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NEWS

Successful marine bio-invasions project concludes

NEWS

The magazine of the International Maritime Organization SUMMER 2017

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NEWS

Connecting ships, ports and people

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FEATURE

Successful cooperation for safe sea transport of oil told in new exhibition

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FEATURE

Ambitious global energy-efficiency project successfully completes first stage


IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

CONTENTS

OPINION

5

Call for action for sustainable use of the oceans

NEWS

6

Successful marine bio-invasions project concludes

7

Norway is first to ratify compensation regime for Hazardous and Noxious Cargoes

14

Sub-Committee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue

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Protecting ships, people and the polar environment

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Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment

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IMO welcomes entry into force of financial security for seafarers

21

Facilitation Committee

FROM THE MEETINGS

Connecting ships, ports and 11 people - World Maritime Day 2017

FEATURE

16

Successful cooperation for safe sea transport of oil told in new exhibition

IMO AT WORK

26-34

News and stories from around the world on IMO’s work to promote safe, secure and sustainable shipping on clean oceans

FEATURE

22

Ambitious global energyefficiency project successfully completes first stage

MANAGING EDITOR Lee Adamson Email: ladamson@imo.org 4, Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom

ASSISTANT EDITOR Natasha Brown Email: nbrown@imo.org

Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210

EDITORIAL PRODUCTION Mark Combe

Email: imonews@imo.org Website: www.imo.org

ADVERTISING Sally McElhayer Email: SMcElhay@imo.org Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611

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IMO News is the magazine of the International Maritime Organization and is distributed free of charge to qualified readers. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of IMO and the inclusion of an advertisement implies no endorsement of any kind by IMO of the product or service advertised. The contents may be reproduced free of charge on condition that acknowledgment is given to IMO News.

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017 A message from IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim

OPINION IMO AT WORK

Call for action for sustainable use of the oceans W

e live in challenging times. In addition to population increase the world today faces many, often related challenges: climate change; threats to the environment; unsustainable exploitation of natural resources; threats to food security; societal threats posed by organized criminals and instability leading to mixed migration. It was against this background that, in 2015, 193 countries, adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This Agenda calls for action by all countries to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development by 2030 worldwide – and the SDGs are seen as an opportunity to transform the world for the better and leave no-one behind. In June, I attended the historical United Nations conference in New York that has helped set the course for implementation of the ocean-related Goal 14 of the SDGs. All aspects of SDG 14 and its sub-targets were analysed and discussed. Among the outcomes of the Ocean Conference were a focused declaration, agreed by governments, in the form of a “Call for Action” to support the implementation of Goal 14 and a list of “voluntary commitments” to reinforce that objective. When considering SDG 14, much of the attention is inevitably focused on what goes on beneath the surface of the oceans. But we cannot – must not – overlook what happens on the oceans. International shipping uses the world’s oceans to deliver more than 80 per cent of global trade. Annually, more than 50,000 seagoing ships carry more than 10 billion tonnes of cargoes, including commodities, fuel, food, raw materials and consumer goods.

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Shipping is the engine that keeps the global economy moving. It is the most cost-effective and cleanest way to move goods in quantity. It facilitates commerce and helps to create prosperity among nations and peoples. Without it, sustainable development is unthinkable. IMO is the United Nations agency responsible for developing and adopting measures to improve the safety and security of international shipping and to prevent pollution from ships. Just as shipping is central to sustainable development, you could say that IMO is central to shipping’s own sustainability. The work of IMO relates to most, if not all, of the SDG 14 targets. IMO covers all aspects of international shipping – including ship design, construction, equipment, manning, operation and disposal – to ensure that this vital sector remains safe, environmentally sound, energy efficient and secure. Implementing and enforcing the main conventions and regulations adopted by IMO Member States actively addresses marine pollution, mainly from sea-based sources but also, at least indirectly, from land based sources. IMO also supports the targets for managing and protecting marine and coastal ecosystems, not least through the establishment of Special Areas and Particularly Sensitive Sea Areas. Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from ships are also regulated by IMO. And, with regard to ocean acidification, IMO has established a regulatory framework that will contribute to climate-change mitigation by regulating for carbon capture and sequestration in sub seabed geological formations and marine geoengineering. To highlight these efforts, IMO registered several voluntary commitments at the conference, reflecting our work in areas such as energy efficiency, climate change mitigation, transfer of invasive species, and dumping of wastes at sea. Shipping is an essential component of any programme for sustainable development. Through IMO, the Organization’s Member States, civil society and the shipping industry itself are working together to ensure its contribution is continued and strengthened. The promotion of sustainable shipping and sustainable maritime development is one of the major priorities of IMO in the coming years. It is expected that the Call for Action that came from this conference, which emphasizes the need to support – and strengthen – ocean-based economies, not least in the economies of Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries, will greatly contribute the sustainable development of the ocean. The development and implementation, through IMO, of global standards covering key issues underpin IMO’s commitment to provide the institutional framework necessary for a green and sustainable global maritime transportation system, thereby contributing, not just to SDG 14, but to all the Sustainable Development Goals.

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

NEWS

Successful marine bio-invasions project concludes A

decade-long project to promote implementation of an international treaty stemming the transfer of potentially invasive species in ships’ ballast water has reached a successful conclusion at a meeting of stakeholders from Governments, industry and UN bodies. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has been executing the GloBallast Partnerships Programme in collaboration with the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The project was launched in 2007 after an initial 4-year phase and has been assisting developing countries to reduce the transfer of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens in ships’ ballast water and implement the IMO Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention. The final meeting of the GloBallast Global Project Task Force (GPTF), held in Panama City, Panama in March, highlighted the legacy elements of the GloBallast project, which are expected to be sustained by its main stakeholders following the formal closure of the project in June 2017. Specific examples include GloBallast training packages to support the capacity-building needs of countries implementing the BWM Convention. The regular Ballast Water Management R&D Fora, which promoted development of innovative ballast water treatment technologies, are also expected to continue after the project’s closure. The GloBallast project has developed a successful model of working with lead partnering countries as well as the shipping industry and academia to promote knowledge-sharing, training and capacitybuilding. Regional task forces were formed in 12 developing sub-regions and regional strategies and action plans on ballast water management were developed, involving

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more than 100 countries; to date, six of these have been adopted through the regional cooperating institutions. GloBallast has also facilitated capacity building at the national level, helping to establish national task forces and assisting with drafting and adopting the national legislation in 80% of its lead partnering countries. This has supported many of these countries to ratify the BWM Convention, which will enter into force in September 2017. The meeting in Panama promoted the key role of the project’s lead partnering countries within their respective regions to sustain regional BWM implementation, and explored funding mechanisms that could finance future capacity-building needs. The GloBallast project also pioneered a public-private sector partnership. The Global Industry Alliance for Marine Biosecurity (GIA) includes shipping companies such as Keppel Offshore and Marine (KOM) and APL. This alliance supported the formation of the Global Ballast Water Test Organizations Network (GloBal TestNet), which is formed of 19 organizations that test ballast water treatment systems and aims to increase levels of standardization, transparency and openness in so doing.

