

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entry into force and when the measure can effectively start to reduce GHG emissions would be defined for each measure individually. The group supported the need for early action. The group highlighted the need to consider carefully the potential impact of measures on States, particularly the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS). The group also recognised the need to address barriers and provide supportive measures, including capacity building and technical cooperation; and research and development especially into alternative fuels. The aim is to reach consensus at the next meeting. IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said, “The working group made considerable progress in bringing together the proposals for the different elements of the draft IMO GHG strategy. I am confident that Member States will continue to work on this ahead of the next working group session, to build convergence so that the draft initial IMO GHG strategy can be adopted as planned at the next session of the Marine Environment Protection Committee in April 2018.” The Working Group’s report, along with other submissions, will go forward to the

third Intersessional Working Group session, scheduled to meet 3-6 April 2018. The third session is expected to finalize a draft initial IMO GHG strategy, to be put forward for adoption by the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 72) (9-13 April 2018). This is in accordance with the timeline set out in the Roadmap for developing a comprehensive IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships, which was approved at MEPC 70. IMO has already adopted global mandatory measures to address the reduction in GHG emissions from ships. IMO is also executing global technical cooperation projects to support the capacity of States, particularly developing States, to support energy efficiency in the shipping sector. The Intersessional Working Group on Reduction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions from Ships was attended by more than 200 delegates, from more than 50 Member States. Representatives of international intergovernmental organizations and from a range of international nongovernmental organizations in consultative status with IMO also participated in the meeting.

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IMO NEWS

WINTER 2017

NEWS

New warning on hazards of carrying bauxite by ship I

MO has issued a new warning that bauxite may become unstable when carried in bulk on a ship, potentially causing the vessel to capsize. Bauxite is one of the world’s major sources of aluminium with around 100 million tons transported annually by sea. In 2015, a bulk carrier sank while transporting bauxite, with the loss of 18 seafarers. Research presented to an IMO sub-committee found that certain forms of bauxite with a large proportion of smaller particles could be subject to a newly-identified phenomenon of “dynamic separation” when there is excess moisture in the cargo. In such conditions, a liquid slurry (water and fine solids) can form above the solid material, according to the report of an international Global Bauxite Working Group on Research into the behaviour of Bauxite during Shipping. The resulting free surface effect of liquid sloshing about could significantly affect the vessel’s stability, leading to the risk of the ship capsizing. IMO’s Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC 4, which met 11-15 September at IMO Headquarters), raised awareness of the potential risks posed by moisture and provided new guidance on carriage of bauxite, in the form of a circular aimed at shippers, terminal operators, shipowners, ship operators, charterers, shipmasters and all other entities concerned. The circular requests that extreme care and appropriate action be taken, taking into account the provisions of relevant IMO instruments, when handling and carrying bauxite in bulk. www.imo.org

The circular takes immediate effect, ahead of the next scheduled adoption (in 2019) of the new test methods and relevant schedules for bauxite cargoes during the routine scheduled updating of the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code. The IMSBC Code is the industry rulebook on how to deal with bulk cargoes. The CCC.1 circular updates a previous circular on carriage of bauxite and invites Governments to note that some bauxite cargoes (specifically those with a larger proportion of smaller particles) present a risk caused by moisture and should be treated as Group A cargoes. Excess moisture in such cargoes can lead to a free surface slurry. This can cause atypical motion of the ship (wobbling). The master should take appropriate action in the event of this possible sign of cargo instability The circular includes the draft Test Procedure for Determining the transportable moisture limit (TML) for bauxite; the draft individual schedule for bauxite of Group A (Bulk Cargo Shipping Name “BAUXITE FINES”); and draft amendments to the existing individual schedule for bauxite of Group C (bauxite with a lower proportion of smaller particles and with a degree of saturation by moisture not liable to reach 70%).

Bauxite Bauxite is a rock formed from the weathering of either silicate rocks (granite/ basalt) or carbonate rocks (limestone/ dolomite). Bauxite is found mainly in tropical

and sub-tropical areas such as Africa, South America and Australia with some small deposits located in Europe. A total of approximately 100 million tonnes (Mt) of bauxite is transported by sea annually. Brazil and Guinea dominate seaborne supply with over 30 Mt per annum each. Australia supplies over 20 Mt per annum and Malaysia accounts for about 10 Mt per annum. Small amounts are supplied from Sierra Leone, Guyana, Ghana and other shippers.

Global Bauxite Working Group There is a long history of safely shipping bauxites over many decades and problems and accidents resulting from carrying bauxite cargoes are extremely rare. However, after the loss of the bauxite carrying vessel the Bulk Jupiter in early 2015, the global bauxite industry was requested by IMO to undertake research into the behaviour of bauxites during ocean transportation. The global bauxite industry responded by forming the Global Bauxite Working Group (GBWG) to conduct research on the behaviour and characteristics of seaborne traded bauxites to inform the IMO in relation to the safe shipping of bauxites. The GBWG membership consists of a wide variety of key disciplines, including shippers (miners), transporters (ship owner/ operators) and users (alumina refinery operators) as well as various consultants with backgrounds in geotechnical and hydraulic engineering, maritime science engineering and real world operations.

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IMO NEWS

WINTER 2017

NEWS

Unsafe mixed migration by sea – an ongoing humanitarian challenge

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nsafe mixed migration by sea continues to claim many lives, despite the strenuous efforts made by Governmental and naval rescue services, often supported by merchant vessels, abiding by the longstanding tradition and legal obligation to go to the rescue of persons in distress at sea. The complexities of this humanitarian challenge were discussed on Monday 30 October at a meeting hosted by IMO, bringing together representatives of UN agencies, the maritime industry and European Union naval forces. For the rescued and seafarers alike, the experience can be harrowing. A modern merchant vessel is unsuited to carrying large numbers of survivors, offering inadequate shelter, medical care or sanitation in such situations, and with limited spare food and water on board. Three rescues involving merchant ships in the Mediterranean illustrate the challenges. In October 2016, the fully-laden oil tanker Okyroe, with a crew of 21 seafarers on board, rescued 1,536 people from rubber dinghies; 778 were transferred to rescue vessels over a two-day period and 758 were transferred by the vessel to port of Augusta, Italy. In August 2016, the platform supply vessel OOC Jaguar rescued 501 people from several rubber boats, including one just-delivered baby and her mother. A crew www.imo.org

member unwrapped the umbilical chord from the baby’s neck and helped the mother deliver the placenta. In April 2016, the container ship Hamburg Bridge rescued 310 people who had been crammed aboard one small boat. Reports show that this year (up to 20 October), some 147,000 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea. The majority arrived in Italy and the remainder were divided between Greece, Cyprus and Spain. But 2,826 individuals who attempted the journey, during the same time frame, lost their lives at sea. Although the number of deaths in the Mediterranean has seen a decline, year on year, the ratio of fatalities to attempted journeys is increasing. Merchant vessels become involved in about one in ten rescue operations in the Mediterranean - 101 cases to date in 2017, and 112 cases in 2016 - in the sea area covered by the Rome, Italy, Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre, the meeting was told. While search and rescue operations continue, the meeting participants recognized that the systems established under IMO’s Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the Search and Rescue (SAR) Convention were never envisaged as, or intended to be, a response to mass migration. “Although governments and the merchant shipping industry will continue

rescue operations, safe, legal, alternative pathways to migration must be developed, including safe, organized migration by sea, if necessary,” said IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim. The solutions to reducing the loss of life at sea were discussed. These include addressing “push” factors, tackling the criminal activity involved in people trafficking and enhanced collaboration amongst international agencies and States. Attending the meeting were representatives from International Organization for Migration (IOM), UN Refugee Agency (UNCHR), United Nations Human Rights (OHCHR), United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), European Union Naval Forces (EU NAVFOR), the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), BIMCO, the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and the International Federation of Shipmasters’ Associations (IFSMA). The record of views of the meeting will be fed into the Global Compact on Migration, a UN Member State-led process that emanated from the 19 September 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants approved by Heads of State during the UN General Assembly. This two-year long process is expected to culminate in the adoption of the GCM at an intergovernmental conference on international migration in 2018.

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Ocean change requires solutions – UN Oceans Envoy S

olutions to address human-induced “ocean change” are needed to save life in the ocean and reverse the cycle of decline in which it is caught, according to Fiji’s Ambassador Peter Thomson, the UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy for the Ocean. Peter Thomson, visiting IMO in London, said that, as a Fijian, he had personally witnessed the degradation of the marine environment in his lifetime, citing marine litter and coral bleaching as just two examples. “As a grandfather I find these changes tragic. It is time for us to implement solutions to the ocean’s many problems,” he said. Special Envoy Thomson told a briefing of IMO staff that the UN Ocean Conference, held in New York in June 2017, had demonstrated a clear will and commitment by all sectors of the ocean community to support the implementation of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 14. SDG14 calls for the world to conserve and sustainably use the resources of the ocean for sustainable development. “We are all aware of ‘climate change’; but we need to talk more about ‘ocean change’ and the effects of acidification, warming, plastic pollution, dead zones and so on,” Thomson said. “The world must know that we have a plan to save the ocean. As it stands, SDG14 represents the only universal commitment we have to save life in the ocean for our grandchildren to enjoy. We have a strategy to drive SDG14 and what is required over the next three years is concerted action.” The UN Ocean Conference resulted in a firm Call for Action declaration, subsequently adopted by consensus at the UN General Assembly, to support the implementation of SDG14. More than 1,400 voluntary commitments have been pledged as a result of the conference and these are now being shaped into “Communities of Ocean Action”. Special Envoy Thomson said he would be working closely with these communities to ensure the commitments were being developed and implemented into meaningful ocean action. He said he would be cooperating with Member States and the UN system to optimize the effectiveness of UN Oceans, the UN’s inter-agency mechanism for ocean action. Equally important, he said, would

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IMO Secretary-General Kitak Lim welcomes Peter Thompson, the UN Special Envoy for the Ocean, to IMO headquarters

these are hosted by IMO. The 2016 Strategic be his work with civil society, the scientific community, the business sector, and other Plan for the London Protocol/Convention has relevant stakeholders, to coalesce and been registered as a voluntary commitment encourage their activities in support of the under SDG 14. implementation of SDG 14. IMO also fulfills secretariat functions Thomson emphasized that IMO, as the for the Joint Group of Experts on Scientific United Nations agency responsible for Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection developing and adopting (GESAMP), an advisory measures to improve the As a grandfather I find body of the United safety and security of these changes tragic. It is Nations. GESAMP has international shipping and to time for us to implement issued peer-reviewed prevent pollution from ships, reports on microplastics the solutions to ocean’s had an integral role to play in the marine many problems in the effort to meet SDG14’s environment and on targets. other relevant topics. IMO has adopted regulations to protect IMO is one of the partners in the Global the marine environment from ships, Partnership on Marine Litter (GPML), which including the International Convention for the is managed by UN Environment, with IMO Prevention of Pollution from ships (MARPOL), co-leading on sea-based sources of marine and the Ballast Water Management litter together with the Food and Agricultural Convention, which aims to prevent the Organization (FAO). spread of potentially harmful aquatic Peter Thomson was appointed as Special invasive species. Envoy for the Ocean by United Nations IMO is the Secretariat for The London Secretary-General António Guterres Convention and Protocol, treaties which in September. regulate the dumping of wastes at sea, and www.imo.org


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Workshop participants provided their feedback on the event to the IMO media team

IMO holds workshop on drafting national legislation

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hroughout the maritime world, the technical regulations developed and adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) are well known. Shipmasters and officers, as well as expert trainers and educators, spend many hours getting to grips with the knowledge needed to implement and impart the detailed regulations governing ship safety and security and the prevention of pollution from ships. But there is an important first step which needs to happen between adopting a new regulation or amendment and its entry into force and application on board ships. Appropriate implementing legislation must be drafted at the national level, because international treaties can only become law when implemented into national legislation. IMO treaties are not self-executing and require domestic legislation to give effect to their provisions. How to do this was the subject of a fiveday global workshop (18-22 September 2017) held at IMO Headquarters in London. www.imo.org

The workshop was attended by 28 lawyers and drafters from 25 countries. “We get the seafarers coming up to us, asking ‘how come you have not implemented this?’, ‘where are the regulations?’, ‘where do you derive your authority from?’ So it is important and imperative for us to ensure that IMO conventions are actually domesticated into our national law,” said participant Jane Florence Otieno, from Kenya. Participants agreed that the workshop would help them to effectively implement IMO regulations in their countries. “As a lawyer, I need to grasp the most important parts of legislative drafting,” said Trevor Potoura, from Papua New Guinea. The workshop also provided the opportunity for networking and sharing ideas, particularly with regards to the challenges countries may face in implementing IMO’s technical regulations into national law, including often having to deal with several different government agencies. “Right now, we have probably eight

different agencies that all deal with maritime issues. And sometimes their roles overlap. So one of the things we have to look at, particularly in writing our laws, is making sure that we know who does what at each point,” said Daffodil Maxwell, from Trinidad and Tobago. IMO’s Head of Legal Affairs, Dorota Lost-Sieminska, said the workshop aimed to provide participants with the tools necessary to ensure effective, national, implementation of IMO treaties, with particular attention to the implementation of amendments adopted through the tacit acceptance procedure. “IMO has always provided extensive training for technical experts. However, to give effect to the technical provisions, national implementing legislation needs to be drafted and adopted. And this is why IMO offers this intense five-day training for lawyers – to provide participants with the tools necessary to understand treaties and their amendments – how they are developed and adopted, and how to implement them into the national legislation.” she said.

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World Maritime Day 2017 – Connecting Ships, Ports and People T

he maritime sector, which includes shipping, ports and the people that operate them, can and should play a significant role helping Member States to create conditions for increased employment, prosperity and stability ashore through promoting trade by sea; enhancing the port and maritime sector as wealth creators both on land; and through developing a sustainable blue economy at sea. This was the key message being shared around the world on 28 September, as IMO and the global maritime community celebrated the annual World Maritime Day, under the theme: Connecting Ships, Ports and People. World Maritime Day is an official United Nations day. Every year, it provides an opportunity to focus attention on the importance of shipping and other maritime activities and to emphasize a particular aspect of IMO’s work. Each World Maritime Day has its own theme. “As a UN agency, IMO has a strong commitment to helping achieve the aims of the Sustainable Development Goals. Shipping and ports can play a significant role in helping to create conditions for increased employment, prosperity and stability through promoting maritime trade. The port and maritime sectors can be wealth creators, both on land and at sea,” said IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim in his annual World Maritime Day Message. “Our theme for this year will enable us to shine a spotlight on the existing cooperation between ports and ships to maintain and enhance a safe, secure and efficient maritime transportation system.” Mr. Lim said. The annual World Maritime Day Parallel Event was held this year in Panama, from 1-3 October.

Our theme for this year has enabled us to shine a spotlight on the existing cooperation between ports and ships to maintain and enhance a safe, secure and efficient maritime transportation system. 12

Port and maritime sectors can be wealth creators on land and sea

Panama hosted the 2017 World Maritime Day parallel event

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Global treaty to halt invasive aquatic species enters into force A

key international measure for environmental protection that aims to stop the spread of potentially invasive aquatic species in ships’ ballast water entered into force on 8 September 2017. The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention) requires ships to manage their ballast water to remove, render harmless, or avoid the uptake or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water and sediments. The BWM Convention was adopted in 2004 by IMO.

Dealing with ballast water

Ballast water is routinely taken on by ships for stability and structural integrity. It can contain thousands of aquatic microbes, algae and animals, which are then carried across the world’s oceans and released into ecosystems where they are not native. Untreated ballast water released at a ship’s destination could potentially introduce new invasive aquatic species. Expanded ship trade and traffic volume over the last few decades has increased the likelihood of invasive species being released. Hundreds of invasions have already taken place, sometimes with devastating consequences for the local ecosystem, economy and infrastructure. The BWM Convention requires all ships in international trade to manage their ballast water and sediments, according to a shipspecific ballast water management plan. All ships must carry a ballast water record book and an International Ballast Water Management Certificate. All ships engaged in international trade are required to manage their ballast

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water so as to avoid the introduction of alien species into coastal areas, including exchanging their ballast water or treating it using an approved ballast water management system. Initially, there will be two different standards, corresponding to these two options. The D-1 standard requires ships to exchange their ballast water in open seas, away from coastal waters. Ideally, this means at least 200 nautical miles from land and in water at least 200 metres deep. By doing this, fewer organisms will survive and so ships will be less likely to introduce potentially harmful species when they release the ballast water. D-2 is a performance standard which specifies the maximum amount of viable organisms allowed to be discharged, including specified indicator microbes harmful to human health. New ships must meet the D-2 standard from the convention’s entry into force, while existing ships must initially meet the D-1 standard; an implementation timetable for existing ships to meet the D-2 standard has been agreed, based on the date of their International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate (IOPPC) renewal survey, which must be undertaken at least every five years. Eventually, all ships will have to conform to the D-2 standard. For most ships, this involves installing special equipment.