Dr Stefan Micallef, Director of IMO’s Marine Environment Division, said the GloBallast project was an outstanding example of direct, large-scale action taken by IMO, together with other international entities, to address the global threat to the health of the world’s oceans from invasive species carried in ships’ ballast water. “Through GloBallast, Governments, industry and other stakeholders have acted to further improve the environmental and socio-economic sustainability of shipping and worked to reduce its negative impact on marine ecosystems. I have every hope that the ‘GloBallast family’ will continue its championing efforts and collaboration to protect our oceans, in the spirit of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 14,” Dr Micallef said. Dr Andrew Hudson, Head of the Water & Ocean Governance Programme at UNDP, said the GloBallast project had pioneered a successful model for collaboration, cooperation and capacity-building, which was now being emulated through other “Glo-X” projects.

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

NEWS

Norway is first to ratify compensation regime for Hazardous and Noxious Cargoes N

orway is first to ratify compensation regime for Hazardous and Noxious Cargoes Norway has become the first country to become a Contracting State to a key compensation treaty covering the transport of hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) by ship. The International Convention on Liability and Compensation for Damage in Connection with the Carriage of Hazardous and Noxious Substances by Sea, 2010 (2010 HNS Convention), when in force, will provide a regime of liability and compensation for damage caused by HNS cargoes transported by sea, complementing existing regimes already in force for the transport of oil as cargo, bunker oil used for the operation and propulsion of ships, the removal of hazardous wrecks and claims for death of or personal injury to passengers, or for damage to their luggage, on ships. Ms. Dilek Ayhan, State Secretary in the Norwegian Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, handed over the instrument of ratification of the 2010 HNS Protocol to IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim on Friday (21 April) during a meeting at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom. Norway also provided, as required by the treaty, data on the total quantities of contributing cargo liable for contributions received in Norway during the preceding calendar year.

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Mr. Lim warmly welcomed the ratification by Norway and encouraged other States to follow suit. “The HNS Convention is the last piece in the puzzle needed to ensure that those who have suffered damage caused by HNS cargoes carried on board ships have access to a comprehensive and international liability and compensation regime,” said IMO Secretary General Kitack Lim. “The number of ships carrying HNS cargoes is growing steadily with more than 200 million tonnes of chemicals traded annually by tankers and we have to recognize that accidents can and do happen. I urge all States to follow the example set by Norway and consider acceding to the HNS 2010 treaty as soon as possible, in order to bring it into force.” Entry into force of the treaty requires accession by at least 12 States, meeting certain criteria in relation to tonnage and reporting annually the quantity of HNS cargo received in a State. IMO measures relating to the prevention of accidents that involve HNS cargoes are already in force, including ship design, operations and safety on board as well as safety of loading and unloading operations. There is also a Protocol covering preparedness and response to shipping accidents involving hazardous substances. The 2010 HNS Convention aims to deliver the uniform and comprehensive regime needed to provide compensation for costs, including clean-up and restoring

the environment, in the event of an incident involving HNS cargoes. Total compensation available under the Convention is capped at 250 million Special Drawing Rights (SDR) of the International Monetary Fund (approximately USD $340 million at current exchange rates) per event. Shipowners are held strictly liable up to a maximum limit of liability established by the Convention for the cost of an HNS incident. Registered owners of ships carrying HNS cargoes have to maintain insurance that is State certified. The HNS Fund pays compensation once shipowner’s liability is exhausted and is financed through contributions paid post incident by receivers of HNS cargoes. The HNS Fund is administered by States and contributions will be based on the actual need for compensation. HNS covered by the Convention include: oils; other liquid substances defined as noxious or dangerous; liquefied gases; liquid substances with a flashpoint not exceeding 60˚C; dangerous, hazardous and harmful materials and substances carried in packaged form or in containers; and solid bulk materials defined as possessing chemical hazards. The HNS Convention establishes the principle that the ‘polluter pays’ by ensuring that the shipping and HNS industries provide compensation for those who have suffered loss or damage resulting from an HNS incident.

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

NEWS

A new IMO film shows how the IMO Polar Code supports safe and environmentally-friendly shipping in the Arctic and Antarctic waters

Protecting ships, people and the polar environment O

nboard the Ocean Diamond expedition ship, eco-tourists gaze at the breathtaking beauty of the Antarctic landscape. This is the chance to encounter some unique wildlife, and marvel at the sheer majesty of the glaciers and the icebergs. For them, it is the trip of a lifetime. To make the new film about the Polar Code, an IMO team visited the Ocean Diamond en voyage in the Antarctic, to find out at first-hand what the Code means for ships like this. As Ocean Diamond’s captain Oleg Klaptenko confirmed, operating in Polar waters is the ultimate test of his ship, and his skills as a professional seafarer. “There are several sources of danger. Low temperature, bad visibility, very long polar night and polar day. Remoteness from our home and from human facility that can help you. It is also lack of good, accurate and complete hydrographic service,” says Captain Klaptenko. With more and more ships navigating in polar waters, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) - the United Nations agency with responsibility for regulating the safety and security of shipping and the prevention of pollution from ships - has addressed international concern about the protection of the polar environment and the safety of seafarers and passengers. It has introduced new regulations that all ships operating in these harsh and challenging waters must comply with. The Polar Code entered into force on 1 January 2017. It sets out mandatory

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standards that cover the full range of design, construction, equipment, operational, training and environmental protection matters for ships making polar voyages. These rules go above and beyond existing IMO requirements such as those governing prevention of pollution from ships (MARPOL) and safety of life at sea (SOLAS). All the extensive safety and environmental regulations included in these and other IMO conventions still apply to shipping in polar waters. The Polar Code has two main sections. One deals with the safety of the ship and personnel, the other with protecting the environment. Ships are already subject to strict environmental regulations under the MARPOL convention, but the Polar Code adds another level. Discharging oil or oily mixtures into the sea, for example, is strictly prohibited under the Polar Code, and all oil tankers must have double hull and double bottom construction to prevent oil spills in case of an accident. IMO’s new film shows some of the equipment specific to polar operations carried aboard Ocean Diamond - the ice picks needed to hack off any ice build-up on deck and the thermal suits for crew and passengers to be used in case of emergency, for example; and the system incorporated into the large windows on the bridge to pour hot water down the outside to melt the ice, as well as a heated panel to ensure visibility remains perfect.

Operationally, voyage planning is crucial, as is receiving accurate and up-to-date information about the state of the ice and the weather. And there are means of communication that can be used where satellite coverage is poor. In the galley, where a dedicated team of chefs, cooks and helpers cater for more than 200 ravenous tourists and hungry crew every day, there are bins to collect food waste, paper and plastic waste which, aboard Ocean Diamond, is bagged up and taken ashore. The Polar Code has strict rules for dumping waste, and animal carcasses. For the crew, navigating in polar waters places special challenges. “Due to the Polar Code, all crew members, as senior officers, as ratings, they have to pass special education, tests and certificates, they have to be certified for and get permission for sailing in polar waters,” says Captain Klaptenko, who has been sailing in Polar waters for 25 years and recognizes the value of specialist training. More seafarers will need to get these skills, as shipping activity in polar regions is set to grow in volume and diversity over the coming years. Receding sea ice is opening up these inhospitable regions to both commercial shipping and tourism. As the film stresses, the issue is not whether this activity is a good thing. The issue how it is managed so that we protect the environment and safeguard the lives of people who live in work in such a remote arena. To view the film, visit IMO’s YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/IMOHQ.

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

NEWS

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IMO welcomes entry into force of financial security for seafarers I

MO Secretary-General Kitack Lim welcomed the entry into force on 18 January of new obligations under the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC 2006) which require shipowners to have compulsory insurance to cover abandonment of seafarers, as well as claims for death or long-term disability of seafarers. The 2014 amendments to the MLC 2006, which comes under the auspices of the International Labour Organization (ILO), are based on guidelines which were developed by a joint IMO/ILO working group, which reported to both IMO’s Legal Committee and ILO’s governing bodies. “These amendments, which will provide better protection for seafarers and their families, are the fruit of successful collaboration between IMO and ILO to ensure better working conditions and better

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protection should things go wrong. I am very pleased to see these amendments enter into force for the Parties to MLC 2006, all of which are also IMO Member States,” Mr. Lim said. “Seafarers make global trade possible and it is vital that we all work together to ensure their rights are protected. It has often been said that the MLC 2006 represents the fourth pillar when it comes to the most important maritime treaties as it complements the IMO treaties covering safety – the SOLAS treaty, pollution prevention – the MARPOL treaty and training of seafarers – the STCW treaty,” he added. The 2014 amendments to the MLC 2006 require that a certificate or other documentary evidence of financial security has to be issued by the financial security provider of the shipowner. This certificate has to be carried on board the ship.

The amendments were developed over nearly a decade of discussion in a Joint IMO/ ILO Ad Hoc Expert Working Group on Liability and Compensation regarding Claims for Death, Personal Injury and Abandonment of Seafarers. IMO’s Legal Committee maintains a standing agenda item, to keep under review the provision of financial security in case of abandonment of seafarers, and shipowners’ responsibilities in respect of contractual claims for personal injury to, or death of seafarers.

These amendments are the fruit of successful IMO/ILO cooperation

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

NEWS

Connecting ships, ports and people

World Maritime Day theme launched by IMO Secretary-General

T

he importance of coherent and connected development across all maritime sectors will feature strongly in IMO’s work this year, as the Organization focuses on its World Maritime Day theme “Connecting ships, ports and people”. The theme for 2017 was launched by IMO Secretary-General Lim during a visit to Felixstowe, the busiest container port in the United Kingdom. “Throughout the year, we will highlight the importance of ‘joined-up’ maritime development across all sectors, both from a policy and a practical perspective. The benefits of a free and efficient flow of goods and trade extend far beyond the ships and ports themselves,” Mr. Lim said. “As a UN agency, IMO has a strong commitment to helping achieve the aims of the Sustainable Development Goals. Shipping and ports can play a significant role in helping to create conditions for increased employment,

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prosperity and stability through promoting maritime trade. The port and maritime sectors can be wealth creators, both on land and at sea,” Mr. Lim said. During a tour of the port led by Mr. Clemence Cheng, Chief Executive Officer of the Port of Felixstowe and Managing Director of Hutchison Ports Europe, Mr. Lim witnessed port operations at first hand, observing the clear link between ships and ports and the people that operate them. He also spoke to crew on board the container ship Munkebo Maersk about the significance of the World Maritime Day theme for seafarers as well as for the wider public, the people who depend on shipping for most of everything they need and want. Mr. Lim noted that the theme for 2017 would enable IMO and the wider maritime community to shine a spotlight on the existing cooperation between ports and ships to maintain and enhance a safe, secure and

efficient maritime transportation system. “Ultimately, more efficient shipping, working in partnership with a port sector supported by governments, will be a major driver towards global stability and sustainable development for the good of all people,” Mr. Lim said. He encouraged IMO Member States and wider stakeholders in the maritime community to join in with activities and initiatives under the World Maritime Day theme for 2017: “Connecting ships, ports and people”.

we will highlight the importance of ‘joined-up’ maritime development across all sectors

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

NEWS

Bangladesh ready for next phase in green ship recycling T

he Government of Bangladesh is actively seeking international partnerships and financial support to help make the country’s ship-recycling facilities greener and more sustainable, following the successful completion of the first phase of a project aimed at improving safety and environmental standards within the country’s ship-recycling industry. IMO, the Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh and the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions (BRS) have jointly implemented the 30-month “Safe and Environmentally Sound Ship Recycling in Bangladesh – Phase I” (SENSREC project). At a high-level closure meeting in Dhaka, Bangladesh in February, which followed site visits to ship-recycling yards, stakeholders highlighted the successful completion of the five work packages under the SENSREC project.

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These included economic and environmental studies on the ship-recycling industry in Bangladesh; studies on managing hazardous materials; refining the Government One-Stop Service (in which all the various ministries with a responsibility for ship recycling offer a single point of contact for related matters); developing training materials; and preparing a document for a follow-up Phase 2 to implement the recommendations of the first phase. The second phase of the project is expected to focus on constructing a dedicated waste-management facility for treating, storing and disposing the hazardous waste (TSDF), as well as rolling out a comprehensive training programme aimed at workers in ship recycling yards, supervisors and government officials. The main funding for the project came from the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad). The European Union

(EU) also supported the project with additional funding channelled through the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and with an annual gross tonnage capacity of more than 8.8 million, the Bangladeshi ship recycling industry is one of the world’s most important, second only to neighbouring India in terms of volume. The successful completion of the SENSREC Phase-I Project is expected to assist Bangladesh in working towards accession to IMO’s Hong Kong Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships and towards meeting the international standards stipulated by the Convention. The Project was coordinated by a dedicated Project Coordination Unit established by IMO, including a project office and project officer based in Dhaka.

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

NEWS

11-15 SEPTEMBER 2017

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The must-attend global maritime event Leaders from every sector of the global shipping industry will descend on London in September 2017 to celebrate London International Shipping Week (LISW17). The week-long event will be packed with over 140 individual events and top-ranking meetings, culminating in a highly-focused industry and government shipping conference and spectacular Gala Dinner.

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NCSR

IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON NAVIGATION, COMMUNICATIONS AND SEARCH AND RESCUE • 4TH SESSION • 6-10 MARCH 2017

Ships routeing systems approved The Sub-Committee approved the following new and amended ships’ routeing measures, for submission to the MSC for adoption: Amendments to existing traffic separation schemes (TSSs) and associated measures • amendments to the existing Long Sand Head two-way route and SUNK Inner precautionary area in the traffic separation scheme “In the SUNK area and in the Northern approaches to the Thames Estuary” (United Kingdom). Other routeing measures • establishment of a new recommended route “Off the western coast of Izu O Shima Island” (Japan);

Modernization of global maritime distress and safety system W

ork to review and update the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) continued during the fourth session of the Sub-Committee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR). A draft Modernization Plan of the GMDSS was completed, for submission to the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) for approval. The plan envisages the development of amendments to SOLAS and related instruments for approval in 2021 and their adoption in 2022, with entry into force in 2024. The aim is to eventually adopt a revised and updated SOLAS chapter IV, enabling the use of modern communication systems in the GMDSS, while removing the requirement to carry obsolete systems, at the same time maintaining the requirements for ships to carry specified terrestrial and satellite radio communications equipment for sending and receiving distress alerts and maritime safety information, as well as for other communications. While the modernization plan does not envisage new carriage requirements for ships, the revised GMDSS is expected to provide for the introduction of new services

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and systems, such as other terrestrial communications using digital technologies for broadcasting maritime safety and security related information from shore-to-ship, and for enhanced and more reliable Search and Rescue capabilities by, for example, including the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. The modernization plan also proposes the review of related regulations in other SOLAS chapters, including SOLAS chapter III (life-saving appliances), for example in relation to search and rescue transponders, and the incorporation of maritime security communications in SOLAS chapter IV. Meanwhile, the Sub-Committee developed draft amendments to SOLAS chapter IV and its appendix to accommodate additional mobile satellite services within the GMDSS. Draft new Performance Standards for a ship earth station for use in the GMDSS were also agreed. The Iridium mobile-satellite system has applied for recognition and use in the GMDSS. A correspondence group was established to work on the GMDSS modernization, including preparing draft revisions of SOLAS chapters III and IV and a work plan for the related and consequential amendments to other existing instruments.