Building on guidelines

IMO has been addressing the issue of invasive species in ships’ ballast water since the 1980s, when Member States experiencing particular problems brought their concerns to the attention of IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee

(MEPC). Guidelines to address the issue were adopted in 1991 and IMO then worked to develop the BWM Convention, which was adopted in 2004. IMO has worked extensively on the development of guidelines for the uniform implementation of the Convention and to address concerns of various stakeholders, such as with regard to the availability of ballast water management systems and their type approval and testing. Shipboard ballast water management systems must be approved by national authorities, according to a process developed by IMO. Ballast water management systems have to be tested in a land-based facility and aboard ships to prove that they meet the performance standard set out in the treaty. These could, for example, include systems which make use of filters and ultraviolet light or electro chlorination. Ballast water management systems that make use of active substances must undergo a strict approval procedure and be verified by IMO. There is a two-tier process, in order to ensure that the ballast water management system does not pose unreasonable risk to ship safety, human health and the aquatic environment. To date, more than 60 ballast water treatment systems have been given type approval.

GloBallast programme

Since 2000, the Global Environment Facility (GEF)-United Nations Development Program (UNDP)-IMO GloBallast Partnerships Project assisted developing countries to reduce the risk of aquatic bioinvasions through building the necessary capacity to implement the BWM Convention. More than 70 countries directly benefited

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IMO NEWS

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FEATURE

high economic costs involved in unblocking water intake pipes, sluices and irrigation ditches. The North Pacific seastar (Asterias amurensis) has been transported in ballast water from the northern Pacific to southern Australia. It reproduces in large numbers, reaching ‘plague’ proportions rapidly in invaded environments. This invasive species has caused significant economic loss as it feeds on shellfish, including commercially valuable scallop, oyster and clam species.

Environmental landmark

from the Project, which received a number of international awards for its work. The GloBallast programme also engaged with the private sector through the Global Industry Alliance (GIA) and GIA Fund, established with partners from major maritime companies.

Examples of invasive species The North American comb jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi) has travelled in ships’ ballast water from the eastern seaboard of the Americas to, for example, the Black, Azov and Caspian Seas. It depletes zooplankton stocks; altering food web and ecosystem function. The species has contributed significantly to the collapse

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of Azov Sea, Black Sea and Caspian Sea fisheries in the 1990s and 2000s, with massive economic and social impact. The Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) has been transported from the Black Sea to western and northern Europe, including Ireland and the Baltic Sea, and the eastern half of North America. Travelling in larval form in ballast water, on release it has rapid reproductive growth with no natural predators in North America. The mussel multiplies and fouls all available hard surfaces in mass numbers. Displacing native aquatic life, this species alters habitat, ecosystem and the food web and causes severe fouling problems on infrastructure and vessels. There have been

As the BWM Convention entered into force, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said “This is a landmark step towards halting the spread of invasive aquatic species, which can cause havoc for local ecosystems, affect biodiversity and lead to substantial economic loss.” “The requirements mean that we are now addressing what has been recognized as one of the greatest threats to the ecological and the economic well-being of the planet. Invasive species are causing enormous damage to biodiversity and the valuable natural riches of the earth upon which we depend. Invasive species also cause direct and indirect health effects and the damage to the environment is often irreversible.” He added, “The entry into force of the Ballast Water Management Convention will not only minimize the risk of invasions by alien species via ballast water, it will also provide a global level playing field for international shipping, providing clear and robust standards for the management of ships’ ballast water.”

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FROMEXECUTIVE THE MEETINGS MBA CBS IN SHIPPING & LOGISTICS

• WINTER Irene Rosberg 2017 – Programme Director, Executive MBA, Shipping & Logistics

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IMO NEWS

WINTER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

4TH SESSION

11-15 SEPTEMBER 2017

Guidance on carriage of ammoniumnitrate based fertilizer issued

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Bauxite carriage alert issued T

he Sub-Committee raised awareness of the potential risks posed by moisture and provided new guidance on carriage of bauxite, in the form of a circular aimed at shippers, terminal operators, shipowners, ship operators, charterers, shipmasters and all other entities concerned (full story, p7). The circular requests that extreme care and appropriate action be taken, taking into account the provisions of relevant IMO instruments, when handling and carrying bauxite in bulk. The circular takes immediate effect, ahead of the next scheduled adoption (in 2019) of the new test methods and relevant schedules for bauxite cargoes during the routine scheduled updating of the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code. The IMSBC Code is the industry rulebook on how to deal with bulk cargoes. The CCC.1/Circ.2/Rev.1 circular

updates a previous circular on carriage of bauxite and notes that some bauxite cargoes (specifically those with a larger proportion of smaller particles) present a risk caused by moisture and should be treated as Group A cargoes. Excess moisture in such cargoes can lead to a free surface slurry. This can cause atypical motion of the ship (wobbling). The master should take appropriate action in the event of this possible sign of cargo instability. The circular includes the draft Test Procedure for Determining the transportable moisture limit (TML) for bauxite; the draft individual schedule for bauxite of Group A (Bulk Cargo Shipping Name “BAUXITE FINES”); and draft amendments to the existing individual schedule for bauxite of Group C (bauxite with a lower proportion of smaller particles and with a degree of saturation by moisture not liable to reach 70%).

High manganese austenitic steel work continued W ork continued on discussing the suitability of high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service, and it was agreed that the draft Interim guidelines for the application of high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service should be developed.

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he Sub-Committee issued guidance on carriage of ammonium-nitrate based fertilizer (CCC.1/Circ.4), urging extreme care when handling and carrying the fertilizer in bulk. The warning follows accidents involving the MV Purple Beach (2015) and MV Cheshire (2017). While the investigation reports are still pending, the Sub-Committee agreed on the need to raise awareness of potential problems. During the incidents, the gas clouds produced were large enough to envelop the ship, and cover the sea area surrounding the ship. The vapour emitted was highly toxic. Such conditions could affect the safe abandonment of the ship and hinder rescue and firefighting efforts. In such events, cargo decomposition may last for multiple days and the temperatures in cargo holds may reach in excess of 500oC. The Circular notes that the best protection for seafarers is awareness of the decomposition process to allow it to be identified at an early stage. Regular monitoring of the cargo throughout the voyage is crucial to detect beginning of decomposition.

IMDG Code amendments finalized

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he editorial corrections to amendment 38-16 to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and the next set of draft amendment 39-18 (for adoption in 2018) to the IMDG Code, The correspondence group was were finalised. re-established. The draft amendments include new High manganese austenitic steel is a provisions regarding IMO type 9 tank, a set material that has been proposed as being of new abbreviations for segregation groups suitable for use in cryogenic applications (SGG), and special provisions for carriage such as cargo tanks, fuel tanks and piping of lithium batteries and carriage of vehicles of LNG carriers and LNG-fuelled ships. powered by flammable liquid or gas.

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CCC

SUB-COMMITTEE ON CARRIAGE OF CARGOES AND CONTAINERS (CCC)


IMO NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

WINTER 2017

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IMO NEWS

WINTER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

4TH SESSION

Addressing Illegal, Unreported, Unregulated (IUU) Fishing T he Sub-Committee agreed a series of recommendations aimed at addressing Illegal, Unreported, Unregulated (IUU) Fishing, the third meeting of the Joint IMO/ Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Ad Hoc Working Group on Illegal, Unreported, Unregulated (IUU) Fishing and Related Matters (JWG), held in November 2015 at IMO Headquarters. The proposals focus on key areas, such as the entry into force and implementation

of relevant international instruments, in particular, the Cape Town Agreement and the development of an effective roadmap; fishing vessels identification and application of the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme; the coordinated implementation of inspection regimes; cooperation among the Secretariats of IMO, FAO and ILO, in particular, on joint capacity development programmes and the sharing of data; and on navigational hazards and environmental issues.