• establishment of a new area to be avoided “Off Peninsula de Osa in the Pacific coast off Costa Rica” (Costa Rica); • establishment of a new area to be avoided as an associated protective measure for the “Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) in the Sulu Sea” (the Philippines).

Automation in ship reporting systems The Sub-Committee agreed draft amendments to the Revised Guidelines and criteria for ship reporting systems (resolution MSC.43(64)), addressing mandatory ship reporting systems established in accordance with SOLAS regulation V/11. The revisions update the resolution and encourage the use and recognition of automated electronic means of ship reporting.

Position, Navigation and Timing data processing The Sub-Committee agreed draft guidelines for shipborne Position, Navigation and Timing (PNT) data processing to support the harmonization and improvement of onboard PNT data processing. The purpose of the guidelines is to enhance the safety and efficiency of navigation by improved provision of PNT data to bridge teams (including pilots) and shipboard applications (e.g. AIS, ECDIS, etc.).

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS

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FEATURE

IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

Successful cooperation for safe sea transport of oil told in new exhibition

T

he 50 years since the grounding of the tanker Torrey Canyon in 1967 have seen dramatic and sustained reduction in major oil spills from ships, thanks to cooperation between Governments and industry. The story of how that incident served as a catalyst for positive change is told in a new exhibition which was launched in January at IMO headquarters in London. A series of panels chart the collaborative work which has resulted in a comprehensive regulatory framework, a demonstrably improved shipping industry, good systems of preparedness and response and adequate compensation for those affected by spills. Demand for oil remains strong and shipping remains the most effective means of meeting that demand. Tankers operating today are designed with double hulls, duplicate controls, segregated ballast tanks, inert gas systems, crude oil tank washing equipment and oily-water separators - all of which were not present fifty years ago. These innovations, together with improvements in aids to navigation and many other aspects of ship design, construction and technology, have all led to much higher

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framework for compensating victims of standards in tanker design and operation. At pollution incidents and established the the same time, proactive industry initiatives International oil Pollution Compensation and IMO-led guidelines and Conventions Funds (IOPC Funds). governing safety, ship operations, vetting and “As a result, tanker shipping today is safer reporting, ship management, crew training and cleaner than ever before and there is and certification - have all contributed to a also a robust mechanism in place to respond safer, cleaner global oil shipping industry. effectively to oil spills and deal with their Speaking at the launch of the exhibition, financial consequences,” IMO Secretary-General Mr. Lim said. Kitack Lim highlighted This exhibition highlights Mr. José Maura, the important measures how government and industry Director of the IOPC taken by IMO in response work to anticipate the needs Funds, emphasised to the Torrey Canyon of the future the successful and incident in March 1967, unique liability and off the coast of the United compensation regime set up by IMO, in Kingdom. Within two months, in May 1967, which ship and cargo interests jointly share IMO had convened an extraordinary meeting the financing of compensation for oil pollution which proposed a number of changes in ship damage from tankers. design and operation. This led directly to the “The transport of oil by sea remains development of the International Convention essential for our daily lives and the risk for the Prevention of Pollution form Ships that carriage of oil brings is inevitable. This (MARPOL), which is still to this day the most exhibition showcases both the ways in which important measure to address prevention of we have fought to reduce the number of spills pollution by ships. but also the ways in which we are prepared The incident also led to the establishment to deal with them when they do occur,” Mr. of IMO’s Legal Committee, which Maura said. subsequently developed a comprehensive www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

FEATURE

Tanker shipping is safer and cleaner than ever before and there is a robust mechanism in place to respond effectively to oil spills and deal with their financial consequences

Statistics compiled by the International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Ltd, show a 90% reduction in the number of major oil spills and a hundred-fold reduction in the volume of oil spilt since the 1970s, highlighting the real, tangible benefit of government and industry working together to reduce oil spills over the decades. In 2016, the total volume of crude oil transported by ship was 1,770 million metric tons and 99.99% of this arrived safely. “Now, the volume of oil lost in accidents is a tiny fraction of the volume that is delivered safely to its destination each year,” said Dr. Karen Purnell, Managing Director, ITOPF. “The goal for everyone must surely be no spills at all, but accidents by their very nature are unpredictable. This exhibition also highlights how government and industry work to anticipate the needs of the future and how they are proactive in developing new initiatives to continually improve safety and ensure an environmentally-responsible approach to meeting the demands of society in the future,” Dr. Purnell said. The exhibition will run at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom, until 7 July 2017.

www.imo.org

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

SSE

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON SHIP SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT (SSE) • 4TH SESSION

20-24 MARCH 2017

Functional requirements and expected performance

Safety during abandon ship drills using lifeboats T

he Sub-Committee agreed draft guidelines on safety during abandon ship drills using lifeboats for submission to MSC 98 for approval. The guidelines provide detailed information on safely carrying out drills using lifeboats and for simulated launching of free-fall lifeboats during drills, and are aimed at shipowners, ship operators, ship-vetting organizations, ship personnel, surveyors, manufacturers and other parties. The guidelines stem from annex 2 to the Measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats (MSC.1/Circ.1206/Rev.1). The Sub-Committee also agreed draft amendments to update the Guidelines for developing operation and maintenance manuals for lifeboat systems (MSC.1/ Circ.1205).

Both sets of guidelines have been reviewed and prepared as a result of the adoption of the Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear (resolution MSC.402(96)) and the related SOLAS amendments which make them mandatory. The package of requirements, expected to enter into force on 1 January 2020, aim to prevent accidents with survival craft and addresses long standing issues such as the need for a uniform, safe and documented standard related to the servicing of these appliances, as well as the authorization, qualification and certification requirements to ensure that a reliable service is provided.

Code for Mobile Offshore Drilling Units updated T

he Sub-Committee agreed the revised and updated Code for the Construction and Equipment of Mobile Offshore Drilling Units, 2009 (2009 MODU Code) for submission to the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) for adoption. The revisions update and amend the 2009 MODU Code, taking into account recommendations arising from the

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investigation into the explosion, fire and sinking of the Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU) Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico, in April 2010. Key revisions concern machinery and electrical installations in hazardous areas, fire safety, and life-saving appliances and equipment.

The Sub-Committee agreed draft functional requirements for SOLAS chapter III and the draft expected performance for each functional requirement, for submission to MSC 98 for consideration. The MSC is expected to consider the next steps in further developing the draft functional requirements/performance, leading to a more quantifiable version of them.