Extension of IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme

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he Sub-Committee proposed to extend the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme to more vessels, on a voluntary basis. A draft Assembly resolution was agreed, for submission to IMO’s 30th Assembly for adoption. The number scheme applies to ships over 100 GT. The proposal is for further voluntary application to fishing vessels of steel and non-steel hull construction; passenger ships of less than 100 gross tonnage, high-speed passenger craft and mobile drilling units, engaged on international voyages; and to all motorized

The IMO number remains with a vessel throughout its life

inboard fishing vessels of less than 100 gross tonnage down to a size limit of 12 metres in length overall authorized to operate outside waters under national jurisdiction of the flag State.

Port State Control – revised procedures agreed

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he Sub-Committee finalized a draft Assembly resolution on Procedures for Port State Control, containing the comprehensive compilation of guidelines relevant to Port State Control. This will be submitted to the 30th IMO Assembly for adoption. The new resolution will update the previous Procedures for PSC adopted in 2011 (resolution A.1052(27)). The revisions include, in particular, guidelines on the ISM Code; the certification of seafarers, hours of rest and manning; and procedures regarding voluntary early implementation www.imo.org

of amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention and related mandatory instruments. The Sub-Committee also noted the outcome of the third Joint Ministerial Conference of the Paris and Tokyo Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control, which adopted a declaration committing to protect oceans by eliminating substandard shipping practices and advancing international ship safety. The Sub-Committee also welcomed the resumption of the series of IMO Workshops for PSC MoU/Agreement Secretaries and Database Managers.

25-29 SEPTEMBER 2017

Availability of adequate port reception facilities reports received

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he Sub-Committee noted that, during 2016, there were 70 reported cases of alleged inadequacies of port reception facilities, received from eight flag States and one territory of the United Kingdom. Of those, 51 reports referred to alleged inadequacies of PRFs under the requirements of MARPOL Annex V (garbage), five under Annex I (oil), two reports under Annexes II (chemicals) and IV (sewage) and 10 reports covered more than one waste type; The total waste categories reported were 282 and covered 30 port Administrations. Six port Administrations responded on actions taken on alleged inadequacy reports, covering 15.7% of the total reports submitted for 2016. IMO has published a manual “Port Reception Facilities – How to do it”, which provides guidance on how to ensure the provision of adequate PRFs. The 2017 Guidelines for the implementation of MARPOL Annex V (resolution MEPC.295(71)), includes guidance (section 6.3) for Member Governments to establish appropriate incentive systems to ensure compliance with MARPOL Annex V. The Sub-Committee urged Member States to report any alleged inadequacies; update and review existing data on port reception faculties to the Organization and provide incentives for ports and terminals to increase investment in the provision of adequate port reception facilities.

Making casualty investigation reports public

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ata and reports on marine casualties and incidents are provided on the publicly accessible IMO database https://gisis.imo. org/Public/MCI/Default.aspx (registration needed). The Sub-Committee noted that new and existing reports of investigations into casualties have been made public by default, while allowing reporting States to amend the release status of their own reports.

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III

SUB-COMMITTEE ON IMPLEMENTATION OF IMO INSTRUMENTS


IMO WINTER 2017 2017 IMONEWS NEWS • • WINTER

FEATURE

IMO promotes fishing vessel safety agreement to save lives W

hen it comes to fishing vessel safety, the mission is clear, says Sandra Allnutt of the International Maritime Organization (IMO): enhance safety to save lives. “We want to reduce loss of life in one of the most dangerous professions in the world, and we want to enhance safety on board fishing vessels,” said Ms Allnutt, Head of Maritime Technology in IMO’s Maritime Safety Division, following a regional seminar, in Cape Town, South Africa, to promote ratification and implementation of a key fishing vessel safety treaty known as the Cape Town Agreement of 2012. “This Agreement, once fully ratified, in force and implemented, will be an internationally binding agreement which will facilitate better control of fishing vessel safety by flag, port and coastal States. It will

Unlike commercial shipping, fishing lacks strict global safety standards.

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also contribute to the fight against illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing,” Ms Allnutt said. The Cape Town Agreement was adopted at an international conference held in South Africa in 2012, as a means to bring into effect the provisions of the 1977 Torremolinos International Convention for the Safety of Fishing Vessels, which was later modified by the 1993 Torremolinos Protocol. In ratifying the 2012 Agreement, Parties agree to amendments to the provisions of the 1993 Protocol, so that they can come into force as soon as possible thereafter. The treaty will enter into force 12 months after at least 22 States, with an aggregate 3,600 fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over, operating on the high seas, have expressed their consent to be bound by it.

To date, seven countries have ratified the Cape Town Agreement: Congo, Denmark, Germany, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway and South Africa. Between them, they have an aggregate of 884 fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over operating on the high seas. International treaties such as the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) have been in force for decades for the commercial shipping industry, including cargo and passenger ships. However, the key instrument applicable to fishing vessels is still not in force. This means there are no mandatory international requirements for stability and associated seaworthiness, life-saving appliances, communications equipment or fire protection, as well as fishing vessel construction. “Implementation of the fishing vessel safety provisions is long overdue,” Ms Allnutt said. “So we have been running a series of seminars around the world to explain what the Cape Town Agreement is, why it is important, how it can be implemented into national legislation and what the next steps are for a Party to the Agreement.” The Cape Town Regional Seminar (16 - 20 October 2017) was attended by participants from 10 countries in the Africa Anglophone region. It followed similar events, organized by IMO in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), including, in the Cook Islands (28 August - 1 September 2017), for 10 countries in the Pacific region; in Côte d’Ivoire (December 2016), for 12 countries from the Africa Francophone region; in Indonesia (April 2015), for 11 countries from the East Asia region; in Belize (October 2014), for 13 countries in the Caribbean; and in Peru (June 2014), for 12 countries in Latin America. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

••

WINTER 2017

FEATURE

Future seminars are planned during 2018 The push to promote the Cape Town Agreement has been given extra momentum by the entry into force of related treaties under the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the FAO – organizations with which IMO works closely in the context of safety of fishing vessels and (IUU) fishing. ILO’s Work in Fishing Convention 2007 (Convention No. 188) entered into force on 16 November 2017. It sets minimum requirements for work on board including hours of rest, food, minimum age and repatriation. FAO’s Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing (PSMA), 2009, entered into force in 2016 and now has 50 Parties. It seeks to prevent, deter and eliminate IUU fishing through the adoption and implementation of effective port State measures. IMO’s Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III), meeting in September 2017, agreed a number of proposals to address IUU fishing, focusing on key areas of vessel identification; flag and port state performance; training and implementation

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of relevant instruments; and environmental issues. The discussion followed a review of recommendations emanating from the Joint IMO/FAO Working Group on IUU fishing and related matters held in 2015. The IMO Assembly, meeting in November 2017, is expected to adopt a resolution to extend the IMO ship identification number scheme, on a voluntary basis, to all fishing vessels more than 12 metres in length authorized to operate outside waters under national jurisdiction of the flag State. This move is expected to contribute to the maintenance of a global record on registered fishing vessels. IMO is also undertaking a comprehensive review of its treaty on training of fishing vessel personnel, the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel (STCW-F), 1995, which entered into force in 2012. The aim is to update and revise the treaty, taking into account the unique nature of the fishing industry, the fishing working environment and the need to prevent damage to the marine environment. The work being done to

promote implementation of the Cape Town Agreement on the safety of fishing vessels and other activities to improve safety and sustainability in the fishing sector and fight IUU fishing is also being supported by international nongovernmental organizations. These include the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean (GFCM), the North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST), the International Transport Workers Federation (ITF), the Pew Charitable Trusts, the World Animal Protection and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). “We are seeing increasing commitment from a number of IMO Member States as well as from regional organizations and international non-governmental organizations to promote the Cape Town Agreement and other measures to make fishing a safer and more sustainable industry. This is something to be welcomed, for the millions of people worldwide who work in the fishing sector,” Ms. Allnutt said.