The draft functional requirements include: 1. A  ll life-saving appliances shall be in a state of readiness 2. Provide familiarization with equipment and emergency procedures 3. Provide information and instructions to all persons on board depending on their assignment to life-saving equipment 4. Ensure readily available information is provided to personnel to enable effective management of an emergency 5. Provide means of external communications suitable to alert and guide ships and aircraft 6. Provide means for internal communication during the emergency 7. Provide means for alerting all persons on board as to the emergency 8. Provide means for safe abandonment for all embarking persons 9. Provide means for the safety and survivability of all persons after abandonment for the time until expected rescue 10. Provide ready access to survival systems for all persons 11. Provide means to enable survival in water until rescue 12. Provide active and passive means for detection of survival units and persons in the water by survival units and by rescue units 13. Provide means for search and rescue and assistance to other vessels The “expected performance(s)” set out how to meet the functional requirement, for example, for the first functional requirement, expected performances include: easily accessible (e.g. not obstructed and not locked), safe operation, operable independently of ship’s power supplies, etc. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

20-24 MARCH 2017

SSE

SUB-COMMITTEE ON SHIP SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT (SSE) • 4TH SESSION

Polar requirements work plan agreed

T

Vessels with dynamic positioning systems

T

he Sub-Committee endorsed draft guidelines for vessels and units with dynamic positioning systems, for submission to the MSC for approval. The draft guidelines, generally applicable to new vessels and units with dynamic positioning systems, have been developed to current industry practice and DP technologies, since the previous set of guidelines was issued in 1994 (Guidelines for vessels with dynamic positioning (DP) systems (MSC/Circ.645)). Compliance with the new Guidelines would be documented by means of a Dynamic Positioning Verification Acceptance Document (DPVAD) for the dynamic positioning system.

Graphical symbols updated

T

he Sub-Committee endorsed draft escape-route signs and equipment location markings with the associated draft Assembly resolution, for submission to MSC 98 for approval. The symbols reflect the international standard ISO 24409 2:2014. It was recognized that not all of the symbols in the Graphical symbols for shipboard fire control plans (resolution A.952(23)) were included in standard ISO 24409-2 and, therefore, resolution A.952(23) should continue to be used in combination with the new Assembly resolution, once adopted, for the preparation of the shipboard fire control plans required by SOLAS regulation II 2/15.2.4.

www.imo.org

he Sub-Committee agreed a work plan to address any additional testing and performance standards related to life-saving appliances and arrangements on board ships operating in polar waters, to support the implementation of the Polar Code, which entered into force on 1 January 2017. Work at the next sessions and in a correspondence group would focus on evaluation of specific conditions, as required, to consider when approving life-saving equipment to be used when in polar waters and to identify test and performance criteria for life-saving appliances and arrangements. The aim would be to finalize the work, which will have a two-step approach starting with an interim solution, as soon as possible for submission to the MSC.

Ventilation of survival craft

T

he Sub-Committee made progress in developing new requirements for ventilation of survival craft. The work follows recommendations arising from the investigation into the incident involving the MOL Comfort, a container ship which broke in two off the coast of Yemen in 2013. All 26 crew escaped the vessel, but the investigation reported on evidence from crew that the totally-enclosed lifeboats became extremely hot and caused discomfort when entry points were closed in bad weather. A correspondence group was established to gather and review data on microclimate in totally enclosed lifeboats to identify the possible criteria on which the new ventilation requirements for totally enclosed lifeboats should be based (e.g. humidity, temperature, threshold levels of O2, of CO2, ventilation rates, air changes); and to recommend the criteria to be used for the development of draft amendments to the LSA Code and to MSC resolution MSC.81(70).

Requirements for onboard lifting appliances and winches

T

he Sub-Committee continued its work to develop SOLAS requirements for onboard lifting appliances and winches, which have been proposed being placed in chapter II-1 of said Convention. A correspondence group was established to further develop draft goal- and function-based SOLAS regulations for onboard lifting appliances and anchor handling winches; and to further develop draft related guidelines supporting the goals and functional requirements,

Fire integrity – unified interpretations

T

he Sub-Committee endorsed a draft unified interpretation of SOLAS regulations II 2/9.2.2.4.2, II-2/9.2.3.3.2 and II-2/9.2.4.2.2 relating to the fire integrity of the bulkheads between the wheelhouse and a navigation locker inside the wheelhouse, for submission to MSC 98 with a view to approval. The Sub-Committee also endorsed a draft unified interpretation of SOLAS regulation II-2/9.2.4.2 intended to clarity that individual compartments of tankers, including those permitted to be located in the cargo area, should be categorized as per regulation 9.2.4, and thus the fire integrity standards stipulated in the relevant regulations should be applied to the boundaries of each space, for submission to MSC 98 with a view to approval.

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

4-7 APRIL 2017

Explanatory FAL Manual updated T

he Committee made progress in updating the Explanatory Manual to the FAL Convention to reflect the amendments to the Annex to the FAL Convention adopted by FAL 40, which are expected to enter into force on 1 January 2018. The Committee agreed to establish a correspondence group to progress the work intersessionally, and extended the scope of the review of the Explanatory Manual to include additional aspects, such as best practices, operation procedures in ports, etc, and agreed to extend the target completion date until 2019.

Maritime Single Window project

T

Reduction of administrative burden in cases of vessel needing to put sick or injured persons ashore

T

he Committee approved a circular to encourage public authorities to share the relevant information submitted by the master of a vessel needing to put sick or injured persons ashore among themselves, in order not to create an additional administrative burden to the ship, through multiple reporting requirements.

www.imo.org

Stowaways reporting form updated

T

he Committee agreed on the importance of including information related to port, port facility number, berth and terminal information when Member States and international organizations report stowaways’ incidents to the Organization. The Committee agreed to update the circular on information on stowaway incidents (FAL.2/Circ.50/Rev.2), and issue a new unified interpretation to Appendix 3 of the FAL Convention, to reflect this. According to information provided by the P&I Clubs, statistics for stowaway cases in 2014-2015 showed a significant decrease in the numbers of incidents and stowaways (the full set of data will be submitted to FAL 42). The Committee also noted that IMO capacitybuilding activities, including regional seminars on stowaways, had led to a reduction in the number of stowaway cases in targeted ports.

he Committee discussed the way forward for IMO’s Maritime Single Window project. There was support for the development of a completely new prototype, taking into account the experience of others in the development and implementation of maritime single window systems. The Committee recognized that the project provided a framework that Member States might refer to, to help them meet their obligations to establish electronic interchange of information by 9 April 2019. However, the goal was not to establish a global system. Member States and non-governmental organizations were invited to submit information to the next session to progress the project further. The Committee established a correspondence group to review and update the guidelines for setting up a single window system in maritime transport (FAL.5/Circ.36), to ensure it reflects best practices and accurately reflects developments in maritime trade, electronic and automated machineto-machine communication and cooperation between Member States, and other relevant developments. The Committee discussed the development of guidance relating to electronic signature and decided to develop (at the next session) guidance for authentication, integrity and confidentiality of content for the purpose of exchange via maritime single windows, with a target completion date of 2019.

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FAL

FACILITATION COMMITTEE • 41st SESSION


IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

FEATURE

Ambitious global energy-efficiency project successfully completes first stage

T

he announcement that the Pacific Community (SPC) has been selected to host the regional Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre (MTCC) for the Pacific region has completed the first phase of the Global MTCC Network (GMN), an ambitious project designed to promote energy efficiency in shipping and help the industry reduce greenhouse gas emissions. SPC will host the MTCC-Pacific in collaboration with the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP). MTCC-Pacific will be located at the office of the SPC Office in Nabua, Suva, Fiji, close to the city’s port and easily reached from Nausori Airport. The selection of the SPC/SPREP consortium followed a competitive international tendering process. The MTCCPacific forms part of a global network of five centres, established under the GMN, funded by the European Union (EU) and implemented by IMO. MTCC-Pacific joins MTCCs in Africa (Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya); Asia (Shanghai Maritime University, China) the Caribbean (the University of Trinidad and Tobago) and Latin America (the International Maritime University of Panama). The regional MTCCs will deliver the agreed project milestones over a three-year period, making a significant contribution to IMO’s continuing, widespread efforts to ensure

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effective implementation and enforcement of the global energy-efficiency regulations for international shipping. The MTCCs will receive allocations from the �10 million European Union funding for the project. They will be established and resourced to become regional centres of excellence, providing leadership in promoting ship energy-efficiency technologies and operations, and the reduction of harmful emissions from ships.

Aims of the GMN project Greenhouse gas emissions from shipping are expected to increase but developing countries, which play a significant role in international shipping, often lack the means to improve energy efficiency in their shipping sectors. Global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from shipping rely heavily on improvements in energy efficiency and increased uptake of low-carbon technologies. Better energy efficiency means less fuel is used, and that means lower emissions. This project, formally entitled “Capacity Building for Climate Mitigation in the Maritime Shipping Industry” will enable developing countries, especially Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States, in the target regions to effectively implement energy-efficiency measures through technical assistance, capacity building and promoting technical cooperation.

The project will be implemented through the network of MTCCs which, once operational, will act as focal point for: •

improving capability in the region – by working with maritime administrations, port authorities, other relevant government departments and related shipping stakeholders to facilitate compliance with international regulations on energy efficiency for ships promoting the uptake of low-carbon technologies and operations in the maritime sector through pilot projects raising awareness about policies, strategies and measures for the reduction of ghg and other emissions from the maritime transport sector demonstrating a pilot-scale system for collecting data and reporting on ships’ fuel consumption to improve shipowners’ and maritime administrations’ understanding in this regard, and developing and implementing strategies to sustain the impact of MTCC results and activities beyond the project time-line. Visit the project website at: http://gmn.imo.org/

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

•

www.imo.org

SUMMER 2017

FEATURE

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

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IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

104TH SESSION

26-28 APRIL 2017

Promoting the HNS 2010 Convention T

he Committee approved a draft Assembly resolution on the implementation and entry into force of the 2010 HNS Protocol, aimed at encouraging implementation of this key compensation treaty covering liability and compensation for damage caused by the transport of hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) by ship. Norway recently became the first country to become a Contracting State to the 2010 HNS Protocol. The draft resolution, to be submitted to the Assembly 30th session (27 November-6 December 2017) for adoption, calls on States to consider ratifying, or acceding to, the 2010 HNS Protocol and implement it in a timely manner. The draft resolution urges all States to work together towards the implementation and entry into force of the 2010 HNS Protocol by sharing best practices, and in resolving any practical difficulties in setting up the new regime. States

are also encouraged to work with industry to assist in the implementation process by using the tools that are made available on identifying receivers, contributing cargo and other relevant information. The Committee agreed on the need for further awareness raising. A generic presentation providing typical HNS incident scenarios was approved by the Committee. It was decided that a two-day workshop on the HNS Convention, aimed at Governments, should be held in 2018 in conjunction with the meetings of LEG 105 or the IOPC Funds. Entry into force of the HNS liability and compensation treaty requires accession by at least 12 States, meeting certain criteria in relation to tonnage and reporting annually the quantity of HNS cargo received in a State.

Issuing insurance certificates T

he Committee approved a draft Assembly resolution to allow for the delegation of authority to issue certificates of insurance under the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1992 (the 1992 Civil Liability Convention) and the 2010 HNS Convention. Unlike the Bunkers Convention 2001, the 2002 Athens Convention and the 2007 Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention, the 1992 Civil Liability Convention and the 2010 HNS Convention do not provide an explicit framework for the delegation of authority to issue certificates of insurance. The draft resolution, to be submitted to the Assembly’s 30th session (27 November-6 December 2017) for adoption, confirms that a State Party to the 1992 Civil Liability Convention or the 2010 HNS Convention can authorize an institution or an organization recognized by it to issue the certificates of insurance or other financial security required by these Conventions. It also reminds States Parties that the delegation of authority to issue the certificates of insurance or other financial security required by the 1992 Civil Liability Convention and the 2010 HNS Convention would not affect the potential liability the delegating State may have in relation to those certificates.

www.imo.org

THE HNS CONVENTION WHY IT IS NEEDED Compensation for damage caused by hazardous and noxious substances transported by sea

IOPC Funds

Fair treatment of seafarers - workshop

T

he Committee welcomed information from the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) regarding a one-day workshop organized by the ITF in London, on 23 June 2017 on the implementation of the 2006 Guidelines on fair treatment of seafarers in the event of a maritime accident (Resolution LEG.3(91)). Some delegations informed the Committee that they were implementing the Guidelines into their national legislation. The Committee discussed a proposal to invite the ILO to explore the possibility of an amendment to the MLC 2006 to incorporate enabling provisions for the continuation of seafarers’ contracts when seafarers were held in captivity for protracted periods. It was noted that an ILO working group of the Special Tripartite Committee (STC) established under the MLC 2006 was currently looking into this matter and would submit its recommendations to the third meeting of the STC in April 2018.

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LEG

LEGAL COMMITTEE


IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

LEG

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON SHIP SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT (SSE) • 4TH SESSION

20-24 MARCH 2017

Abandonment database T

he Committee discussed the joint IMO/ International Labour Organization (ILO) joint database of abandonment of seafarers, recognized as an important tool in monitoring and resolving cases of abandonment. It was agreed that IMO and ILO should work to improve the functioning of the database. Over the last five years, between 12 to 18 incidents, affecting 1,015 seafarers, have been reported annually. During this period, 33 flag States were involved in 75 incidents and 40 port States were involved in 77 incidents.

Since 18 January 2017 there has been a spike of new abandonment cases, with 11 cases thus far, compared to 5 in the same period in 2016 and in 2015. The Committee expressed its strong commitment to preserving the rights of seafarers in cases of abandonment and noted that providing accurate information to the IMO/ILO database was not only the responsibility of the flag State but also that of the port State and other parties that were involved. Consultations and contacts with

the flag State should take place prior to publication on the database. The Committee also acknowledged the benefits of the amendments to the MLC relating to the provision of financial security for abandonment, personal injury to and death of seafarers, which entered into force in January. The Committee urged those Member States that have not already done so, to consider ratifying the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 at their earliest convenience.