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IMO NEWS

FEATURE

WINTER 2017

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11/07/17 11:47


WINTER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS

LONDON CONVENTION / LONDON PROTOCOL

39th / 12th sessions

9-13 OCTOBER 2017

Disposing of fibreglass vessels A

large number of abandoned or no-longer usable fibreglass vessels – including fishing vessels and leisure craft – are dumped at sea each year, possibly due to a lack of land-based disposal facilities. This was a concern raised by Pacific delegations to the Parties to the treaties which regulate the dumping of wastes at sea. However, full data on the scale of the problem is lacking. Fibreglass is a highly recyclable material, and the technology for recycling fibreglass already exists, but the logistics of handling the large amounts of fibreglass hulls from abandoned or derelict vessels poses a significant challenge, in particular in Small Island Developing States. However, some countries reported that they had implemented a programme or strategy for disposal or deconstruction of fibre glass pleasure boats. Following discussion, the Parties to the London Convention and London Protocol agreed further work was needed. The IMO Secretariat was instructed to commission a study to collate information on the scale of the problem and identify key knowledge gaps relating to impacts of fibre reinforced plastic vessels dumped or placed in the marine environment. The Scientific Groups (which provide scientific and technical advice to the

Parties to the Convention and Protocol) will be invited to consider the study and evaluate whether there is a need for disposal into the sea of fibre-reinforced plastic vessels or vessels with fibrereinforced plastic components. If there is a need, then whether such vessels could be disposed of in the sea in a safe and

Dredged material guidance finalized T

he meeting finalized Step-by-step guidance on simple approaches to creating and using action lists and action levels for dredged material. This guidance is aimed at countries in the early stages of implementing the London Protocol and addresses action lists (set of chemicals of concern) and action levels (thresholds used in the decision making process that determine whether sediments can be disposed of at sea) for dredged material. On average, 500 million tonnes of

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permitted dredged material are dumped annually in waters of countries which have signed up to the London Convention or London Protocol. Some 10% of dredged material is contaminated by shipping, industrial and municipal discharges, or by land run-off. It is therefore important to assess if the material is suitable for dumping at sea, before a permit is given. This step-by step guidance complements the other low cost, low technology documents already available.

environmentally sound manner would be examined. Additionally, the Scientific Groups should consider whether there is a need to develop guidance on the disposal of fibreglass vessels. The Scientific Groups are scheduled to meet in April-May 2018 in Chile.

Dealing with platforms and other man-made structures

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he meeting continued its work to review and update the Specific guidelines for assessment of platforms or other man-made structures at sea, which were last issued in 2000. Vessels and platforms or other manmade structures at sea may be considered for a permit for dumping under the 1996 London Protocol. A Polar waters special protection correspondence groupgetwas instructed from the new Polar Code to continue the revision.

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LC LP

IMO NEWS


LC LP

IMO NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

LONDON CONVENTION / LONDON PROTOCOL

WINTER 2017

39th / 12th sessions • 9-13 OCTOBER 2017

Compliance and monitoring T

Marine litter and microplastics – further efforts needed T

he meeting was updated on actions being taken by a number of countries to address the input of marine litter, including microplastics into the marine environment. Parties to the London Convention and Protocol were urged to redouble efforts to share knowledge and technical expertise with regard to the analysis of plastics, including microplastics, in dredged material and sewage sludge (in particular). This is with a view to developing methods to enable routine, reliable monitoring, assessment and reporting of microplastic contaminant

levels in such waste streams as soon as possible. Delegations were also encouraged to share information on successful and effective methods to reduce microplastics entering the environment through waste streams. The Joint Group of Experts on Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) second microplastics report, published in January 2017, investigates the sources and fate and potential ecological impacts of microplastics and gives recommendations for further work.

Guidance on national implementation of the London Protocol

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he Meetings approved the Revised guidance on national implementation of the London Protocol, and instructed the Secretariat to publish it, as soon as possible, in all three working languages of IMO. The revised document replaces the initial guidance, which was adopted in 2001, with a view to increasing ratifications of the London Protocol.

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he meeting reviewed in general matters relating to compliance and monitoring, including the submission of obligatory reports. Under the London Convention and Protocol, Parties are required to submit annual reports on dumping activities (such as permits which have been granted); any illegal activities detected; exceptions granted (such as force majeure); and so on. However, the reporting rate is low, at 60% of the Protocol Parties. The meeting urged all Parties, if they had not done so, to provide the Secretariat with their annual reports, including NIL reports that indicate no dumping activities were undertaken in a particular year. A compliance group, formed of 15 elected members (three per region) has been established to review compliance and develop materials to support compliance. These include a “Frequently Asked Questions” document, and a power-point presentation on reporting requirements, which will be further reviewed by a correspondence group for finalization. A Barriers to Compliance (B2C) Project, funded by voluntary contributions from a number of countries over the years, has also been contributing to the work to improve compliance and not least to increase the ratifications of the Protocol. A number of national and regional workshops to raise awareness of the London Protocol were held during the past year, as part of an ongoing series. The workshops have been supported by the IMO Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (IMO ITCP), the LC/LP Technical Cooperation Trust Fund. The meeting also thanked the Governments of Canada, People’s Republic of China, the Republic of Korea, South Africa and the United Kingdom, for providing funding and experts in-kind to those activities.

Implementation of the Strategic Plan

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he meeting noted that the 2016 Strategic Plan for the London Protocol/Convention, approved at the last meeting, had been registered as a voluntary commitment to support the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14 (Life below water), following the 2017 UN Oceans Conference, held in New York in June. A draft implementation plan was approved by the meeting to support bringing the strategic plan to fruition. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

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WINTER 2017

The Marine Professional weekly e-newsletter Now being sent, on a weekly basis, to key decision makers across the marine industry

FROM THE MEETINGS

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IMO NEWS

IMO AT WORK

WINTER 2017

Training for port security staff in Guinea

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ort security officials in Guinea have undergone training on complying with IMO’s maritime security measures. They were trained in how to perform their duties in line with SOLAS Chapter XI-2, the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and related guidance. The event in Conakry, Guinea (20-24 November) was organised in conjunction with Guinea’s Maritime Authority and the Ministry of Transport. The training involves Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs) and representatives of the Designated Authority (DA).

Modern simulator to enhance regional training

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he IMO-funded Djibouti Regional Training Centre (DRTC) has been equipped with a modern computerbased training simulator as part of IMO’s efforts to promote maritime safety and security in the West Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden. Equipment installation, funded through a contribution to the Djibouti Code of Conduct Trust Fund by the Kingdom of Denmark, has been completed and the first cohort of six Djibouti officers has been trained to operate it.

The simulator training room consists of 11 trainee consoles and an instructor’s work station. The package includes software for many modules such as Marine Communication, Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) and Search and Rescue (SAR). It is capable of maritime safety and security scenario simulation and also includes animation and video clips, printed and electronic textbooks and training syllabus.

Addressing invasive species

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he spread of invasive species is recognized as one of the greatest threats to the ecological and the economic well-being of the planet. These species are causing enormous damage to biodiversity and the damage to the environment is often irreversible. Moreover, significant economic impact occurs to industries that depend on the coastal and marine environment, as well as costly damage to infrastructure. Direct and indirect health effects are also becoming increasingly serious. Ships have been identified as a vector for invasive aquatic species. This could be through species hitching a ride in the ballast water of ships; or by adhering to the ship’s hull and external structures - a process known as biofouling. IMO addresses invasive aquatic species carried in ballast water through the Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention, which requires ships to manage their ballast water to limit the spread of aquatic organisms. The BWM treaty entered into force in September 2017. This landmark step was recognized at the latest meeting of the Interagency Liaison Group on Invasive

Alien Species, which held its 8th session in Brussels, Belgium (2223 November). IMO provided an outline of the main provisions of the BWM Convention and explained aspects of its implementation and enforcement. Biofouling was also on the agenda and IMO updated the group on its latest Glo-Fouling project to address bioinvasions via ships’ hulls through the effective implementation of IMO’s Biofouling Guidelines. Addressing invasive species is listed as a target under the UN Sustainable Development Goal 15, which calls on States, by 2020, to introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species. IMO’s work also has relevance under SDG 14, which calls on States, by 2020, to sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Why cover liability for transport of hazardous and noxious substances by ship?

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ransporting hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) by sea is a vital trade. Chemicals, LPG, LNG and other products are important to many manufacturing and energy processes and IMO regulations ensure their safe transport. However, when incidents do happen, IMO’s HNS Convention helps to ensure that those who have suffered damage have access to a comprehensive and international liability and compensation regime. To explain this treaty and why it is needed, IMO participated at the LNG Ship/Shore Interface Conference in London (16-17 November), covering the impacts associated with HNS incidents, including those involving chemical and LPG tankers, as well the overall benefits of the Convention and the next steps for States to implement the treaty.