Trans-boundary oil pollution damage T

he Committee noted the finalized guidance for bilateral/ regional arrangements or agreements on liability and compensation issues connected with trans-boundary oil pollution damage resulting from offshore exploration and exploitation activities guidance, provided by Indonesia and Denmark The Committee encouraged Member States and observer delegations to take the guidance into consideration when negotiating bilateral/regional arrangements or agreements connected with transboundary pollution damage from offshore exploration and exploitation activities. The traditional diplomatic reception at IMO

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

IMO AT WORK

Liability cover for Antarctic waters

T

he issue of liability arising from environmental emergencies in Antarctic waters was part of discussions at the 40th Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting in Beijing, China (23 May – 1 June). Among other maritime safety and environmental protection issues, IMO contributed to discussions on the legal aspects of the Antarctica Treaty and Protocol and the applicability of IMO’s liability and compensation regime. This regime includes the Civil Liability Convention, Fund Convention, Bunkers Convention, Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention and Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims Convention. The Antarctic Treaty was set up by countries with an interest in the region, in 1959, to ensure peaceful use of, and freedom of scientific investigation in, the Antarctic.

When searching is not enough T

he Pacific’s wild weather and vast distances make it a challenging location for search and rescue, said Keith Manch, Director Maritime New Zealand, in his opening address at the Pacific Regional Search and Rescue workshop in Auckland, New Zealand (22-26 May). The objective of the workshop was to provide Pacific Search and Rescue (SAR) coordinators and responders with the tools to improve coordination between national SAR agencies. The event also aimed to improve regional collaboration through formal protocols and communication ensuring a uniform SAR response throughout the Pacific. IMO’s Carlos Salgado echoed the importance of shared experiences: “This regional workshop is vital as it provides an opportunity for those who have responsibilities in search and rescue, to discuss their common issues and share some best practices on how to resolve them”. He also highlighted key aspects of international standards: “The work done at this workshop will improve Pacific SAR responders’ ability to comply with international rules and standards around search and rescue activities.” The workshop, attended by more than 100 participants, saw a mock search and rescue operation, featuring a sinking boat firing flares, a US Coastguard C-130 Hercules dropping a life raft and an Auckland Rescue Helicopter winching a person from the water. The workshop was jointly organised by the Pacific Community (SPC) and IMO, and co-hosted by the Government of New Zealand. Pacific Island governments continue to be challenged by search and rescue cases, despite ongoing efforts to prevent them. Between 2015 and early 2017, there were some 680 search and rescue cases reported in Guam, 213 in Papua New Guinea, 86 in Kiribati, 72 in Solomon Islands, 25 in Cook Islands and 25 in Tuvalu.

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Studying the London Protocol

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he core functions of the treaty regulating dumping of wastes at sea - the London Protocol - were presented to some 30 participants at a workshop in Accra, Ghana (22-24 May). The workshop provided relevant examples and experiences on the implementation of the Protocol. Participants from nine countries* also received information on various legal and technical aspects, including lessons on waste assessment guidance, the permitting and reporting procedures, as well as possible steps to ratification. The workshop was hosted by the Ghana Maritime Authority. IMO’s Fredrik Haag led the event, which was followed by a regional workshop on the anti-fouling convention and biofouling guidelines.

* Cabo Verde, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Nigeria, Sao Tome & 

Principe and Sierra Leone.

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SUMMER 2017

National maritime transport policy training in Antigua and Barbuda

A

three-day National Maritime Transport Policy (NMTP) workshop has been held in St. John’s, Antigua and Barbuda (16-18 May). The event provided valuable knowledge and skills to those involved in the development, adoption and review of a NMTP in the country. The exercise was part of a series of workshops and seminars being delivered in various regions of the world to provide training to interested IMO Member States in the development, adoption and updating of such policies, which are key to a coordinated and integrated approach to maritime transport. The participants represented various government agencies and stakeholders spanning multiple sectors. The workshop was hosted by the Antigua and Barbuda Department of Marine Services and Merchant Shipping and facilitated by IMO, with consultants representing both IMO and the World Maritime University (WMU). Ahead of the workshop, the IMO/WMU team met the Honourable Mr Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, and discussed and discussed the benefits of developing a National Maritime Transport Policy and other maritime matters of mutual interest.

www.imo.org

IMO AT WORK

Oil spills: prevent, prepare, respond, restore I

nternational experts shared experiences, new technologies and scientific advancements relating to oil spill response at the International Oil Spill Conference (IOSC) in Long Beach, United States (15-18 May). The theme of the conference was “prevent, prepare, respond and restore”, which fully aligns with IMO’s regulatory work to prevent oil spills from occurring and also its work to support countries to be prepared to respond to such incidents. IMO`s capacity-building activities include training for oil pollution preparedness and response through simulation of oil spills. IMO is a co-sponsor of the triennial conference alongside the oil industry body IPIECA, the United States Coast Guard, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAAA) and other US entities. IMO’s technical cooperation programme sponsored seven attendees from the Caribbean region under the conference’s scholarship programme.

Turkey’s Prime Minister visits IMO

T

urkey’s Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım visited IMO Headquarters on Thursday (11 May). During the visit, IMO SecretaryGeneral Kitack Lim and Prime Minister Yildirim discussed maritime matters and reflected on this year’s World Maritime Day theme, “Connecting Ships, Ports and People”. This has great resonance for Turkey, which, as a significant maritime nation, has an interest in the whole range of issues linked to the theme, including the facilitation of maritime transport, and increasing efficiency, navigational safety, protection of the marine environment, and maritime security. During his visit, Mr. Yildirim toured the IMO Headquarters building and met senior staff.

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IMO NEWS • SUMMER 2017

IMO AT WORK

Safely using natural gas as marine fuel

T

he safe use of natural gas as marine fuel was in focus at the International Conference on Liquefied Natural Gas for Transport and Industry in Naples, Italy (10-11 May). IMO’s Loukas Kontogiannis gave an update on IMO regulations on the subject, specifically, the International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code), which entered into force on 1 January 2017. Gas and other low-flashpoint fuels are cleaner for the atmosphere as they emit very low levels of air pollutants, such as sulphur oxides and particulates. However, these fuels pose their own safety challenges. Therefore, the Code aims to minimize the risk to ships, their crews and the environment.

Pollution response at Panama workshop

T

he need to ratify and implement various marine pollution conventions was highlighted at a regional workshop in Panama City, Panama (8-12 May). The workshop focused on the oil spill response convention (OPRC) and its related protocol, and liability and compensation conventions related to oil carried as cargo (FUND 1992) and bunkers. In attendance were 31 participants from the Member States of the Operative Network for Regional

Cooperation among Maritime Authorities of the Americas (ROCRAM). The event was led by IMO’s Carlos Salgado. It was organized by ROCRAM and the Maritime Authority of Panama (AMP), under the Memorandum of Understanding between IMO and the General Secretariat of ROCRAM’s Secretariat (SECROCRAM), currently held by Mexico, within the framework of IMO’s Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP).

Promoting cyber risk management in Caribbean shipping

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IMO catalyst for more efficient ships

“I

MO regulations will be a driver and catalyst for a generation of new, more efficient ships” said Stefan Micallef, Director of the Marine Environment Division at IMO, as he concluded his remarks at the 2017 Propulsion and Emissions conference, Hamburg, Germany (10-11 May). The ‘Future proofing your fleet’ event discussed challenging issues of complying with environmental regulations and the associated costs. In his keynote address, Mr. Micallef also touched upon key IMO issues such as CO2 emissions reduction policies, noting the successful introduction of the EEDI, which is forecast to cut CO2 emissions by 1.3 gigatonnes, or 3.6% of total global emissions, by 2050. The 2020 global sulphur limit, agreed last year, was a landmark step, Micallef said, but ultimately, “we need a pioneering spirit to navigate the waters ahead”.