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IMO NEWS

WINTER 2017

IMO AT WORK

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IMO NEWS

•

WINTER 2017

BALLAST WATER MANAGEMENT - HOW TO DO IT 2017 EDITION

   

IMO I624E



05/09/2017 14:43

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IMO NEWS

WINTER 2017

IMO AT WORK

Free-flowing maritime traffic in Montenegro

Cooperation key among maritime universities

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ooperation between academic institutions is key in ensuring the next generation of maritime professionals is well prepared. In this spirit, IMO’s Juvenal Shiundu delivered a keynote address at the opening ceremony of the International seminar on mutual cooperation between IMO, the World Maritime University (WMU) and the Korea Maritime and Ocean University (KMOU) in Busan, Republic of Korea (11 November). Mr. Shiundu reiterated the crucial role played by IMO’s technical cooperation work in enhancing

the capacities of many developing countries and producing maritime leaders through the many global training institutions, such as the World Maritime University and the International Maritime Law Institute, and ultimately helping to implement IMO instruments worldwide. Students also heard about the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and how they offer both opportunities and challenges which IMO, WMU and KMOU are keen to explore as an area of potential collaboration for maritime research and education.

Supporting port security in Ghana

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MO’s work to assist ports with the highest numbers of stowaway incidents through enhancing port security continued at a workshop in Tema, Ghana (13-17 November). Meetings with key stakeholders responsible for maritime security and facilitation were used to gauge knowledge of national legislation, port facility security plans, local organization of maritime security and facilitation, and inter-agency cooperation through security and facilitation committees. The event included a visit to the port of Tema to assess the physical security which is currently in place. Participants were also trained to plan and conduct effective selfassessments and internal/external

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he key IMO treaty supporting the free flow of international maritime traffic – the Facilitation Convention – provides a set of consistent, uniform regulations that cover the wide range of administrative tasks required of ships coming into and leaving port. To support this process in Montenegro, IMO held a seminar with the Ministry of Transport and Maritime Affairs in Bar, Montenegro (14-16 November). Thirty-five participants from various agencies with responsibilities for clearing ships, cargo, crew and passengers in the country’s ports, and private stakeholders took part.

The seminar advised participants on both the current facilitation regulations and recent amendments on the mandatory electronic data exchange for international shipping, which enter into force in 2018 via the Annex to the FAL Convention. Under the new amendments, all contracting governments will establish means for exchanging information electronically by April 2019. Participants were also advised on the benefits of using a maritime “single window” for ship notifications as well as on topics such as stowaways and persons rescued at sea.

Worldwide implementation of maritime search and rescue audits of port facilities, in line with IMO guidance on voluntary self-assessment. Consultants assessed the port’s compliance with stowaway provisions in IMO’s Facilitation Convention and with recommendations adopted by a regional conference on stowaways held in 2014. The national workshop was funded by the Government of Denmark. Attendees included representatives from the Ghana Maritime Authority, Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority, UNODC, Interpol and the Port and Maritime Authority of West & Central Africa (PMAWCA).

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nternational search and rescue plans are crucial, so that, no matter where an accident occurs, the rescue of persons in distress at sea can be coordinated successfully. Therefore, the worldwide implementation of IMO’s International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR Convention 1979) is a key component in efforts to ensure the safety of international shipping. To further promote the ratification and appropriate implementation of the Convention in Central America and the Caribbean, a seminar was held in Bogota, Colombia, (14 to 16 November). This seminar also provided an opportunity for search and rescue authorities in Central

America and the Caribbean to enhance their understanding of regional SAR issues and to learn about new technologies. The three-day workshop, which brought participants from more than 20 countries in Central America and the Caribbean, encouraged participants to share best practices, establish common procedures and raise awareness of their national situation. The end goal is to strengthen the national search and rescue plans in the region and to encourage the implementation of SAR services efficiently and effectively. The event was organized by IMO in collaboration with the General Maritime Directorate of Colombia (DIMAR).

Inspection training for cleaner shipping

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n IMO workshop in Buenos Aires, Argentina (6-8 November) delivered inspection training to Port State Control Officers in South and Central America. Port State Control is the process, supported by IMO, by which officials in ports can board visiting foreign-flagged vessels to verify compliance with international safety and pollution standards.

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The Buenos Aires workshop was specifically focused on training officers to inspect and enforce both air pollution and energy-efficiency provisions in IMO’s MARPOL Annex VI treaty. The event is part of on-going work under IMO’s GloMEEP project to promote energy-efficient shipping, and was hosted by the Prefectura Naval Argentina.

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IMO NEWS

IMO AT WORK

particularly sensitive sea area (PSSA) is an area of special ecological, socio-economic or scientific importance which may be vulnerable to international shipping. To date, IMO has designated 17 areas which benefit from the scheme and are protected. IMO Member Governments can submit applications for the designation of PSSAs at any time. Representatives from IMO, the UNESCO World Heritage Centre Marine Program and the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA) met national stakeholders in Nouakchott, Mauritania (6-8 November) to discuss options to designate the area around the Banc d’Arguin National Park as a PSSA. The Banc d’Arguin National Park, which is already on the UNESCO World Heritage List, hosts the largest concentration of wintering wading birds in the world and one of the most diversified communities of nesting piscivorous birds. Marine mammals are also regularly recorded and a small resident population of monk seal is found in the area, as well as important fish varieties.

IMO activities showcased at Bonn climate talks MO participated in a range of side- and special events at the Bonn climate change talks (COP 23), following its report on progress to the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA 47). The GMN maritime technology project, run by IMO and funded by the European Union, was presented during a side-event (10 November). The project has established a network of five regional Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres (MTCCs). Representatives of the European Union, IMO, MTCCCaribbean and MTCC-Pacific participated at the event. MTCCs updated the audience on their pilot projects, including data collection on fuel oil consumption on ships. From 2019, ships over 5,000 gross tonnage worldwide – which account for 85% of CO2 emissions from international shipping - will be required to collect consumption data for each type of fuel oil they use, as well as other, additional, specified data including proxies for transport work. The pilot projects are good examples of how the MTCCS will support implementation of IMO’s energy efficiency regulations. The MTCCs will also work to help

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WINTER 2017

New audit team leaders trained

Protecting Mauritania’s marine park A

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participating countries develop national energy-efficiency policies and measures for their maritime sectors and promote uptake of lowcarbon technologies and operations in maritime transport. Presentations were followed by a panel discussion. IMO participated alongside the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in a special event (7 November) on actions and progress made by ICAO and IMO in addressing emissions from international aviation and maritime transport. IMO highlighted recent progress towards developing a draft initial IMO GHG strategy. At the UN Oceans side event (11 November), IMO again highlighted its work to mitigate greenhouse gases from the shipping sector. This side event brought together various agencies from the UN system, to speak about actions that countries are taking, with the support of the UN system, to address climate related multistressors on the ocean. Improved scientific capacity to understand ocean change, the development of CO2 mitigation strategies and new innovative adaptation approaches were discussed.

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uditing IMO Member States to assess how effectively they administer key IMO instruments is an important part of the Organization’s work to create a regulatory framework for the shipping industry that is universally adopted and implemented. To support this process, new audit team leaders have been trained under IMO’s Member State Audit Scheme (IMSAS) at a course at IMO Headquarters, London (6-10 November). The course involved thirteen auditors who were part of audit teams under the Scheme in 2016 and 2017 and are now ready to act as audit team leaders in future audits. The training addressed an increased demand for audit team

leaders to conduct up to 25 audits of Member States per year, which became mandatory from January 2016 and are carried out in accordance with the overall audit schedule. The course has been designed to further develop skills in preparing, conducting and reporting from audits in accordance with the IMO Member State Audit Scheme and using the IMO Instruments Implementation (III) Code as the audit standard. The course is the second to take place since the introduction of the Audit Scheme. To-date, 40 mandatory audits have been carried out, with a further 22 planned for 2018. All Member States are required to undergo a mandatory audit within a 7-year cycle.

Preventing stowaways

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nhanced port security can help facilitate international maritime traffic and prevent stowaways. A national workshop in Freetown, Sierra Leone (6-10 November) was one of a series assisting ports with the highest number of stowaway incidents to address these issues. Meetings with key stakeholders responsible for maritime security and facilitation were used to gauge knowledge of national legislation, port facility security plans, local organization of maritime security and facilitation, and inter-agency cooperation through security and facilitation committees. These were followed up by port visits, to assess the physical security in place. Five ports were visited during

the exercise: the Queen Elizabeth II Quay (Water Quay), Petrojetty Limited, Pepel (Shandong Steel), Nitti I (Vimetco) and Nitti II (Sierra Rutile Ltd) Ports. In addition, participants were trained to plan and conduct effective self-assessments and internal/ external audits of port facilities, in line with IMO guidance on voluntary self-assessment. Consultants will also assess the port’s compliance with stowaway provisions in IMO’s Facilitation Convention and with recommendations adopted by a regional conference on stowaways held in 2014. The national workshop was funded by the Government of Denmark.

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WINTER 2017

IMO AT WORK

Women in maritime Asia strengthen their network

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regional conference on women in the maritime sector took place in Dili, Timor Leste (6-9 November) under the theme: Transitioning from Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals. Organized by IMO in cooperation with Timor Leste’s Ministry of Development, Transports and Communications, and the German Development Cooperation Agency, the event gathered members of the Women in Maritime Associations for Asia (WIMAs), from 22 Asian countries. The associations aim to deliver the IMO’s Programme on the Integration of Women in the Maritime Sector (IWMS), giving visibility and recognition to the role

women play as key resources for the maritime sector. The conference looked at ways to implement the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), notably SDG 5, which seeks to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. Discussions identified challenges ahead which will need to be addressed, such as the current political and cultural mind-set as well as varying levels of development among Asian countries. But participants agreed that the exchange of experiences and best practices that are taking place at events like this are already helping to enhance women’s education, competency and career development.

Teaching energy-efficient ship operation in Argentina

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aritime training institutions in Argentina are the latest to benefit from IMO’s work to help introduce the topic of energyefficient ship operation into teaching curriculums. A workshop, in Buenos Aires (2-3 November) under the Organization’s GloMEEP project gave support to maritime training institutes delivering the IMO Model Course 4.05 to seafarers. The course consists of a series of lectures, interactive exercises and videos to enhance the learning experience and ensure there are

properly trained crews who can contribute to efficient shipping. The Buenos Aires workshop, hosted and organized by the Prefectura Naval Argentina, was one of a series of GloMEEP events that has seen training delivered in various countries, including Georgia, South Africa, Malaysia and the Philippines. This on-going work supports IMO’s environmental protection goals by spreading industry best practices that can reduce fuel consumption from ships and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Oil spill preparedness for the wider Caribbean

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ny state with offshore oil interests needs to be ready to respond to an oil spill. With this in mind, an IMO workshop (2-5 October) in Cartagena, covered how to assess, identify and acquire oil spill response equipment. A simulated table-top exercise provided hands-on practical experience in how an incident might play out. Participants also gained knowledge of how to develop and implement national and regional exercise programmes. Lessons learned from the exercise and workshop may be incorporated into future revisions of the Wider Caribbean Island and Central American Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation Plans.

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The workshop was conducted by the Regional Marine Pollution, Emergency, Information and Training Center - Wider Caribbean Region (RAC/REMPEITC-Caribe) and attended by representatives from The Bahamas, Barbados, Colombia, Cuba, Curacao, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. It was hosted by the Colombian Maritime Authority (SIMAR) and support including course materials and equipment demonstration was provided by representatives from: Oil Spill Response Limited; Shell Exploration and Production Co.; Exxon Mobil Biomedical Sciences, Inc; T&T Salvage; LAMOR Corporation AB; VARICHEM de Colombia G.E.P.S.; and RAC/ REMPEITC-Caribe.

Who certifies ships?

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nder IMO treaties, ships can be surveyed and certified either by officers of the relevant flag State, or by Recognized Organizations (ROs) acting on their behalf. As part of this process, countries delegating surveys and certification to ROs need to recognize, authorize and monitor these Organizations, which was the subject of a regional IMO workshop in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (31 October – 2 November). The event helped participants from Arab and Mediterranean States to meet their responsibilities under IMO’s RO Code, which entered into force in January 2015. Participants

were provided with knowledge on the harmonized, transparent and independent mechanisms that can assist in consistent oversight of ROs. The workshop was organised in close cooperation with the Federal Transport Authority of the UAE and Abu Dhabi Ports, under IMO’s Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme to support maritime development in the Arab States and Mediterranean region. H.E. Dr. Abdullah Belhaif Al Naimi, Minister of Infrastructure Development and Chairman of the Federal Transport Authority of the UAE, opened the event.

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WINTER 2017

Focus on piracy prevention at Djibouti workshop

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high-level workshop in Djibouti saw an exchange of ideas on preventing a resurgence of piracy in the West Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden, as well as addressing other transnational organized crimes at sea that threaten the security of navigation. The event (29 October) was hosted at the Djibouti Regional Training Centre, which is partfunded by IMO and supports implementation of the Djibouti Code of Conduct – the international

treaty that has been instrumental in repressing piracy and armed robbery against ships in the region. Co-hosted by Japan and France, the workshop was attended by Ambassadors from France, Japan, EU, Egypt and Saudi Arabia, and by members of the diplomatic corps, senior government officials from Djibouti, East African Standby Force and IMO. Speaking at the opening of the workshop, Djibouti’s Minister of Defence, H.E. Ali Hassan Bahdon

invited regional countries to take advantage of the newly completed regional training centre and appealed to donor partners to provide assistance in providing training at the centre. The workshop reinforced the importance of national strategies for developing the maritime sector and a sustainable “blue economy” that generates revenue, employment and stability – a key factor in tackling maritime security challenges in the region.

Maritime security for sustainable development

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gathering of navy chiefs from around the world heard how effective, joined-up and forwardlooking maritime security can be key to an efficient maritime sector, and, therefore, national and regional economic development. Fortyseven navies, including 29 Chiefs of Navies, and 11 international and national organizations participated in the XI Venice Regional Seapower Symposium in Italy (17-20 October), which was hosted by the Italian Navy under the theme of “Navies

beyond traditional roles: crewing efforts to project stability and security from the sea”. Addressing the theme of “how to face trans-regional challenges through traditional capabilities” IMO’s Chris Trelawny outlined the current trans-national threats to shipping, highlighted how effective maritime security requires cooperation, coordination and communication between all stakeholders at national, regional and international level, and

acknowledged the contribution of effective civil/military cooperation to protecting international maritime transport. Mr Trelawny also emphasized that these practices will not only support the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development but could also address some of the stress factors that lead to instability, insecurity and uncontrolled mixed migration.

Maritime policy for good governance

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n IMO workshop to provide training in the development, adoption and updating of a National Maritime Transport Policy (NMTP) was held in Bangkok, Thailand (911 October). The event highlighted the importance of a national maritime transport policy as a good mechanism for improved maritime governance in a sustainable manner.

The Marine Department of Thailand hosted the workshop, which was facilitated by IMO and the World Maritime University (WMU). Forty participants with a role to play in the preparation of an NMTP were exposed to the objectives, development process, content, implementation, and updating of such a policy.

Training for spill response in East Africa

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ow to manage emergency preparedness and response in the oil and gas sector was on the agenda at an IMO workshop in Zanzibar, United Republic of Tanzania (17-20 October). Participants from countries across the East Africa region gathered to highlight good practices in developing national preparedness and response systems, as well as how to improve understanding of risk assessments related to oil and gas development and potential impacts on environment. The group also worked to identify areas for strengthening emergency preparedness and response at national and regional levels. IMO helped facilitate the workshop and provided an overview of the Organization’s International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (OPRC) – the treaty covering measures for dealing with pollution incidents. This Zanzibar workshop was funded by the Norwegian Oil for Development (OfD) Programme and implemented through their partnership program with UNEP in collaboration with the Nairobi Convention Secretariat, the Indian Ocean Commission and hosted by the Zanzibar Environment Management Authority (ZEMA).