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ll stakeholders should use existing safety and security management practices to implement the maritime cyber risk management recommendations agreed by IMO. This was a key message from IMO’s Javier Yasnikouski, Head of Maritime Security, IMO, presented the latest developments on maritime security at the 16th Caribbean Shipping Executives Conference, Curaçao. (8-9 May). The conference participants, from a range of maritime areas, engaged in group exercises to discuss possible cyber security scenarios that could affect shipping-related activities and organizations, as well as the financial consequences of such actions. They acknowledged the IMO cyber risk recommendations and recognized the critical importance of cyber security for all maritime stakeholders and the need to address cyber security, as an urgent matter, within their own organizations.

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Preparing for ballast water management implementation

Training for maritime law enforcement

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dentifying organisms and microbes in ballast water, as well as monitoring port marine life where ballast water may be released, are key for countries preparing to enforce IMO’s Ballast Water Management Convention. The treaty will enter into force on 8 September 2017 and aims to counter the threat to marine ecosystems by potentially invasive species transported in ships’ ballast water. A regional workshop in Surabaya, Indonesia (2-5 May) provided participants from 10 countries* with theoretical and practical training in compliance, monitoring and enforcement of the Convention. The workshop also addressed port biological baseline surveys and risk assessment. These baseline surveys aim to provide inventories of marine life in and around commercial ports frequented by ships carrying ballast water, determine if there are any non-indigenous species which have been introduced and provide a baseline of biological data against which future changes can be measured.

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The Workshop is being hosted by the Directorate General of Sea Transportation of the Ministry of Transport of Indonesia and is being attended by 49 participants from Indonesia, Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor Leste and Viet Nam.

three-week training course on maritime law enforcement for countries surrounding the Gulf of Aden was held in May, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The course brought together specialists from 14 signatory countries* to the Djibouti Code of Conduct – the IMO instrument helping to repress piracy and armed robbery against ships in the Western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden. Participants covered topics covered under the recently adopted Jeddah amendment to the Djibouti Code – such as how to suppress a range of illicit activities. These include piracy, arms trafficking, trafficking in narcotics, illegal trade in wildlife, illegal oil bunkering, crude oil theft, human trafficking, human smuggling, and illegal dumping of toxic waste. The course was delivered by instructors from the Border Guard of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, supported by experts from INTERPOL, the NATO Maritime Interdiction Operations Training Centre (NMIOTC), the Hellenic Police, the United States Coast Guard, United States Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and IMO.

* Djibouti Code signatory States: Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Somalia, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen; as well as two representatives from the Bahrain Coast Guard.

‘No hiding place’ for sub-standard shipping

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MO Secretary-General Kitack Lim has stressed the vital importance of collaborative efforts to leave ‘no hiding place’ for sub-standard shipping. Mr Lim was addressing the third Joint Ministerial Conference of the Paris and Tokyo Memoranda of Understanding on Port State Control in Vancouver, Canada (3-4 May). Port State Control is the mechanism that enables officials from a port state to board and inspect foreign-flag ships to ensure they comply with the necessary safety and environmental regulations. By sharing information and data and adopting uniform operational procedures, regional Port State Control organizations can make it harder for sub-standards ships to slip through their net. IMO actively promotes and supports strong and collaborative Port State Control. During his visit to Canada, Mr Lim also had meetings with Mr Marc Garneau, Canada’s Transport Minister; Mr Yasutada Ohno, Japan’s Parliamentary Vice-Minister for Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, and Mr He Jianzhong, the Chinese Vice Minister of Transport.

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Harnessing digital technology – for good

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nformation and communication technology (ICT) are seen within the UN system as vital to help deliver the Sustainable Development Goals and monitor progress towards them. The bodies that deal with these issues across the UN system* met (2-4 May) to discuss progress on their so-called Digital Transformation Agenda. Among topics on the agenda were datadriven decision making, predictive analysis, cyber security issues and partnership with the private sector. It was agreed to establish

a task force for each of the key areas identified at the meetings. *The 28th meeting of the CEB-ICT Network and the 99th session of the United Nations International Computing Centre Management Committee took place at the Pan American Health Organization in Washington DC, USA, with IMO’s Vincent Job representing the Organization.

Piracy recap

What’s next for ballast water management?

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MO contributed to the ReCAAP ISC Piracy and Sea Robbery Conference 2017 in Singapore (27 April). IMO special advisor on maritime security, Chris Trelawny, gave a presentation on current statistics and trends on the issue of piracy and armed robbery against ships. According to reports received by IMO, the number of incidents followed a downward trend in 2016, with 215 incidents, compared with 303 in 2015 – a reduction of about 29% at the global level. In the Malacca Straits, reported incidents fell by 85% from 134 incidents in 2015 to 20 in 2016. View the full presentation here.

A number of IMO treaties and guidelines help to address the issue of piracy and improve maritime security. These include the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) and Djibouti Code of Conduct. IMO Member States are encouraged to report incidents of piracy and armed robbery against ships on the IMO piracy database via the Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS).

atest developments on the entry into force of the Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention took centre stage at the 8th International Conference on Ballast Water Management (24-25 April) in Singapore. IMO SecretaryGeneral Emeritus, Koji Sekimizu, and Chief Technical Advisor of the GEF-UNDPIMO GloBallast Partnerships Programme, Jose Matheickal, delivered keynote addresses at the event. Among other key issues, participants discussed the revised guidelines for the approval of Ballast Water Management Systems (G8),

challenges facing Port State Control with regards to Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement (CME) and the timeline for installation of BWM systems. The conference also looked at latest technological developments in the field of ballast water treatment and monitoring systems. Organized by IMarEST in partnership with GloBallast and the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, the conference was part of the Singapore Maritime Week and also included a tour of laboratories for testing ballast water management systems.

Inspiring more women to join the Pacific maritime sector

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egional commitment of the Pacific on the advancement of women and gender equality in the maritime sector was at the forefront of a meeting held by The Pacific Women in Maritime Association (PacWIMA) in Nuku’alofa, Tonga (24-28 April). Thanks to IMO funding, the association was able to meet and discuss the regional strategy for Pacific women in the maritime sector, launching their new

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website and collaborating with the World Maritime University`s Women’s Association. The strategy seeks to encourage women who aspire to train for, and work in, the maritime sector, by raising awareness and providing the tools for civil society and local communities to create an enabling environment for them to do so. Executive members of PacWIMA also attended the Pacific Regional Energy and

Transport Ministers’ Meeting, to highlight women`s economic contribution and leadership to the Pacific maritime sector. IMO`s Juvenal Shindu, who was in attendance, reiterated that maritime transport has a role to play in contributing to the achievement of the sustainable development goals (SDG) and in particular SDG 5 in supporting regional activities through empowering women.

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At your service

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IMO News - Summer Issue - 2017  
IMO News - Summer Issue - 2017  

The Official Magazine of the International Maritime Organization