Training for port security officials in Tunisia

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n IMO workshop has provided training for Tunisian port security officials to design and undertake drills and exercises in ports. The training course (10-13 October) helped to reinforce and improve existing security measures in the country by training participants to conduct drills and exercises in line with the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and recommendations in the APEC Manual of Maritime

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Security Drills and Exercises for Port Facilities. Activities included live simulation exercises in which participants were assigned various roles, including responders to occurring events and as controllers of incidents, as well as theoretical lessons and discussions. The workshop was arranged at the request of the General Directorate of Ports and Maritime Transport of Tunisia.

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WINTER 2017

IMO AT WORK

Arab Women in Maritime Association launched

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ground-breaking event took place in Alexandria, Egypt (15-19 October) when 30 women from nine Arab countries officially launched The Arab Association for Women in the Maritime Sector (AWIMA). The new network joins the IMO family of regional Women in Maritime Associations (WIMAs), giving visibility and recognition to the role women play as key resources for the maritime sector. Ships’ surveyors, harbourmasters, marine engineers and maritime lawyers, to name a few, came together at the Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Transport (AASTMT)

to set a framework for the new network. The goal is to provide training and knowledge-sharing to facilitate the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), notably SDG 5, which seeks to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. Female cadets studying at the AASTMT also joined the opening ceremony to demonstrate the changes taking place in the industry and to encourage other young women to join the maritime sector, which offers the many benefits of a maritime career, particularly in seafaring careers.

Antigua and Barbuda gets set for single window

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he first phase of the project was initiated with a kick-off week in St. John’s (9-13 October). This week provided an opportunity for stakeholders to discuss the scope of the project, identify existing facilities and conduct a needs’ assessment. The aim is to install a fully functional system based on SafeSeaNet Norway (SSNN), an internet-based maritime single window reporting system focused on FAL Forms. This single window will connect all terminals for stakeholders such as customs, defence, police, maritime authorities, and ports in the country. Vessels will be able

to register mandatory arrival and departure information via the single window and this information will be forwarded to individual authorities and ports in accordance with international and national regulations. Amendments to IMO’s Facilitation Convention adopted in 2016 require Parties to establish systems for the electronic exchange of information by 8 April 2019. The intention is that the Antigua and Barbuda Single Window will provide a system for maritime transport clearance, including the clearance of the ship electronically, by the deadline.

IMO regional pollution centre assists Greece oil spill clean-up

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he IMO-administered Regional Marine Pollution Emergency Response Centre for the Mediterranean Sea (REMPEC) provided technical expertise to help clean up beaches in Greece affected by an oil spill. Two experts were in Greece (8 to 14 October) to give technical support on sunken oil assessment, removal techniques and efficient oil removal from sandy beaches, following the sinking of the AGIA ZONI II, off Piraeus, on

10 September. The experts were from the Centre of Documentation, Research and Experimentation on Accidental Water Pollution (Cedre) based in Brest, France, and from the Italian National Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA) based in Rome, Italy. Both centres are members of the Mediterranean Assistance Unit (MAU), which was established in 1993 and can be mobilized by REMPEC to assist in the event of an emergency situation.

The MAU was established by the Parties to the Barcelona Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment and the Coastal Region of the Mediterranean. IMO administers REMPEC, based in Malta, under the Protocol to the Barcelona Convention Concerning Co-operation in Preventing Pollution from Ships and, in Cases of Emergency, Combating Pollution of the Mediterranean Sea, 2002.

Spotlight on maritime security at Mexico workshop

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exican port security officials underwent training on

complying with IMO’s International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code). Forty participants took part in the workshop in Manzanillo, Mexico (16-20 October), focusing on self-assessing compliance with regulations under the Code that apply to port facilities.

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The workshop included theoretical lessons, presentations on self-assessment processes and techniques, practical exercises, role playing and a visit to a port facility in Manzanillo. The event is part of a series of activities coordinated with the Mexican Navy (SEMAR) following the reorganization of maritime security responsibilities in Mexico this year.

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WINTER 2017

Busy agenda for IMO chief in Cyprus

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MO Secretary-General Kitack Lim was in Cyprus (9-11 October) for a series of high-level meetings with ministers and officials. First, he delivered a keynote address at the Maritime Cyprus event under the theme: “Future Shipping Strategy: Regulators vs. Industry”. He said, “an industry where standards of safety, security and environmental stewardship are high is far better placed to attract both the financial investment and the high-calibre personnel it needs to sustain itself in the long term”. The event operates as a forum where important and current issues relating to international shipping are presented, attracting over 800 shipping executives from around the globe. Mr Lim then continued with his busy trip to attend the 20 year anniversary since the Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control in the Mediterranean Region. Known as the Mediterranean MoU, the original agreement was signed in Valletta, Malta – on 11 July 1997. Port State Control is the process, supported by IMO, by which officials in ports can board visiting foreign-flag vessels to verify compliance with international safety and pollution standards. In a speech

to the meeting, Mr Lim praised Port State Control officers who have worked tirelessly to harmonize and coordinate PSC activities which are essential as the second line of defence against non-compliance with international standards. Mr Lim’s last stop in Cyprus involved a much younger audience, as he visited an elementary school in Limassol, along with EU Transport Commissioner Violeta Bulc. There, he learned more about the Cyprus Chamber of Shipping’s “Adopt a Ship” programme from the students themselves. He later declared how impressed he was by the programme saying, “this inspirational initiative connects young people to the shipping world in a really tangible way, improving their knowledge and firing their imagination. I really think this is a wonderful scheme and all those involved in it deserve great credit”. This visit was part of the IMO Maritime Ambassador scheme which Cyprus has been actively engaged in. Under the scheme, spokespersons are nominated by IMO Member States or NGOs to advocate on behalf of the maritime and seafaring professions, especially among younger audiences.

Digital technology for sustainable development

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nformation and communication technology (ICT) experts from across the United Nations system – including IMO – gathered to discuss the UN’s digital vision – a vital part of efforts to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Innovation in analytics, artificial intelligence and machine learning were among the topics discussed

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at the CEB-ICT Network meeting at the United Nations Office at Geneva, Switzerland (31 October – 2 November) as the Network continued to develop its digital vision paper on the future of data, security, mobility, innovation and partnerships. Cybersecurity also came to the forefront in the discussions and remains a priority area for the entire UN system.

An ocean for life

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ver the last few decades, marine environments have undergone widespread deterioration. To help turn this tide, the Our Ocean Conference 2017 held in Malta (2-3 October) brought together world leaders looking to commit to actions to reduce marine pollution, manage aquatic resources sustainably, mitigate climate change, and set up marine sanctuaries. IMO attended the conference and reaffirmed its commitments made at the UN Oceans Conference in New York in June 2017 to develop, maintain and implement a set of global regulations to ensure shipping’s sustainable use of the oceans.

The event, which took place under the theme “An Ocean for Life, held discussions on four main issues: marine protected areas, sustainable fisheries, marine pollution, and climate-related impacts on the ocean. This year’s event also discussed the newly added topics of maritime security and the blue economy. IMO joined the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in a side-event, organized by the One Earth Foundation, which launched a newly developed “maritime security index”. The index aims to measure and map a range of threats to maritime governance and the capacity of nations to counter these threats.

Safe and sustainable Straits of Malacca and Singapore

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series of the meetings under the Cooperative Mechanism on Safety of Navigation and Environmental Protection in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore was held in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia (2-6 October 2017). Safety of navigation, including e-navigation, and marine environmental protection in one of the busiest waterways were on the agenda, attended by representatives of the littoral States (Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore), user States and other stakeholders. IMO participated in the 10th Cooperation Forum (CF10), the 10th Project Coordination Committee (PCC10) and the 42nd Tripartite Technical Experts Group (TTEG42) meetings. The IMO Malacca and Singapore Straits Trust Fund supports capacity-building activities in the Straits, and IMO contributes

to the Cooperative Mechanism, established in 2007, under IMO’s “Protection of Vital Shipping Lanes” initiative, to foster cooperation and communication between the littoral States, user States and stakeholders of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. The Mechanism comprises three interconnected and complementary components: the Cooperation Forum serves as a platform for dialogue; the Project Coordination Committee coordinates the implementation of Straits Projects; and the Aids to Navigation Fund receives direct financial contributions for the provision and maintenance of critical navigational aids in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. The Tripartite Technical Experts Group supervises the activities of the Cooperative Mechanism.

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WINTER 2017

IMO AT WORK

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IMO News - Winter Issue - 2017  
IMO News - Winter Issue - 2017  

The Official Magazine of the International Maritime Organization